Last May a braw wooer by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns

Robert Burns writes the humorous song “Last May a Braw Wooer” (Last May a fine lover) making some drafting revisions, on an old Scottish air ‘The Lothian Lassie”. The song was published in the SMM, 1787; in Thomson’s collection” Scotish Airs “, 1799 and in the SMM, 1803.
Robert Burns scrive la canzone umoristica “Last May a Braw Wooer” (Lo scorso Maggio un baldo pretendente)  facendone alcune revisioni di stesura, su una vecchia aria scozzese ‘The Lothian Lassie. La canzone fu pubblicata nello SMM del 1787, nella raccolta di Thomson “Scotish Airs”, 1799 e nello SMM del 1803.

Mr. Stenhouse says : ” This humorous song was written by Burns in 1787, for the second volume of the Museum ; but Johnson, the publisher, who was a religious and well-meaning man, appeared fastidious about its insertion, as one or two expressions in it seemed somewhat irreverent. Burns afterwards made several alterations upon the song, and sent it to Mr. George Thomson for his Collection, who readily admitted it into his second volume, and the song soon became very popular. Johnson, however, did not consider it at all improved by the later alterations of our bard. It soon appeared to him to have lost much of its pristine humour and simplicity ; and the phrases which he had objected to were changed greatly for the worse. He therefore published the song as originally written by Burns for his work. ” (from here)
Dice Stenhouse: Questa canzone umoristica fu scritta da Burns nel 1787, per il secondo volume del Museo; ma Johnson, l’editore, che era un uomo religioso e benevolo, appariva infastidito riguardo al suo inserimento, poiché una o due espressioni sembravano in qualche modo irriverenti. Burns in seguito apportò diverse modifiche alla canzone, e la mandò a George Thomson per la sua Collezione, che incluse prontamente nel suo secondo volume, e la canzone divenne presto molto popolare. Johnson, tuttavia, non la ritenne per niente migliorata dalle successive modifiche del nostro bardo. Gli sembrò aver perso molto del suo umorismo e della sua semplicità; e le frasi alle quali aveva obiettato erano molto cambiate in peggio. Ha quindi pubblicato la canzone come originariamente scritta da Burns per il suo lavoro.”


1870 vintage book: “The Illustrated Family Burns”

In the beginning of the story a young and affluent suitor asks our loath protagonist to marry him, swearing his eternal love but in a few weeks he is flirting with Bess, (although the two women are cousins). She held him too much on his toes and so as soon as he asks her again for a wife, this time she immediately answers yes!
Un giovane e benestante corteggiatore prima chiede in moglie la nostra riluttante protagonista, giurandole amore eterno e dopo qualche settimana fa il cascamorto con Bess, (sebbene le due donne siano cugine). Lei lo ha tenuto troppo sulle spine e così non appena lui la richiede in moglie questa volta risponde subito di sì!

Tannahill Weavers in Leaving St. Kilda 1996

Ewan MacColl 

Meredith Hall


I
Last May, a braw wooer
cam doun the lang glen,
And sair wi’ his love
he did deave (1) me;
I said, “there was naething I hated like men-
The deuce gae wi’m,
to believe me, believe me;
The deuce gae wi’m to believe me. “
II
He spak o’ the darts in my bonie black e’en (2), /And vow’d for my love he was diein,
I said, he might die when
he liked for Jean-
The Lord forgie me for liein, for liein;
The Lord forgie me for liein!
III
A weel-stocked mailen (3),
himsel’ for the laird,
And marriage aff-hand,
were his proffers;
I never loot on (4) that
I kenn’d it, or car’d;
But thought I might hae
waur offers, waur (5) offers;
But thought I might hae waur offers.
IV
But what wad ye think?
In a fortnight or less-
The deil tak his taste to gae near her!
He up the Gate-slack (6)
to my black cousin, Bess-
Guess ye how, the jad (7)!
I could bear her, could bear her;
Guess ye how, the jad! I could bear her.
V
But a’ the niest week,
as I petted wi’ care,
I gaed to the tryst (8) o’ Dalgarnock;
But wha but my fine fickle wooer was there,
I glowr’d (9) as I’d seen a warlock, a warlock,
I glowr’d as I’d seen a warlock.
VI
But owre my left shouther
I gae him a blink (10),
Lest neibours might say
I was saucy;
My wooer he caper’d as he’d been in drink,
And vow’d I was his dear lassie, dear lassie,
And vow’d I was his dear lassie.
VII
I spier’d (11) for my cousin fu’ couthy (12) and sweet, /Gin she had recover’d her hearin’,
And how her new shoon fit
her auld schachl’t (13) feet,
But heavens! how he fell a swearin, a swearin,
But heavens! how he fell a swearin.
VIII
He begged, for gudesake, I wad be his wife,
Or else I wad kill him wi’ sorrow;
So e’en to preserve the poor body in life,
I think I maun wed him tomorrow, tomorrow;
I think I maun wed him tomorrow.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Lo scorso Maggio un bel pretendente 
venne giù dalla lunga valle
e con il suo corteggiamento,
assai m’infastidì;
dissi “Non c’è niente che odio come gli uomini, che vadano al diavolo,
credimi, credimi,
che vadano al diavolo, credimi
II
Lui parlò dei dardi nei miei begli occhi neri
e giurò che sarebbe morto per amor mio,
io dissi che avrebbe dovuto morire quando era innamorato di Jean.
il Signore mi perdoni per la bugia, la bugia
il signore mi perdoni per la bugia
III
Una fattoria ben fornita,
se stesso come padrone
e un matrimonio senza indugio,
furono le sue offerte;
non ho mai dato a vedere
di saperlo o che me ne importasse
ma pensai che avrei potuto avere
offerte peggiori, offerte peggiori, ma pensai che avrei potuto avere offerte peggiori
IV
Eppure cosa credete?
In meno di due settimane
il diavolo gli fece cambiare idea
Su per il Gateslake
dalla mia cugina mora, Bess-
Immaginate quanto, la scostumata, potevo sopportarla, potevo sopportarla, immaginate quanto, la scostumata, potevo sopportarla
V
Ma la settimana seguente
mi pettinai con cura
e andai alla fiera di Dalgarnock, e chi se non il mio bel corteggiatore volubile era là.
Lo fissai come se avessi visto il diavolo
Lo fissai come se avessi visto il diavolo
VI
Gli lanciai uno sguardo sorridente
di traverso
per timore che i miei vicini dicessero
che ero una facile;
il mio corteggiatore annuiva come se avesse bevuto e giurava che ero la sua cara ragazza
e giurava che ero la sua cara ragazza
VII
(Gli) Chiesi della mia cugina affabile e dolce
se avesse recuperato il suo udito
e di come le sue nuove scarpe avessero preso
la forma dei suoi vecchi piedi contorti!
Ma cielo! Si è messo a giurare, giurare
Ma cielo! si è messo a giurare
VIII
Pregò per carità, che io fossi sua moglie
altrimenti lo avrei ucciso per il dolore, così per mantenere il suo povero corpo in vita
credo che lo sposerò domani, domani
credo che lo sposerò domani

