Archivi tag: capstan shanty

Sally Brown I rolled all night, capstan shanty

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time. Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

SECOND VERSION: I ROLLED ALL NIGHT

In this version the chorus is developed on several lines and the song is classified, also with the title of “Roll and Go”, in the capstan shanty that is the songs performed during the lifting of the anchor.

Planxty live (which not surprisingly chuckle, given the name of the song)

Irish Descendants from Encore: Best of the Irish Descendants


Shipped on board a Liverpool liner,
CHORUS
Way hey roll(1) on board;
Well, I rolled all night
and I rolled all day,
I’m gonna spend my money with (on)
Sally Brown.

Miss Sally Brown is a fine young lady,
She’s tall and she’s dark(2) and she’s not too shady
Her mother doesn’t like the tarry(3) sailor,
She wants her to marry the one-legged captain
Sally wouldn’t marry me so I shipped across the water
And now I am courting Sally’s daughter
I shipped off board a Liverpool liner

NOTE
1) the term is generically used by sailors to say many things, in this context for example could mean “sail”.
2) it could refer to the color of the hair rather than the skin, even if in other versions Sally is identified as creole or mulatto. The term “Creole” can be understood in two exceptions: from the Spanish “crillo”, which originally referred to the first generation born in the “New World”, sons of settlers from Europe (Spain or France) and black slaves. The most common meaning is that which refers to all the black half-bloods of Jamaica from the color of the skin that goes from cream to brown and up to black-blue. In the nineteenth century with this term was also indicated a small elite urban society of light skin in Louisiana (resident mostly in New Orleans) result of crossings between some beautiful black slaves and white landowners who took them as lovers.
3) tarry is a derogatory term to distinguish the typical sailor. More generally Jack Tar is the term commonly used to refer to a sailor of merchant ships or the Royal Navy. Probably the term was coined in 1600, alluding to the tar with which the sailors waterproofed their work clothes.

Teddy Thompson from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate   Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys,  ANTI 2006 in a more meditative and melancholic version

Sally Brown she’s a nice young lady,
CHORUS
Way, hay, we roll an’ go.
We roll all night
And we roll all day
Spend my money on Sally Brown.

Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Mother doesn’t like a tarry sailor
She wants her to marry a one legged captain
Sally Brown she’s a bright lady
She drinks stock rum
And she chews tobacco

LINK
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

Paddy Lay Back: take a turn around the capstan

Leggi in italiano

Paddy Lay Back is a kilometer sea shanty, variant wedge, sung by sailors both as a recreational song and as a song to the winch to raise the anchor (capstan shanty).

Stan Hugill in his “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, testifies a long version with about twenty stanzas (see), here only those sung by himself for the album ” “Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail”, 1980: “It was both a forebitter and a capstan song and a very popular one too, especially in Liverpool ships. […] It is a fairly old song dating back to the Mobile cotton hoosiers and has two normal forms: one with an eight-line verse – this was the forebitter form; and the second with a four-line verse – the usual shanty pattern. Doerflinger gives a two-line verse pattern as the shanty – a rather unusual form, and further on in his book he gives the forebitter with both four- and eight-line verses. He gives the title of the shanty as Paddy, Get Back and both his versions of the forebitter as Mainsail Haul. Shay, Sampson and Bone all suggest that it was a fairly modern sea-song and give no indication that any form was sung as a shanty, but all my sailing-ship acquaintances always referred to it as a shanty, and it was certainly sung in the Liverpool-New York Packets as such – at least the four-line verse form. […] Verses from 11 onwards [of the 19 verses given, incl. v. 3, lines 1-4 above] are fairly modern and nothing to do with the Packet Ship seamen, but with the chorus of ‘For we’re bound for Vallaparaiser round the Horn’ are what were sung by Liverpool seamen engaged in the West Coast Guano Trade.” (Stan Hugill)
(all the strings except III)
Stan Hugill

Nils BrownAssassin’s Creed Rogue   (I, II, III, V, VI)

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord (Christ) I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
‘Bout ship’s stations, boys,
be handy (be handy)! (2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’ (5),
To stand by the comin’ of a storm.
IV
Now some of our fellers had bin drinkin’,
An’ I meself wuz heavy on the booze;
An’ I wuz on me ol’ sea-chest a-thinkin’
I’d turn into me bunk an’ have a snooze.
V
I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore,
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ (calling) at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’
VI
‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw you,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart feel sick an’ sore.
VII
There wuz Spaniards an’ Dutchmen an’ Rooshians,
An’ Johnny Crapoos jist acrosst from France;
An’ most o’ ‘em couldn’t speak a word o’ English,
But answered to the name of ‘Month’s Advance’.
VIII
I knew that in me box I had a bottle,
By the boardin’-master ‘twas put there;
An’ I wanted something for to wet me throttle,
Somethin’ for to drive away dull care.
IX
So down upon me knees I went like thunder,
Put me hand into the bottom o’ the box,
An’ what wuz me great surprise an’ wonder,
Found only a bottle o’ medicine for the pox

NOTES
1) pawl – short bar of metal at the foot of a capstan or close to the barrel of a windlass which engage a serrated base so as to prevent the capstan or windlass ‘walking back’. […] The clanking of the pawls as the anchor cable was hove in was the only musical accompaniment a shanty ever had! (Hugill, Shanties 414)
2)  it is a typical expression in maritime songs
3) limey – The origin of the Yanks calling English sailors ‘Limejuicers’ […] was the daily issuing of limejuice to British crews when they had been a certain number of days at sea, to prevent scurvy, according to the 1894 Merchant Shipping Act (Hugill, Shanties 54)
4) the sailor has spent all the advance on high-alcohol drinking
5) A storm-cone is a visual signalling device made of black-painted canvas designed to be hoisted on a mast – if apex upwards, a gale is expected from the North, if from the South, apex downward. The storm cone was devised by Rear Admiral Robert Fitzroy, former commander of HMS Beagle, head of a department of the Board of Trade known today simply as the Met Office, and inventor of weather forecasts.
“In 1860 he devised a system of issuing gale warnings by telegraph to the ports likely to be affected. The message contained of a list of places with the words:
‘North Cone’ or ‘South Cone’ – for northerly or southerly gales respectively
‘Drum’  – for when further gales were expected,
Drum and North/South Cone’ – for particularly heavy gales or storms. ” (from herei) (see more)

FOLK VERSION: Valparaiso Round the Horn

For his title the song has become a traditional Irish song, a popular drinking song, connected to equally popular jigs (eg Irish washer woman)! Also known as “The Liverpool song” and “Valparaiso Round the Horn”. Among the favorite pirate song of course!

