The Pleasant Month of May

Leggi in italiano

“The haymaker’s song” aka “The Pleasany Month of May”, ‘”Twas in the Pleasant Month of May” or ” The Merry Haymakers” is in the Family Copper’s collection of traditional songs from Sussex (see): in the season of haymaking, starting in May, the farmers went to make hay, cutting the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.

George Stubbs - Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)
George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Mr A. L. Lloyd (“Folk Song in England”, p 234/5) traces a possible source to a broadside of 1695; collected versions seem more in the style of the 18th century and presumably stem from the late broadsides, of which there were one or two. Found in tradition mainly in the South and South East of England, the exception being Huntington, Sam Henry’s Songs of the People(1990) which has an unprovenanced set, Tumbling Through the Hay, presumably noted in Ulster.” (from here)

After the hard work, however, it’s time to have fun and so all the workers are dancing in the middle of the haystacks on the melodies of a piper !!


William Pint & Felicia Dale
from Hartwell Horn 1999 
Jackie Oates from Hyperboreans 2009 
Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

PLEASANT MONTH OF MAY *
I
‘Twas in the pleasant month of May,
In the springtime of the year,
And down in yonder meadow
There runs a river clear.
See how the little fishes,
How they do sport and play;
Causes many a lad and many a lass
To go there a-making hay.
II
Then in comes the scythesman,
That meadow to mow down,
With his old leathered bottle
And the ale that runs so brown.
There’s many a stout and a laboring man
Goes there his skill to try;
He works, he mows, he sweats, he blows,
And the grass cuts very dry.
III
Then in comes both Tom and Dick
With their pitchforks and their rakes,
And likewise black-eyed Susan
The hay all for to make.
There’s a sweet, sweet, sweet and a jug, jug, jug(1)
How the harmless birds do sing
From the morning to the evening
As we were a-haymaking.
IV
It was just at one evening
As the sun was a-going down,
We saw the jolly piper
Come a-strolling through the town.
There he pulled out his tabor and pipes(2)
And he made the valleys ring;
So we all put down our rakes and forks
And we left off haymaking.
V
We called for a dance
And we tripped it along;
We danced all round the haycocks
Till the rising of the sun.
When the sun did shine such a glorious light,
How the harmless birds did sing;
Each lad he took his lass in hand
And went back to his haymaking.

NOTES
1) sounds that recall the trill of birds: they are the verses that imitate birds singing
2) pipe and drum, in a combination called tabor-pipe: the three-hole flute allows the musician to play the instrument with one hand, while with the other he strikes the tambourine with a shoulder strap. If the combination was very versatile and well suited to street performances of the jester, it was also perfect for the performance of the dances and then in the ancient iconography convivial images are often frequent in the presence of dancers. ((see more)

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

LINK
http://www.hayinart.com/001405.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thepleasantmonthofmay.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/213.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/haymaker.htm
http://konkykru.com/e.caldecott.our.haymaking.html

Lark in the Morning

Leggi in italiano

The irish song “The Lark in the Morning” is mainly found in the county of Fermanagh (Northern Ireland): the image is rural, portrayed by an idyllic vision of healthy and simple country life; a young farmer who plows the fields to prepare them for spring sowing, is the paradigm of youthful exaltation, its exuberance and joie de vivre, is compared to the lark as it sails flying high in the sky in the morning. Like many songs from Northern Ireland it is equally popular also in Scotland.
The point of view is masculine, with a final toast to the health of all the “plowmen” (or of the horsebacks, a task that in a large farm more generally indicated those who took care of the horses) that they have fun rolling around in the hay with some beautiful girls, and so they demonstrate their virility with the ability to reproduce.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners

Alex Beaton with a lovely Scottish accent

The Quilty (Swedes with an Irish heart)

CHORUS
The lark in the morning, she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy, she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy, he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing, over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,, she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing, then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home, from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green, and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble, all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”,  this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks, they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice, how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble, all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king
NOTES
1) The lark is a melodious sparrow that sings from the first days of spring and already at the first light of dawn; it is a terrestrial bird which, however, once safely in flight, rises almost vertically into the sky, launching a cascade of sounds similar to a musical crescendo.
Then, closed the wings, he lets himself fall like a dead body until he touches the ground and immediately rises again, starting to sing again . see more
2) blade= boy, term used in ancient ballads to indicate a skilled swordsman
3) The story’s backgroung is that of the season of haymaking, starting in May, when farmers went to make hay, that is to cut the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.. see more

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, from Paddy Tunney (only I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), the most extensive version comes from the Sussex Copper family, but Lisa further changes some verses.