NOTE
1. deafen
2. eyes
3. well-stocked farm.
4. let out
5. worse
6. Gateslake is the name of a particular place in the Lawter hills but Thomson corrected with “green lane”
7. jad= wanton; scottish, a mare, of a woman, usu. as a term of reprobation: a hussy
8. market, cattle fair
9. stared
10. smiling look 
11. asked
12. kind, kindly
13. twisted , distorted. In the revised version it becomes  “how my auld shoon suited (fitted) her shauchled feet”; auld shoon is a discarded lover (being a sarcastic expression when applied to a discarded lover who pays his addresses to another fair one. ) [Nella versione riveduta diventa “come le mie vecchie scarpe calzassero i suoi piedi storti”, la scarpa vecchia è un amante scaricato, l’espressione è usata sarcasticamente quando applicata ad un amante scaricato che rivolge le sue attenzioni ad un altra bella]

LINK

http://wikilivres.ca/wiki/Songs_of_Robert_Burns/Last_May_a_braw_wooer
https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/91340095
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1176ly11.htm
http://www.bartleby.com/337/837.html
http://www.online-literature.com/robert-burns/2520/
https://www.wdl.org/en/item/3370/

Hey, Donald ! How, Donald ! by Robert Tannahill

Robert Tannahill (1774 – 1810) “the poet-weaver of Paisley”, wrote a pastoral song recalling a very popular melody in the previous century entitled “Donald Couper”. In the mighty compilation “The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill” by Fred Freeman (divided into 4 volumes) we find two versions, incidentally the melody is the same remembered by Mary Brooksbank (a poet-worker at the spinning-wheel) who sang her mother when she was a child . Not remembering the words she too rewrites Hey, Donald! How, Donald!
Robert Tannahill (1774 – 1810) “il poeta-tessitore di Paisley”,  scrisse una canzoncina pastorale richiamando una melodia molto popolare nel secolo precedente dal titolo “Donald Couper”. 
Nella poderosa compilation The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill di Fred Freeman (suddivisa in 4 volumi) troviamo ben due versioni, incidentalmente la melodia e la stessa ricordata da Mary Brooksbank (poeta-lavoratrice alla Filanda) che le cantava la madre quando era bambina. Non ricordando le parole anche lei la riscrive Hey, Donald ! How, Donald !

THE SIXTH CENTURY VERSION
[LA VERSIONE SEICENTESCA]

The tune called “Donald Couper” is very old, and it can be traced back at least as far as the middle of the 17th century. 
La melodia “Donald Couper” è molto antica, la ritroviamo alla metà del 17 ° secolo. Un testo fu pubblicato da Herd e riportato parzialmente nello SMM.

Wendy Weatherby in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume I (2006) 

Chorus
Hey, Donald, howe (1) Donald,

Hey Donald Couper!
He’s gane awa’ to seek a wife,
And he’s come hame without her.
I=IV
O Donald Couper and his man
Held to a Highland fair, man;
And a’ to seek a bonnie lass—
But fient a ane was there, man.
II
At length he get a carlin gray, (2)
And she’s come hirplin’ hame (3), man;
And she’s fawn ower the buffet stool (4),
And brak’ her rumple-bane, man(5)
III 
“I downa look on bank and brae, 
I downa greet where a’ are gay, 
But O! my heart will break wi’ wae, 
Gin Donald cease to lo’e me”

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Ehi Donald, come va Donald
Donald Couper!
E’ andato a cercare moglie
ed è ritornato a casa senza di lei
I
Donald Couper e il suo uomo
si recarono alla fiera delle Highland
per cercare una bella ragazza
ma diavolo se ce n’era una!
II
Alla fine ha preso una befana
che è arrivata lemme-lemme a casa
e si è seduta sullo sgabello
e si è rotta il coccige
III LEI
“Non guarderò alla riva e al colle
non brinderò quanto tutti sono allegri,
ma il mio cuore si spezzerà dal dolore
se Donald cesserà di amarmi”

English translation
Hey, Donald, how Donald,
Hey Donald Couper!
He’s gone away to seek a wife,
And he’s come home without her.
I=IV
O Donald Couper and his man
Held to a Highland fair, man;
And all to seek a pretty maid—
But devil a one was there, man.
II
At length he get an old woman gray,
And she’s come hirpling home, man;
And she’s sitting over the buffet stool,
And broke her rump-bon, man.
III
“I will not yet look on bank and hill, 
I will not yet greet where all are gay, 
But O! my heart will break with woe, 
if Donald will cease to love me”

NOTE
from Johnson’s Musical Museum, Part IV., 1792 but not the last stanza [Il testo proviene dallo “Scots Musical Museum” di Johnson, Part IV., 1792, ma non l’ultima strofa]
1) sono incerta se howe sia da considerarsi un intercalare “how” o voglia dire “zappatore”
2)  carlin means old woman, but it does not necessarily mean an old woman; used to indicate a wife (to whom one is attached) but also an hag; gyre-Carling is in fact the term with which in the Borders it was called the mother goddess
carlin significa vecchia donna, ma non necessariamente sta a indicare una donna anziana; usato per indicare una moglie (a cui si è affezionati) ma anche una megera  Gyre-Carling è infatti il termine con cui nel Borders veniva chiamata  la dea madre che si trasformerà in Italia nella Befana
3) per questo Donald era ritornato a casa solo, la “vecchietta” andava piano
4) buffet stole (c 1440)= a low stool, a footstool. In the 15th c. described as a three-legged stool, but in the 18th c. denoting in north of England a low stool of any kind and in Scotland a four-footed stool
[ è uno sgabello da buffet: uno sgabello basso, un poggiapiedi. Nel 1400 descritto come uno sgabello a tre gambe, ma nel 1700 denota nel Nord Inghilterra uno sgabello basso di ogni tipo e in Scozia uno sgabello a quattro piedi
5) Herd writes another verse “And Donald he’s as daft o’ her/As a ripe rosie dame, man

TANNAHILL VERSION: Tho’ simmer smiles 

Tannahill reworks the humorous situation of popular verses by writing a pastoral courting song.
R. A. Smith, who possessed Tannahill’s fragment, set it to a Highland air, which he took down from the voice of a country girl in Arran.
Tannahill rielabora la situazione umoristica dei versi popolari scrivendo una courting song di genere pastorale. R. A. Smith, che possedeva il frammento di Tannahill, lo musicò su un’aria delle Highland, che prese dal canto di una contadina ad Arran.

Marieke McBean in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume II (2010)

I
Though simmer smiles on bank and brae,
And nature bids the heart be gay,
Yet a’ the joys o’ flowery May 
Wi’ pleasure ne’er can move me (1).
Chorus
Hey, Donald ! how, Donald !