The Wolfe Tones from “Let The People Sing” 1972 make a folk version that has become the standard of a classic irish drinking song
The Irish Rovers live
Sons Of Erin

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
About ships for England boys be handy(2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
There were Frenchmen, there were Germans, there were Russians
And there was Jolly Jacques came just across from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they’d answer to the name of Bill or Dan
IV
I woke up in the morning sick and sore (5)
I wished I’d never sailed away again
Then a voice it came thundering thru’ the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name
V
I wish that I was in the Jolly Sailor (6)
With Molly or with Kitty on me knee
Now I see most any men are sailors
And with me flipper I wipe away my tears

NOTES
1) see above
2) or Bout ship’s stations, boys
3) see above
4) see above
5) a euphemism to describe the hangover
6) the name varies at the discretion of the singer

 LINK
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/paddy-lay-back/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/PaddyLayBack/hugill.html
https://maritime.org/chanteys/paddy-lay-back.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/12/36-paddy-lay-back.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddylay.html

Heave away, my Johnny sea shanty

Leggi in Italiano

The second sea shanty sung by A.L. Lloyd in the film Moby Dick, shot by John Huston in 1956, is a windlass shanty or a capstan shanty. As we can clearly see in the sequence, crew action the old anchor winch.
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented on the cover notes of the album “Thar She Blows” by Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd (1957)”A favourite shanty for windlass work, when the ship was being warped out of harbour at the start of a trip. A log rope would be made fast to a ring at the quayside and run round a bollard at the pierhead and back to the ship’s windlass. The shantyman would sit on the windlass head and sing while the spokesters strained to turn the windlass. As they turned, the rope would round the drum and the ship nosed seaward amid the tears of the women and the cheers of the men. This version was sung by the Indian Ocean whalers of the 1840s“.

The song starts at 1:50, when the catwalk is pulled off and the old spike windlass is activated, model replaced by the brake windlass around 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) the curse of every sailor at the time of sailing ships: Cape Horn

This sea shanty presents a great variety of texts even with different stories, so sometimes it is a song of the whaleship other times a song of emigration. (a collection of various text versions here).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Dubbing Cape Horn was a feared affair by sailors, being a stretch of sea almost perpetually upset by storms, a cemetery of numerous unlucky ships.
The wind dominated the bow, so the ship was pushed back for days with the crew exhausted by effort and icy water that was breaking on all sides.

Louis Killen from Farewell Nancy 1964  “capstan stands upright and is pushed round by trudging men. A windlass, serving much the same function, lies horizontally and is revolved by means of bars pulled from up to down. So windlass songs are generally more rhythmical than capstan shanties. Heave Away is usually considered a windlass song. Originally, it had words concerning a voyage of Irish migrants to America. Later, this text fell away. The version sung here was “devised” by A. L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick

Assassin’s Creed Rogue

I
There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.
II
The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls, we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
III
Farewell to you, my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
IV
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.

NOTES
1) Kingston upon Hull (or, more simply, Hull) is a renowned fishing port from which flotillas for fishing in the North Sea started from the Middle Ages. In the song, the departing ships also head for the Indian Ocean (see routes )

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  from Just Another Day 2014, from the repertoire of the seafaring songs of Minehead (Somerset) collected by Cecil Sharp from only two sources – the retired captains Lewis and Vickery.

trad and Tom Brown verses
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.

NEWFOUNDLAND VERSION

Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook # 49) was released by Pius Power, Southeast Bight,  in 1979 Genevieve Lehr writes “this is a song which was often used to establish a rhythm for hauling up the anchors aboard the fishing schooners. Many of these ‘heave-up shanties’ were old ballads or contemporary ones, and very often topical verses were made up on the spur of the moment and added to the song to make the song last as long as the task itself.”

The Fables from Tear The House Down, 1998 a cheerful version with a decidedly country arrangement

I
Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
III
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
IV
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”

NOTES
1) duds in this context means “clothes” but more generally the large canvas bag containing the sailor’s baggage
2) Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova for the Marconi experiment, is a city in Canada, capital of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located in the peninsula of Avalon, which is part of the Newfoundland island
3) clearly a “flying” verse taken from the many farewells here is Nancy answering

 

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
 emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/default.htm

Paddy Lay Back: take a turn around the capstan

Read the post in English

Paddy Lay Back è una sea shanty kilometrica, zeppa di varianti, cantata dai marinai sia come canzone ricreativa che come canzone all’argano per sollevare l’ancora (capstan shanty) .

Stan Hugill nel suo “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, ci testimonia una lunga versione con una ventina di strofe (vedi), qui si riportano solo quelle cantate da lui stesso per l’album “Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail”, 1980
Così scrive in merito: “Era sia una forebitter che una capstan shanty e anche molto popolare, specialmente sulle navi di Liverpool. […] È una canzone abbastanza vecchia che risale agli scaricatori del cotone di Mobile e di norma ha due strutture: una con strofe di otto versi – questa era la forma delle forebitter; e la seconda con strofe a quattro versi – la tipica struttura degli shanty. Doerflinger dà uno schema con strofe a due  versi per la shanty – una forma piuttosto insolita, e più avanti nel suo libro dà la versione forebitter con strofe a quattro e a otto versi. Dà il titolo della shanty come Paddy, Get Back e entrambe le due versioni della forebitter con il titolo Mainsail Haul. Shay, Sampson e Bone suggeriscono che si trattava di una canzone del mare abbastanza moderna e non davano notizie che fosse cantata come una shanty, ma tutti i miei contatti sulle nave da crociera si riferivano ad essa come shanty, ed era certamente cantata nella tratta dei postali Liverpool-New York per lo meno con le strofe di quattro versi. […] Le strofe dall’11 in poi sono abbastanza moderne e non hanno nulla a che fare con i marinai delle navi di linea, piuttosto sono relazionate al coro “For we are bound for Vallaparaiser round the Horn”, erano quelle cantate dai marinai di Liverpool impegnati nel Commercio del guano sulla costa occidentale”
(tutte le strofe tranne la III^)
Stan Hugill

Nils BrownAssassin’s Creed Rogue   (strofe I, II, III, V, VI)


I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord (Christ) I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
‘Bout ship’s stations, boys,
be handy (be handy)! (2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’ (5),
To stand by the comin’ of a storm.
IV
Now some of our fellers had bin drinkin’,
An’ I meself wuz heavy on the booze;
An’ I wuz on me ol’ sea-chest a-thinkin’
I’d turn into me bunk an’ have a snooze.
V
I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore,
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ (calling) at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’
VI
‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw you,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart feel sick an’ sore.
VII
There wuz Spaniards an’ Dutchmen an’ Rooshians,
An’ Johnny Crapoos jist acrosst from France;
An’ most o’ ‘em couldn’t speak a word o’ English,
But answered to the name of ‘Month’s Advance’.
VIII
I knew that in me box I had a bottle,
By the boardin’-master ‘twas put there;
An’ I wanted something for to wet me throttle,
Somethin’ for to drive away dull care.
IX
So down upon me knees I went like thunder,
Put me hand into the bottom o’ the box,
An’ what wuz me great surprise an’ wonder,
Found only a bottle o’ medicine for the pox
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era una fredda e triste mattina di Dicembre
e avevo speso tutti i soldi
dove andai per Dio non mi riesce di ricordare, ma alla fine mi sono trovato davanti all’ufficio per l’arruolamento
CORO
Paddy rilassati
finisci il lavoro
fai un giro intorno all’argano-
passa la castagna 
sulla nave, ai posti di manovra,
ragazzi datevi da fare
perchè siamo in partenza per Valparaiso
a doppiare il Corno
II
Quel giorno c’era una grande richiesta di marinai
per le Colonie e Frisco e per
la Francia
così mi sono imbarcato su una barca di limoncini la “Hotspur”
ed ero ubriaco fradicio con il mio anticipo
III
L’ho raggiunta in una fredda mattina di Dicembre
sfregandomi le pinne per tenermi al caldo
con un cono verso sud innalzato come avvertimento
che stava per l’arrivo di una tempesta
IV
Alcuni dei nostri compagni stavano bevendo e io stesso ci davo dentro,
ero sul mio vecchio baule a pensare di trasformarlo in una branda per un sonnellino
V
Mi svegliai al mattino con un malanno
e sapevo di essere di nuovo
in partenza, quando sentìì una voce abbaiare alla porta “Alzatevi, uomini, e rispondete al vostro nome”
VI
Fu sul ponte dove vi vidi la prima
volta
dei così brutti ceffi non li avevo mai visti prima
perchè c’era un barbone e un cadavere in ogni direzione
da far venire triste e afflitto il mio povero cuore
VII
C’erano Spagnoli e Tedeschi
e Russi
e un Johnny Crapoos appena arrivato dalla Francia
e nessuno di loro sapeva parlare una parola d’Inglese
ma rispondevano al nome di “Mese d’anticipo”
VIII
Sapevo che nel baule avevo una bottiglia che l’arruolatore aveva messo lì,
e volevo qualcosa per bagnarmi la gola,
qualcosa per scacciare le noiose faccende quotidiane
IX
Così mi sono gettato sulle ginocchia come un fulmine e ho messo la mano sul fondo del baule,
ma con mia grande sorpresa
ho trovato solo una bottiglia di medicina per il vaiolo!