I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may

 

THE ENGLISH VERSION

This version was collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 as heard by Ms. Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, Horsham in Sussex, but already circulated in the nineteenth-century broadsides and then reported in Roy Palmer’s book “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Became into the English folk music circuit in the 60s the song was recorded in 1971 by the English folk rock group Steeleye Span with the voice of Maddy Prior.

The refrain is similar to that of the previous irish version, but here the situation is even more pastoral and almost Shakespearean with the shepherdess and the plowman who are surprised by the morning song of the lark, but with the reversed parts: he who tells her to stay in his arms, because there is still the evening dew, but she who replies that the sun is now shining and even the lark has risen in flight. The name of the peasant is Floro and derives from the Latin Fiore.

Steeleye Span from Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior  from Arthur The King – 2001

I
“Lay still my fond shepherd and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro, it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows where the grass is all cut down.

NOTES
1)plow the field but also plow a complacent girl

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

“Lark in the morning” is a jig mostly performed with banjo or bouzouki or mandolin or guitar, but also with pipes, whistles or flutes, fiddles ..
An anecdote reported by Peter Cooper says that two violinists had challenged one evening to see who was the best, only at dawn when they heard the song of the lark, they agreed that the sweetest music was that of the morning lark. Same story told by the piper Seamus Ennis but with the The Lark’s March tune

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes with Alan Murray guitar

Peter Browne uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

LINK
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62

Sailor’s farewell: on the sailor’s side!

Leggi in italiano

A further variant of “Sailor’s Farewell” is titled “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy” (aka “Swansea Town,” and “The Holy Ground”) found in England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the United States. It’s developed on twice directions, on the one hand it’s the typical and cheerful sea shanty, sometimes rough and with a lot of drink, and on the other it becomes a more intimate and fragile vein, which reflects on the solitude and danger of the sea. In these versions the sailor is enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Copper Family: Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy

Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy is one of the best-known songs from the repertoire of the Copper Family. It was published in the first issue of the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 1, in 1899, a version also released in Australia and entitled “Lovely Nancy”, in which it is only the handsome sailor who speaks during the separation on the shore.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 from Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger from a free session in front of the pub for “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”

ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) In the part of dialogue ometted Nancy wants to dress up as a sailor to go with him.
3) the reference is always to broadside ballad version in which our johnny (slang term for sailor) has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants Nancy to stay home waiting for him.

AMERICAN/ IRISH VERSION: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan from American Stranger 1997 “I learned this version from the Max Hunter Collection. Hunter was a traveling salesman and amateur folksong collector from Springfield, Missouri, who amassed an impressive number of field recordings from the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. When I was a teenager I learned many songs from the cassette tapes of his collection that were housed in the Springfield Public Library.
Hunter recorded this song in 1959 from Bertha Lauderdale, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She had learned the song from her grandfather, who, in turn, had learned it from his grandmother, when “he was a young child in Ireland.” Since I recorded the song on American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, and Pete Coe have all added it to their repertoires.”

Altan from Local Ground, 2005

ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) hearts of oak rerefers to the wood from which British warships were generally made during the age of sail. The “Heart of oak” is the strongest central wood of the tree.

000brgcf
Sailor’s farewell

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte del marinaio!

