The Dreadnought shanty

Leggi in italiano

A sea song about The Dreadnought an American packet ship launched in 1853, flagship of the “Red Cross Line”, dubbed “The Wild Boat of the Atlantic”: competing companies like the Swallow Tail and the Black Ball never succeeded in exceed its performance. Yet the era of the great sailing ships was over and her life seems to be the swan song.

A red cross, the company’s logo, was drawn on her fore-topsail, and she could carry up to 200 passengers.

Montague Dawson (1890–1973) The Red Cross – ‘Dreadnought

The Dreadnought sailed into the Atlantic, mostly on the New York-Liverpoo route, to her sinking to the infamous Cape Horn after she set sail from Liverpool to San Francisco (1869).

Derry Down, Down, Derry Down

According to Stan Hugill this song was a forebitter sung on the melody known as “La Pique” or “The Flash Frigate” (which recalls “Villikins and His Dinah”). Even Kipling in his book “Captains Courageous” has it sing by fishermen on the Banks of Newfoundland.
In the capstan shanty version a longer refrain is added, sung in chorus
Bound away! Bound away! 
where the wide [wild] waters flow,
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnaught we’ll go!

The melody with which the shanty is associated is not univocal, since the “The Dom Pedro” tune is also used. The forebitter version bears the refrain of a single verse, a nonsense phrase sometimes used in the most ancient ballads. The melody is sad, looking like a lament to the memory of a famous wrecked ship; while praising her merits it’s a farewell at the time of sailing ships, now outclassed by steam ships.

Ewan MacColl

Iggy Pop & Elegant Too  from “Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys” ANTI 2013


The Dreadnoughts,
the Vancouver band took its name not from the nineteenth-century packet ship but from an innovative battle ship called “armored monocaliber” developed since the early twentieth century (Dreadnought, from English “I fear nothing”)
(stanzas I, III, IV, V)

full version (here)
I
There’s a flash packet,
a flash packet of fame,
She hails to (from) New York
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She’s bound to the westward
where the strong winds blow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the westward we go.
Derry down, down, down derry down.
II
Now, the Dreadnought
she lies in the river Mercey,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea;
Out around the Rock Light
where the salt tides do flow,
Bound away to to the westward
in the Dreadnought, we’ll go.
III (1)
(O, the Dreadnought’s a-howlin’
down the wild Irish Sea,
Her passengers merry,
with hearts full of glee,)
As sailors like lions
walk the decks to and fro,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!
 

IV (2)
O, the Dreadnought’s a-sailin’
the Atlantic so wide,
While the high roaring seas
roll along her black sides,
(With her sails tightly set
for the Red Cross to show,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!)
V
Now, a health to the Dreadnought,
to all her brave crew,
To bold Captain Samuel (3),
his officers, too,
Talk about your flash packets,
Swallowtail and Black Ball (4),
The Dreadnaught’s the flier
that outsails them all.

NOTES
1)  TheDreadnoughts sings:
With the gale at her back/ What a sight does she make
A skippin’ so merry/With the west in her wake
2)  the Dreadnoughts sings:
With her sails tight as wires/And the Black Flag to show
All away to the Dreadnought/To the westward we’ll go
3) her first captain was called Samuel Samuels,, “In his own words: “Swearing, which appeared to me so essential in the make-up of an officer, I found degrading in a gentleman and I prohibited its indulgence. I also insisted that the crew should be justly treated by the officers.” He seems to have known when to turn a blind eye to the particular brand of justice which had to be handed out to over-troublesome “packet rats” by his mates. To the passengers and his officers he was the model of the young clipper captain, respected, well-groomed and quietly spoken, but always perfectly self-confident and calm in an emergency. The Dreadnought undoubtedly owed her conspicuous success at a difficult time to the personality of her master.(from here) the Dreadnoughts sings ” To bold captain Willy”
4) companies competing in the “Red Cross Line”

STAN HUGILL VERSION

Hulton Clint sings it on the tune “Dom Pedro.” It is the most extensive version of the previous one, with some variations

I
There’s a saucy wild packet,
a packet of fame;
She belongs to New York,
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She is bound to the westward
where the wide water flow;
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.
Chorus
Derry down, down, down derry down
II
The time of her sailing
is now drawing nigh;
Farewell, pretty maids,
we must bid you good-bye;
Farewell to old England
and all we hold dear,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll steer.
III
And now we are hauling
out of Waterlock dock,
Where the boys and the girls
on the pierheads they do flock;
They will give us their cheers
as their tears they do flow,
Saying, “God bless the Dreadnought, where’er she may go!”
IV
Now, the Dreadnought she lies
in the Mersey so free,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea,
For to around that rock light
where the Mersey does flow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
where’er we’ll go.
V
Now the Dreadnaught’s a-howling
down the wild Irish Sea,
Where the passengers are merry,
their hearts full of glee,
her sailors like tigers
walk the decks to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
VI
Now, the Dreadnought’s
a-sailing the Atlantic so wide,
While the high rolling seas
roll along her black sides,
With her topsails set taut
for the Red Cross to show
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
 