Think upon your vow, Donald ;
Mind the heather knowe (2), Donald,
Where you vowed to love me.
II (3)
The budding rose and scented brier, 
The siller fountain skinkling clear, 
The merry lav’rock whistling near, 
Wi’ pleasure ne’er can move me
III
“I downa look on bank and brae, 
I downa greet where a’ are gay, 
But O! my heart will break wi’ wae, 
Gin Donald cease to lo’e me”

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sebbene l’estate sorrida tra il rivo e il colle
e la natura esorti il cuore ad essere gaio
pur tutte le gioie della florida May
di piacere non mi commuoveranno
Coro
Ehi Donald, come va Donald
pensa alla tua promessa Donald, rammenda quando ci siamo conosciuti tra l’erica
dove hai giurato di amarmi
II
Il bocciolo di rosa germoglia soave
la fontana argentina spruzza chiara
l’allegra allodola fischietta vicina,
di piacere non mi commuoveranno
III
“Non guarderò alla riva e al colle
non brinderò quanto tutti sono allegri,
ma il mio cuore si spezzerà dal dolore
se Donald cesserà di amarmi”

NOTE
1) they won’t convince him to marry [non lo convinceranno a sposare la bella May]
2) probably a carnal knowledge [probabilmente una conoscenza carnale]
3) “These two supplemental stanzas were written by Motherwell about the year 1820, at the request of Smith, who was fond of the air, which he took down from the voice of a country girl in Arran. Smith afterwards inserted the whole song, as now given, in the second volume of his Scotish Minstrel. (by Ramsay)
Queste due strofe supplementari furono scritte da Motherwell intorno al 1820, su richiesta di Smith, che amava l’aria, ripresa dal canto di una contadina ad Arran. Successivamente Smith ha inserito l’intera canzone, come ora fornita, nel secondo volume del suo Scotish Minstrel.

LINK
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%2029B.htm
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Donald_Couper
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:The_Book_of_Scottish_Song.djvu/45

Banks of the Sweet Primroses

Leggi in italiano

It is the 50-60 years of folk revival when the first recordings of “The Banks of Sweet Primroses” begin to circulate; the Fairport Convention record the ballad on several occasions, as well as the folk revival of the years 70 re-proposes it with the names of great interpreters; the textual variations are minimal, the melody is substantially the same.

THE INCOSTANT LOVER

“The Banks of Sweet Primroses” is widespread in the English countryside of the South collected by the Copper family, printed in the nineteenth century as a broadside ballad.
Our beautiful gallant meets a maiden for the countryside and jumped on her; unfortunately he had not noticed that the girl was of his knowledge and that therefore she knowing already the boy: even on a desert island she would prefer the company of the birds rather than him.
The versions are sometimes only four stanzas but the last stanza handed down in the Copper family is comforting: the young man will surely find another girl who will be well disposed towards him!

June Tabor from At the Wood’s Heart 2005 (I, III, IV, V, VI)

Luke Kelly (I, III, IV, V)

Josienne Clarke & Ben Walker from digital download album “fRoots 53” 2015 (I, III, IV, V, VI)

I
As I roved out one midsummer (1)’s morning
To view the fields and to take the air
‘Twas down by the banks of the sweet primroses (2)
There I beheld a most lovely fair
II
Three long steps I stepped up to her,
Not knowing her as she passed me by,
I stepped up to her thinking for to view her,
She appeared to me like some virtuous bride.
III
Says I: “Fair maid, where can you be a going
And what’s the occasion of all your grief?
I will make you as happy as any lady
If you will grant me once more a leave. (3)”
IV
Stand up, stand up, you false deceiver
You are a false deceitful man, ‘tis plain
‘Tis you that is causing my poor heart to wander
And to give me comfort ‘tis all in vain
V
Now I’ll go down to some lonesome valley
Where no man on earth shall e’er me find
Where the pretty small birds do change their voices
And every moment blows blusterous winds (4)
VI
Come all young men (5) that go a-courting,
Pray pay attention to what I say.
There is many a dark and a cloudy morning
Turns out to be a sun-shiny day.

NOTES
1) Midsummer is the day of the summer solstice, equivalent to the day of St. John
2) the primrose which blooms in summer is a variety of primrose called common cowslip (scientific name primula veris), The common name cowslip may derive from the old English for cow dung, probably because the plant was often found growing amongst the manure in cow pastures.
3) Luke Kelly’s line” If you will grant me one small relief” , the sentences clearly allude to a second chance request to flirt
4) Luke Kelly ‘s line “And ev’ry moment blows blustrous wild”, it is probably a mistake in the oral transmission blustrous = blusterous windy stormy, wild=wind
5) in other versions a sentence for young girls: even if today they cry tomorrow they will find a man to marry!

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/banksofthesweetprimroses.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/s_prim.htm
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/week-53-banks-of-the-sweet-primroses/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/451.html

http://www.fairylandtrust.org/how-to-see-fairies-part-one/

 

I pendii delle belle primule odorose

Read the post in English  

Sono gli anni 50-60 del folk revival quando iniziano a circolare le prime registrazioni di “The Banks of Sweet Primroses“, Shirley Collins la intitola “The Sweet Primeroses” e i Fairport Convention la registrano in più occasioni, così anche il folk revival degli anni 70 la ripropone con i nomi di grandi interpreti, le varizioni testuali sono minime, la melodia è sostanzialmente la stessa.

L’AMANTE INCOSTANTE

E’ una ballad diffusa nella campagna inglese del Sud tra i canti della famiglia Copper circolata in stampa nell’Ottocento come broadside ballad.
Il nostro bel galante incontra una donzella tutta sola per la campagna e le zompa subito addosso; ahimè non si era accorto che la fanciulla era già stata una sua preda e che quindi conoscendo già il tipo anche su un isola deserta preferirebbe la compagnia degli uccelli piuttosto che la sua.
Le versioni sono talvolta di sole 4 strofe ma l’utlima strofa tramandata nella famiglia Copper è consolatoria: il giovanotto sicuramente troverà un’altra fanciulla che sarà ben disposta nei suoi confronti!

June Tabor in At the Wood’s Heart 2005 (strofe I, III, IV, V, VI)

Luke Kelly (strofe I, III, IV, V)

Josienne Clarke & Ben Walker in digital download album “fRoots 53” 2015 (strofe I, III, IV, V, VI)


