Archivi tag: Cantovivo

The Concealed Death: Re Giraldin

Leggi in Italiano

 Concealed death

LORD OLAF AND THE ELVES 
SCANDINAVIAN VARIANTS
BRITISH AND AMERICAN VERSIONS
FRENCH VERSIONS
ITALIAN VERSION

Just as professor Child also Costantino Nigra brings back the theme of concealed death by a story of the old farmers of Castelnuovo.

The fairy’s present

rackham_fairy There was a hunter who often hunted on the mountainside. Once he saw a very beautiful and richly dressed woman under a rock bottom. The woman, who was a fairy, nodded to the hunter to approach and asked him to take her as his wife. The hunter told her he was just married and did not want to leave his young bride. The fairy gives him a casket containing a gift for the young wife, and advises him to hand it out only to her and by no means to open it. Of course, on his way home he cannot refrain from opening it and finds a splendid belt interwoven with gold and silver threads. Just to know what it will look like when worn by his wife, he ties it round the trunk of a tree. Suddenly the belt catches fire when the tree is hit by a flash of lightning. The hunter is hit, too and he hardly manages to drag himself home. He crumbles on his bed and dies.

Arthur_Rackham_1909_Undine_(7_of_15)In the Breton and Piedmontese version, the accent is placed more precisely on the second part of the story, that of the Concealed Death, a tipicall feature in all Romance languages of the ballad: Comte Arnau (in the Occitan version), Le Roi Renaud (the French one) and Re Gilardin (the Piedmontese one). The relationship between the knight-king and the fairy-mermaid is more nuanced than the Nordic versions, it seems to prevail a more “catholic” and intransigent view on sexual relations … in fact in the ballad greenwood and fairy disappear while the knight returns from the war wounded to death.

RE GILARDIN

La Ciapa Rusa (founders Maurizio Martinotti and Beppe Greppi) made many ethnographic researches with the elderly singers and the players of the musical tradition of the Four provinces -to be precise in Alta Val Borbera – a mountain area straddling four different provinces Al, Ge, Pv and Pc.
The ballad of medieval high origin, had already been collected and published in different versions by Costantino Nigra in his “Popular Songs of Piedmont”

The Ciapa Rusa in 1982 makes an initial arrangement of Re Gilardin
In this first version there is a sort of dramatic representation with the narrating voice (Alberto Cesa) the king (Maurizio Martinotti), the mother, the widow, the altar boy. We can imagine all the most tragic and comical scenes – turned into horror with the dead man who snatches a last kiss from his widow!

La Ciapa Rusa from  “Ten da chent l’archet che la sunada l’è longa – Canti e danze tradizionali dell’ alessandrino” 1982: compared to the translation, it seems more like a “literary” language than a dialect.

Gordon Bok and hig group, 1988 ♪ 
they follow with a good skill the Piedmontese version and in the notes Gordon says he has received the Ciapa Rusa version through the Italian music journalist Mauro Quai

The group refounded with the name of Tendachent (remain Maurizio Martinotti – ghironda and voice, Bruno Raiteri -violin and viola- and Devis Longo – voice, keyboards and flutes) again proposes the ballad in theri first album “Ori pari”, 2000 , with a more progressive sound (now the group is called Nord-Italian progressive folk-rock)

Donata Pinti from “Io t’invoco, libertà!: La canzone piemontese dalla tradizione alla protesta” 2010 ♪ featuring Silvano Biolatti on the guitar