Read the post in English  

Un’ulteriore variante del “Sailor’s Farewell” è intitolata “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy”ma anche “Swansea Town,” e “The Holy Ground”, ed è diffusa  in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Australia, Canada e Stati Uniti.
Si sviluppa su un duplice registro, da una parte è la tipica e allegra canzone marinaresca, a volte sguaiata e inneggiante alle colossali bevute, e dall’altra assume una vena più intimista e fragile, che riflette sulla solitudine e il pericolo del vita in mare. In queste versioni il marinaio è al servizio della Royal Navy.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY

Dal repertorio tradizionale della Famiglia Copper del Sussex la ballata è stata trascritta nel primo numero del Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol.1, No.1, nel 1899. Una versione diffusa anche in Australia e intitolata “Lovely Nancy”, in cui è solo il bel marinaio a parlare durante la separazione.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 in Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger in una session davanti al pub per la serie “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”


I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
vado in giro per l’oceano, amore
a cercare l’avventura.
Vieni a scambiare l’anello
con me mia cara ragazza,
scambia l’anello con me,
perchè sarà un pegno di vero amore mentre sarò per mare.
II
Quando sarò lontano sul mare
e non saprai dove sono,
dolci lettere ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera,
i segreti del tuo cuore, cara ragazza
sono in cima ai miei pensieri,
perciò resta al sicuro dove
il mio cuore potrà stare di nuovo con te.
III
C’è una forte tempesta in arrivo,
vedi come si raduna tutt’intorno,
mentre noi povere anime sul vasto oceano combattiamo per la corona.
Non ci sarà nulla a proteggerci, amore
o a tenerci lontani dal freddo, nel vasto oceano che dobbiamo affrontare da allegri e coraggiosi marinai.
IV
Ci sono calderai, sarti e calzolai
che dormono russando,
mentre noi povere anime
sul vasto oceano solchiamo
gli abissi.
I nostri ufficiali ci comandano
e perciò dobbiamo ubbidire
aspettandoci in ogni momento
di essere spazzati via.
V
Ma quando le guerre saranno finite
ci sarà la pace in ogni terra
torneremo dalle nostre mogli e famiglie e dalle ragazze che amiamo,
ordineremo da bere allegamente
e spensieratamente  spenderemo i nostri soldi, e quando i soldi saranno finiti riprenderemo il mare con coraggio.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) letteralmente ” tieni il tuo corpo dove il mio cuore potrà stare con te ancora”; manca la parte di dialogo in cui lei dice di voler travestirsi da marinaio per poter andare con lui. Ma il bel Johnny la dissuade dicendole di restare a casa dove lui la saprà al sicuro
3) il rimando è sempre alla versione della broadside ballad il cui il nostro johnny (termine gergale per marinaio) si  si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che Nancy resti a casa ad aspettarlo.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA/ IRLANDESE: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan in American Stranger 1997leggiamo nelle note “Ho imparato questa versione dalla raccolta di Max Hunter. Hunter era un venditore ambulante e un collezionista amatoriale di canzoni folk da Springfield, Missouri, che ha raccolto un numero impressionante di registrazioni sul campo dal  Missouri all’ Arkansas Ozarks. Da ragazza ho imparato molte canzoni dalle cassette delle sue registrazioni catalogate nella Biblioteca pubblica di Springfield.
Hunter ha registrato questa canzone nel 1959 da Bertha Lauderdale, di Fayetteville, Arkansas. Aveva imparato la canzone dal nonno che a sua volta l’aveva appresa dalla nonna quando “era un bambino in Irlanda.” Da quando ho registrato la canzone in American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, e Pete Coel’hanno aggiunta nel loro repertorio.”

Altan in Local Ground, 2005


I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
penserò al mio vero amore,
penserò mia cara, a te
II
Scambierai l’anello
con me, amore mio
scambierai l’anello con me?
Sarà un pegno del nostro amore
mentre starò lontano per mare.
III
Quando sarò lontano da casa
e non saprai dove sono,
lettere d’amore ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera.
IV
Quando i contadini
ritornano a casa la sera
racconteranno alle loro ragazze delle belle storie di ciò che hanno fatto
tutto il giorno nei campi
V
Del grano e del fieno
che hanno tagliato
certo, è tutto quello che sanno fare,
mentre noi poveri allegri,
allegri cuori di quercia
dobbiamo navigare  per tutti i mari
VI
E quando ritorneremo di nuovo, amore mio, alla nostra cara terra natia
delle belle storie vi racconteremo
su come abbiamo navigato per gli oceani
VII
E faremo risuonare le birrerie
e rimbombare le taverne
e quando i soldi saranno tutto finiti
torneremo di nuovo per mare.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) hearts of oak espressione marinaresca per le navi costruite nell’età della vela con il legno più forte nella parte più interna dell’albero

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Andare a fare il fieno nel mese di maggio!