I
As I roved out one midsummer (1)’s morning
To view the fields and to take the air
‘Twas down by the banks of the sweet primroses (2)
There I beheld a most lovely fair
II
Three long steps I stepped up to her,
Not knowing her as she passed me by,
I stepped up to her thinking for to view her,
She appeared to me like some virtuous bride.
III
Says I: “Fair maid, where can you be a going
And what’s the occasion of all your grief?
I will make you as happy as any lady
If you will grant me once more a leave. (3)”
IV
Stand up, stand up, you false deceiver
You are a false deceitful man, ‘tis plain
‘Tis you that is causing my poor heart to wander
And to give me comfort ‘tis all in vain
V
Now I’ll go down to some lonesome valley
Where no man on earth shall e’er me find
Where the pretty small birds do change their voices
And every moment blows blusterous winds (4)
VI
Come all young men (5) that go a-courting,
Pray pay attention to what I say.
There is many a dark and a cloudy morning
Turns out to be a sun-shiny day.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo in una bella mattina di mezza estate per guardare i campi e prendere il fresco,
fu sui pendii (le rive) delle primule odorose
dove vidi la fanciulla  più bella.
II
Con tre balzi mi avvicinai a lei,
non avendola riconosciuta mentre mi passava accanto;
le andai vicino pensando di guardarla bene,
mi apparviva come una moglie ideale
III
Dico io “Bella donzella, dove state andando
e qual’è il motivo di tutto il vostro dolore?
Vi farò felice più di ogni altra madama
se mi darete soltanto un po’ di speranza”
IV
“State lontano voi falso imbroglione,
è chiaro che voi siete un traditore,
è per colpa vostra che mi si è spezzato il cuore
ed è inutile che mi confortiate ora!
V
Andrò in qualche valle
solitaria
dove nessun uomo sulla terra mi troverà
dove i piccoli uccellini si scambiano i richiami
e ogni momento soffiano venti impetuosi.”
VI
Venite voi giovanotti che andate ad amoreggiare
siete pregati di fare attenzione a quello che vi dico:
ci sono molte mattinate buie e nuvolose
che si trasformano in un giorno soleggaito

NOTE
1) Midsummer è il giorno del solstizio d’estate, equivalente al giorno di San Giovanni
2) la primula che fiorisce d’estate è una varietà di primula sempe spontanea detta primula odorosa (nome scientifico primula veris), rispetto alla primula comune che fiorisce da febbraio a marzo, la primula odorosa spunta nei boschi e nei prati da aprile a giugno, si differenzia per i fiori più piccoli e dal giallo brillante che crescono ad ombrella sorrette da un lungo stelo.
In Italia la primula viene anche detta Primavera, Primavera odorosa, Orecchio d’orso giallo, Fior d’cuch, Trombete, Filadora, ed anche Occhio di Civetta.
3) letteralemnte la frase dice “se mi concederete ancora una volta il permesso“, Luke Kelly dice” If you will grant me one small relief” (se mi concederete un po’ di sollievo) le frasi alludono chiaramente a una richiesta di seconda occasione per amoreggiare
4) Luke Kelly dice “And ev’ry moment blows blustrous wild” e si tratta probabilmente di un errore nella trasmissione orale blustrous =blusterous ventoso burrascoso, wild = vento
5) in altre versioni si cerca di confortare le giovani fanciulle: anche se oggi piangono domani troveranno un uomo che le sposi!

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/banksofthesweetprimroses.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/s_prim.htm
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/week-53-banks-of-the-sweet-primroses/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/451.html

http://www.fairylandtrust.org/how-to-see-fairies-part-one/

 

DULAMAN, THE SEAWEED-GATHERER IN IRISH BALLADRY

seaweed-guillouLe popolazioni che vivono lungo le coste hanno imparato a raccogliere, per il consumo abituale, diverse qualità di alghe,
In particolare in Scozia e Irlanda le alghe dulse e il muschio irlandese hanno sempre fatto parte della dieta degli abitanti costieri.

Dúlamán all’apparenza un nome esotico, che in gaelico significa “seaweed-gatherer” (in italiano “raccoglitore d’alga“): da millenni gli Irlandesi hanno fatto della raccolta delle alghe un mestiere, c’era il “dúlamán Gaelach” che selezionava le alghe per tingere i panni e il “dúlamán maorach” che raccoglieva le alghe commestibili.
Le alghe vengono raccolte come fertilizzanti per i campi altrimenti sabbiosi e aridi delle isole (vedasi Ascophyllum nodosum, dette in Irlanda knotted wrack qui)

ALGHE NEL PIATTO

Tipico ingrediente della cucina giapponese l’alga del mare è anche onnipresente nella cucina irlandese: l’Irish moss (in italiano muschio d’Irlanda) per le sue proprietà addensanti è utilizzata ancora oggi nel settore alimentare, come ingrediente di zuppe e stufati e in particolare nella preparazione della birra, che non necessita di essere filtrata e alla quale conferisce una schiuma molto “spessa”. Molte sono poi le proprietà medicamentose delle alghe, non solo come integratori alimentari (antiossidanti e ricche di iodio), ma anche cosmetico (benefici alla pelle e ai capelli); anche in agricoltura possono essere utilizzate come fertilizzanti con alto potere battericida o come integratore alimentare per il bestiame..
Ci sono vari tipi di alga rossa che si trovano lungo le coste di Irlanda – Gran Bretagna: l’alga dulse (Palmaria palmata)  e l’irish moss (Chondrus crispus detta anche Carragheen) che distesa e fatta asciugare sotto il sole vira al bianco in una caratteristica tinta “bionda”! Ovviamente si possono già mangiare “al naturale” e crude come gli amanti del sushi ben sanno!

irish-mossPer diventare esperti raccoglitori di alghe e cimentarsi in sfiziose nonché salutari ricette ecco l’ Irish Seaweed Kitchen Cookbook, non solo un libro ma anche un sito web (qui)

Nella mia ignoranza italica (certamente fugata se leggessi il libro su indicato!) non saprei dire se le alghe dalle quali si ottengono le tinture per lana e filati in genere o stoffe siano le stesse edibili, ovviamente il processo di lavorazione per ottenere la tintura sarà diverso dal processo di essiccazione, perchè l’obiettivo è quello di ottenere un colorante (non tossico!!) nella gamma del verde-blu e arancione-rosso.

Dúlamán è anche una popolare e antica ballata irlandese, apparentemente una “nonsense song”, è in realtà il racconto del corteggiamento della figlia di un “dúlamán gaelach” che ha almeno due pretendenti un “dúlamán gaelach” che le vuole comprare un bel paio di scarpe e un “dúlamán maorach” che la tenta con l’acquisto di un pettine. Il padre non è contento d’imparentarsi con un semplice “dúlamán maorach”, così la ragazza, che ha fatto la sua scelta, viene “rapita” per una “fuitina” a scopo matrimoniale.