NOTE
1) Pawl ( castagna): specie di arpione mobile che impediva all’argano di girare in senso inverso inserendosi in una serie di fori alla sua base. Per consentire la rotazione in senso contrario c’era una seconda castagna con forma diversa. Il suono secco prodotto dalla castagna mentre il cavo si avvolge fa da accompagnamento musicale alla shanty
2)  “Be handy” è un espressione tipica nelle canzoni marinaresche : letteralmente si traduce in italiano come “essere a portata di mano” C’è anche una lieve di allusione sessuale. Possibili significati: rendersi utile ma anche trovarsi a portata di mano (come in handy),
3) gli americani chiamavano i soldati inglesi limely per via della razione di limone distribuita per prevenire lo scorbuto dopo un certo numero di giorni in mare (secondo il  Merchant Shipping Act  del 1894)
4) cioè ha speso tutti i soldi dell’anticipo sulla paga in bevute ad alto grado alcolico
5) “Storm cones”  (coni tempesta) erano delle segnalazioni approntate lungo le coste irlandesi e britanniche per segnalare l’arrivo di una tempesta alle navi . Il sistema era stato messo a punto dal capitano Robert FitzRoy nel 1860 e consisteva in un collegamento telegrafico tra le stazioni meteo di terra e tutti i porti delle isole britanniche, di modo che venissero esibiti degli appositi segnali (coni neri o luci) lungo le coste non appena era segnalata una tempesta. I segnali di avvertimento  indicavano la direzione in cui infuriava il maltempo in modo che le navi di passaggio potessero prendere gli opportuni provvedimenti.
“Nel 1860 escogitò un sistema di emissione di allerta burrasca via telegrafo ai porti che potevano essere colpiti.Il messaggio conteneva una lista di località con le parole:
‘North Cone’ o ‘South Cone’ – rispettivamente per i venti settentrionali o meridionali
“Drum” – per quando ci si aspettavano ulteriori venti,
Drum and North/South Cone ‘- per venti di burrasca di notevole entità
” (tratto da qui) (continua)

LA VERSIONE FOLK: Valparaiso Round the Horn

Giocoforza per quel Paddy del titolo, la canzone è diventata un traditional irlandese, una popolare drinking song, collegata ad altrettanto popolari jigs! Anche conosciuta con il titolo “The Liverpool song” e “Valparaiso Round the Horn”. Tra le canzoni preferite dei pirati ovviamente!

The Wolfe Tones in “Let The People Sing” 1972 ne fanno una versione folk che è diventata lo standard di una classica irish drinking song
The Irish Rovers live
Sons Of Erin


I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
About ships for England boys be handy(2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
There were Frenchmen, there were Germans, there were Russians
And there was Jolly Jacques came just across from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they’d answer to the name of Bill or Dan
IV
I woke up in the morning sick and sore (5)
I wished I’d never sailed away again
Then a voice it came thundering thru’ the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name
V
I wish that I was in the Jolly Sailor (6)
With Molly or with Kitty on me knee
Now I see most any men are sailors
And with me flipper I wipe away my tears
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era una fredda e triste mattina di Dicembre
e avevo speso tutti i soldi
dove andai per Dio non mi riesce di ricordare, ma alla fine mi sono trovato davanti all’ufficio per l’arruolamento
CORO
Paddy rilassati
finisci il lavoro
fai un giro intorno all’argano-
passa la castagna 
sulle navi per l’Inghilterra ragazzi datevi da fare, perchè siamo in partenza per Valparaiso a doppiare il Corno
II
Quel giorno c’era una grande richiesta di marinai
per le Colonie e Frisco e per
la Francia
così mi sono imbarcato su una barca di limoncini la “Hotspur”
ed ero ubriaco fradicio con il mio anticipo
III
C’erano Francesi e Tedeschi, c’erano Russi
e c’era un Jolly Jacques appena arrivato dalla Francia
e nessuno di loro sapeva parlare una parola d’Inglese
ma rispondevano al nome di
Bill o Dan
IV
Mi svegliai al mattino con un malanno
e sapevo di essere di nuovo
in partenza
quando sentìì una voce abbaiare alla porta “Alzatevi, uomini, e rispondete al vostro nome”
V
Vorrei essere al “Marinaio Allegro”
con Molly o con  Killy sulle mie ginocchia
ma vedo solo marinai attorno
e con le mie pinne mi asciugo le lacrime

NOTE
1) vedi nota sopra
2) oppure Bout ship’s stations, boys
3) vedi nota sopra
4) cioè ha speso tutti i soldi dell’anticipo sulla paga in bevute ad alto grado alcolico
5) un eufemismo per descrivere i postumi della sbornia
6) il nome del locale varia a discrezione di chi canta

 FONTI
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/paddy-lay-back/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/PaddyLayBack/hugill.html
https://maritime.org/chanteys/paddy-lay-back.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/12/36-paddy-lay-back.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddylay.html

Sally Brown I rolled all night

Read the post in English

Nei sea shanties Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola con la quale il nostro marinaio cerca di spassarsela. Di probabile origine giamaicana secondo Stan Hugill, era un canto popolare nei porti delle Indie Occidentali negli anni 1830. Le varianti testuali e melodiche sono molte.

ARCHIVIO

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

SECONDA VERSIONE: I ROLLED ALL NIGHT

In questa versione il coro si sviluppa su più versi e la canzone è classificata, anche con il titolo di “Roll and Go”, nelle capstan shanty cioè i canti eseguiti durante il sollevamento dell’ancora per mezzo dell’argano (o verricello).