Read the post in English

“The haymaker’s song” anche “The Pleasany Month of May”, ‘”Twas in the Pleasant Month of May” oppure ” The Merry Haymakers” è riportata nella raccolta di canti tradizionali della famiglia Copper del Sussex (vedi): nella canzone, che plaude all’onesto lavoro nei campi, ci si riferisce a un attività particolare della stagione agricola, quella in cui si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi.
Per tutto l’Ottocento non mancarono poesie e canzoni sul tema “Making of the Hay” vedi

George Stubbs - Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)
George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Al Lloyd (“Folk Song in England”, p 234/5) traccia una possibile fonte in un foglio volante del 1695; le versioni raccolte richiamano però lo stile del 1700 e presumibilmente derivano da un paio di broadsides più recenti. Trovata principalmente nella tradizione  nel sud e sud-est dell’Inghilterra, ad eccezione di Huntington; in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry (1990), “Tumbling Through the Hay”, presumibilmente trascritto in Ulster.” (tratto da qui)

Dopo il duro lavoro arriva però il momento di divertirsi e così tutti i lavoranti si trovano a danzare in mezzo ai covoni di fieno sulle melodie di un piper di passaggio!!

William Pint & Felicia Dale in Hartwell Horn 1999 
Jackie Oates in Hyperboreans 2009 
Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

PLEASANT MONTH OF MAY *
I
‘Twas in the pleasant month of May,
In the springtime of the year,
And down in yonder meadow
There runs a river clear.
See how the little fishes,
How they do sport and play;
Causes many a lad and many a lass
To go there a-making hay.
II
Then in comes the scythesman,
That meadow to mow down,
With his old leathered bottle
And the ale that runs so brown.
There’s many a stout and a laboring man
Goes there his skill to try;
He works, he mows, he sweats, he blows,
And the grass cuts very dry.
III
Then in comes both Tom and Dick
With their pitchforks and their rakes,
And likewise black-eyed Susan
The hay all for to make.
There’s a sweet, sweet, sweet and a jug, jug, jug(1)
How the harmless birds do sing
From the morning to the evening
As we were a-haymaking.
IV
It was just at one evening
As the sun was a-going down,
We saw the jolly piper
Come a-strolling through the town.
There he pulled out his tabor and pipes(2)
And he made the valleys ring;
So we all put down our rakes and forks
And we left off haymaking.
V
We called for a dance
And we tripped it along;
We danced all round the haycocks
Till the rising of the sun.
When the sun did shine such a glorious light,
How the harmless birds did sing;
Each lad he took his lass in hand
And went back to his haymaking.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Si era nel felice mese di Maggio
nella Primavera dell’Anno
e giù per quel prato
scorreva un ruscello limpido.
Guarda come i pesciolini
giocano e nuotano
perchè più di un ragazzo e una ragazza
vanno là a fare il fieno.
II
Allora arriva l’uomo con la falce
a falciare quel prato
con la sua vecchia fiaschetta
e la birra che scorre così scura
c’è più  di un robusto e alacre bracciante che
va dove c’è da mostrare la sua bravura
lavora, falcia, suda,
ansima
e l’erba molto secca taglia.
III
Poi entrano sia Tom e Dick
con i loro forconi e rastrelli
e anche Susan dagli occhi scuri
per fare tutti il fieno.
c’era una melodia, cip, cip
ciop, ciop
come cantavano gli uccellini
da mattina a sera
mentre eravamo a fare il fieno!
IV
E non appena arrivava la sera
quando il sole tramontava
si vedeva l’allegro piper
che girovaga per i paesi.
Allora tirava fuori il tamburo
e il flauto
e faceva risuonare la vallata
così si posavamo rastrelli e forconi
e si smetteva di fare fieno.
V
Si invitava per un ballo
e si girava in tondo
danzavamo intorno al covoni di fieno
fino al sorgere del sole.
Quando il sole risplendeva nella sua luce gloriosa,
mentre gli uccellini cantavano;
ogni ragazzo prendeva la sua ragazza per mano e ritornava a fare il fieno