VII
Now the Dreadnought’s has reached the banks of Newfoundland,
Where the water’s so green
and the bottom so sand;
Where the fish in the waves
They swim to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
with the ice and the snow
VIII
Now the Dreadnought’s lying
on the long .. shore
??
as we have done before
? your main topsail ?
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
IX
And now we arrived
in New York once more,
We’ll go to the land we adore,
we call for strong liquors
and merry we’ll be
Drink to the health to the Dreadnought, where’er she may be.
X
So here’s health to the Dreadnought
and all her brave crew;
To bold Captain Samuels
and his officers too.
Talk about your flash packets, Swallowtail and Black Ball,
but the Dreadnought’s
he clipper to beat one and all
XI
Now my story is finish
and my tale it is told
forgive me, old shipmates,
if you think that I’m bold;
for this song was composed
while the watch was below
and at the health
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.

LINK
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LD13.html
http://www.shippingwondersoftheworld.com/dreadnought.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/Dreadnought.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/dread.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/isingofa.htm
http://czteryrefy.pl/data/dskgrtx/teksty/eteksty/eng_flashfrigate.html
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/dreadnaught.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62355
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85200

Dreadnought, The Wild Boat of the Atlantic

Read the post in English

Una sea song sulla nave The Dreadnought  il postale americano varato nel 1853, fiore all’occhiello della Compagnia Marittima “Red Cross”, soprannominato “The Wild Boat of the Atlantic”: compagnie concorrenti come la Swallow Tail e la Black Ball non riuscirono mai a superare le sue prestazioni. Eppure l’epoca dei grandi velieri era finita e la sua vita sembra essere il canto del cigno.
Una croce rossa, logo della compagnia era disegnata sulla vela di parrocchetto (la vela intermedia dell’albero di trinchetto), e poteva portare fino a 200 passeggeri.

Montague Dawson (1890–1973) The Red Cross – ‘Dreadnought

The Dreadnought fece rotta nell’Atlantico, per lo più nella tratta New-York-Liverpoo, fino al suo naufragio al famigerato Capo Horn dopo che era salpata da Liverpool per San Francisco (1869).

Derry Down, Down, Derry Down

Secondo Stan Hugill era una forebitter cantata sulla melodia nota come “La Pique” o “The Flash Frigate” (che richiama “Villikins and His Dinah”). Anche Kipling nel suo libro “Capitani Coraggiosi” la fa cantare dai pescatori sui Banchi di Terranova.
Nella versione capstan shanty si aggiunge un ritornello più lungo cantato in coro
Bound away! Bound away! 
where the wide [wild] waters flow,
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnaught we’ll go!

La melodia con cui è associata la shanty non è univoca essendo utilizzata anche l’aria “The Dom Pedro”. La versione forebitter porta il ritornello di un solo verso, una frase nonsenso talvolta utilizzata nelle ballate più antiche. La melodia è mesta, pur decantando i pregi della nave, sembra essere un compianto alla memoria di una nave famosa per le sue prestazioni, conclusasi nel naufragio. E’ anche un addio all’epoca dei velieri, oramai surclassati dalle navi a vapore.

Ewan MacColl

Iggy Pop & Elegant Too  in “Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys” ANTI 2013


The Dreadnoughts,
la band di Vancouver ha preso il nome non dal postale ottocentesco ma da una innovativa nave da battaglia detta “corazzata monocalibro” sviluppata a partire dai primi anni del XX secolo (Dreadnought, dall’inglese “non temo nulla”) strofe (I, III, IV, V) il piglio alla “pogues” la trasforma in un lament rock