RE GILARDIN*
I
Re Gilardin, lü ‘l va a la guera
Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada
(Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada)
O quand ‘l’è stai mità la strada(1)
Re Gilardin ‘l’è restai ferito.
Re Gilardin ritorna indietro
Dalla sua mamma vò ‘ndà a morire.
II
O tun tun tun, pica a la porta
“O mamma mia che mi son morto”.
“O pica pian caro ‘l mio figlio
Che la to dona ‘l g’à ‘n picul fante(2)”
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i  sonan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria al tuo fante”
III
“O madona la mia madona
Cosa vol dire ch’i cantan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria ai soldati
“O madona , la mia madona
Disem che moda ho da vestirmi”
“Vestati di rosso, vestati di nero
Che le brunette stanno più bene”
IV
O quand l’è stai ‘nt l üs de la chiesa
D’un cirighello si l’à incontrato
“Bundì bongiur an vui vedovella”
“O no no no che non son vedovella
g’l fante in cüna e ‘l marito in guera”
“O si si si che voi sei vedovella
Vostro marì l’è tri dì che ‘l fa terra”
V
“O tera o tera apriti ‘n quatro
Volio vedere il mio cuor reale”
“La tua boca la sa di rose(4)
‘nvece la mia la sa di terra”
English translation**
I
King Gilardin was in the war,
Was in the war wielding his word.
(Was in the war wielding his word.)
When he was Midway, upon the journey, King Gilardin was wounded.
King Gilardin goes back home,/At his mother’s house he whished to die.
II
Bang, bang! He thumped at the door.
“O Mother, I am near to die.”
“Don’t thump so hard, my son,
Your wife has just given birth to a boy.”
“My Lady my mother-in-law
What does all their chanting mean?”
“O my daughter-in-law,
They want to feast your baby.”
III
“My Lady my mother-in-law
What does all their singing mean?”
“O my daughter-in-law,
They want to entertain the soldiers.”
“My Lady my mother-in-law
Tell me, how shall I dress?”
“Dress in red or dress in black,
It fits brunettes perfectly .”
IV
When she came to the church gate,
She encountered an altar boy:
“A wish you a good day, new widow.”
“By no means am I a new widow,
I’ve a child in its cradle and a husband at war.”
“O yes, you are a new widow,
Your husband was buried three days ago.”
V
“O earth, open up in four corners!
I want to see the king of my heart.”
“Your mouth has a taste of rose,
Whereas mine has a taste of earth.”

NOTES
* (From an original recording by Maurizio Martinotti in the upper Val Borbera)
** (revised by here)
1) it’s inevitable remembering Dante “Midway, upon the journey of our life” (with forest corollary), in this context it’s a point that changes forever the life of the king, or the hero.
2) probably he knew about his fatherhood at the time of his death
3) in the answers the real reason for the preparations is hidden: the king’s funeral is being set up
4) it is the dead king who speaks to his wife, but also the popular wisdom, the tearful burial times are still to come .. In the French (and Occitan) version of Re Renaud the earth opens up to swallow up the lady

RE ARDUIN

Cantovivo recorded the same ballad with the title “King Arduin” already collected from the oral tradition by Franco Lucà, in 1984 to Alpette Canavese, performer Battista Goglio “Barba Teck” (1898-1985)

RE ARDUIN
I
Re Arduin (1) a ven da Turin
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
II
“O mamma mia preparmi ‘l let
La cuerta noira e i linsöi di lin
III
O mamma mia cosa diran
Le fije bele ca na stan lì”
IV
“O no no no parla en tan
La nostra nora l’à avù n’infan”
V
“O mamma mia (2) disimi ‘n po’
Che i panatè a na piuren tan”
VI
“A l‘àn brüsà tüti i biciulan (3)
L‘è par sulì c’a na piuren tan”
VII
“O mamma mia cosa diran
Perché da morto na sunen tan”
VIII
“Sarà mort prinsi o quai signor
Tüte le cioche a i fan unur”
IX
“Re Arduin a ven da Turin
L‘è ndà a la guera l’è stai ferì”
X
“O tera freida apriti qui
Ch io vada col mio marì”
English Translation Cattia Salto
I
King Arduin comes from Turin
King Arduin comes from Turin
comes from the war and he was wounded, comes from the war and he was wounded
II
O mother dear, prepare me my bed
the black blanket and linen sheets
III
O mother dear what will they say
the fine ladies who stay there?
IV
Do not talk a lot / our daughter in law has had a baby
V
O  mother dear tell me why the bakers so cry?
VI
They burned all their breads
for they cry so much
VII
O mother dear what’s the news
for stroking the funeral bells?
VIII
The prince or some Lord will be dead/ all the bells do him honor
IX
King Arduin comes from Turin
comes from the war and he was wounded,
X
O  earth, open up now
that I’ll go with my husband

NOTES
* from here
1) King Arduin (Marquis of Ivrea and first king of Italy) is still extremely popular in the Canavese, tributing him in many historical re-enactments
2) in reality it is the daughter-in-law who asks for information on the laments and the dead bells (theme of hidden death) while in the first part (verses II and III) it is Arduino who speaks. Only in the 9th stanza is the death of Arduino announced
3) the “bicciolani” are biscuits typical of Vercellese, but in Turin the biciulan are long and thin breads (a bit pot-bellied in the middle and thin at the tips) the Piedmontese version of the baguette!

