Archivi tag: Custer LaRue

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight ballad)

Leggi in italiano

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

A young knight strolls through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she is intent on bathing in a river) and asks her to have sex. In truth, the approaches in secluded places between noblemen and curvy country girls even if paludated with bucolic verses, they ended much more prosaically with rape (if the gentleman “stung vagueness”)

But in this ballad the girl is a lady, and the dialogue between the two protagonists becomes rather a gallant skirmish of love, a game of love to make it more appetizing; the knight, however, does not yet know the rules because of his young age and is therefore mocked by the lady, courtesan much more experienced and cynical, skilled maneuverer of her lovers!

VERSION A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
The gallant knight is called “Baffled knight” as usual term in the Scottish dialect of 1540-1550: “bauchle”, here in the meaning of “bewildered”, “perplexed” but also “juggled”. Originally the ballad is transcribed in Deuteromelia (1609) by Thomas Ravenscroft with a melody that he attributes to the reign of Henry VIII.

CARPE DIEM

The song is an exhortation to draw pleasure when the opportunity arises: the lady (as an expert courtesan) puts the young knight to the test by presenting the comforts of a bed that awaits them in the paternal home; so she enters first at home and closes off the naive (and inexperienced) knight. The lady does not hide her disdain for the knight who did not dare to get some among the branches!

Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort from “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
The Baltimore Consort give us a little musical jewel: the melody is performed in a cadenced manner and vaguely refers to the Dargason jig, as also reported in the first edition of “The Dancing Master” by John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits from” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Sparkling and playful interpretation that I imagine salaciously mimed in the most fashionable living rooms of the time. A couple of verses are omitted from the original version. (they skip II, IV and VII )

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich from “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”

I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land
2)interlayer onomatopoeic and apparently non-sense of some ballads; also in the ballad The Three Ravens always reported by Ravenscoft this time in his Melismata. Vernon Chatman proposes as a translation for a sentence in the finished sense: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed it is a kind of invocation of the type “Jupiter you assist”, but also a way of greeting. Jupiter is also the god famous for his love adventures and lust: in short, he did not miss one.
4) Lucie Skeaping sing ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule =  pomp and circumstance
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = ‘as denoting a double ass?’ (Child)
9) Lucie Skeaping sings’You had me, abroad in the field,
10) once safe, the lady mocks the inexperienced knight!
11)  the image is burlesque: the young man with a rusty sword because he never got to use it (swordsman inexperienced or clumsy as in the love duels) raises it to the sky pointing to Jupiter to attract lightning!
12) believe

ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

Fare ye well, lovely Nancy

Leggi in italiano

000brgcfLover’s separation is a theme widespread in the english balladry and that of a sailor and a young maid it’s probably originated in the eighteenth century, as we find it in the illustrations of the time: some ballads dwell on the figure of Nancy in tears who die of heartbreak because she believes that the sailor has abandoned her.

THE SAILOR’S FAREWELL

A further version of the sailor’s farewell ballad comes from”Oxford Book of Sea Song” 1986 “that version was originally noted by Dr George Gardiner (text) and (probably) Charles Gamblin (tune) from George Lovett (born 1841) at Winchester, Hampshire. In January 1909, Ralph Vaughan Williams re-noted the melody because there was some doubt about the notation; it appears that he visited Mr Lovett and recorded his singing for later checking”.

A sailor bidding farewell from his weeping sweetheart 1790s

TEARS ON THE SHORE

Polly / Nancy is on the beach  to complain for having been abandoned by her sailor (who evidently left for the sea without marrying her).

There are many variations of the text, in this one we go back to the eighteenth century music
Baltimore Consort

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY
I
Fare ye well, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you.
I am bound for th’ East Indies
my course for to steer.
I know very well my long absence
will grieve you,
But, true love, I’ll be back
in the spring of the year(1).”
II
“Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me,
my dearest Johnny,
Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me
here all alone;
For it is your good company
that I do desire
I will sigh till l die
if l ne’er see you more.
III
In sailor’s apparel I’ll dress
and go with you,
ln the midst of all danger
your friend I will be;
And that is, my dear,
when the stormy wind’s blowing,
True love, I`ll be ready to reef your topsails.”
IV
“Your neat little fingers
strong cables can’t handle,
Your neat little feet
to the topmast can’t go;
Your delicate body
strong winds can’t endure.
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
to the seas do not go.”
V
Now Johnny is sailing
and Nancy bewailing;
The tears down her eyes
like torrents do flow.
Her gay golden hair
she’s continually tearing,
Saying, “I’ll sigh till I die
if l ne’er see you more”.
VI
Now all you young maidens
by me take a warning,
Never trust a sailor
or believe what they say.
First they will court you,
and then they will slight you;
They will leave you behind,
love, in grief and in pain.

NOTES
1) as sea ballad  Lovely on the Water the sailor’s farewell is framed in an opening stanza that describes the coming of spring

SAILOR’S LETTER

Johnny is about to send a letter to his sweetheart to swear his true love and renew the promise of marriage (but everyone knows what happened to sailor vow)

Solas from Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers, 1997

ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
I
“Adieu, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you
To the far-off West Indies
I’m bound for to steer
But let my long journey
be of no trouble to you
For my love, I’ll return
in the course of a year”
II
“Talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Jimmy
Talk not of leaving me
here on the shore
You know very well
your long absence will grieve me
As you sail the wild ocean
where the wild billows roar
III
I’ll cut off my ringlets
all curly and yellow
I’ll dress in the coats
of a young cabin boy
And when we are out
on that dark, rolling ocean
I will always be near you,
my pride and my joy”
IV
“Your lily-white hands,
they could not handle the cables
Your lily-white feet
to the top mast could not go
And the cold winter storms, well,
you could not endure them
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
where the wild winds won’t blow”
V
As Jimmy set a-sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears from her eyes
in great torrents did a-flow
As she stood on the beach,
oh her hands she was wringing
Crying, “Oh and alas,
will I e’er see you more?”
VI
As Jimmy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
they filled him with pride
He said, “Nancy, lovely Nancy,
if I had you here, love
How happy I’d be for
to make you my bride”
VII
So Jimmy wrote a letter
to his own lovely Nancy
Saying, “If you have proved constant, well, I will prove true”
Oh but Nancy was dying,
for her poor heart was broken
Oh the day that he left her,
forever he’d rue
VIII
Come all of you young maidens,
I pray, take a warning
And don’t trust a sailor boy
or any of his kind
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their love, it is tempestuous
as the wavering wind

HEART BREAKING

A melodramatic ending with sailor’s letter coming too late to the bedside of a dying Nancy.
Jarlath Henderson from Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016  
Samplers, piano and an expressive voice for this young musician who won the BBC Young Folk Award in 2003.

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY
I
Fare thee well, lovely Nancy,
It’s now I must leave you,
To cross the main ocean
where the stormy winds blow,
let not my long journey
be of no trouble to you,
for you know I’ll be back
in the course of a year”
II
“Let’s talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Billy
Let’s talk not of leaving me
here all alone
for you know your long journey
at early will grieve me
stay at home lovely Billy
to the sea do not roar”
V-VI
As Billy went to sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears down her eyes
like fountains did flow
As Billy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
still run throu his eyes
VII
So Billy wrote a letter
to his own true love Nancy
Saying, “If you prove constant,
then I will prove true”
Lovely Nancy on death bed
could not recover
when the news was brough to her
but his true love was death
VIII
So come on ye pretty fair maids,
and a warning take by me
care for a sailor or of his kind men
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their minds are imperfectual like the westerly wind

000brgcf

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.8notes.com/scores/4582.asp?ftype=gif

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte della bella Nancy/Polly

000brgcfRead the post in English  

Il tema della separazione tra i due innamorati è molto diffuso nelle ballate popolari e quella tra marinaio e giovane fidanzatina risale sicuramente al 1700: alcune ballate si soffermano sulla figura di Nancy in lacrime che muore di crepacuore perchè crede che il marinaio l’abbia abbandonata.