Planxty live (che non a caso ridacchiano, dato la nomea della canzoncina)

Irish Descendants in Encore: Best of the Irish Descendants


Shipped on board a Liverpool liner,
CHORUS
Way hey roll(1) on board;
Well, I rolled all night
and I rolled all day,
I’m gonna spend my money with (on)
Sally Brown.
Miss Sally Brown is a fine young lady,
She’s tall and she’s dark(2) and she’s not too shady
Her mother doesn’t like the tarry(3) sailor,
She wants her to marry the one-legged captain
Sally wouldn’t marry me so I shipped across the water
And now I am courting Sally’s daughter
I shipped off board a Liverpool liner
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool-Caraibi
CORO Salpa(1) e vai,
ho lavorato(1) tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
e spenderò i miei soldi
con Sally Brown.
La signorina Sally Brown è una bella ragazza, è alta e scura e non è troppo ombrosa
ma a sua madre non piacciono i marinai, vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally non mi vuole sposare, così ho preso il mare
e ora faccio la corte alla figlia di Sally e mi sono imbarcato sulla tratta di Liverpool

NOTE
1) non è un termine propriamente nautico, ma è genericamente utilizzato dai marinai per dire molte cose
2) si potrebbe riferire al colore dei capelli più che della pelle, anche se in altre versioni è identificata come creola o mulatta. Il termine “creolo” può essere inteso in due eccezioni: dallo spagnolo “crillo”, che originariamente si riferiva alla prima generazione nata nel “Nuovo Mondo”, figli di coloni dall’Europa (Spagna o Francia) e gli schiavi neri. Il significato più comune è quello che si riferisce a  tutti i neri mezzosangue della Giamaica dal colore della pelle che passa dal marrone al nero-blu. Nell’Ottocento con questo termine si indicava anche una piccola società urbana elitaria di pelle chiara nella Louisiana  (residente per lo più a New Orleans) risultato degli incroci tra le belle schiave nere e i proprietari terrieri bianchi che le prendevano come amanti
3) tarry è un termine dispregiativo per contraddistinguere il tipico marinaio. Più in generale Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro.

Teddy Thompson in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate   Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys,  ANTI 2006 in una versione più meditativa e malinconica

Sally Brown she’s a nice young lady,
CHORUS
Way, hay, we roll an’ go (1).
We roll all night
And we roll all day
Spend my money on Sally Brown.
Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Mother doesn’t like a tarry sailor(3)
She wants her to marry a one legged captain
Sally Brown she’s a bright lady(2)
She drinks stock rum
And she chews tobacco
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Salpa e vai,
ho lavorato tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
spenderò i miei soldi con Sally Brown.
imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool,
a sua madre non piacciono i marinai, vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally Brown è una bella ragazza
beve la riserva di rum
e mastica tabacco

NOTE
2) la “fine young lady” si beve la riserva di rum (ovvero grandi quantità di rum) e mastica tabacco – non proprio quello che si dice “una lady”!!!

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

ROLLER BOWLER SEA SHANTY

Questa ulteriore versione dello sea shanty contenente nel chorus la frase “good morning ladies all” deriva invece dallo spettacolo di uno show man, Thomas Dartmouth Rice, molto popolare negli anni 1830, che aveva inventato il personaggio di Jim Crow, dipingendosi la faccia di nero.

capstan_shanty

E’ una capstan shanty in cui si racconta delle prodezze amorose di un marinaio


As I rolled out (roved out) one mornin’
Away (Hooray),  you roller bowler (rowler bowler)(1)
As I rolled out one mornin’
I met a lady (Dou Dou)(2) fair
(Chorus)
Timme (To my)(3), hey-rig-a-jig
an’ a ha-ha

Good mornin’, ladies all
Away (Hooray), you roller bowler!
Timme, hey-rig-a-jig(4) an’ a ha-ha
Good mornin’, ladies all
The first time that I saw(met) her
that saucy gal of mine:
But when she found that I was skint
She left me standing there
I squared me yards an’ sailed away
An’ to the ship I went
She winked & flipped a flipper(5)
She thought I was a mate (6)
Traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
Mentre andavo in giro una mattina
Via roller bowler(1)
mentre andavo in giro una mattina
ho incontrato una bella fanciulla(2). (RITORNELLO
A me (3)! Balla una giga(4)
a-ha. 

Buon giorno a tutte voi signore!
Via roller bowler(1)
A me (3)! Balla una giga(4)
Buon giorno a tutte voi signore!
La prima volta che l’ho vista
(ho pensato) fosse il mio peperino!
Ma quando lei ha scoperto che ero al verde,
mi ha piantato là ;
ho preso e me ne sono andato per mare.
Salito sulla nave,
lei mi fece l’occhiolino(5) e mi salutò pensando fossi un compagno(6)

NOTE
1) roller bowler, rowler bowler, un modo simpatico per apostrofare un marinaio, non ho ancora capito bene cosa significhi e quindi non riesco a tradurlo in italiano! Il termine proprio si riferisce ad un giocatore di cricket, ma è anche il nome dato ad un cappello ovvero la bombetta che tuttavia è stata inventata solo negli anni 60 e non è certo parte dell’abbigliamento tipico di un marinaio. “Nata nel 1860 a Southwark (Londra) dalle mani di Thomas William Bowler (da cui il nome bowler con cui è nota nel mondo anglosassone), la bombetta divenne in breve tempo il cappello formale maschile per eccellenza nella moda occidentale, raggiungendo la massima popolarità tra il 1890 e il 1920.” (tratto da Wikipedia)
2) come già sottolineato da più parti per quanto il lavoro svolto dai creatori del gioco Assassin Creed abbia portato le canzoni marinaresche in auge tra i giovani è stata operata una sorta di “sforbiciatura” riguardo a tutti i riferimenti possibili alla cultura afro americana e all’epoca del 1800 (proprio per inquadrare tali canti nell’ambito dell’epoca della pirateria e della cultura inglese del 1600-1700). Così il termine caraibico Dou Dou viene sostituito da quello più “british”. DouDuo, DuoDuo deriva dal francese “ma cherie”; in francese si dice “douce”
3) probabilmente l’escalamazione “Timmes!” è stata inventata dai Clancy Brothers negli anni 1960!
4) balla una giga
5) to flip a flipper o anche to tip one’s flipper= to wave one’s hand
6) evidentemente la “signora” lo ha scambiato per uno dei suoi “clienti” ancora con i soldi da spendere!

sailor drinking

JIM CROW

Thomas Dartmouth Rice (1808-1860) was a white actor and playwright who specialised in playing black-faced characters on stage, and is credited with the creation  of the Jim Crow character. He was a worldwide sensation in the 1830s, and popularised blackface in London in 1836 when he appeared in his own opera “Oh, Hush”, featuring the song “Good Morning Ladies All”,which is pretty clearly the progenitor  of the shanty versions.” (tratto da qui)

La versione di Thomas Dartmouth Rice da “Negro singer’s own book” ca.1843, pg 334-335: da “Oh, Hush.”

Down in ole Wurginny,
Oh, Roley, Boley,
A gun dat massa gib me,
To go an shoot de koon.
Wid a hida ka dink, ah, ah!
Oh, Roley, Boley,
Wid a hida ka dink, who dare?
Good morning ladies all

Den I take my ole rifle,
Get powder for a trifle,
And’s gwan to an shoot de koon.
Den I saw de koon a swingin,
Den I cocked my gun an bring him,
And down cum Mister Coon.
He lodged upon a bramble,
Den I begin to scrample,
To get him down de tree.
He dead or very nearly,
I tink I love him dearly,
Cause he make such damn good soup.
After dat I leabe Wurginny,
An go to ole Kentucky,
On my way to New Orleans.
Den I got a wife on Sunday
My son cum down a Monday,
An I neber seed a finer.
Den I sen my son to college,
Whar he got his sense an knowledge,
An growed up to a man.
His learning cost me a dollar,
An now he is a lawyer,
An soon will be a judge.
So I gwan away to morrow,
Oh, people aint you sorry,
As I leabe Louisiany.

ulteriori strofe (versione Stan Hugill)
The last time that I saw her
Was down the waterside
Oh you ladies short & ladies tall
I love you one & all

Rowler Bowler

La versione di John Short raccolta da Cecil Sharp nel 1914

ASCOLTA Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


Away  you roller bowler
To me hey-rig-a-jig

an’ a ha-ha

Good mornin’, ladies all
O the first time that I saw her
Away  you roller bowler 
O the first time that I saw her
Twas down in playhouse square
To me hey-rig-a-jig
an’ a ha-ha

Good mornin’, ladies all
As I walked out one morning
Down by the riverside
She winked and tipped her flipper
I thought she was my girl
But when she found that I was skint
She left me standing there
O ladies short and ladies tall
O I have had them all
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Via roller bowler(1)
A me (3)! Balla una giga(4)
e ha-ha

Buon giorno a tutte voi signore!
La prima volta che la vidi
Via roller bowler
La prima volta che la vidi
fu nella piazza del Teatro
A me! Balla una giga
e ha-ha
Buon giorno a tutte voi signore!