NOTE
1) suoni che richiamano il trillo degli uccelli: sono dei versi che imitano il canto degli uccelli
2) piffero e tamburo, in una combinazione detta tabor-pipe:  il flauto a tre buchi  permette al musicista di suonare lo strumento con una sola mano, mentre con l’altra percuote il tamburino a tracolla. Se la combinazione era molto versatile e ben si prestava alle esecuzioni di strada del giullare, era anche perfetta per l’esecuzione delle danze e quindi nell’antica iconografia sono frequenti le immagini conviviali spesso in presenza di danzatori. (continua)

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

FONTI
http://www.hayinart.com/001405.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thepleasantmonthofmay.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/213.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/haymaker.htm
http://konkykru.com/e.caldecott.our.haymaking.html

BABES IN THE WOOD

“The Children in the Wood” o “Babes in the Wood” è una sorta di ninna-nanna/fiaba molto popolare sia nelle isole britanniche che nei paesi di forte emigrazione, come America e Australia: si narra di due bambini abbandonati nel bosco, morti di stenti e seppelliti dai pettirossi  sotto a un manto di foglie.
La prima pubblicazione in stampa risale al 1595 sotto forma di broadside ballad (con il titolo di The Norfolk Tragedy, Thomas Millington editore) e poi ripetutamente pubblicata nelle nursery rhymes e variamente rielaborata.

IL BOSCO DI WAYLAND

La storia è fatta risalire all’epoca medievale e collegata da Thomas Percy (poeta e antiquario inglese di fine ottocento) al ritrovamento dei cadaveri di due bambini nel Bosco di Wayland (Norfolk – Inghilterra): nella residenza di Griston Hall il padre morente affida i figli al fratello il quale per impossessarsi dell’eredità, assolda due bravacci. I due abbandonano i bambini nel folto del bosco, che lì muoiono di stenti, così i fantasmi delle due innocenti creature ancora vagano nei paraggi (la leggenda locale qui).

UNA FIABA DA PAURA

Le fiabe non insegnano ai bambini che i draghi esistono, loro lo sanno già. Le fiabe insegnano ai bambini che i draghi si possono sconfiggere.
– G. Chesterton

La storia affonda sicuramente in un archetipo così come nella fiaba italiana di Nennillo e Nennella, la versione partenopea di Hansel e Gretel o nelle tante rielaborazioni di bambini abbandonati nelle foreste. Qui però non c’è il lieto fine (anche se in alcune delle  molte varianti  i bambini finiscono per essere trovati ancora vivi).
La canzoncina ha ossessionato i sogni di molti bambini quantomeno  da 300 anni: un modo un po’ curioso per far addormentare subito il bambino e  senza capricci, con tre grosse paure una dopo l’altra, l’abbandono, i pericoli della vita e la morte!

Ma in questa fiaba c’è dell’altro, un vecchio mito celtico palesato dall’apparizione del pettirosso.