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY

Un’ulteriore versione dell’addio del marinaio (sailor’s farewell)  viene dall'”Oxford Book of Sea Song” 1986 “questa versione fu scritta dal Dr George Gardiner (testo) e (probabilmente) Charles Gamblin (melodia)  da George Lovett (nato nel 1841) a Winchester, Hampshire. Nel gennaio 1909, Ralph Vaughan Williams annotò nuovamente la melodia perché aveva qualche dubbio sulla precedente annotazione; sembra che abbia visitato il signor Lovett e registrato il suo canto per un successivo controllo”. (Malcom Douglas tradotto da qui)

Il marinaio saluta la fidanzatina in lacrime circa 1790

LE LACRIME SUL LITORALE

Oltre al momento della separazione questa seconda versione presenta ulteriori sviluppi: in uno si descrive Polly/Nancy rimasta sulla spiaggia che si lamenta e piange per essere stata abbandonata dal suo marinaio (che evidentemente se n’è andato per mare senza sposarla).

Ci sono molti varianti del testo, vediamo quella che ci riporta al Settecento anche come arrangiamento musicale.
Baltimore Consort


I
Fare ye well, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you.
I am bound for th’ East Indies
my course for to steer.
I know very well my long absence
will grieve you,
But, true love, I’ll be back
in the spring of the year(1).”
II
“Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me,
my dearest Johnny,
Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me
here all alone;
For it is your good company
that I do desire
I will sigh till l die
if l ne’er see you more.
III
In sailor’s apparel I’ll dress
and go with you,
ln the midst of all danger
your friend I will be;
And that is, my dear,
when the stormy wind’s blowing,
True love, I`ll be ready to reef your topsails.”
IV
“Your neat little fingers
strong cables can’t handle,
Your neat little feet
to the topmast can’t go;
Your delicate body
strong winds can’t endure.
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
to the seas do not go.”
V
Now Johnny is sailing
and Nancy bewailing;
The tears down her eyes
like torrents do flow.
Her gay golden hair
she’s continually tearing,
Saying, “I’ll sigh till I die
if l ne’er see you more”.
VI
Now all you young maidens
by me take a warning,
Never trust a sailor
or believe what they say.
First they will court you,
and then they will slight you;
They will leave you behind,
love, in grief and in pain.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare
sono in partenza per le Indie orientali
per seguire la mia rotta.
So bene che la mia lunga assenza
ti addolorerà,
ma amore, io ritornerò
nella primavera dell’anno”
II LEI
“Oh non parlare di lasciarmi
caro il mio Johnny,
oh non parlare di lasciarmi
qui tutta sola;
perchè è la tua cara compagnia
che io desidero,
piangerò fino a morire
se non ti vedrò mai più!
III
Come un marinaio mi vestirò
e verrò con te,
in mezzo ai grandi pericoli
ti sarò compagna;
e così mio caro, quando soffierà
il  freddo vento di tempesta,
amore, sarò pronta a ridurre le vele di gabbia”
IV LUI
“Ma le tue piccole manine non possono maneggiare le nostre grosse cime
e nemmeno i tuoi piedini delicati
posso salire sull’albero maestro;
il tuo corpo delicato
non può sopportare le raffiche di vento, resta a casa, Nancy cara
non andare per mare”.
V
Ora Johnny è per mare
e Nancy si lamenta,
le lacrime dai suoi occhi cadono
come torrenti in piena,
i capelli biondi
in continuazione si strappa
dicendo “Piangerò fino a morire
se non ti vedrò mai più”
VI
Allora tutte voi giovani fanciulle
ascoltate il mio avvertimento
non fidatevi di un marinaio
e non credete a quello che dicono,
prima vi corteggiano
e poi vi faranno piangere;
vi lasceranno a casa
care, a tormentarvi

NOTE
1) il verso riprende la sea ballad  Lovely on the Water  
in cui l’addio del marinaio è inquadrato in una strofa d’apertura che descrive l’arrivo della primavera

LA LETTERA

In un’altra versione l’aggiunta di ulteriori strofe descrivono Johnny in procinto di mandare una lettera alla fidanzata per giurarle amore eterno e rinnovarle la promessa di matrimonio (ma tutti sanno che fine fanno le promesse da marinaio)..

Solas in Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers, 1997


I
“Adieu, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you
To the far-off West Indies
I’m bound for to steer
But let my long journey
be of no trouble to you
For my love, I’ll return
in the course of a year”
II
“Talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Jimmy
Talk not of leaving me
here on the shore
You know very well
your long absence will grieve me
As you sail the wild ocean
where the wild billows roar
III
I’ll cut off my ringlets
all curly and yellow
I’ll dress in the coats
of a young cabin boy
And when we are out
on that dark, rolling ocean
I will always be near you,
my pride and my joy”
IV
“Your lily-white hands,
they could not handle the cables
Your lily-white feet
to the top mast could not go
And the cold winter storms, well,
you could not endure them
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
where the wild winds won’t blow”
V
As Jimmy set a-sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears from her eyes
in great torrents did a-flow
As she stood on the beach,
oh her hands she was wringing
Crying, “Oh and alas,
will I e’er see you more?”
VI
As Jimmy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
they filled him with pride
He said, “Nancy, lovely Nancy,
if I had you here, love
How happy I’d be for
to make you my bride”
VII
So Jimmy wrote a letter
to his own lovely Nancy
Saying, “If you have proved constant, well, I will prove true”
Oh but Nancy was dying,
for her poor heart was broken
Oh the day that he left her,
forever he’d rue
VIII
Come all of you young maidens,
I pray, take a warning
And don’t trust a sailor boy
or any of his kind
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their love, it is tempestuous
as the wavering wind
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
che ora ti devo lasciare,
per le Indie Occidentali
sto per salpare,
che la mia lunga assenza
non ti crei affanno,
perche amore mio
io ritornerò entro l’anno”
II LEI
“Non dire che mi lasci qui,
Jimmy amore mio,
non dire che mi lasci
qui sulla spiaggia,
lo sai bene che
la tua lunga assenza mi addolorerà, perchè tu navighi nel vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono gli immensi flutti.
III
Mi taglierò i boccoli
biondi e ricci,
mi metterò i panni
di un mozzo,
e quando saremo fuori
nell’oscuro, beccheggiante oceano, starò sempre accanto a te,
mio orgoglio e gioia”
IV LUI
“Le tue mani bianche come giglio
non riuscirebbero a maneggiare le cime
e nemmeno i tuoi piedini delicati
riuscirebbero a salire sull’albero maestro e le fredde tempeste invernali
non saresti in grado di sopportare.
Resta a casa amata Nancy,
dove non soffia forte il vento.”
V
Appena Jimmy fu a bordo
la bella Nancy si lamentò,
le lacrime dagli occhi
scorrevano come torrenti
mentre stava sulla spiaggia
si torceva le mani
gridando “Ahimè
ti vedrò ancora?”
VI
Mentre Jimmy stava camminando
per il molo di Filadelfia
i pensieri del suo vero amore
lo riempivano d’orgoglio
diceva: “Nancy, amata Nancy
se ti avessi qui, amore,
quanto sarei felice
di farti la mia sposa!”
VII
Così Jimmy scrisse una lettera
alla sua amata Nancy
dicendo “Se mi sei restata fedele
allora ti mostrerò fedeltà”
Ma Nancy stava morendo, perchè il suo povero cuore si era spezzato il giorno in cui lui l’aveva lasciata e per sempre lui se ne sarebbe pentito.
VIII
Venite tutte voi giovani fanciulle, accettate il mio consiglio
e non fidatevi di un marinaio
o di altri della sua specie,
perchè prima vi corteggeranno
e poi vi inganneranno
perchè il loro amore è tempestoso come il vento incostante.