Mentre passeggiavo un mattino
lungo la riva del fiume
lei mi fece l’occhiolino e mi salutò, credetti fosse la mia ragazza
ma quando scroprì che ero al verde,
mi piantò là
o ragazze basse e ragazze alte
vi ho avute tutte

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=23215
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49421
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/roller-bowler.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/roller_bowler.htm

ROLLER BOWLER pumping shanty qui
ROLLER BOWLER halyard shanty qui

LEAVE HER, JOHNNY.. TIME FOR US TO LEAVE HER

“Leave her Johnny” è una capstan shanty o più propriamente una pumping shanty per il lavoro alle pompe. Una canzone marinaresca tradizionalmente cantata al termine del viaggio, quando i marinai si preparavano a sbarcare, ma prima azionavano le pompe per esaurire l’acqua in sentina, e ovviamente la “lei” del canto è la nave, non una donna.
pumping-hugill

This was, traditionally, the last chantey the crew would sing before disem-barking. It was used when warping (pulling) the ship into the pier, or when pumping the bilges for the last time. Although it at first sounds like the crew is sentimental about leaving the ship, the lyrics describe the horrible conditions that they suffered through during the voyage. Since it was the 1ast song of the journey, the sailors took the opportunity to vent their feelings about how they were treated without fear of reprisal. (tratto da qui)

Anche per questa sea shanty le versioni testuali sono numerose ma l’argomento resta sempre lo stesso: il duro lavoro sulla nave, il mare in tempesta, le lamentele verso gli ufficiali, il vitto e la misera paga!

ASCOLTA Sean Dagher per Assassin’s Creed in Black Flag

ASCOLTA la versione live con La Nef


Oh I thougth I heard the old man say
Leave her, johnny, leave her
Tomorrow ye will get your pay
An’ it’s time for us to leave her
CHORUS
Leave her, Johnny, leave her
Oh leave her, Johnny, leave her
For the voyage is long and the winds don’t blow
An’ its time for us to leave her
Oh the wind was foul and the sea ran high
She shipped it green an’ none went by
I hate to sail on this rotten tub
No grog allowed and rotten grub
We swear by rote for want o’ more
Oh now we’re through so we’ll go on shore
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Se non sbaglio il capitano ha detto
lasciala, Johnny, lasciala
‘Domani ritirerai la paga’.
ed è il momento per noi di lasciarla.
CORO
lasciala, Johnny, lasciala
lasciala, Johnny, lasciala

che il viaggio è finito
e il vento non soffia

ed è il momento per noi di lasciarla.
Il vento impazzava e il mare si sollevava in alto,
lei fendeva il verde e mai affondava.
Detesto navigare su questa bagnarola marcia,
niente grog e la sbobba marcia, giuriamo e ripetiamo che vogliamo di più
ora abbiamo finito così andremo a riva

ASCOLTA Lou Reed in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006 Sulla scia della moda piratesca dopo i film sui Pirati dei Caraibi con il capitan Jack Sparrow interpretato da Johnny Deep, anche le grandi star del rock si sono lasciate trascinare dall’idea di comparire in una “galleria di ritratti dei brutti ceffi” (“Rogue’s Gallery” nel mondo anglosassone indica gli schedari fotografici dei criminali); per citare Gino Castaldo “Lou Reed sembra il filosofo del mondo piratesco. Canta Leave her Johnny come fosse una canzone di Brecht e Weill.”


O the times are hard and the wages low
Leave her, Johnny, leave her
I guess it’s time for us to go
And it’s time for us to leave her
O I thought I heard the old man say,
Tomorrow you will get your pay
Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
It’s Yankee John the packet rat
It’s rotten beef and weev’ly bread,
It’s pump or drown the old man said
We’d be better off in a nice clean jail,
With all night and plenty of ale
The mate was a bucko(1) and the old man a turk,
The bosun was a beggar with the middle name of work(2)
The cook’s a drunk, he likes to booze,
‘tween him and the mate there’s a little to choose
I hate to sail on this rotten tub,
No grog allowed and rotten grub
No Liverpool bread, nor rotten cracker hash,
No dandy funk, nor cold and sloppy hash(3).
The old man shouts, the pumps stand by,
Oh, we can never suck her dry
Now I thought I heard the old man say,
Just one more pull and then belay.
It’s time for us to leave her
It’s time for us to leave her
For the voyage is done and the winds don’t blow(4)
And it’s time for us to leave her
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
oh i tempi sono difficili e le paghe sono scarse
lasciala, Johnny, lasciala
dico che è il tempo per noi di andare
ed è il momento per noi di lasciarla.
Se non sbaglio il capitano ha detto che domani prenderai la paga
Liverpool Pat con il suo cappello cerato
e c’è Yankee John il topo del postale
la carne è guasta e nel pane i vermi
‘Pompa o annega’ ha detto il capitano
si starebbe meglio via, in una bella prigione pulita
con tanta birra  tutta la notte
Il primo ufficiale era un duro(1) e il capitano un turco,
il nostromo uno scansafatiche(2)
il cuoco un ubriacone che gli piace sbevazzare
tra lui e il “primo” c’è poco da scegliere;
detesto navigare su questa bagnarola marcia,
niente grog e sbobba marcia,
niente pane di Liverpool nessuna fetente galletta e biscotti,
nessuno spezzatino freddo e brodoso(3)
Il capitano urla, le pompe si fermano
“Non riusciremo mai a pompare e lasciarla asciutta”
Se non sbaglio il capitano ha detto “Ancora un altro giro e poi basta”
ed è il momento per noi di lasciarla.
è il momento per noi di lasciarla
perchè il viaggio è finito e i venti non soffiano più(4)

ed è il momento per noi di lasciarla

NOTE
1) bucko nello slang marinaresco è l’appellativo con il quale si indicava un comandante brutale che portava la ciurma allo sfinimento pur di far andare veloce la nave
2) se ho capito bene il senso della frase
3) tra le principali lamentele dei marinai c’era il vitto che sia per problemi di approvvigionamento che di conservazione era molto monotono e “sufficiente”. Un detto molto in voga ai tempi diceva ” God provides the food, the Devil provides the cook” e nelle canzoni il cuoco è sempre preso di mira. Per il significato dei termini vedi
4) qui la barca è la metafora della vita 

Times Are Hard and Wages Low (Leave her Johnny)

La versione di John Sharp “This chantey was usually sung when getting into port, the chantey-man seizing this opportunity to express the crew’s dissatisfaction with the ship they were about to leave, which, Mr. Bullen says, was very often fully justified
ASCOLTA Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