Secondo Robert Graves (in La Dea Bianca) pettirosso e scricciolo sono due simboli solstiziali che muoiono ciclicamente, l’uno per lasciare il posto all’altro: il pettirosso è lo spirito dell’anno nuovo il quale nel solstizio d’inverno uccide lo scricchiolo (il regolo dal ciuffo) ed è ucciso dallo scricciolo nel solstizio d’estate.
Così pur nell’essenzialità della storia, la narrazione specifica che è estate, volendo  con buona probabilità richiamare l’attenzione sul periodo solstiziale, l’inizio di un nuovo periodo di vita, il “primo giorno d’estate”.
Anche se nella versione della ballata si parla genericamente di due piccoli bambini, sono spesso rappresentati come fratello e sorella,  così la loro morte (il principio maschile e quello femminile uniti in un abbraccio) potrebbe essere allusiva ad un sacrificio rituale, una prova iniziatica (il passaggio dall’infanzia alla fase adolescenziale) che si svolgeva nel nemeton il bosco sacro e più impenetrabile, o molto più probabilmente era una sorta di rappresentazione sul piano simbolico di un evento cosmico ritualizzo .
In altre versioni è lo stesso Robin Hood il mitico fuorilegge ad andare in soccorso ai due bambini, mentre il pettirosso delle prime versioni si limita a coprire con le foglie i corpi dei bambini.

LA NINNA NANNA

La versione cantata è stata divulgata dalla Famiglia Copper i quali la cantavano durante la cena di Natale (probabilmente come omaggio alla strage degli innocenti celebrata in calendario): la versione proviene da un arrangiamento fatto da William Gardiner (1770-1853).
This version is from a recording by the Copper Family (Bob and Ron Copper, Folk-Legacy, 1964). In the notes to Come Write Me Down: Early Recordings Of The Copper Family of Rottingdean, Topic TSCD534, 2001, folklorist Steve Roud identifies the writer of Babes in the Wood as William Gardiner [1769/70-1853]. Gardiner was a Leicester hosiery manufacturer and accomplished amateur musician. (tratto da qui)
Copper Family

I
My dear, do you know
How, a long time ago,
Two poor little children,
Whose names I don’t know,
Were stolen away
On a fine summer’s day,
And left in a wood,
As I’ve heard people say?
II
And when it was night,
So sad was their plight,
The sun it went down,
And the moon gave no light!
They sobbed and they sighed,
And they bitterly cried,
And the poor little things
They lay down and died.
III
And when they were dead,
The robins so red
Brought strawberry leaves
And over them spread;
And all the day long
They sang them this song:
“Poor babes in the wood!
Poor babes in the wood!
And don’t you remember
The babes in the wood?”


CHORUS
Pretty babes in the wood,
pretty babes in the wood,
Oh, don’t you remember
those babes in the wood.
I
Oh, don’t you remember,
a long time ago,
Those two little babies,
their names I don’t know?
They strayed(1) far away
one bright summer’s day,
These two little babies
got lost on their way.(2)
II
Now the day being long
and the night coming on
These two little babies
sat under a stone.
They sobbed and they sighed,
they sat down and cried;
These two little babies
they laid down and died.
III
Now the robins so red(3),
so swiftly they sped,
They put out their wide wings
and over them spread.
And all the day long
on the branches did throng;
They sweetly did carol(4)
and this was their song.
(traduzione di Cattia Salto)
CORO
Bei bimbi nel bosco
bei bimbi nel bosco
vi ricordate
di quei bimbi nel bosco?
I
Ricordate
tanto tempo fa
quei due bimbi
di cui non conosco il nome?
Furono abbandonati lontano
in un bel giorno d’estate,
e quei bue bambini
smarrirono la strada
II
Terminato il giorno
e arrivata la notte
questi due bimbi
si sedettero su una pietra.
Sospirarono e piansero,
seduti in lamento,
quei due bimbi
si distesero e morirono
III
Allora i pettirossi (3)
accorsero in fretta
volando con le forti ali
su di loro
e per tutto il giorno
ammassarono i rami
dolcemente fischiettarono
e questa era la loro canzone

NOTE
1) oppure “they were stolen”
2) oppure “and left in the wood, so I’ve heard folks say”
3) il pettirosso è  un piccolo passero dal caratteristico petto macchiato di rosso (ogni tanto in autunno e con i primi freddi dell’inverno, ne vedo qualcuno che si spinge fino alla mia finestra per prendere le briciole di pane) simbolo solstiziale nella mitologia dei paesi nordici, è stato trasposto nella religiosità cristiana a simbolo d’amore, e connesso con la nascita e la morte di Gesù. Compare così in molte immagini o cartoline dedicate al Natale.
4) oppure “whistle”