LA MORTE DI CREPACUORE

In questa versione sono tagliate le strofe centrali in cui Nancy vuole travestirsi da marinaio per seguire il suo bel marinaio, ma c’è il finale melodrammatico della lettera che giunge troppo tardi al capezzale della morta.

Jarlath Henderson in Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016  
Campionatori,  pianoforte e una voce espressiva per questo giovane  musicista  che ha vinto il BBC Young Folk Award nel 2003.


I
Fare thee well, lovely Nancy,
It’s now I must leave you,
To cross the main ocean
where the stormy winds blow,
let not my long journey
be of no trouble to you,
for you know I’ll be back
in the course of a year”
II
“Let’s talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Billy
Let’s talk not of leaving me
here all alone
for you know your long journey
at early will grieve me
stay at home lovely Billy
to the sea do not roar”
V-VI
As Billy went to sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears down her eyes
like fountains did flow
As Billy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
still run throu his eyes
VII
So Billy wrote a letter
to his own true love Nancy
Saying, “If you prove constant,
then I will prove true”
Lovely Nancy on death bed
could not recover
when the news was brough to her
but his true love was death
VIII
So come on ye pretty fair maids,
and a warning take by me
care for a sailor or of his kind men
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their minds are imperfectual like the westerly wind
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
ora ti devo lasciare,
per attraversare l’oceano
dove soffiano i venti di tempesta,
che la mia lunga assenza
non ti crei affanno,
perchè io ritornerò
entro l’anno”
II LEI
“Non dire che mi lasci qui,
caro Billy
non dire che mi lasci
qui tutta sola,
lo sai bene che il tuo lungo viaggio
alla lunga mi addolorerà,
resta a casa caro Billy
non andare per mare”
V-VI
Appena Billy fu a bordo
la bella Nancy si lamentò,
le lacrime dagli occhi
zampillavano come fontane.
Mentre Billy stava camminando
per il molo di Filadelfia
i pensieri del suo vero amore
gli scorrevano innanzi agli occhi
VII
Così Billy scrisse una lettera
alla sua amata Nancy
“Se mi sei restata fedele
allora ti mostrerò che sono sincero”
La cara Nancy sul letto di morte
non si riprendeva
quando le fu portata la lettera
era già morta
VIII
Venite tutte voi giovani fanciulle,
accettate il mio consiglio
e non fidatevi di un marinaio o di altri della sua specie,
perchè prima vi corteggeranno
e poi vi inganneranno
perchè il loro amore è scostante
come il vento dell’ovest.
000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
versione sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.8notes.com/scores/4582.asp?ftype=gif

LORD BAKER/YOUNG BEICHAN/LORD BATEMAN

Child ballad #53

Una ballata che è in pratica una fiaba in musica, così come nel Medioevo si divulgavano  “le storie romanzate” con i menestrelli e i cantastorie che le cantavano e mimavano .. questa ha un fondamento storico o presunto tale, riportato dai biografi di Thomas Becket (1118-1170), il futuro arcivescovo di Canterbury in merito ai suoi genitori:  il padre quando era giovanotto conobbe una bellezza d’oltremare, ribattezzata con un nome cristiano prima di renderla sua sposa.

batemanLA TRAMA

Una trama che non sfigurerebbe in una moderna serie televisiva! Erano i tempi delle Crociate e dei grandi pellegrinaggi nella Terra Santa e il nostro protagonista partito dalle Isole Britanniche finisce in mano ai Mori (Saraceni) ed è in attesa che qualcuno paghi il suo riscatto; in alcune versioni è messo in prigione perchè si rifiuta d’accettare la religione islamica (vedi).
La bella figlia del Turco innamoratasi del prigioniero, lo aiuta a fuggire con la promessa che quando vorrà prendere moglie, sarà lei la sua sposa. Prima della separazione, i due amanti si giurano eterno amore, e Beichan promette di ritornare entro sette anni; come pegno la fanciulla gli regala l’anello che porta al dito. Nei lunghi anni di separazione, la principessa saracena soffre e si ammala per la depressione, invece il bel Lord si è dimenticato della bellezza orientale: è la ragazza, oramai donna e stanca di aspettare, a prendere l’iniziativa e ad attraversare il mare per riunirsi al promesso sposo, ma giunta in Inghilterra, apprende che il suo Lord sta per convolare a nozze con una pallida bellezza inglese! Allora corre fino al castello dove si festeggiano le nozze, in alcune versioni giunge sotto le mentite spoglie di mendicante.
Ovviamente il lieto fine non può mancare e così la storia si conclude con la ri-unione dei due innamorati!!

plate11

Per molti aspetti la storia richiama un’altra ballata Hind Horn in cui è l’uomo a ritornare dopo anni d’assenza per trovare la sua donna in procinto di sposarsi con un altro uomo.
Il richiamo corre anche ad una novella del Boccaccio “La Novella di messer Torello“(Decamerone, X. 9): a Pavia messer Torello ospita il Saladino facendolo passare per mercante e preparando per lui un sontuoso banchetto; quando arriva il momento di partire per le Crociate dice alla moglie di attendere il suo ritorno per 1 anno, 1 mese e 1 giorno,  oltre i quali potrà risposarsi. Durante la Crociata Torello viene fatto prigioniero, ma riconosciuto dal Saladino è liberato; nel frattempo la moglie è in procinto di sposarsi, Torello si affida ad un negromante del Saladino per ritornare subito a Pavia e impedire il matrimonio della moglie. (vedi)

Il testo è lungo come ogni ballata medievale che si rispetti, incentrato sulla vera protagonista della storia che è un’eroina, forte e determinata. Il protagonista maschile della storia è chiamato  Young Bicham/Beichan  o Baker/Bekie, ma anche Lord Bateman o Lord Ateman. Il professor Child riporta 14 versioni della ballata nota anche con il titolo Lord Bateman, Lord Beichan and Susie Pye, The Turkish Lady; così come per i testi anche la melodia presenta un’ampia serie di variazioni e qui sarebbe arduo proporle tutte sebbene raggruppate, così mi limiterò alla selezione di alcuni ascolti  che ritengo essere più significativi; la ballata è stata anche interpretata da Angelo Branduardi nel già citato lavoro “Il rovo e la rosa“,  2013, nella traduzione italiana della moglie Luisa Zappa

ASCOLTA Angelo Branduardi in Il rovo e la rosa, 2013

Testo: Luisa Zappa Branduardi (tratto da qui): come potete notare le strofe non sono suddivise rigorosamente nella stessa lunghezza metrica e musicale, è questa una caratteristica della musica medievale più antica.