O, the times are hard
and the wages low
Leave her Johnny leaver her
O, the times are hard
and the wages low
It’s time for us to leave her.
My old mother she wrote to me
“My loving son come home from sea.
I ‘ve got no money
and I’ve got no clothes”
I will send you money I will send you clothes.
We all leave her when we get on dock
We’ll leave her and we want’ come back.
A leaking ship and a carping crew
o two long years (we pold her true)*.
A dollar a day is the sailors pay
pump all night and work all day.
We pumped her all ‘round the Horn
“It’s pump you bastards pump or drown”.
O I thought I heard the captain say
“we’ll go ashore when we pump her dry.”
Leave her Johnny like a man
leave her Johnny while you can
* trascritto ad orecchio ma non credo di aver capito bele le parole
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
oh i tempi sono difficili
e le paghe sono scarse
lasciala, Johnny, lasciala
oh i tempi sono difficili
e le paghe sono scarse
è il momento per noi di lasciarla.
La mia vecchia madre mi ha scritto
“Amato figliolo, ritorna dal mare
Sono rimasta senza soldi
e non ho vestiti”
Ti manderò i soldi e ti manderò i vestiti.
La lasceremo tutti quando arriveremo al molo
la lasceremo per non voler ritornarci.
Una bagnarola e una squadra di carpentieri
o due lunghi anni …
Un dollaro al giorno è la paga dei marinai, pompa tutta la notta e lavora tutto il giorno.
L’abbiamo pompata al largo dell’Horn
“Pompate bastardi o annegate”
Credo di aver sentito il capitano dire
“Andremo a riva quando sarà asciutta”
lasciala, Johnny come un sol uomo
lasciala, Johnny fin che puoi

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/leaveherjohnny.html http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/leaveher.htm http://www.repubblica.it/2006/07/sezioni/spettacoli_e_cultura/canzoni-pirati/canzoni-pirati/canzoni-pirati.html http://blueloulogan.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/songs-of-logan-3-leave-her-johnny/ https://monkbarns.wordpress.com/tag/dandy-funk/

SANTY ANNA O SANTY ANO

Santy Anna o Santy Ano è una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) riservata per lo più ai lavori di pompaggio dell’acqua di sentina.
Ha due filoni testuali, uno sulla figura del generale messicano Antonio Lòpez de Santa Anna da cui deriva il titolo, l’altro sulla corsa dell’oro in California. Il brano conosce una vasta diffusione oltre i circuiti della tradizione anglofila per diventare popolare soprattutto in Francia e Germania e più in generale nei paesi del Nord Europa con riscritture varie e adattamenti anche in lingua.

IL NAPOLEONE DEL WEST

Antonio López de Santa Anna, il “Napoleone del West” presidente del Messico nel 1833 (e rinominato a più riprese per ben sei volte) è quello che nel 1836 ha ordinato ai suoi soldati di uccidere David Crockett e tutti quelli rinserrati nel Forte Alamo per impedire la secessione del Texas; ritiratosi dalla vita politica fu richiamato a difendere la patria durante la guerra contro gli Stati Uniti quando il Messico perse la California.

Se si può comprendere gli Inglesi, ancora scornati per la perdita delle colonie americane, che fanno il tifo per Santa Anna, meno evidente è lo schierarsi dei marinai americani (se non per sbeffeggiare il generale ringraziandolo per aver perso). Ecco perchè  nelle versioni americane prevalgono testi più “pecorecci” o la versione da “cercatore d’oro”.  In realtà furono gli irlandesi-americani a disertare e a schierarsi con i messicani: ecco come andò
” Nel  1846 allo scoppio della guerra tra Stati Uniti e Messico migliaia di irlandesi si arruolarono per combattere con l’esercito americano. Immigrati appena sbarcati nelle cittá della East Coast venivano convinti ad arruolarsi con promesse di una paga sostanziosa e fantastici bonus alla fine della ferma . Una volta ritrovatisi all’altra estremitá del paese la realtá che trovarono era di discriminazioni contro i cattolici e condizioni di vita miserevoli. In molti disertarono, ma un gruppo di uomini guidati dal capitano John Riley si unirono nel Saint Patrick’s battalion e si misero al servizio della repubblica messicana combattendo fino alla fine contro l’invasione statunitense e passando alla storia come eroi nazionali messicani.” (tratto da qui)

Lo stendardo del battaglione San Patrizio

I Chieftains hanno inciso un doppio cd sulle musiche di questi irlandesi trapiantati in Messico (ma l’approfondimento ad un prossimo post)

LA VERSIONE MESSICO

I marinai abbandonano la nave per servire nella guerra Messicano-americana a fianco di Santa Anna. Il tema è stato poi infarcito con tutte altre ben più “eroiche” battaglie e del generale e del Messico sono rimasti solo la prima strofa e il coro!

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem in Sing of the Sea 1968

ASCOLTA Forebitter in Victory Sings at Sea (qui)


O! Santy Anna gained the day(1)
Away Santy Anno!
And Santy Anna gained the day
All on the plains of Mexico!
CHORUS
Mexico, Mexico,
Away Santianno!
Mexico is a place I know!
All on the plains of Mexico!
Them Liverpool girls don’t use no combs
They combs their hair with a kipper backbone
Them yaller(2) girls I do adore
With their shinin’ eyes and their cold black hair
Why do them yaller girls love me so
Because I don’t tell them all I know
When I was a young man in me prime
I knocked them scouse(3) girls two at a time
Skipper likes whiskey,
the maid likes run
the crew likes both, but we can’t have none
Times is hard and the wages low
It’s time for us to roll and go
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Santa Anna ha vinto il giorno(1)
Lontano da Santa Anna!
Santa Anna ha vinto il giorno
Tutti nelle pianure del Messico
CORO
Messico, Messico, 
Lontano da Santa Anna
il Messico è un posto che conosco!
Tutti nelle pianure del Messico
Le ragazze di Liverpool non usano pettini
pettinano i capelli con una lisca d’aringa
Adoro le ragazze mulatte(2)
dagli occhi scintillanti e i capelli neri.
Perchè le ragazze mulatte mi amano tanto?
Perchè non dirò loro tutto quello che so.
Quando ero un giovanotto di primo pelo
di quelle ragazze (3) me ne facevo due alla volta.
Al comandante piace il whiskey, alle ragazze il rum,
alla ciurma piacciono entrambi, ma non ne possiamo avere altro.
Il tempo è duro e la paga bassa
è tempo per noi di prendere e andare

NOTE
1) in realtà il generale Antonio Lòpez de Santa Anna fu sconfitto dal generale Taylor (guerra messicana 1847-48) e un’altra versione è intitolata proprio a lui
2) yaller è la versione dialettale di yellow nel senso di “avere la pelle scura” quindi traducibile con mulatto
3) scouse è un dialetto inglese parlato nella città di Liverpool in questo contesto significa ragazza di Liverpool

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

La versione nel Short Sharp Shanties ha solo le due frasi di risposta del coro Hurro Santy Anna! e All on the plains of Mexico! che si alternano in risposta ai versi dello shantyman. Il canto è stato mixato insieme alla she shanty Whio Jamboree
ASCOLTA Roger Watson, Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify) prima parte della traccia Santy Anna / Whip Jamboree


General Taylor gained the day(1)
Hurro Santy Anna!
Santy Anna ran away,
All on the plains of Mexico!
Mexico you’ll all do know
Mexico with a (?riding bow?)
Oh, Santy Anno fought for fame,
Santy Anno  made his name
Santy Anno stayed and gone
all the fighting has didn’t go
The american Jamaica was a (?wilde place?)
fly away at the break of day
I wish I was in New York town
It’s where we’ll make the girls fly around
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il Generale Taylor ha vinto il giorno
Evviva Santa Anna!
Santa Anna è scappato
Tutti nelle pianure del Messico
Il Messico lo sapranno tutti
il Messico con (?)
Oh Santa Anna ha combattuto per la fama, Santa Anna si è fatto un nome
Santa Anna rimase e se ne andò
perchè il combattimento non ha funzionato. La Jamaica americana è un posto ?
volar via alla fine del giorno
Vorrei essera a New York
dove porteremo le ragazze in giro