ASCOLTA Clannad in Dulaman 1976

ASCOLTA Omnia, 2009 (che sembra più un canto di guerra che un canto di lavoro)

ASCOLTA Altan in Island Angel 1993

ASCOLTA Celtic Woman live 2006


VERSIONE Clannad
CurfáX2:
Dúlamán na binne buí
Dúlamán Gaelach
I
A’níon mhín ó
Sin anall na fir shúirí
A mháithair mhín ó
Cuir na roithléan go dtí mé(1)
II
Tá ceann buí óir(2)
Ar an dúlamán gaelach
Tá dhá chluais mhaol
Ar an dúlamán gaelach
III
Rachaimid ‘un an Iúr(4)
Leis an dúlamán gaelach
Ceannóimid bróga daora
Ar an dúlamán gaelach
IV
Bróga breaca dubha
Ar an dúlamán gaelach
Tá bearéad agus triús
Ar an dúlamán gaelach
V
Ó chuir mé scéala chuici
Go gceannóinn cíor dí
‘Sé an scéal a chuir sí chugam
Go raibh a ceann cíortha(6)
VI
Caidé thug tú ‘na tíre?
Arsa an dúlamán gaelach
Ag súirí le do níon
Arsa an dúlamán maorach
VII
Chan fhaigheann tú mo ‘níon
Arsa an dúlamán gaelach
Bheul, fuadóidh mé liom í
Arsa an dúlamán maorach
VIII
Dúlamán na binne buí
Dúlamán a’ tsleibhe
Dúlamán na farraige
Is dúlamán a’ deididh

VERSIONE Altan
Curfá: Dúlamán na binne buí,
dúlamán Gaelach
Dúlamán na farraige,
‘s é b’fhearr a bhí in Éirinn
I
A ‘níon mhín ó,
sin anall na fir shúirí
A mháithair mhín ó,
cuir na roithléan go dtí mé(1)
II
Tá cosa dubha dubailte (2)
ar an dúlamán gaelach
Tá dhá chluais mhaol
ar an dúlamán gaelach
III
Rachaimid go Doire(4)
leis an dúlamán gaelach
Is ceannóimid bróga daora
ar an dúlamán gaelach
IV
Bróga breaca dubha
ar an dúlamán gaelach
Tá bearéad agus triús
ar an dúlamán gaelach
V
Ó chuir mé scéala chuici,
go gceannóinn cíor dí
‘S é’n scéal a chuir sí chugam,
go raibh a ceann cíortha(6)
VI
Góide a thug na tíre thú?
Arsa an dúlamán gaelach
Ag súirí le do níon,
arsa an dúlamán maorach
VII
Ó cha bhfaigheann tú mo ‘níon,
arsa an dúlamán gaelach
Bheul, fuadóidh mé liom í,
arsa an dúlamán maorach

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
Seaweed from the yellow cliff,
Irish seaweed
Seaweed from the ocean,
the best in all of Ireland
I
Oh gentle daughter
Here come the wooing men
Oh gentle mother
oh bring me my spinning wheel (1)
II
There is a yellow-gold head(2)
On the Irish seaweed
There are two blunt(3) ears
On the Irish seaweed
III
We’ll go to Newry(4)
With the Irish seaweed
I would buy expensive shoes
Said the Irish seaweed
IV
Beautiful black shoes(5)
The Irish seaweed has
A beret and trousers
The Irish seaweed has
V
I spent time telling her the story
That I would buy a comb for her
The story she told back to me
That she is well-groomed(6)
VI
“What did you bring from the land?”
Says the Irish seaweed
“Courting with your daughter”
Says the stately seaweed(7)
VII
“You’re not taking my daughter”
Says the Irish seaweed
“Well, I’d take her with me”
Says the stately seaweed
VIII
Seaweed of the yellow cliff
Seaweed of the mountain
Seaweed from the sea
Seaweed..

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO (da qui)
(ritornello)
Alga dalla scogliera gialla,
alga irlandese,
Alga dall’oceano,
la migliore in tutta l’Irlanda.
I
“Oh cara figliola,
ecco che arrivano i corteggiatori”
“Oh cara madre,
portami il filatoio”(1).
II
C’è una testa giallo-oro(2)
sul raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese,
ci sono due piccole(3) orecchie
sul raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese.
III
“Andremo a Newry (Derry) (4)
con il raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese “Vorrei comprarti delle scarpe costose” ha detto il raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese,
IV
Scarpe nere bellissime(5)
ha il raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese
ha un berretto e i pantaloni.
V
Ho passato del tempo a raccontarle la storia, di come le avrei comprato un pettine. La storia che mi ha raccontato di rimando, è che era una buona idea (6).
VI
“Che cosa sei venuto a fare?”
dice il raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese.
“A corteggiare tua figlia”
dice il raccoglitore d’alghe(7).
VII
“Oh, dove stai portando mia figlia?” dice il raccoglitore d’alghe irlandese. “Beh, la porterei con me” dice il raccoglitore d’alghe
VIII
Alga dalla scogliera gialla,
alga della montagna, alga dall’oceano, la migliore, la migliore di tutta l’Irlanda

NOTE
1) la ragazza si mette a filare per mostrare al corteggiatore che è laboriosa e modesta
2) nella versione Altan “Tá cosa dubha dubailte“= there are two black thick feet (in italiano ci sono due grossi piedi neri)
3) narrow
4) oppure Derry
5) un tempo possedere un paio di scarpe era un lusso tra la gente del popolo, l’unico paio veniva indossato solo nelle occasioni speciali, per andare a messa o per ballare!
6) Go raibh a ceann cíortha tradotto anche come ” that it was a fine one“.
7) il raccoglitore d’alghe per mangiare che è quello scelto dalla ragazza ma non benvisto dal padre.

continua Pulling the dulse

FONTI
http://connemara.verdeirlanda.info/it/30-le-news/la-vita/44-alghe-la-ricchezza-dal-mare
http://testitradotti.wikitesti.com/2011/03/13/dulaman-testo-traduzione-e-video-dei-celtic-woman/ http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/Dulaman.html http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/dulaman_song.htm http://thesession.org/tunes/10313 http://songoftheisles.com/2013/06/25/dulaman/ http://www.mondobirra.org/alga.htm http://vre2.upei.ca/cap/node/456 http://irishseaweedkitchen.ie/

Braw Lads O’ Galla Water

“Braw Lads O ‘Galla Water”, “Galla Water”, “Gala Water” or “Braw, braw Lads (lassie)” are various titles for the same traditional Scottish song. The Gala Water is a river of the Scottish Border that comes from Moorfoot Hills and flows into the Tweed near Melrose through the counties of Edinburgh, Selkirk and Roxburgh, a serpentine and pleasant path between wide tracts of pasture. Galashiels (Gala) is a town in the county Selkirk on the Gala river, famous for its textile productions; the song is invariably sung on the occasion of the Braw Lads Gathering a sort of re-enactment of the salient historical moments lived by the town, which takes place at the end of May and for most of June
“Braw Lads O’ Galla Water”, “Galla Water”, “Gala Water” o “Braw, braw Lads(lassie)” sono vari titoli per la stessa canzone tradizionale scozzese.
Il Gala Water è  un fiume del Border scozzese che nasce dalle Moorfoot Hills e confluisce nel Tweed vicino a Melrose attraversando le contee di Edimburgo, Selkirk e Roxburgh, una percorso serpentino e ameno tra ampi tratti di pascolo. Galashiels (Gala) è una città nella contea di Selkirk sul fiume Gala famosa per le sue produzioni tessili; la canzone è cantata immancabilmente in occasione del Braw Lads Gathering una sorta di rievocazione dei momenti storici salienti vissuti dalla cittadina, che si svolge a fine maggio e per buona parte di giugno.