I
Lui era il Lord di queste terre,
era un signore di gran lignaggio
e prese il mare su  una grande nave,
verso paesi sconosciuti.
II
Lui viaggiò ad Est e viaggiò ad Ovest,
fino al freddo Nord e al caldo Sud.
Ma il giorno in cui lui sbarcò in Turchia,
fu catturato e imprigionato
dal fiero Turco che viveva lì.
III
Ed era padre di una figlia sola,
la più bella lady nata in Turchia
prese le chiavi e ingannò suo padre,
rese a Lord Baker la libertà.
IV
Lo so che hai case, tela di lino,
il Northumber s’inchina a te,
ricorderai la ragazza turca
che oggi ti ha reso la libertà?
V
Lo so che ho case, tela di lino,
il Northumber s’inchina a me,
tutto ai tuoi piedi metterò, mia cara,
perché mi hai reso la libertà.”
VI
Lei lo condusse giù fino al porto,
per lui armò una ricca nave,
Ed ad ogni sorso di quel vino rosso
Brindò: “Lord Baker, che tu sia mio!
VII
Ci fu tra loro una promessa
Per sette anni ed ancora sette…
Se non prenderai mai un’altra sposa,
non sarò mai io di un altro uomo.”
VII
E sette anni eran passati
E sette ancora sommati a quelli…
Lei radunò tutti i suoi vestiti,
giurò:” Lord Baker, ti troverò!
VIII
Lei viaggiò ad Ovest e viaggiò ad Est,
sino a che giunse ad un grande palazzo.
Chi c’è, chi c’è?” – si destò il guardiano
Bussa gentile a questa porta?”

IX
È qui che Lord Baker vive? – chiese la lady –Ed ora è in casa il tuo signore?
È qui che Lord Baker vive – replicò il guardiano –E proprio oggi lui prende moglie.”
X
Vorrei un poco di quel loro dolce
Ed un bicchiere di vino rosso,
che si ricordi la bella lady
che là in Turchia lo liberò.”
XI
E corse, corse il buon soldato
Fino ai piedi del suo signore.
Ora alza il capo, mio buon guardiano,
che novità porti con te?
XII
Per te io annuncio un grande evento,
la più bella lady che si vide mai
resta in attesa di carità.
XIV
Porta un anello ad ogni dito,
solo al medio ne porta tre.
E con quell’oro lei può comprare
Tutto il Northumber ed anche te.
Ti chiede un poco del vostro dolce
Ed un bicchiere di vino rosso.
Ricorderai la bella lady
che là in Turchia ti liberò?
XV
Scese la madre della sua sposa:
Figlia mia cara, che sarà di te?
Con me tua figlia non ha mentito,
non ha mai detto d’amare me.
Venne da me con una borsa d’oro (1),
ne avrà in cambio ben trentatrè.”
XVI
Prese la spada tra le sue mani
E poi di fette ne tagliò tre:
una alla madre della mia sposa,
una al mio amore, una per me.”
XVII
Così Lord Baker corse alla porta,
di ventun passi ne fece tre.
Prese tra le braccia la ragazza turca
E baciò il suo amore… teneramente.

NOTE
1) per non mettere il Lord in difficoltà con la promessa sposa inglese il loro rapporto viene ridotto a un contratto d’interesse, la donna sarà ampiamente ripagata per lo scioglimento del contratto.

Le versioni che seguono provengono dall’area Inghilterra-Scozia-America, ma  la ballata si è diffusa in varie parti d’ Europa, la ritroviamo in particolare nei paesi  scandinavi, Spagna e Italia (vedi Moran d’Inghilterra).

ASCOLTA Sinéad O’ConnorChristy Moore in Sean-Nós Nua, 2002

ASCOLTA Planxty 1983


I
There was a Lord who lived in this land/He being a Lord of high degree
He left his foot down a ship’s board
And swore strange countries he would go see.
II
He’s travelled east and he’s travelled west/Half the north and the south also/Until he arrived into Turkey land./There he was taken and bound in prison/ Until his life it grew weary.
III
And Turkey bold had one only daughter/ As fair a lady, as the eye could see/ She stole the key to her Daddy’s harbour/ And swore Lord Baker, she would set free.
IV
Singing, ‘You have houses and you have linen,/All Northumber belongs to thee/ What would you give to Turkey’s daughter/If out of prison she’d set you free?’
V
Singing, ‘I have houses, I have linen,/All Northumber belongs to me/I would will them all to you my darling,/If out of prison you set me free?’
VI
She’s brought him down to her Daddy’s harbour/And filled for him was the ship of fame/And every toast that she did drink round him,/’I wish Lord Baker that you were mine.’
VII
They made a vow for seven years
And seven more for to keep it strong
Saying ‘If you don’t wed with no other woman/I’m sure I’ll wed with no other man.’
VIII
And seven years been past and over
And seven more they were rolling on
She’s bundled up all her golden clothing/And swore Lord Baker she would go find.
IX
She’s travelled East and she’s travelled West/Until she came to the palace of fame/ ‘Who is that, who is that?’ called the young foot soldier (cried the bold young porter)/ ‘Who knocks so gently and can’t get in?’
X
‘Is this Lord Baker’s palace?’ replied the lady/’Or is his lordship himself within?’/’This is Lord Baker’s palace’ replied the porter,
‘This very day took a new bride in.’
XI
‘Well ask him send me a cut of his wedding cake/A glass of his wine that been e’er so strong/And to remember the brave young lady/ Who did release him in Turkey land.’
XII
In goes, in goes, the young foot soldier/Kneels down gently on his right knee/’Rise up, rise up now the brave young porter,/What news, what news have you got for me?’
XIII
Singing, ‘I have news of a grand arrival,/As fair a lady as the eye could see/She is at the gate/Waiting for your charity.’
XIV
‘She wears a gold ring on every finger,
And on the middle one where she wears three,/She has more gold hanging around her middle
Than’d buy Northumber and family.’
XV
‘She asked you send her a cut of your wedding cake/ A glass of your wine, it been e’er so strong,/And to remember the brave young lady/Who did release you in Turkey land.’
XVI (4)
Down comes, down comes the new bride’s mother/’What will I do with my daughter dear?’/’I know your daughter, she’s not been covered/Nor has she shown any love for me.
XVII
Your daughter came with one pack of gold/ I’ll avert her home now, with thirty-three.’/ He took his sword all by the handle/And cut the wedding cake, in pieces three/Singing ‘here’s a slice for the new bride’s mother/A slice for me new love and one for me.’
XVIII
And then Lord Baker, ran to his darling
Of twenty-one steps, he made but three/ He put his arms around Turkey’s daughter/And kissed his true love, most tenderly.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
C’era un Lord che viveva in questo paese, ed era un Lord d’alto lignaggio,
prese il mare a bordo di una nave
e giurò che sarebbe andato a vedere dei paesi sconosciuti (1)
II
Viaggiò ad Est e viaggiò ad Ovest,
fino al  Nord e al Sud.
finchè arrivò in Turchia,
dove fu catturato e imprigionato
e ne ebbe abbastanza della sua vita.
III
Il fiero Turco (2) aveva una sola figlia
la più bella dama che mai si vide,
rubò al padre  la chiave del covo
e giurò che avrebbe liberato Lord Baker.
IV
Dicendo ” Hai case, tela di lino,
il Northumber t’appartiene,
cosa darai alla figlia del Turco
se ti libererà dalla prigione?
V
“Ho case, tela di lino,
il Northumber m’appartiene,
tutto ai tuoi piedi metterò, mia cara,
se mi libererai dalla prigione.”
VI
Lei lo condusse giù fino al porto del padre,
per lui armò una ricca nave,
ed ad ogni sorso che beveva
brindò: “Lord Baker, che tu sia mio!
VII
Ci fu tra loro una promessa (3)
per sette anni ed ancora sette per mantenerla salda
Se non prenderai mai un’altra sposa,
non sarò mai io di un altro uomo.”
VIII
E sette anni eran passati
e altri sette si aggiunsero
lei radunò tutti i suoi vestiti preziosi,
e giurò che avrebbe trovato Lord Baker
IX
Lei viaggiò ad Ovest e viaggiò ad Est,
sino a che giunse ad un grande palazzo.
Chi c’è, chi c’è?– disse la giovane sentinella –
chi bussa con grazia per entrare?
X
È questo il palazzo si Lord Baker  – rispose la lady –Ed ora è in casa il tuo signore?
È questo il palazzo di Lord Baker – replicò il guardiano –
E proprio oggi lui prende moglie.”
XI
Allora ditegli di farmi mandare una fetta del suo dolce
ed un bicchiere del suo vino che non sarà troppo forte
che si ricordi la giovane e audace dama
che in Turchia lo liberò.”
XII
E corse, corse la giovane sentinella
si inginocchiò con grazia ai piedi del suo signore.
Alzati, alzati ora buon guardiano,
che novità, che novità mi porti?
XIII
Per te io annuncio un grande evento,
la più bella lady che si vide mai
è ai cancelli
in attesa della tua carità”.