LINK
https://minimazione.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/re-gilardin-alla-guerra/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1048
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/italren.htm
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/child-ballads-v2/child8-v2%20-%200371.htm
http://amischanteurs.org/wp-content/uploads/Canti-di-Donata-Pinti.pdf

La morte occultata nelle ballate piemontesi: Re Giraldin

Read the post in English

IL TEMA DELLA MORTE OCCULTATA

LORD OLAF E GLI ELFI DEL BOSCO 
VARIANTI SCANDINAVE
VERSIONI ISOLE BRITANNICHE E AMERICA 
VERSIONI FRANCIA
VERSIONE PIEMONTE

Così come il professor Child anche il nostro Costantino Nigra riporta il tema della Morte occultata da un racconto delle vecchie contadine di Castelnuovo.

IL DONO DELLA FATA

rackham_fairyC’era un cacciatore che cacciava spesso per la montagna. Una volta vide sotto una balza una donna molto bella e riccamente vestita. La donna, che era una fata, accennò al cacciatore di avvicinarsi e lo richiese di nozze. Il cacciatore le disse che era ammogliato e non voleva lasciare la sua giovane sposa. Allora la fata gli diede una scatola chiusa, dicendogli che dentro v’era un bel dono per la sua sposa; e gli raccomandò di consegnare la scatola a questa, senza aprirla. Il cacciatore partì colla scatola. Strada facendo, la curiosità  lo spinse a vedere che cosa c’era dentro. L’aperse, e ci trovò una stupenda cintura, tinta di mille colori, tessuta d’oro e d’argento. Per meglio vederne l’effetto, annodò la cintura a un tronco d’albero. Subitamente la cintura s’infiammò e l’albero fu fulminato. Il cacciatore, toccato dal folgore, si trascinò fino a casa, si pose a letto e morì

Nella versione bretone e piemontese della storia si pone maggiormente l’accento proprio sulla seconda parte della storia, quello della Morte Occultata, caratteristica che permea un po’ tArthur_Rackham_1909_Undine_(7_of_15)utte le versioni della ballata nelle lingue romanze:  Comte Arnau (nella versione occitana), Le Roi Renaud (quella francese) e Re Gilardin (quella piemontese). La relazione tra il cavaliere-re e la fata-sirena è più sfumata rispetto alle versioni nordiche, sembra prevalere una visione più “cattolica”  e intransigente in merito alle relazioni sessuali… infatti nella ballata bosco e  fata scompaiono mentre il cavaliere ritorna dalla guerra ferito a morte.

RE GILARDIN

Il gruppo alessandrino La Ciapa Rusa (fondatori Maurizio Martinotti e Beppe Greppi) raccolse sul campo -tra le tante ricerche etnografiche presso gli anziani cantori e i suonatori della tradizione musicale delle Quattro province,il canto popolare Re Gilardin. (per la precisione in Alta Val Borbera -area appartenente dal punto di vista della tradizione musicale alle Quattro Province, una zona pedo-montana a cavallo di quattro diverse province Al, Ge, Pv e Pc.)
La ballata di origine alto medievale, era già stata raccolta e pubblicata in diverse versioni da Costantino Nigra nel suo “Canti popolari del Piemonte”

La Ciapa Rusa nel 1982 ne fa un primo arrangiamento.
In questa prima versione è allestita una sorta di  rappresentazione drammatica sul modello  delle compagnie dei guitti di un tempo con la voce narrante, il re, la madre, la vedova, il chierichetto in chiesa. Ci possiamo immaginare tutta la sceneggiata più tragica che comica – virata in horror con il morto che strappa un ultimo bacio alla sua vedova!!

La Ciapa Rusa in “Ten da chent l’archet che la sunada l’è longa – Canti e danze tradizionali dell’ alessandrino” 1982. La lingua usata è un italiano piemontizzato o viceversa, si confronti con la traduzione, sembra più un linguaggio “letterario” che dialettale.