Versione completa (qui)
I
There’s a flash packet,
a flash packet of fame,
She hails to (from) New York
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She’s bound to the westward
where the strong winds blow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the westward we go.
Derry down, down, down derry down.
II
Now, the Dreadnought
she lies in the river Mercey,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea;
Out around the Rock Light
where the salt tides do flow,
Bound away to to the westward
in the Dreadnought, we’ll go.
III (1)
(O, the Dreadnought’s a-howlin’
down the wild Irish Sea,
Her passengers merry,
with hearts full of glee,)
As sailors like lions
walk the decks to and fro,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!
IV (2)
O, the Dreadnought’s a-sailin’
the Atlantic so wide,
While the high roaring seas
roll along her black sides,
(With her sails tightly set
for the Red Cross to show,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!)
V
Now, a health to the Dreadnought,
to all her brave crew,
To bold Captain Samuel (3),
his officers, too,
Talk about your flash packets,
Swallowtail and Black Ball (4),
The Dreadnaught’s the flier(5)
that outsails them all.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è un postale veloce
un postale veloce rinomato
che salpa per (da) New York
e si chiama la Dreadnought
Fa rotta per l’Occidente
dove colpiscono i venti di tempesta
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andiamo.
Derry down, down, down derry down
II
La Dreadnought
è in rada nel fiume  Mercey
in attesa dell’Independence
che la rimorchierà fino al mare;
oltre il Faro
dove s’alza la marea
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andremo
III
La Dreadnought fa vela
verso il Mare d’Irlanda
I suoi passeggeri felici
con i cuori pieni di gioia
mentre i marinai come leoni
camminano sui ponti indaffarati
E’ il postale di Liverpool
per Dio, fatela andare!
IV
La Dreadnought naviga
l’oceano Atlantico
mentre le onde alte ruggiscono
e scorrono lungo le sue fiancate
con le vele dispiegate
per mostrare alla Red Cross
che è lei il postale di Liverpool
per Dio, fatela andare!
V
Alla salute della Dreadnought
e a tutta la sua ciurma di bravi
al valente Capitano Samuel
e anche ai suoi ufficiali
e riguardo i vostri veloci velieri
Coda Forcuta e Palla Nera
la Dreadnought  è il postale
che li supera tutti.

NOTE
1)  i Dreadnoughts dicono invece
With the gale at her back/ What a sight does she make
A skippin’ so merry/With the west in her wake
2)  i Dreadnoughts dicono invece nella seconda parte della strofa
With her sails tight as wires/And the Black Flag to show
All away to the Dreadnought/To the westward we’ll go
3) il suo primo capitano si chiamava Samuel Samuels, “In his own words: “Swearing, which appeared to me so essential in the make-up of an officer, I found degrading in a gentleman and I prohibited its indulgence. I also insisted that the crew should be justly treated by the officers.” He seems to have known when to turn a blind eye to the particular brand of justice which had to be handed out to over-troublesome “packet rats” by his mates. To the passengers and his officers he was the model of the young clipper captain, respected, well-groomed and quietly spoken, but always perfectly self-confident and calm in an emergency. The Dreadnought undoubtedly owed her conspicuous success at a difficult time to the personality of her master.(tratto da qui)  i Dreadnoughts dicono ” To bold captain Willy”
4) compagnie concorrenti alla  “Red Cross Line”
5) scritto come flier o flyer, ho preferito tradurre con la tipologia di nave

LA VERSIONE DI STAN HUGILL

Hulton Clint la canta sulla melodia  “Dom Pedro.” E’ la versione più estesa della precedente, con alcune variazioni (ho ancora delle difficoltà nella trascrizione a distinguere alcune frasi)


I
There’s a saucy wild packet,
a packet of fame;
She belongs to New York,
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She is bound to the westward
where the wide water flow;
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.
Chorus
Derry down, down, down derry down
II
The time of her sailing
is now drawing nigh;
Farewell, pretty maids,
we must bid you good-bye;
Farewell to old England
and all we hold dear,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll steer.
III
And now we are hauling
out of Waterlock dock,
Where the boys and the girls
on the pierheads they do flock;
They will give us their cheers
as their tears they do flow,
Saying, “God bless the Dreadnought, where’er she may go!”
IV
Now, the Dreadnought she lies
in the Mersey so free,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea,
For to around that rock light
where the Mersey does flow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
where’er we’ll go.
V
Now the Dreadnaught’s a-howling
down the wild Irish Sea,
Where the passengers are merry,
their hearts full of glee,
her sailors like tigers
walk the decks to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
VI
Now, the Dreadnought’s
a-sailing the Atlantic so wide,
While the high rolling seas
roll along her black sides,
With her topsails set taut
for the Red Cross to show
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
VII
Now the Dreadnought’s has reached the banks of Newfoundland,
Where the water’s so green
and the bottom so sand;
Where the fish in the waves
They swim to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
with the ice and the snow
VIII
Now the Dreadnought’s lying
on the long .. shore
??
as we have done before
? your main topsail ?
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
IX
And now we arrived
in New York once more,
We’ll go to the land we adore,
we call for strong liquors
and merry we’ll be
Drink to the health to the Dreadnought, where’er she may be.
X
So here’s health to the Dreadnought
and all her brave crew;
To bold Captain Samuels
and his officers too.
Talk about your flash packets, Swallowtail and Black Ball,
but the Dreadnought’s
he clipper to beat one and all
XI
Now my story is finish
and my tale it is told
forgive me, old shipmates,
if you think that I’m bold;
for this song was composed
while the watch was below
and at the health
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è un postale biricchino
un postale  rinomato
che appartiene a New York
e si chiama la Dreadnought.
Fa rotta per l’Occidente
dove scorrono i flutti impetuosi,
verso Occidente imbarcati
sulla Dreadnought andremo.
Coro
Derry down, down, down derry down