XIV
Porta un anello d’oro ad ogni dito,
e al dito medio ne porta tre.
Ha più oro intorno al suo dito medio
che potrebbe comprare
 il Northumber e accasarsi.
XV
Ti chiede udi mandarle una fetta del vostro dolce
ed un bicchiere di vino che non sarà troppo forte
e che si ricordi la giovane e audace dama
che in Turchia ti liberò.

XVI
Scese, scese giù la madre della sua sposa:
Che ne sarà della mia cara figlia?
Con me tua figlia non ha mentito,
non ha mai detto d’amare me (5).
XVII
Vostra figlia venne con una borsa d’oro,
la rimanderò a casa ora con ben trentatrè.”
Prese la spada tra le sue mani
e taglio dalla torta nunziale tre fette :
dicendo “una alla madre della mia sposa,
una al mio amore, una per me.”
XVIII
Così Lord Baker corse dal suo amore,
di ventun passi ne fece tre.
Prese tra le braccia la figlia del Turco
e baciò il suo amore teneramente.

NOTE
1) già in apertura si delinea il personaggio, non certo un pellegrino penitente o un mercante medievale, piuttosto un uomo di mondo, uno spirito inquieto. Di certo la ballata si è adattata allo spirito del Settecento e Lord Bateman è molto più simile a Lord Byron
His goblets brimmed with every costly wine,
And all that mote to luxury invite.
Without a sigh he left to cross the brine,
And traverse Paynim shores, and pass earth’s central line. (tratto da qui)
2) il turco è un corsaro o un predone, crudele e spietato
3) strano giuramento o promessa, quella di mantenersi casti per sette anni, proprio mentre i due si sollazzano bevendo vino!!
4) I Planxty invertono le strofe
XVI
He took his sword all by the handle
Cut the wedding cake in pieces three
Singing here’s a piece for Turkey’s daughter
Here’s a piece for the new bride and one for me
XVII
Down comes, down comes the new bride’s mother
“What will I do with my daughter dear?”
“Your daughter came with one bag of gold
I’ll let her to home love with thirty-three”
5) si suppone che il matrimonio non essendo stato consumato possa essere dichiarato nullo

ASCOLTA Chris Wood in The Lark Descending 2005: molto gradevole la modulazione della voce.
Si aggiunge la strofa con l’albero che cresce nella prigione, a cui il Lord viene incatenato
“And in this prison there grew a tree,
It grew so large and it grew so strong;
Where he was chain-ed around the middle
Until his life it-e-was almost gone.”

interessante anche l’arrangiamento del gruppo folk australiano Stray Hens ASCOLTA

LA VERSIONE DEI MONTI APPALACHI

ASCOLTA Elizabeth Laprelle

ASCOLTA su Spotify Custer LaRue (Baltimore Consort) in “The Lover’s Farewell – Appalachian Folk Ballads, 1995; ho riportato la maggior parte del testo ad orecchio e in parte da qui

I
Lord Bateman was so noble lord,
and he was handsome high degree;
but yet he could not rest contented
some foreign country he would see.
II
He sailed east and he sailed west,
until he came to Praterky;
where he was took and put in prison,
Until his life grew quite weary.
III
The Sogger had one only daughter
the fairest creature as eyes did see
She stole the key to her father’s prison
and said, “Lord Bateman I’ll free”
IV
“Have you got houses, have you got land ?
and are you hold some high degree
What would you give to the fair young lady
that out of prison will set you free?”
V
“Oh I’ve got house and I’ve got land
Half of Northumberland belongs to me.
I’ d give it all to the fair young lady
that out of prison would set me free”
VI
She took him to her father’s table,
And gave to him the best of wine;
And every health she drank to him,
“I wish Lord Bateman that you were mine”.
VII
She lead him to her father’s harbor
And give to him a ship of fame.
“Fare-the-well Fare-the-well to you, Lord Bateman
Fare-the-well Fare-the-well till we meet again”
VIII
“It’s seven long years I will make this honour
it’s seven long years I’ll give my hand;
If you will wed no other woman,
Then I will wed no other man.”
IX
When seven long years had gone and passed,
And fourteen days well known to me;
She dressed herself in a fine gay clothing,
And said “Lord Bateman I’ll go see”
X
And when she came to Lord Bateman’s castle,
So boldly there she rang the bell;
“Who’s there who’s there?” cried the proud young porter,
“Who’s there who’s there, unto me tell.”
XI
She said , “Is this Lord Bateman’s castle,
and is his Lordship here within?”
“Oh, yes, this is  Lord Bateman’s castle,
“He’s just now taken his young bride in.”
XII
“Go tell to send me a slice of cake,
And a bottle of the best of wines;
Not to forget the fair young lady,
That did release him when he was close confined”.
XIII
Away, away went that proud young porter
untill Lord Bateman  he did see.
“What news? What news, my proud young porter?
What news, what news have you brought to me?”
XIV
“That stand at your gate the fairest lady
That ever my two eyes did see.
‘She has a ring on every finger,
And round one of them she has got three”
XV
“She says to bring a slice of cake,
a bottle of your best wine.
And not to forsake the fair young lady
That did release you when close confined”
XIV
Lord Bateman in a passion flew,
His sword he broke in pieces three;(1)
“Oh how forsake my fair young lady
Sophia has crossed the sea.”
XV
It’s up then  spoke the young bride’s mother,
Who was never heard  to speak so free:
“Don’t forget my only daughter,
although Sophia has crossed the sea.”
XVI
“I own I’ve made a bride(2) of your daughter,
and so she’s none  worse by me;
She came here on a horse and saddle,
and I’ll send her home in a coach and three.”
XVII
Lord Bateman prepared another wedding ,
With both their hearts so full of glee;
“I’ll range no more to foreign countries,
now Sophia has crossed the seas “

NOTE
1) mentre nelle altre versioni testuali il Lord utilizza la spada per tagliare dalla torta nunziale tre fette, qui spezza la spada in tre pezzi. Gli studiosi si sono interrogati sul perchè del gesto: scaramanzia, la frenesia del momento nell’apprendere la notizia?
plate102) Come se nulla fosse successo il Lord manda a casa la moglie (ricompensandola per il disturbo con un po’ d’oro o una bella carrozza) e prepara un’altro matrimonio per sposare la sua Sofia (evidentemente quello precedente viene annullato perchè non consumato!)

continua

FONTI
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15618/15618-h/15618-h.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/child/bateman.html
http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=marshall&book=island&story=gilbert
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_53
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8950
https://www.mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/songs/lordbateman.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/13/bateman.htm
http://www.mescalina.it/musica/recensioni/angelo-branduardi-il-rovo-e-la-rosa-ballate-damore-e-di-morte-

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight)

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

Read the post in English

Un giovane cavaliere a spasso per la campagna incontra una  fanciulla (a volte la sorprende mentre è intenta a farsi il bagno in un fiume) e le chiede di fare sesso. Per la verità gli approcci in luoghi appartati tra nobiluomini e procaci contadinelle (o pastorelle) anche se paludati con versi bucolici, si concludevano molto più prosaicamente con lo stupro (se al gentiluomo “pungeva vaghezza” cioè se gli veniva voglia!).