Gordon Bok e il suo gruppo, 1988 ♪ 
ricalcano con una discreta bravura la versione piemontese e nelle note Gordon dice di aver ricevuto la versione della Ciapa Rusa tramite il giornalista musicale italiano Mauro Quai

Il gruppo rifondatosi con il nome di Tendachent (restano Maurizio Martinotti – ghironda e canto, Bruno Raiteri -violino e viola- e Devis Longo – canto, tastiere e fiati) ripropone ancora la ballata nel primo album della  nuova formazione “Ori pari“, 2000, con un sound più progressive (ora il gruppo è definito folk-rock progressivo nord-italiano)

Donata Pinti in “Io t’invoco, libertà!: La canzone piemontese dalla tradizione alla protesta” 2010 ♪ con l’accompagnamento alla chitarra di Silvano Biolatti

RE GILARDIN*
I
Re Gilardin, lü ‘l va a la guera
Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada
(Lü el va a la guera a tirar di spada)
O quand ‘l’è stai mità la strada(1)
Re Gilardin ‘l’è restai ferito.
Re Gilardin ritorna indietro
Dalla sua mamma vò ‘ndà a morire.
II
O tun tun tun, pica a la porta
“O mamma mia che mi son morto”.
“O pica pian caro ‘l mio figlio
Che la to dona ‘l g’à ‘n picul fante(2)”
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i  sonan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria al tuo fante”
III
“O madona la mia madona(3)
Cosa vol dire ch’i cantan tanto?”
“O nuretta, la mia nuretta
I g’fan ‘legria ai soldati
“O madona , la mia madona
Disem che moda ho da vestirmi”
“Vestati di rosso, vestati di nero
Che le brunette stanno più bene”
IV
O quand l’è stai ‘nt l üs de la chiesa
D’un cirighello si l’à incontrato
“Bundì bongiur an vui vedovella”
“O no no no che non son vedovella
g’l fante in cüna e ‘l marito in guera”
“O si si si che voi sei vedovella
Vostro marì l’è tri dì che ‘l fa terra”
V
“O tera o tera apriti ‘n quatro
Volio vedere il mio cuor reale”
“La tua boca la sa di rose(4)
‘nvece la mia la sa di terra”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Re Gilardino va alla guerra
va alla guerra a tirar di spada
(va alla guerra a tirar di spada)
e quando si è trovato a metà strada,
Re Gilardino è stato ferito
Re Gilardino ritorna indietro, vuole andare a morire vicino alla madre
II
Tum-Tum batte alla porta
“O mamma mia, sono morto”
“Batti piano, caro figliolo che la tua signora ha un piccolo in fasce”
“O signora, mia signora
perchè suonano tanto?!”
“O mia nuorina, la mia piccola nuora
fanno festa al tuo bambino”
III
“O signora, mia signora
perchè cantano tanto?!”
“O mia nuorina, la mia piccola nuora
sono i soldati che fanno baldoria”
“O signora, mia signora
ditemi in che modo mi devo vestire”
“Vestiti di rosso e nero che addosso alle brunette stanno meglio”
IV
E quando è stata sulla porta della chiesa ha incontrato un chierichetto
“Buon giorno a voi vedovella”
“O no no non che non sono vedovella ho il bambino nella culla e il marito in guerra”
“O si si che voi siete vedovella
Vostro marito è da tre giorni sotto terra”
V
“O terra apriti in quattro
voglio vedere il mio cuore di re”
“La tua bocca sa di rose
invece la mia sa di terra!”

NOTE
*(Da una registrazione originale di Maurizio Martinotti in alta Val Borbera)
1) inevitabile il richiamo dantesco “nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita” (con corollario di bosco), in questo contesto il trovarsi a metà strada allude ad un cambiamento che muta per sempre la vita del re, ovvero dell’eroe.
2) probabilmente il figlio è nato mentre il re era in guerra e quindi egli apprende della sua paternità nel momento della morte!
3) è la nuora che parla per chiedere il motivo del trambusto e nelle risposte le si occulta il vero motivo dei preparativi: si sta allestendo il funerale del re
4) è il re defunto che parla alla moglie, ossia la saggezza popolare, i tempi della sepoltura lacrimata sono ancora a venire.. Nella versione francese (e occitana) di Re Renaud invece la terra si spalanca e la bella viene inghiottita