II
Il tempo della partenza
si avvicina
Addio belle fanciulle,
dobbiamo dirvi addio,
addio vecchia Inghilterra
e a tutti  i nostri cari
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente faremo rotta
III
Ora leviamo l’ancora
dal molo di Waterlock
dove i ragazzi e le ragazze
si ammassano sulla banchina
ci saluteranno con gli applausi
mentre faranno scorrere le lacrime
dicendo ” Dio benedica la Dreadnought ovunque vada”
IV
Ora la Dreadnought
è in rada nel fiume  Mercey
in attesa dell’Independence
che la rimorchierà fino al mare;
per superare il Faro
dove il Mersey s’alza
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andremo
III
La Dreadnought fa vela
verso il Mare d’Irlanda,
i suoi passeggeri felici
con i cuori pieni di gioia,
mentre i marinai come tigri
camminano sui ponti indaffarati
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andremo
IV
La Dreadnought naviga
l’oceano Atlantico
mentre le onde alte ruggiscono
e scorrono lungo le sue fiancate
con le vele dispiegate
per mostrare la Croce Rossa
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andremo
V
Ora la Dreadnought  ha raggiunto
i Banchi di Terranova
dove l’acqua è così verde
e il fondale è sabbioso
dove i pesci nel mare
nuotano a frotte
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
con ghiaccio e neve
VIII
Ora la Dreadnought è in rada
sulla lunga spiaggia ..
?
come abbiamo già fatto prima
?
imbarcati sulla Dreadnought
verso Occidente andremo
IX
E ora  che siamo arrivati
ancora una volta a New York,
andremo nella terra che adoriamo,
a ordinare liquori forti
e felice saremo
a bere alla salute della Dreadnought,
ovunque vada
X
Alla salute della Dreadnought
e a tutta la sua ciurma di bravi
al valente Capitano Samuel
e anche ai suoi ufficiali
e riguardo i vostri postali rapidi
Swallowtail e Black Ball,
la Dreadnought
è il clipper che li supera tutti.
XI
Ora la mia storia è finita
e ho raccontato tutto
perdonatemi vecchio compagni
se credete che sia stato audace;
perchè questa canzone è stata composta nel turno di riposo
e alla salute della Dreadnought

continua

FONTI
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LD13.html
http://www.shippingwondersoftheworld.com/dreadnought.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/Dreadnought.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/dread.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/isingofa.htm
http://czteryrefy.pl/data/dskgrtx/teksty/eteksty/eng_flashfrigate.html
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/dreadnaught.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62355
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85200

CONGO RIVER

Blow Bullies Blow, conosciuta anche con il titolo di “Blow boys blow”, “The Yankee Clipper” e “Congo River” è un canto marinaresco (sea shanty) classificabile sostanzialmente in due principali filoni testuali.
(Versione Yankee Clipper)

CLIPPER: nave a vela, con spiccate attitudini per la velocità (arrivavano anche a 18 nodi), usata tra gli anni venti e la fine del XIX secolo, per lunghi percorsi con carichi pregiati (tè con la Cina, lana con l’Australia, passeggeri come postali) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico —in particolare i Black Baller , i postali della American Black Ball line, che derivava il nome dalla sua bandiera rossa con un disco nero al centro. Erano navi molto veloci e il percorso dall’Inghilterra all’America (tratta Liverpool – New York), per lo più contro vento, durava quattro settimane, mentre il ritorno, con il vento a favore, poteva durare meno di tre settimane. Il nome “packet” deriva dal fatto che i clipper svolgevano la funzione di “postini” ovvero trasportavano la corrispondenza tra le due sponde dell’Atlantico o anche tra Inghilterra-Australia (altro continente pieno di coloni inglesi, scozzesi e irlandesi)
“Nasceva così, intorno al 1820, un nuovo tipo di veliero che tradizionalmente si pone nelle coste nordorientali degli Stati Uniti d’America, nazione giovane e dinami­ca ben diversa dal mondo conservatore e consuetudinario inglese. Trattavasi di una nave ancora piccola, a due alberi, detta BALTIMORE CLIPPER perché nata a Baltimora, caratterizzata da forme di scafo molto stellate e molta vela, agile, manovriera e sopra tutto veloce. Buona pertanto al contrabbando e al trasporto di schiavi, perfino pirata.” (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE CONGO RIVER