“MARRIAGE FOR THE SAKE”
[Il matrimonio d’amore]

There are many text versions of the song combined with a couple of melodies, this is the song of a shepherdess in love with a handsome boy from Gala, who decides to go live with him. In some versions a sort of “gallant” encounter is described between the two, and in fact the song is part of the topic “romantic encounters among the Heather” between provocative shepherdesses and bold young men; this story, however, is the story of a marriage union. Once marriage for the sake was the privilege of poor people, while good people married for convenience (and a girl without a dowry could hardly get married, if she was not beautiful) Among the poor there was not even the need for the consent of the reciprocal parents, it was enough the exchange of vows in a grove .. with a complete sexual relationship and / or the cohabitation. And of course no public party with friends and relatives.
Della canzone esistono molte versioni testuali abbinate ad un paio di melodie, si tratta della canzone di una pastorella innamorata di un bel ragazzo di Gala, che decide di andare a vivere con lui. In alcune versioni si descrive una sorta di incontro “galante” tra i due, e in effetti la canzone si inserisce nel filone degli incontri romantici “among the Heather” tra procaci pastorelle e baldi giovanotti; questa storia però è la storia di un’unione matrimoniale, un tempo il matrimonio per amore era privilegio della povera gente , mentre la gente bene si sposava per convenienza (e una ragazza senza dote difficilmente riusciva a sposarsi, se non era più che bella).
Tra poveri non c’era nemmeno bisogno del consenso dei reciproci genitori, bastava dar seguito ad una promessa di matrimonio (lo scambio dei voti in un boschetto.. con un rapporto sessuale completo) e/o alla coabitazione. E ovviamente nessuna festa pubblica con amici e parenti.

Gala Water

Ossian in “St Kilda Wedding” Iona Records, 1978 

Old Blind Dogs in New Tricks 1992 Spotify
They take up the version of Ossian transforming the first stanza into Chorus
[riprendono la versione di Ossian trasformando la prima strofa in Coro]


I=VI
Oh braw (1), braw lads o’ Gala Water
Bonnie lads o’ Gala Water
Let them a’ say whate’er they may
The gree gaes aye tae Gala Water
Braw, braw bonnie lads O
II
Ower yon moss an’ ower yon moor
Aye, o’er yon bonnie bush o’ heather
Let them a’ say whate’er they may
The gree gaes aye tae Gala Water
Braw, braw bonnie lads O
III
Oh lords an’ lairds (2) cam here tae woo
An’ gentlemen wi’ sword an’ dagger (3)
But the black-eyed lads o’ Galashiels (4)
Would hae nane but the gree (5) o’ Gala Water,
Braw, braw bonnie lads O
IV
“Adieu soor plooms (6) o’ Galashiels
Fareweel, my faither an’ my mither
I’ll awa’ wi’ the black-haired lad
Who keeps his flocks on Gala Water”
Braw, braw bonnie lads O
V
Oh, doon amang the bonnie broom (7)
Aye, doon amang the broom sae dreary
The lassie lost her silken snood (8)
That gar’d (9) her greet, till she was weary
Braw, braw bonnie lads O
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala,
graziosi ragazzi del fiume Gala,
che dicano ciò che vogliono
il primato va al fiume Gala,
Bei ragazzi del (fiume Gala).
II
Per quella torbiera, per quella brughiera, 
su quel cespuglio d’erica, 
che dicano ciò che vogliono,
il primato va al fiume Gala,
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala.
III
Oh Signori e signorotti venuti qui per corteggiare e cadetti con la spada e pugnale,
eppure i ragazzi dagli occhi scuri di Gala
non hanno altro che il primato del fiume Gala,
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala.
IV
“Addio  prugne acide di Gala,
addio padre mio e madre mia,
vado via con il ragazzo dai capelli scuri
che tiene le sue pecore sul fiume Gala”.
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala.
V
Oh giù per la bella ginestra
per quella bella ginestra così cara,
la ragazza perse la sua fascia argentata
e pianse fino allo sfinimento,
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala.

NOTE
1) Braw: fine
2) the laird is a typical figure of the small Scottish nobility, a landowner [il laird è una figura tipica della piccola nobiltà scozzese, un possidente terriero]
3) probably reference to young cadets [si riferisce probabilmente ai giovani cadetti]
4) Galashiels (Gala) è una città nella contea di Selkirk sul fiume Gala
5) gree= Pre-eminence, supremacy, the first place; hence, the prize, palm; the boy is a simple shepherd but he is superior to the noblemen because he comes from Gala [il ragazzo è un semplice pastorello ma è superiore ai nobiluomini perchè proviene da Gala.]
galashie6) Soor plooms= Sour Plums  “The motto Sour Plums and the date refer to when English soldiers were on a raid (one of the many) and some of theme were gathering wild plums which grow in the area. They were surprised by some locals and sent to meet their maker, their guts being opened with the sword and the plums they had eaten spilled out, sour” (from here) [
è diventato un motto per commemorare lo scontro avvenuto nel 1337 tra gli uomini di Gala e un gruppo di soldati inglesi; il motto è ripreso nello stemma araldico della città.
Il motto Sour Plums e la data si riferiscono a quando i soldati inglesi fecero un raid (uno dei tanti) e alcuni di loro si misero a raccogliere le prugne selvatiche che crescono nell’area. Furono sorpresi da alcuni abitanti del posto e mandati a incontrare il loro creatore, aprendo le loro budella con la spada e le prugne che avevano mangiato fuoriuscirono, acide
 Una versione “guerresca” della volpe e l’uva]
7) the broom alludes to a wild sexuality, free of rules. The scottish moor is like the “greenwood”, it is an “outlaw” place outside civil society where fairy and illicit encounters occur [la ginestra allude a una sessualità selvaggia, libera da regole. La brughiera è come il “greenwood” è un luogo “fuori legge” fuori dalla società civile dove accadono incontri fatati e illeciti]
8) Snood: ribbon to bind hair, an euphemism for the loss of virginity [un eufemismo per la perdita della verginità]
9) Gars: make; gard: made; does the verse end with the girl’s repentance or is it an implicit reproach? il verso si conclude con il pentimento della fanciulla o è un implicito rimprovero?

Here’s a version from ‘The Scots Musical Museum’, #125. The text varies only slightly from one in Herd’s ‘Scots Songs’ 1776 (without music). The tune had earlier been called “Coming through the broom”, and the song is called “Down among the Broom” in ‘The Scots Vocal Miscellany’, 1780. It’s called “Galla Water” in ‘The Goldfinch’, Glasgow, c 1780, but the last two lines are given there as “The lassie lost her silken snood, That gar’d her greet till she was weary”.  (from here)
Ecco una versione da “The Scots Musical Museum”, # 125. Il testo varia leggermente da quello di Herd in ‘Scots Songs’ (senza musica). La canzone era una volta intitolata “Coming through the broom”, ed è detta “Down in the Broom” nello “The Scots Vocal Miscellany”, 1780. Si chiama “Galla Water” in “The Goldfinch”, Glasgow, 1780 , ma gli ultimi due versi sono”The lassie lost her silken snood, That gar’d her greet till she was weary”. 