BABES IN THE WOOD – Walt Disney 1923
Un pastiche con tanto di villaggio di elfi, strega cattiva e casetta di Marzapane alla Hansel e Gretel e lieto fine con gli elfi che liberano i due bambini e la strega che finisce vittima dei suoi stessi sortilegi

FONTI
http://vivalamamma.tgcom24.it/2013/03/le-favole-aiutano-i-bambini-a-crescere-e-a-vincere-le-loro-paure/
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BabesWood.html
http://www.cavernacosmica.com/simbologia-del-pettirosso/
http://myths.e2bn.org/mythsandlegends/origins19-the-abandoned-children-of-wailing-wood.html
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/the-wren-song/
http://www.lefiguredeilibri.com/2010/01/18/the-babes-in-the-wood-cronaca-di-una-leggenda/
http://www.lefiguredeilibri.com/2010/01/20/la-vera-morte-di-cock-robin-la-simbologia-del-pettirosso/
http://hypnogoria.blogspot.it/2014/12/folklore-on-friday-babes-in-woods.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/434.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/babes.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5238
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/babesinthewood.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19361/19361-h/19361-h.htm
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/12/24/week-70-the-boars-head-carol-babes-in-the-wood-the-king/
http://www.bambinicoraggiosi.com/?q=node/772

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

Read the post in English

La irish song “The Lark in the Morning”  è diffusa principalmente nella contea di Fermanagh (Irlanda del Nord): l’immagine è agreste, ritratto di una visione idilliaca della sana e semplice vita di campagna; un giovane contadino che ara i campi per prepararli alla semina primaverile, è il paradigma dell’esaltazione giovanile, la sua esuberanza e gioia di vivere, viene paragonata all’allodola mentre s’invola cantando alta nel cielo al mattino. Come molte canzoni del Nord Irlanda è altrettanto popolare anche in Scozia.
Il punto di vista è maschile, con tanto di brindisi finale alla salute di tutti gli “aratori” (o dei cavallanti, mansione che in una grande fattoria indicava più genericamente coloro che si prendevano cura dei cavalli) che se la spassano rotolandosi nel fieno con le belle ragazze, e così dimostrano la loro virilità con la capacità di procreare.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners dalla melodia gioiosa e allegra in sintonia con il testo

Alex Beaton (con un adorrrabile accento scozzese)

ASCOLTA The Quilty (svedesi con il cuore irlandese!)


CHORUS
The lark in the morning
she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy
she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy
he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing
over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,
she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing
then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home
from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green
and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble
all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”, this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks
they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice
how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,
-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble
all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass
a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy
as a prince or a king
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ritornello
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore
lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
I
O Roger l’aratore
è un ragazzo affascinante
fischiettando e cantando si avvicina laggiù all’ombra delle fronde
e s’incontra con la dolce Susan,
che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente
di tutti gli uccelli del cielo
II
Una sera tornando a casa
dalle taverne della città
essendo tutti i prati verdi
e l’erba essendo stata appena falciata
ebbi l’occasione di rotolare
in tutto il fieno appena tagliato
“Oh baciami ora o mai più amore”,
disse questa bella fanciulla.
III
Quando venti lunghe settimane
erano finite e passate
sua madre iniziò a notare
come lei si arrotondasse in vita
“E’ stato il bell’aratore”,
le disse la ragazza
“che ci fece cadere in tutto il fieno appena falciato.”
IV
Ecco alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che amano avere una graziosa fanciulla
seduta sulle ginocchia
con un boccale di buona e forte birra scura, fischiettate e cantate
perché un aratore è felice
proprio come un principe o un re