Ma in questa ballata la fanciulla è una lady, e il dialogo tra i due protagonisti diventa piuttosto una galante schermaglia d’amore, un gioco d’amore per renderlo più stuzzicante; il cavaliere tuttavia non ne conosce ancora le regole a causa della sua giovane età ed è perciò preso in giro dalla dama, cortigiana molto più esperta e cinica, abile manovratrice dei suoi amanti!

VERSIONE A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
Il cavaliere galante è etichettato come “Baffled knight” termine usuale nel dialetto scozzese del 1540-1550: bauchle“, qui nel significato di “sconcertato”, “perplesso” ma anche “raggirato”. In origine la ballata è trascritta nel Deuteromelia (1609) di Thomas Ravenscroft con una melodia che egli attribuisce al regno di Enrico VIII.

CARPE DIEM

La canzone è un’esortazione a trarre il piacere quando se ne ha l’opportunità: la dama (da esperta cortigiana) mette alla prova il giovane cavaliere prospettando gli agi del comodo letto che li aspetta nella casa paterna; così entra per prima in casa e chiude fuori l’ingenuo (e inesperto) cavaliere. La dama non nasconde il disprezzo verso il cavaliere che non ha osato prenderla tra le verdi frasche!!
Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort in “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
Come sempre i Baltimore Consort ci regalano un piccolo gioiello musicale: la melodia è eseguita in modo cadenzato e richiama vagamente la Dargason jig, come riportata anche nella prima edizione del “The Dancing Master” di John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits in” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Le parti dialogate sono a due voci: interpretazione frizzante e scherzosa che mi immagino mimata salacemente nei salotti più alla moda del tempo. Sono omesse un paio di strofe rispetto alla versione originale. (saltano le strofe II, IV e VII)

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich in “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”


I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue(13)
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Da lungi giunse un cavaliere cortese,
che razzolava lussurioso per i campi;
si accorse di una bella fanciulla,
mentre arrivava a passeggio per la via.
CORO
downe a downe,
hey downe derry
II
“Per Giove bella dama che andate spedita tra le foglie rigogliose,
se fossi re con indosso la corona, tosto bella dama,
voi sareste la mia regina.
III
Che Giove vi preservi bella dama,
tra le rose sì rosse,
se  non vi farò mia,
tosto bella dama
io morirò.”
IV
Così guardò a Est
e poi guardò a Ovest,
guardò a Nord e anche a Sud,
ma non riusciva a trovare un posto appartato che fosse nelle fauci del diavolo.
V
“Se condurrete me, gentile signore
una fanciulla, fino alla dimora paterna, allora potrete fare di me ciò che vorrete
tra gli agi e il lusso”.
VI
Egli la accomodò sul destriero
e lui ne montò un altro per sè
e per tutto il giorno le cavalcò accanto, proprio come se fossero sorella e fratello.
VII
Quando giunsero alla dimora paterna
si era ormai a buon punto,
ma ella entrò nel portone
e chiuse fuori lo sciocco asino.
VIII
“Potevate avermi – disse lei – fuori nei campi, tra il grano e l’avena, dove avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà, perchè in verità Signore, non vi avrei detto di no.
IX
Potevate avermi anche in mezzo alla brughiera tra i giunchi maturi,
dove avreste avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà,
ma non avete avuto il coraggio di stendermi a terra”
X
Egli sguainò
la spada arrugginita ,
la pulì sulla manica,
e disse”La maledizione di Giove
scenda su questo mio cuore
che crede ad ogni donna”.
XI
Quando hai la tua femmina innamorata
a un miglio o due fuori dalla città,
non risparmiare le sue gaie vesti,
ma appiattisci il suo corpo a terra!

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land: il giovanotto è infoiato, gli basta vedere una dama sola per la campagna!
2) intercalare onomatopeico e apparentemente non-sense proprio di alcune ballate; anche nella ballata The Three Ravens sempre riportata da Ravenscoft questa volta nel suo Melismata. Vernon Chatman propende come traduzione per una frase in senso compiuto: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed è una specie d’invocazione del tipo “Giove ti assista”, ma anche un modo di salutare. Giove è anche il dio famoso per le sue avventure amorose e la lussuria: insomma non se ne faceva scappare una.
4) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule = pompa magna, ossia tra gli agi e il lusso
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = così commenta il professor Child: ‘as denoting a double ass?’
9) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘You had me, abroad in the field,
10) una volta al sicuro la dama sbeffeggia il cavaliere inesperto!
11)  l’immagine è burlesca: il giovanotto con una spada arrugginita perchè non ha mai avuto modo di usarla (spadaccino inesperto o maldestro come nei duelli amorosi) la alza al cielo puntandola su Giove pluvio per attirarne i fulmini!!( uno spasso)
12) believe
13) nelle ballate non si andava tanto per il sottile, ogni femmina era una true-love ovvero il vero-amore

ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

THE TWO SISTERS: BINNORIE

La ballata “The two sisters” è originaria dalla Svezia o più in generale dai paesi scandinavi (vedi “De två systrarna) e si è diffusa largamente anche in alcuni paesi dell’Est e nelle isole britanniche. Le varianti in cui è presente sono molteplici come pure i titoli: The Twa Sisters, The Cruel Sister, The Bonnie Milldams of Binnorie, The Bonny Bows o’ London, Binnorie and Sister, Binnorie, Minnorie, Dear Sister, The Jealous Sister (Minorie), Bonnie Broom, Swan Swims Sae Bonny O, The Bonny Swans, Bow Your Bend to Me.

IL TRIANGOLO AMOROSO

Si racconta la storia di un triangolo amoroso con due sorelle che si contendono le attenzioni di un bel giovane, una volta che la scelta cade sulla fanciulla bionda, l’altra (guarda caso dai capelli neri) per avere l’uomo tutto per sè, uccide la sorella facendola precipitare dall’alto di una scogliera (o dalla riva di un fiume). Il tema è trattato in molti dipinti ed è caro ai pittori pre-raffaelliti e più in generale un tema ricorrente nei pittori ottocenteschi (grazie ai buoni uffici di sir Walter Scott);
20121002205259a31nel dipinto dello scozzese John Faed (1851) dal titolo Cruel Sister è riassunto tutto il dramma della gelosia al centro della storia (leggasi movente): un affascinante principe dal fascino esotico (com’è lezioso quel cappello piumato!) tiene per mano una bionda fanciulla vestita di satin bianco, non solo il principe la guarda e le stringe teneramente la mano, ma anche indica un cagnolino in primo piano per dire : “ecco a te sono fedele”. Quale grazia e dolcezza è soffusa nella fanciulla la quale con modestia volge lo sguardo a terra, ma le sue guance sono imporporate, segno di una profonda emozione che la turba. L’altra fanciulla è leggermente arretrata rispetto ai due innamorati e guarda il principe afflitta da cupi pensieri, anche se gli si aggrappa al braccio è chiaramente il terzo incomodo (da notare che mentre i due innamorati incedono con lo stesso passo  la donna bruna muove in avanti il piede sinistro).
Per comprendere tutta la storia ci soccorre una fiaba scozzese dal titolo “The Singing Breastbone” (da Fair is Fair: World Folktales of Justice di Sharon Creeden vedi) che già nel titolo preannuncia un racconto “gotico”.