E dire che la versione iniziale era questa (Songs of American Sailormen, Joanna Colcord) -si sa che davanti a una donna i marinai non cantano mai le versioni oscene o più ammiccanti!-
O Santy Anna gained the day,
Hooray, Santy Anna!
He lost it once but gained it twice,
All on the plains of Mexico!
And Gen’ral Taylor ran away,
He ran away at Monterey.
Oh, Santy Anna fought for fame,
And there’s where Santy gained his name.
Oh, Santy Anna fought for gold,
And the deeds he done have oft been told.
And Santy Anna fought for his life,
But he gained his way in the terrible strife.
Ah, Santy Anna’s day is o’er.
And Santy Anna will fight no more.
I thought I heard the Old Man say
He’d give us grog this very day.

ASCOLTA Moni Ovadia & il Gruppo Folk Internazionale (1975-1979) in una versione ulteriormente rielaborata e più aderente alla storia. Il testo riprende una vecchia registrazione di Paul Clayton & the Foc’sle Singers del 1959 ripubblicata dal Smithsonian Folkways nel 2007: Foc’sle Songs And Shanties


Oh, shellbacks(4) have you heard the news?
Away Santy Anno!
The Yankees at Vera Cruz
All on the plains of Mexico!
Brave General Taylor saved the day,
and chased those Mexicans away.
Oh, Santy Anno fought for fame,
And that is why we sing his name
Old Santy Anna had a wooden leg(5),
He wore it for a wooden peg
I thought I heard the Old Man say
He’d give us grog this very day.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O figli di Nettuno (4) conoscete le novità?
Lontano da Santa Anna!
Gli americani a Vera Cruz!
Tutti nelle pianure del Messico.
Il coraggioso generale Taylor ha vinto il giorno
e ha scacciato via i Messicani.
Santa Anna ha combattuto per la gloria ed è per questo che cantiamo il suo nome.
Il vecchio Santa Anna aveva una gamba di legno (5),
la portava come stampella.
Credo di aver sentito il vecchio dire
che ci darà grog questo giorno.

NOTE
4) il passaggio dell’equatore era celebrato sulle navi con una sorta di battesimo dei novellini; coloro che avevano già superato la prova erano soprannominati Shellbacks ovvero i figli di Nettuno; la prova forse iniziata come un momento di divertimento per il morale degli uomini, è degenerata in atti violenti di nonnismo con pratiche degradanti e violente
5) Santa Anna perse la gamba per un colpo di cannone francese nel 1838. La sua gamba di legno venne presa come trofeo dai soldati del IV fanteria dell’Illinois nel 1847 e ora si trova nell’Illinois State Military Museum a Sprinfield (il diorama al museo qui)
line-cross-darwin

CALIFORNIO

Nel 1848 venivano scoperti i ricchi giacimenti auriferi della California, il che favoriva un nutrito movimento migratorio, senza precedenti, di gente che partiva dalle coste orientali degli Stati Uniti via Capo Horn verso l’immaginato eldorado californiano dando molto lavoro agli agenti marittimi che pubblicavano manifesti reclamizzanti questo o quel veliero. Ne approfittavano gli armatori americani attrezzandosi per il trasporto dei passeggeri in cerca di ventura, mettendo in linea navi di buona capacità e ricettività, che si videro navigare tra il 1850 e il 1870. Esiste una ricca documentazione iconografica di questi velieri in centinaia di quadri ad olio ed acquerelli raccolti dal Peabody Museum di Salem (non pochi dei quali recano la firma di artisti italiani, forse emigrati). (tratto da La marineria velica di lungo corso di Aldo E Corrado Cherini qui)

ASCOLTA Highwaymen

ASCOLTA The Kingston Trio

ASCOLTA Dublin Fair (tanto per sentire il brano in tutte le salse, anche quella pop)


From Boston Town we’re bound away,
heave aweigh (heave aweigh!)
Santy ano
(1).
around Cape Horn to Frisco Bay,
We’re bound for Californi-o.
CHORUS
So heave her up and away we’ll go,
heave aweigh (heave aweigh!)
Santy ano.

heave her up and away we’ll go,
We’re bound for Californi-o.
She’s a fast clipper(2) ship and a bully crew,
a down-east(3) Yankee for her captain, too.
Back in the days of Forty-nine(4),
Those were the days of the good old times,
Way out in Californi-o.
When I leave ship I’ll settle down
I’ll marry a girl named Sally Brown
There’s plenty of gold, so I’ve been told,
Plenty of gold so I’ve been told
traduzione italiano di Italo Ottonello
Dalla città di Boston siamo diretti lontano vira a lasciare (vira a lasciare!)
Santy ano(1).

doppiando Capo Horn fino alla baia di Frisco, Siamo diretti in California.
CORO
Quindi salpala, e andremo lontano
vira a lasciare (vira a lasciare!)
Santy ano

Salpala, e andremo lontano
Siamo diretti in California.
È un clipper(2) veloce con uno splendido equipaggio.
il capitano è pure uno Yankee del down-east. (3),
Tornando ai giorni del Quarantanove, (4). Quelli eran giorni del buon tempo antico
laggiù in California.
Quando sarò sbarcato mi sistemerò
Sposerò una ragazza di nome Sally Brown
C’è oro in abbondanza, m’hanno detto,
oro in abbondanza, m’hanno detto

NOTE
1) in questo contesto il nome potrebbe essere riferito a Sant’Anna in veste di protettrice dei marinai bretoni (secondo Stan Hugill)
2) Clipper: trattavasi di una nave ancora piccola, a due alberi, detta BALTIMORE CLIPPER perché nata a Baltimora, caratterizzata da forme di scafo molto stellate e molta vela, agile, manovriera e sopra tutto veloce. Buona pertanto al contrabbando e al trasporto di schiavi, perfino pirata. Secondo fonti più credibili, il primo vero clipper , quanto­meno a farsi notare, sarebbe stato l’ “Ann Mac Kim” del 1832, stazzante 493 tonn., con carena rivestita di rame. Nel 1840 ed anni successivi si trovavano in esercizio non pochi velieri di questo tipo, più grandi, progettati da architetti assai reputati quali Donald Mac Kay, George Thomas e John Griffits. Basti citare il “Great Republic”, il “Dreadnought”, il “Lightning”. Sulla scia degli Americani si mettevano gli Inglesi, o meglio Scozzesi, col capostipite “Scottish Maid” seguito da molte unità eccellenti tanto da declassare quelle americane. Alla fine degli anni cinquanta John Jordan introduceva la costruzione degli scafi composita, con ordinate in metallo, irrobustendo e nello stesso alleggerendo una struttura nata alquanto debole. Col “Richard Cobden” veniva sperimentato nel 1844 il primo veliero di ferro. Prendeva piede, così, il tipo generico del CLIPPER (nome derivante, forse, dal cavallo da corsa degli stati americani sudisti) che, acquistando maggiore stazza tra il 1830 e il 1860, si divideva in più sottotipi sia americani che inglesi. (tratto da La marineria velica di lungo corso di Aldo E Corrado Cherini qui)
3) il termine down-east indica la parte settentrionale atlantica degli Stati Uniti, in particolare il Maine. Gli abitanti, come pure i velieri costruiti in quella zona, erano chiamati down-easter.
4) anno d’inizio della corsa all’oro in California.