I
Braw, braw lads of Galla water,
O! braw lads of Galla water:
I’ll kilt (1) my coats aboon (2) my knee,
And follow my love thro’ the water.
II
Sae fair her hair, sae brent her brow,
Sae bonny blue her een, my dearie;
Sae white her teeth, sae sweet her mou’,
The mair I kiss, she’s ay my dearie.
III
O’er yon bank, and o’er yon brae,
O’er yon moss amang the heather:
I’ll kilt my coat aboon my knee,
And follow my love thro’ the water.
IV
Down amang the broom, the broom,
Down amang the broom, my dearie.
The lassie lost her silken snood,
That cost her mony a blirt and bleary (3)
NOTE
1) kilt=tuck up
2) Aboon: above
3) Which cost her many a blurt and blear-eye [che le costò rimpianti e lacrime]

Another version is the one partly reported in Robert Chambers‘ collection “Songs of Scotland Prior to Burns” 1829 (for the complete text here
Un’altra versione è quella in parte riportata nella raccolta di Robert Chambers “Songs of Scotland Prior to Burns” 1829 (per il testo completo qui)
Bear the Tinker
the text is similar to the version sung by Ewan MacColl in 1965 in “Folk Songs and Ballads of Scotland “except in the third stanza 
il testo è simile alla versione cantata da Ewan MacColl nel 1965 in “Folk Songs and Ballads of Scotland” tranne che nella III strofa


I
Braw, braw lads o’ Gala Water,
Bonnie lads o’ Gala Water;
I’ll kilt my coats abune my knee (1),
And follow my lad o’ Gala Water
Braw, braw lad.
II
Lothian (2) lads are black as deils,
And Selkirk (3) lads are no’ much better;
I’ll kilt my coats abune my knee
And follow my love thro’ the water;
Braw, braw lad.
III (4)
But there is ane, a secret ane,
Aboon them a I loe him better
And I’ll be his, and he’ll be mine
The bonnie lad o’ Gala Water;
Braw, braw lad.
IV
Corn rigs are fine and bonnie,
A block o’ sheep is muckle (5) better,
The wind will shake a field of oats
While lambs are frisklin’ in Gala Water;
Braw, braw lad.
V
Adieu, soor plooms o’ Galashiels,
Tae you, my faither, here’s a letter;
It’s I’m awa’ wi’ the black herd lad,
To bide (6) wi’ him in Gala Water;
Braw, braw lad.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Bei ragazzi del fiume Gala
graziosi ragazzi del fiume Gala
mi arrotolo la gonna alle ginocchia
per seguire il mio ragazzo del fiume Gala
Bel ragazzo
II
I ragazzi di Edimburgo sono neri come diavoli
e i ragazzi di Selkirk non sono molto meglio,
mi arrotolo la gonna alle ginocchia,
per seguire il mio ragazzo del fiume Gala,
Bel ragazzo
III
C’è ne uno, uno speciale
che sopra a tutti gli altri amo di più;
e io sarò sua e lui sarà mio,
il bel ragazzo del fiume Gala
Bel ragazzo
IV
I campi di grano sono cosa buona e bella,
un gregge di pecore è ancora meglio
il vento agiterà un campo d’avena,
mentre gli agnelli saltelleranno nel fiume Gala,
Bel ragazzo
V
Addio prugne acide di Gala
per voi padre ecco una lettera
Sono andata via con il mandriano dai capelli neri, per restare con lui sul fiume Gala
Bel ragazzo

NOTE
1) typical expression of the Scottish ballads in which a girl decides to follow a traveler-beggar
[tipica espressione delle ballate scozzesi in cui una fanciulla decide di seguire un traveller-mendicante]
2) county of Edinburgh [è la contea di Edimburgo]
3) Selkirk is a village along the Ettrick in the county of the same name, territory of the Scottish Border. The girl does not want any “stranger” the best is her boyfriend from Galashiels (Gala)
[Selkirk è un paese lungo l’Ettrick nella contea omonima, territorio dello Scottish Border. La ragazza non vuole nessun “forestiero” il migliore è il suo ragazzo di Galashiels (Gala) ]
4) in this version the verse is identical to Robert Burns’s I verse; the verse in Ewan MacColl (which in some versions is called II strophe) says instead:
It’s ower the moss and doon yon glen,
And o’er the bonnie blooming heather,
Nicht or day he bears the gree, [=to hold or win first place]
The bonnie lad o’ Galla Water; 
in questa versione la strofa è identica alla I strofa di Robert Burns; la strofa in Ewan MacColl (che in alcune versione è messa come II strofa) dice invece: su per la torbiera e giù per la valle e su per la bella brughiera fiorita, notte o giorno lui conquista il primo posto, il bel ragazzo del fiume Gala)

5) muckle= much
6) to bide= to dwell, to stay

Bonnie lass o’ Gala Water

The male version is one of many variations of the song
La versione al maschile è una delle tanti varianti della canzone

The McCalmans in In Harmony 1993 (Spotify).


Chorus
Bonnie lass o’ Gala Water
Braw braw lass o’ Gala Water
I would range the mountains sae deep (1)
Wi’ you bonnie lass o’ Gala Water
I
Sae fair her hair, sae brent her brow
Sae bonnie blue her een and cheerie
Oh I would range the mountains sae deep 
Tae get back home wi’ my dearie
II 
O’er yonder moor, o’er yonder mountain
O’er yon bonnie hills taegither
O I would range the mountains sae deep
My own bonnie lass tae forgather
III
Lords and lairds came here tae woo
And gentlemen wi’ sword and dagger
But the black eyed lass o’ Galashiels
Would hae nane but the gree o’ Gala Water
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Bella ragazza del Fiume Gala
brava, bella ragazza del Fiume Gala
vorrei scalare le montagne tanto ampie,
con te, bella ragazza di Gala
II
Così belli i capelli, così spaziosa la fronte
così belli e cari i suoi occhi blu!
Oh vorrei scalare le montagne tanto ampie,
per tornare a casa con la mia ragazza
III
Per quella brughiera, quella montagna
e quelle belle colline insieme
vorrei scalare le montagne tanto ampie
per incontrarmi con la mia bella ragazza
IV
Signori e signorotti son venuti qui a corteggiare e cadetti con la spada e pugnale,
ma la ragazza dagli occhi scuri di Gala
non vuole altro che il migliore del fiume Gala

NOTE
1) in altre versioni dice “I could wade the stream sae deep” che è sicuramente più calzante con il concetto di profondo

Braw lads on Yarrow-braes

ritratto di Robert BurnsAt first Robert Burns sent a traditional version to Johnson for the publication in the ‘Scots Musical Museum’ (Vol II 1788) which version is almost identical to that published by David Herd a decade earlier (Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs Vol II 1776). Then he reworked the poem in another version sent to George Thomson which was printed in 1793 (in Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs for the Voice) with the arrangement by Joseph Haydn (Hob. XXXIa: 15ter)
Dapprima Robert Burns inviò una versione tradizionale all’editore Johnson per la pubblicazione sullo ‘Scots Musical Museum‘ (Vol II 1788) la quale versione è pressochè identica a quella pubblicata da David Herd una decina d’anni prima (Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs Vol II 1776). Poi rielaborò la poesia in una ulteriore versione inviata all’editore George Thomson che venne data in stampa nel 1793 (in Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs for the Voice) con l’arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn (Hob. XXXIa:15ter)