LA FIABA SCOZZESE: The Singing Breastbone

“C’erano una volta due figlie di re che dimoravano in una casetta vicino alla diga di Binnorie. Sir William venne a corteggiare la maggiore delle due che si innamorò di lui. Le chiese la mano porgendole guanto ed anello. Ma dopo un certo tempo cominciò a guardare la sorella minore dalle guance color ciliegia e dai capelli biondi e il suo amore si trasferì su di lei, tanto che non gli importava più nulla dell’altra. Così la maggiore cominciò ad odiare la minore per averle portato via l’amore di William e giorno dopo giorno il suo odio crebbe tanto da tramare e pianificare il modo di liberarsi di lei.

Katharine Cameron (scozzese, 1874–1965): She has taken her by the lily white hand binnorie o binnorie

Una bella mattina disse a sua sorella: “Andiamo a vedere le barche di nostro padre attraccare al mulino di Binnorie.” E mano nella mano si recarono sul posto. Quando arrivarono alla riva del fiume la minore si arrampicò su una pietra per osservare lo spiaggiamento delle barche. Sua sorella, che era dietro, l’afferrò per i fianchi e la spinse nell’acqua della corrente del mulino di Binnorie.
“Oh sorella, sorella, dammi la mano!” Urlava mentre la corrente la spingeva via. “E avrai metà di tutto ciò che posseggo.” “No sorella, non ti darò la mano poiché sono comunque erede di tutte le tue terre. Che io sia maledetta se tocco la sua mano che si è frapposta fra me e l’amore del mio cuore.” “Oh sorella raggiungimi con un guanto!” gridò la principessa mentre la corrente la trascinava ancora più lontano, “E tu avrai di nuovo il tuo William.” “Continua ad affondare”, gridò la principessa crudele, “Nessuna mano o guanto tu toccherai. Il dolce William sarà mio quando sarai affogata nella corrente del mulino di Binnorie.” Detto questo si voltò e tornò a casa nel castello del re.
La principessa passò attraverso la corrente del mulino, talvolta nuotando, talvolta affondando, finché arrivò vicino al mulino. La figlia del mugnaio stava cucinando e quel giorno e aveva bisogno di acqua per cucinare. Non appena cominciò a tirar su l’acqua dalla corrente, vide qualcosa che galleggiava verso la diga del mulino e chiamò il padre: “Padre chiudi la diga! C’è qualcosa di bianco, una bella ragazza o un cigno bianco latte che viene giù lungo la corrente.” Allora il mugnaio si precipitò a chiudere la diga e fermò le pesanti e crudeli pale del mulino. Poi presero la principessa e la stesero sulla riva. Era così bella e dolce stesa sulla riva! Nei suoi capelli c’erano perle e pietre preziose; non si riusciva a vedere la sua vita tanto era coperta da una cintura d’oro e le frange d’oro del suo vestito bianco scendevano fino ai suoi piedi color del giglio. Ma era affogata, affogata!

E mentre giaceva là nella sua bellezza, un famoso suonatore d’arpa passò dalla diga del mulino di Binnorie e vide il suo dolce, pallido viso. E sebbene continuasse a viaggiare in lungo e in largo, non dimenticò mai quel viso e dopo molti giorni tornò al mulino sulla diga di Binnorie e finì poi per arrivare al castello del re, padre della fanciulla.

binnorie_2_by_tanmorna-d5fxw2h

Quella sera erano tutti riuniti nella sala del castello per ascoltare il grande arpista. C’erano il re e la regina, la loro figlia, Sir William e tutta la corte. Al principio l’arpista cantò utilizzando la sua vecchia arpa dando gioia o tristezza a suo piacimento. Ma mentre cantava mise l’altra arpa, che aveva fatto quel giorno stesso, su una pietra della sala. Improvvisamente l’arpa cominciò a cantare da sola con voce bassa e chiara. L’arpista smise e tutti zittirono. E questo è ciò che l’arpa cantò:
“Laggiù siede mio padre, il re,
Binnorie, oh Binnorie;
E laggiù siede mia madre, la regina;
Presso le belle dighe sul mulino di Binnorie.
E laggiù in piedi c’è mio fratello Hugh,
Binnorie, oh Binnorie;
E accanto a lui il mio William, bugiardo e sincero;
Presso le belle dighe sul mulino di Binnorie.”
Tutti si meravigliarono dell’accaduto e l’arpista disse loro che aveva visto la principessa affogata stesa sulla riva vicino alle belle dighe sul mulino di Binnorie e che successivamente aveva costruito un’arpa utilizzando i suoi capelli e le sue ossa pettorali. Proprio allora l’arpa cominciò a suonare di nuovo e questo è ciò che cantò a voce alta e chiara:
“E là siede mia sorella che mi ha affogato
presso le belle dighe sul mulino di Binnorie.”
E l’arpa si schiantò e si ruppe e non cantò più.

“Sommando le versioni inglesi e quelle scandinave si sono calcolati un centinaio di testi: è come se ogni cantore si fosse divertito a inventare qualcosa di differente per distinguersi dagli altri. In alcune varianti norvegesi l’arpa si rompe in mille pezzi e la principessa bionda ritorna in vita mentre la sorella dai capelli neri è o bruciata viva o seppellita viva come punizione per il crimine commesso.
In un’altra, sempre norvegese, le ossa della ragazza sono utilizzate per fare un flauto che è portato alla famiglia per farlo suonare da tutti. Quando la sorella crudele lo suona il sangue sgorga da esso denunciando così la sua colpa. Ne consegue una punizione: la sorella è condannata ad essere legata a quattro cavalli che partono in quattro distinte direzioni e che la faranno a pezzi. In una versione svedese il mugnaio salva la ragazza e la riporta alla famiglia. Alla fine la principessa bionda perdonerà la sorella per il tentato omicidio.” (Giordano Dall’Armellina)

La fiaba si presta come sempre a molteplici letture fuori dal testo, quella per simbolismi si concentra sul significato delle ossa, del cigno e dell’elemento acqua (vedi) e tuttavia nell’approdare in America la ballata diventa una più tipica murder ballad

Avendo operato una cernita, vado a riportare le versioni più conosciute della ballata, per un elenco esaustivo dei titoli e degli interpreti vedere invece qui 