Tanto per gradire anche altre versioni, dal Francese
ASCOLTA Gérard Jaffrès (la versione in francese fu scritta da Jacques Plante e Hugues Aufray per primo la registrò nel 1961)

al tedesco
ASCOLTA Santiano

continua

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/santyanna.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46588

Heave away, my Johnny

Read the post in English

Il secondo sea shanty cantato da A.L. Lloyd nel film Moby Dick, girato da John Huston nel 1956 , è un windlass shanty o un capstan shanty. Come si vede bene nella sequenza è intonato dallo shantyman al verricello dell’ancora quando non era ancora in adozione il modello brake windlass . (vedi parte prima)
Kenneth S. Goldstein ha commentato nelle note di copertina dell’album “Thar She Blows” di Ewan MacColl e A.L. Lloyd (1957) “La sea shanty preferita per il lavoro ai verricelli, quando la nave veniva portata fuori dal porto all’inizio di un viaggio. Una cima robusta si agganciava  ad anello sulla banchina e girava intorno a una bitta del molo e di nuovo al verricello della nave. Lo shantyman si sedeva sulla testa del verricello e cantava mentre i marinai che rispondevano nel coro si sforzavano di girare il verricello. Come manovravano, la corda si avvolgeva attorno al tamburo e la nave avanzava piano verso il mare in mezzo alle lacrime delle donne e agli applausi degli uomini. Questa versione fu cantata dai balenieri dell’Oceano Indiano negli anni ’40 dell’Ottocento“.

Il brano inizia a 1:50, quando viene tirata via la passerella e viene azionato il vecchio spike windlass, modello sostituito dal brake windlass verso il 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) la maledizione di ogni marinaio all’epoca dei velieri, Capo Horn

E tuttavia il brano presenta una grande varietà di testi anche con storie diverse, così a volte è una canzone delle baleniere altre volte un canto d’emigrazione. (una raccolta di varie versioni testuali qui).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, essendo un tratto di mare quasi perennemente sconvolto dalle tempeste, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
Il vento dominava di prua, così la nave veniva spinta indietro per giorni e giorni con l’equipaggio stremato dallo sforzo e dall’acqua gelida che rompeva da tutte le parti.

Louis Killen in Farewell Nancy 1964 che scrive nelle note: “l’argano per salpare (capstan) è in posizione verticale e viene spinto da uomini che arrancano in tondo. Un verricello, che serve più o meno alla stessa funzione, è in orizzontale ed è ruotato con delle barre spinte su e giù. Quindi le canzoni dei verricelli (windlass shanty) sono generalmente più ritmiche di quelle all’argano (capstan shanty). Solitamente Heave Away è considerato una windlass song. Originariamente aveva le parole riguardanti un viaggio di emigranti irlandesi in America. Più tardi, questo testo è venuto meno. La versione cantata qui è stata “ideata” da A.L Lloyd per il film di Mody Dick
Assassin’s Creed Rogue


There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.

The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls,
we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
And farewell to you,
my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ecco che alcuni partono per la città di New York
e altri per la Francia
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
E altri partono per
il Golfo del Bengala
ad insegnare la danza alle balene
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
Il pilota è in attesa
che cambi la marea
e poi mie ragazze, la faremo
andare ancora
con una buona brezza da ovest.
E addio a voi,
ragazze di Kingston (1)
addio moli di St Andrews
se mai ritorneremo ancora,
faremo dondolare le vostre culle.
Venite tutti marinai, uomini che
che lavorano sodo
che doppiano il capo delle tempeste
accertatevi di avere stivali e cerate
o non vorrete essere mai nati

NOTE
1) Kingston upon Hull (o, più semplicemente, Hull) è un rinomato porto di pescatori da cui fin dal medioevo partivano le flottiglie per la pesca nel Mare del Nord. Nella canzone le navi in partenza si dirigono anche nell’oceano indiano (vedi rotte)

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  in Just Another Day 2014  dal repertorio dei canti marinareschi di Minehead (Somerset) raccolti da Cecil Sharp da due sole fonti – i capitani in pensione Lewis e Vickery.

trad e versi di Tom Brown
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak (1) bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino nel mese di Maggio
vira mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
pensavo alle navi commerciali che salpavano dalla nostra baia,
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
II
A volte si parte per la città di Wexford e a volte per  St. John
e a volte nel Mediterraneo andiamo,
solo per prendere il sole
III
Stavamo correndo verso la Baia di San Austell, con il carbone da scaricare e una tempesta ci colpì prima di raggiungere Charlestown.
IV
Ci sono aringhe affumicate e sotto sale che abbiamo spedito in tutto il mondo,
duecento anni di pescato finchè è scomparso
V
E’ un giovane legno in partenza per la città di Swansea, è il sale che portiamo dalla Francia, ma è nelle Indie che insegniamo la danza a quelle ragazze
VI
Con un carico di alghe, ragazzi, siamo in partenza per Bristol,
ad aiutarli a fare il vetro, si sa, in quella città famosa.
VII
Farina e malto, pelli e grano sono sulla rotta di Bristol;
la Jane e la Susan li batterono tutti a diciotto e sessantuno.
VIII
Abbiamo navigato il mondo in navi di fama che provenivano da Minehead,
e l’Unanimity era l’ultima da Manson’s Yard.

NOTE
* prima stesura, da rivedere, alcune frasi sono tradotte in senso letterale, ma non ne ho compreso il significato
1) letteralmente  quercia verde, è modo marinaresco per dire vascello, essendo il legno di quercia ampiamente usato un tempo per la costruzione dello scafo

LA VERSIONE DI TERRANOVA

La variante pubblicata da Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook #49) è stata raccolta da Pius Power, Southeast Bight, (Terranova) nel 1979 Genevieve Lehr scrive “questa è una canzone che è stata spesso usata per stabilire un ritmo per tirare su le ancore a bordo delle golette di pesca. Molte di queste ‘heave-up shanties’ erano vecchie ballate o contemporanee, e molto spesso versi d’attualità erano inventati al momento e aggiunti alla canzone per renderla lunga quanto il compito stesso”

The Fables in Tear The House Down, 1998 un’allegra versione con un arrangiamento decisamente country


Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca, perchè stiamo per attraversare il mare
virate a lasciare, compagni,
virate a lasciare
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca,  perchè partiremo domani
virate a lasciare, allegri compagni,
siamo in partenza.
a volte partiamo per Liverpool
a volte partiamo per la Spagna
ma ora siamo in partenza per il vecchio St. John, dove tutte le ragazze ballano.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera, mentre ero sulla Jenny Lind.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera e l’ho firmata con un anello
e ora addio mia cara Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare adesso
“mi hai promesso che mi avresti sposato, ma ora mi lasci”

NOTE
1) duds  in questo contesto significa “vestiti” ma più genericamente la grossa sacca di tela contenente il bagaglio del marinaio
2) Saint John’s, conosciuta in italiano come San Giovanni di Terranova per l’esperimento di Marconi, è una città del Canada, capitale della provincia di Terranova e Labrador, situata nella penisola di Avalon, che fa parte dell’isola di Terranova.
3) chiaramente un verso “volante” preso dai tanti farewell qui è Nancy che risponde

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott (Heave away my Johnnies)

FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html