Davidona Pittock

Elspeth Cowie

The Corries

Ed Miller in Lyrics of Gold – Songs of Robert Burns 2008


CHORUS
Braw, braw lads on Yarrow-braes,
They rove amang the blooming heather;
But Yarrow braes, nor Ettrick shaws (1)
Can match the lads o’ Galla Water.
Braw, braw (bonie) lad o’  
I
But there is ane, a secret ane,
Aboon them a’ I loe him better;
And I’ll be his, and he’ll be mine,
The bonie lad o’ Galla Water.
II
Altho’ his daddie was nae laird,
And tho’ I hae nae meikle tocher (2),
Yet rich in kindest, truest love,
We’ll tent (3) our flocks by Galla Water.
III (5)
It ne’er was wealth, it ne’er was wealth,
That coft (6) contentment, peace, or pleasure;
The bands and bliss o’ mutual love,
O that’s the chiefest warld’s treasure.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Bei ragazzi nelle colline di Yarrow
che girovagavano tra l’erica in fiore
ma nè quelli delle colline di Yarrow o dei boschetti di Ettrick si possono paragonare ai ragazzi del fiume Gala. Bei ragazzi
I
C’è ne uno, uno speciale
che sopra a tutti gli altri amo di più;
e io sarò sua e lui sarà mio,
il bel ragazzo del fiume Gala.
II
Anche se il padre non è un possidente,
e io non ho una gran dote, siamo però ricchi di buoni affetti e dell’amore più vero, e ci prenderemo cura del gregge sul fiume Gala.
III
Non c’è mai stata ricchezza che porti felicità, pace o piacere; la compagnia e la grazia dell’amore reciproco, questo è il principale tesoro del mondo

NOTE
English translation here
1) Shaws: thickets, woods;the Ettrick forest once much larger than today was the quintessential place of the Border ballads [la foresta di Ettrick un tempo assai più estesa di oggi era il luogo per eccellenza delle ballate del Border]
2) Meikle Tocher: much dowry
3) Tent: look after
4) Burns’s characteristic opposition of love and money. [nella strofa Burn esprime un tema “classico” della sua poetica: la contrapposizione tra amore e vil danaro]
5) Coft: bought

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/matrimonio-celtico-storia.html
http://www.scottish-places.info/features/featurehistory3398.html http://www.jamespringle.co.uk/html/braw_lads_of_gala.html http://sangstories.webs.com/brawladsogallawater.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7667
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/other/75GalaWater.pdf http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_gala.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-125,-page-131-braw,-braw-lads-of-galla-water.aspx http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/braw_lads_o_galla_water/ http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/gala.htm http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/galawate.html http://www.annexgalleries.com/inventory/detail/17937/Joan-Hassall/Gala-Water-from-The-Poems-of-Robert-Burns

https://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/braw-lads-on-yarrow-braes/

http://www.robertburnsfederation.com/poems/translations/braw_lads_o_gala_water.htm

I’M O’ER YOUNG TO MARRY YET

La canzone è una canzone d’amore umoristica se non proprio oscena. Compare in stampa nel ‘Scots Musical Museum’ – Volume II, # 107 con un testo in parte riscritto da Robert Burns (essendo il ritornello invece originario).

La melodia è un reel molto popolare nel Border e comune a diversi titoli “Bonny Lad to Marry Me” (William Vickers 1770), “O’Flynn’s Fancy”, “Were You at the Fair,” “The Pretty Lass,” “Donny Brook”, ma può anche essere accompagnato dalla melodia, ‘The Braes of Balquidder’ (spartito qui)

GameCourt_GSmith-dettaglioUna giovinetta rifiuta la proposta di matrimonio di un uomo a causa dell’età e dell’inesperienza, ma invita l’uomo a ritornare con l’arrivo dell’estate; così leggendo meno maliziosamente tra le righe, la fanciulla, sebbene professi la sua giovinezza, non è disposta a farsi scappare il corteggiatore. L’allusione che desta il sorriso è quella relativa all’inesperienza della ragazzina: con la stagione invernale evidentemente non ha molte occasioni per rimediare, ma in Primavera non le mancheranno le opportunità per amoreggiare nei campi!

ASCOLTA Betty Sanders

VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS 1788
CHORUS
I’m o’er young, I’m o’er young,
I’m o’er young to marry yet;
I’m o’er young, ‘twad be a sin
To tak me frae my mammy yet.
I
I am my mammny’s ae bairn(1),
Wi’ unco(2) folk I weary, Sir,
And lying in a man’s bed,
I’m fley’d it mak me irie(3), Sir.
II(4)
My mammie coft(5) me a new gown,
The kirk maun hae the gracing o’t;
Were I to lie wi’ you, kind Sir,
I’m feared ye’d spoil the lacing o’t
III
Hallowmass is come and gane,
The nights are lang in winter, Sir,
And you an’ I in ae bed,
In trowth, I dare na venture, Sir.
IV
Fu’ loud and shill the frosty wind
Blaws thro’ the leafless timmer, Sir;
But if ye come this gate again,
I’ll aulder be gin simmer, Sir.
TRADUZIONE  CATTIA SALTO
RITORNELLO
Sono troppo giovane, sono troppo giovane, troppo giovane per sposarmi.
Sono troppo giovane sarebbe un peccato portarmi già via dalla mia mammina.
I
Sono la sola bimba di mamma,
con un rozzo popolano mi annoio, Signore e andare nel letto di un uomo
temo che mi spaventi, Signore.
II
La mamma mi ha comprato un nuovo abito, con la gonna abbellita da un ornamento; dovessi giacere con lei signore,
temo di rovinarle il merletto.
III
Ognissanti è venuto e andato,
le notti sono lunghe in inverno, Signore
e voi ed io in un letto
per la verità, non oso rischiare, Signore.
IV
Con piena forza e vigore il vento gelido soffia attraverso gli alberi senza foglie, Signore, ma se verrete ancora a questa porta, sarò più vecchia quando arriverà l’estate Signore!

Traduzione inglese  (qui)

NOTE
1) child
2) uncouth
3) to be annoyed or irritated with something.
4) La seconda strofa è riportata in Robert Burns (1759–1796). “Poems and Songs”.
5) coff= buy

FONTI
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-107,-page-110-im-oer-young-to-marry-yet.aspx
http://digital.nls.uk/english-ballads/pageturner.cfm?id=74893852
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/
im_oer_young_to_marry_yet.htm

http://www.asaplive.com/archive/detail.asp?id=R0307302
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:114.146
http://www.electricscotland.com/music/minstrelsie/volume4.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Bonny_Lad_to_Marry_Me_(A)
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Donny_Brook_(1)

http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3392