PRIMA VERSIONE: BINNORIE

In Scozia la ballata comparve in stampa nel 1656 con il titolo “The Miller and the King’s Daughter” (vedi testo) ed è finita poi nelle Child Ballads, (al numero 10), così chiamate dal Professor Francis James Child che nel tardo 1800 aveva pubblicato The English and Scottish Popular Ballads: le versioni in Child sono una ventina circa a sottolineare l’ampia popolarità e diffusione della storia (e anche per le melodie si hanno molte versioni).
La versione analizzata però qui è quella di Sir Walter Scott (in “Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border” 1802) che con il suoi libri contribuì a ridestare l’interesse dei contemporanei verso il Medievalismo.
Il testo è ricco di termini scozzesi, la trama è molto simile alla fiaba “The Singing Breastbone” di cui la ballata sembra essere la versione cantata, il tragico epilogo si tinge di magia con le ossa della fanciulla diventate strumento musicale e che smascherano l’assassina.
ASCOLTA Custer LaRue&Baltimore Consort in The Daemon Lover, 1993 un arrangiamento dal sapore medievale


There were twa sisters sat in a bow’r(1)
Binnorie, O Binnorie (2)
There cam a knight to be their wooer.
By the bonnie mill-dams of Binnorie .
He courted the eldest wi’ glove and ring (3)
But he lo’ed the youngest aboon a’thing.
The eldest she was vexed sair
And sore envied her sister fair.
The eldest said to the youngest ane:
“Will you go and see our father’s ships come in”
She’s ta’en her by the lily hand
And led her down to the river strand.
The youngest stude upon a stane
The eldest cam’ and pushed her in.
“Oh sister, sister reach your hand
And ye shall be heir of half my land”
“Oh sister, I’ll not reach my hand
And I’ll be heir of all your land.”
“Oh sister, reach me but your glove
And sweet William shall be your love.”
“Sink on, nor hope for hand or glove
And sweet William shall better be my love.”
Sometimes she sunk, sometimes she swam
Until she cam to the miller’s dam.
The miller’s daughter was baking bread
And gaed for water as she had need.
“O father, father, draw your dam!
There’s either a mermaid or a milk-white swan (4).”
The miller hasted and drew his dam
And there he found a drown’d woman.
Ye couldna see her yellow hair
For gowd and pearls that were sae rare.
Ye coldna see her middle sma’
Her gowden girdle was sae braw.
Ye couldna see her lily feet
Her gowden fringes were sae deep.
A famous harper passing by
The sweet pale face he chanced to spy.
And when he looked that lady on
He sighed, and made a heavy moan.
He made a harp (5) o’ her breast bone
Whose sounds would melt a heart of stone.
The strings he framed of her yellow hair,
Their notes made sad the listening ear.
He brought it to her father’s ha’
There was the court assembled there.
He layed the harp upon a stane
And straight it began to play alane.
“O yonder sits my father the King
And yonder sits my mother, the queen.”
“And yonder stands my brother Hugh
And by him, my William, sweet and true.”
But the last tune that the harp played then
Was: “Woe to my sister, false Helen”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
C’erano due sorelle sedute in salotto(1), Binnorie, O Binnorie (2)
venne un cavaliere per essere il loro pretendente, presso le belle dighe al mulino di Binnorie.
Corteggiò la più grande con guanto e anello (3), ma amava la più giovane sopra ogni cosa
La più grande era infastidita e dolorante
e invidiava la sua bionda sorella
La più grande disse alla più giovane:
“Vuoi venire a guardare le navi di nostro padre mentre arrivano?”
Prese la sorella per la bianca mano
e la condusse fino alla riva del fiume.
La più giovane stava su un masso
la più grande venne e gettò la sorella (in acqua)
“Oh Sorella, sorella dammi la mano
e sarai erede della mia metà di terra”
“Oh sorella, non ti darò la mano
e sarò l’erede di tutta la tua parte”
“Oh sorella, dammi il tuo guanto
e il bel William sarà tutto tuo”
“Annega e non sperare per la mano e il guanto e il bel William sarà il mio amore piuttosto”
Talvolta affondava, talvolta nuotava
finchè giunse alla diga del mulino.
La figlia del mugnaio stava cuocendo il pane
e andava a prendere l’acqua che  le serviva
“O padre, padre, chiudi la diga!
C’è una sirena o un cigno bianco come il latte (4).
Il mugnaio si precipitò a chiudere la diga
e là trovò una donna annegata
Non si riusciva a vedere i suoi capelli biondi,
per l’oro e le perle che c’erano così preziose.
Non si riusciva a vedere la sua vita
tanto era coperta da una cintura d’oro
Non si riuscivano a vedere i suoi candidi piedi,
le frange d’oro erano così lunghe.
Un famoso arpista passò li vicino
cercando di vedere il suo dolce e pallido viso.
E quando vide la fanciulla
lui sospirò ed emise un grande gemito.
Fece un’arpa (5) con le sue ossa pettorali,
il cui suono scioglierebbe un cuore di pietra.
Incorniciò le corde dai suoi capelli biondi,
il loro suono rendeva triste l’ascolto.
La portò nella sala di suo padre,
c’era la corte riunita là,
Pose l’arpa su una pietra
e cominciò a suonare da sola.
“Laggiù siede mio padre, il re,
e laggiù siete mia madre, la regina;
E laggiù in piedi c’è mio fratello Hugh,
e accanto a lui il mio William, amorevole e sincero”
Ma l’ultima melodia che l’arpa suonò poi fu “La colpa sulla mia bugiarda sorella Helen”

NOTE
1) bower si traduce con pergolato, ma nel Medioevo stava a indicare la camera privata della signora del castello, non proprio la camera da letto quando la saletta in cui soggiornava con le sue ancelle.
2) Scott sostituisce il ritornello “Edinburgh, Edinburgh” ispirandosi alla battaglia di Binnorie (per rievocare le guerre d’inipendenza scozzesi)
3) Dare l’anello e il guanto in epoca medievale era una promessa di matrimonio. Come da consuetudini ad essere corteggiata era la sorella maggiore , si tratta con evidenza di un matrimonio combinato in cui però il giovane si innamora della sorella più giovane
4)  la fanciulla portata dalla corrente non muore subito affogata e un po’ nuota come un candido cigno. Il paragone sottolinea la purezza e l’innocenza della fanciulla che si presume non abbia incoraggiato le avance del pretendente.
5) il menestrello costruisce un’arpa con le ossa della fanciulla e dai lunghi capelli biondi ricava le corde, si tratta ovviamente di un’arpa magica, infatti non appena posata su una pietra si mette a cantare da sola. Qui si fa riferimento alla credenza vichinga secondo la quale l’anima risiede nelle ossa (le ossa dei morti accusano i loro assassini). La sorella assassina che stava per andare in sposa viene smascherata dal fantasma della sorella e sicuramente sarà punita come merita.
E’ lecito presumere che nelle versioni scandinave della storia lo strumento fosse in realtà una crotta o lyra ad arco: detto anche “rotta” o “rotta germanica”-per sottolineare il suo areale nordico- lo strumento può essere dotato anche di una tastiera centrale e si suona con l’archetto essendo probabilmente l’antenata del violino. In Galles porta il nome di crwth (mentre in Irlanda è detta cruith) e la tastiera centrale porta le sei corde di cui due le drone strings (“corde fannullone”) sono di bordone. Questo strumento, che gli studiosi sono incerti se ritenere totalmente autoctono ed attribuito all’area scandinava, compare verso il II° sec, si presenta in una forma analoga a quella attuale intorno al VII sec. (vedi)

Da ascoltare nella versione strumentale di Dorothy Carter all’hammer dulcimer

continua seconda parte

FONTI E APPROFONDIMENTO
L’ottimo saggio di Giordano  Dell’Armellina in “Racconti comuni in ballate italiane, svedesi e  britanniche: un confronto” continua
Giordano  Dell’Armellina: “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”.
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49269&lang=it
http://walterscott.eu/education/ballads/supernatural-ballads/the-cruel-sister/