NOTE
1) L’allodola è un passerotto dal canto melodioso che risuona nell’aria fin dai primi giorni della primavera e già alle prime luci dell’alba; è un uccello terricolo che però una volta sicuro nel volo si innalza quasi verticalmente nell’alto del cielo lanciando una cascata di suoni simili a un crescendo musicale.
Poi, chiuse le ali, si lascia cadere come corpo morto fino a sfiorare la terra e subito risorge ricominciando a cantare. continua
2) blade= boy, termine usato nelle antiche ballate per indicare un abile spadaccino
3) il contasto dell’amoreggiamento è quello della stagione della fienagione, a partire da maggio, quando si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi. continua

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, dalla registrazione di Paddy Tunney di cui però abbiamo solo due strofe (I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), la versione più estesa viene dalla famiglia Copper del Sussex, ma Lisa modifica ulteriormente alcuni versi.

Trascrizione di Cattia Salto
I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may
(traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’allodola al mattino si alza dal nido
e fischietta e canta,con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
II
Roger l’aratore è un bel ragazzo
va fischiettando e cantando per quella verde radura
e s’incontra con  Susan dagli occhi scuri, che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente degli uccelli nel cielo
III
Una sera tornando a casa dalle taverne della città
con i prati verdi che erano tutti verdi e l’erba appena tagliata
lei si rotolò  nel  fieno appena falciato
“Amami adesso o mai più”, disse questa bella fanciulla.
IV
Quindi alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che prenderanno  una graziosa fanciulla per farla sedere sulle ginocchia
..
non c’è vita migliore di quella dell’aratore nel bel mese di Maggio

 

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Questa versione invece è stata collezionata da Ralph Vaughan Williams nel 1904 come ascoltata dalla signora Harriet Verrall di Monk’s Gate, Horsham nel Sussex, ma circolava già nei broadsides ottocenteschi e quindi riportata nel libro di Roy Palmer “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Entrata nel circuito della musica folk inglese negli anni ’60 è stata registrata nel 1971 dal gruppo inglese folk rock Steeleye Span con la voce di Maddy Prior.

Il ritornello è simile a quello della versione precedente, ma qui la situazione è ancora più pastorale e quasi shakespeariana con la pastorella e l’aratore che sono sorpresi dal canto mattutino dell’allodola ma con le parti invertite: lui che dice a lei di restare ancora tra le sue braccia, perché c’è ancora la rugiada della sera, ma lei gli risponde che il sole ormai risplende e anche l’allodola si è alzata in volo. Il nome del contadinello è Floro e deriva dal latino Fiore.

Steeleye Span in Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior nel Cd “Arthur The King” – 2001


I
“Lay still my fond shepherd
and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love
and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro
and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro,
it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining
and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning
she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air
with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy
she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return
to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done
all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows
where the grass is all cut down.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Giaci ancora mia appassionata pastorella e non alzarti
è una bella mattina fresca ma, amore mio, c’è la rugiada”
“Non è poi così umido, amore mio,
e nemmeno così freddo,
mi alzerò mio amato Fiore
e andrò via con il gregge.
Oh no mio bel Fiore,
non è cosa da niente
c’è il sole luminoso che risplende
e l’allodola è in  volo”
II
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e s’innalza in aria
con la rugiada sul petto
e come il bell’aratore
lei fischietterà e canterà
e la sera ritornerà
di nuovo nel suo nido
Quando l’aratore ha fatto
tutto quanto doveva fare (1),
balla nei prati
dove l’erba è tutta falciata.

NOTE
1) frase a doppio senso: arare il campo ma anche arare una fanciulla compiacente

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

La melodia “Lark in the morning” è una jig per lo più eseguita con il banjo o il bouzouki o il mandolino o la chitarra, ma anche con le pipes, i whistles o i flutes, i fiddles..
Un aneddoto riportato da Peter Cooper racconta che due violinisti si erano sfidati una sera per vedere chi fosse il migliore, solo all’alba nel sentire il canto dell’allodola, convennero che la musica più dolce fosse quella dell’allodola del mattino. Stessa storiella raccontata dal piper Seamus Ennis ma con la melodia The Lark’s March

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely alla uilleann pipes accompagnato alla chitarra da Alan Murray

Peter Browne alla uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

FONTI
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62