Tra le merci pregiate imbarcate nei clipper c’erano anche gli schiavi africani, la tratta degli schiavi infatti perdurò ancora per buona parte dell’Ottocento (grosso modo un margine temporale tra il 1500 e il 1850), nonostante l’embargo inglese, e cessò con la spartizione dell’Africa in colonie. La prima nazione ad abolire lo schiavismo e a contrastare la tratta degli schiavi fu l’Inghilterra (per la verità la Francia rivoluzionaria rese liberi anche i neri, ma Napoleone ristabilì la schiavitù nelle colonie francesi).

slave-tradeLa tratta degli schiavi coinvolse tutta la costa atlantica  dell’Africa ma in particolare si concentrò nel territorio intorno alle foci del fiume Congo (si stima che da qui partirono quattro milioni di persone, circa un terzo del totale).  Portoghesi, inglesi, francesi e olandesi erano i mercanti principali, ma a dare una mano per le razzie nell’entroterra erano le stesse tribù africane in perenne lotta tra di loro. E il fiume Congo era un ottimo tracciato che attraversava la foresta vergine fino al mercato di Kinshasa, a trecento kilometri dalla costa.

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brotheres & Tommy Makem in Sing of the Sea 1968 (testo più esteso qui)

ASCOLTA The 97th Regimental String Band

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint variante proveniente da una fonte caraibica (in Folklore and the Sea di Horace Beck)
ASCOLTA Ivan Houston (una interpretazione decisamente caraibica)


I
Oh was you ever on the Congo River Blow, boys, blow!
Black fever makes the white man shiver
Blow, me bully boys, blow!
A Yankee ship came down the river
Her masts and yards they shone like silver
Chorus:
And blow me boys and blow forever
Blow, boys, blow!
Aye, blow me down the Congo River
Blow, me bullyboys, blow!
II
What do think she had for cargo
Why, black sheep that had run the embargo
And what do you think they had for dinner?
Why a monkey’s heart and a donkey´s liver.
III
Yonder comes the Arrow packet
She fires her guns can´t you hear the racket?
Who do you think was the skipper of her?
Why, Bully Hayes, the sailor lover
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Siete mai stati sul fiume Congo?
forza, ragazzi, forza!
Le febbre nera fa tremare gli uomini bianchi.
forza, miei bravacci, forza
Una nave yankee (1) discende il fiume,
albero e pennoni brillano come l’argento.
CORO
E forza (2), miei ragazzi, forza per sempre, forza, ragazzi, colpite!
Si, buttatemi giù nel fiume Congo
forza, miei bravacci, colpite!
II
Quale pensate che sia il suo carico?
Beh, sono pecore nere (3), sfuggite all’embargo.
E cosa pensate che abbiano mangiato a pranzo?
Beh, code di scimmia e fegato di manzo (4).
III
Da lontano arriva il postale Arrow (5),
spara i suoi cannoni non senti il baccano?
Chi pensate che sia il suo capitano?
Beh, Bully Hayes (6)  il beniamino dei marinai(7)!

NOTE
1) la Terra Yankee corrisponde alla Nuova Inghilterra, e yankees sono detti i suoi abitanti. Sembra che il termine sia la corruzione indiana del francese anglais.
2) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma trattandosi di velature potrebbe essere un incitazione perchè si alzi il vento. Ma anche nel significato di colpire, come monito della dura disciplina che vigeva sulle navi. Del resto in termino colloquiali anche in italiano “suonargliele” a qualcuno significa picchiarlo per bene!
3) il carico di “pecore nere” sta per gli schiavi africani deportati verso le Americhe.
4) il menù varia elencando cibo altrettanto insolito: “monkey’s arse and a sandfly’s liver”
5) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico
6) il soprannome di Bully dato al capitano è da intendersi qui nel significato negativo di bullo, persona prepotente e crudele, non per niente era conosciuto come “Bully Hayes, the Down East bucko.” 
7) appellativo da intendersi in senso ironico “colui che è amato dai marinai” è ovviamente il più detestato

FONTI
Congo di David van Reybrouck
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17461
http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=27276
http://anitra.net/chanteys/blow.html