RE ARDUIN

Cantovivo registrò la stessa ballata col titolo “Re Arduin” già raccolta dalla tradizione orale da Franco Lucà, nel 1984 ad Alpette Canavese, esecutore Battista Goglio “Barba Teck” ( 1898-1985 )

RE ARDUIN
I
Re Arduin (1) a ven da Turin
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
Ven da la guera l’è stai ferì
II
O mamma mia preparmi ‘l let
La cuerta noira e i linsöi di lin
III
O mamma mia cosa diran
Le fije bele ca na stan lì
IV
O no no no parla en tan
La nostra nora l’à avù n’infan
V
O mamma mia (2) disimi ‘n po’
Che i panatè a na piuren tan
VI
A l‘àn brüsà tüti i biciulan (3)
L‘è par sulì c’a na piuren tan
VII
O mamma mia cosa diran
Perché da morto na sunen tan
VIII
Sarà mort prinsi o quai signor
Tüte le cioche a i fan unur
IX
Re Arduin a ven da Turin
L‘è ndà a la guera l’è stai ferì
X
O tera freida apriti qui
Ch io vada col mio marì
traduzione italiano*
I
Re Arduino viene da Torino
Re Arduino viene da Torino
viene dalla guerra è stato ferito
viene dalla guerra è stato ferito
II
O mamma mia preparami il letto
la coperta nera e le lenzuola di lino
III
O mamma mia cosa diranno
le figlie belle che stanno lì
IV
O non parlar tanto/ la nostra nuora ha avuto un bambino
V
O mamma mia ditemi un poco perché i panettieri piangono tanto
VI
Hanno bruciato tutti i “biciulan”
è per quello che piangono tanto
VII
O mamma mia cosa diranno
perché da morto suonano tanto
VIII
Sarà morto il principe o qualche
signore/ tutte le campane gli fanno onore
IX
Re Arduino viene da Torino/ è andato alla guerra è
stato ferito/
X
O terra fredda apriti qui/ che io vada con il mio marito.

NOTE
* da qui
1) Arduino d’Ivrea (marchese di Ivrea e primo re d’Italia) è ancora estremamente popolare nel Canavese omaggiato in molte rievocazioni storiche
2) in realtà è la nuora che chiede informazioni sui lamenti e le campane a morto (tema della morte occultata) mentre nella prima parte (strofe II e III) è Arduino che parla. Solo nella IX strofa è annunciata la morte di Arduino
2) “hanno bruciato tutto il pane” i bicciolani sono dei biscotti tipici del Vercellese, ma a Torino i biciulan sono dei pani di forma lunga e sottile (un po’ panciuta nel mezzo e sottile alle punte), la versione piemontese della baguette!

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/italren.htm
https://minimazione.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/re-gilardin-alla-guerra/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1048
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/child-ballads-v2/child8-v2%20-%200371.htm
http://amischanteurs.org/wp-content/uploads/Canti-di-Donata-Pinti.pdf

WHEN YOU FELL IN THE FOGGY DEW

Canto patriottico per eccellenza ovvero rebel song che testimonia la Rivolta di Pasqua del 1916 (vedere anche Erin go bragh)

Il testo è stato scritto da Charles O’Neil nel 1919, in occasione del giorno d’insediamento del nuovo parlamento irlandese a Dublino per commemorare i primi passi dell’Isola verso l’indipendenza (l’ultima strofa però è stata aggiunta successivamente): meglio morire sotto il cielo di Dublino piuttosto che combattere sotto il comando degli inglesi o per una causa sbagliata. La melodia è quella di The Moorlough shore.

Sinead O’Connor & Chieftains (strofe da I a III e V)

ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones con le cinque strofe canoniche


I
As down the glen
one Easter morn
To a city fair(1) rode I
Their armed lines of marching men
In squadrons passed me by
No pipe did hum
and no battle drum
Did sound its loud tattoo
But the Angelus Bell o’er the Liffy(2) swell Rang out in the foggy dew
II
Right proudly high in Dublin town
Hung they out a flag of war
‘Twas better to die
‘neath an Irish sky
Than at Suvla or Sud-el-bar (3)
And from the plains of Royal Meath
Strong men came hurrying through
While Britania’s huns
with their long-range guns
Sailed in though the foggy dew
III
The bravest fell and the requiem bell
Rang mournfully and clear
For those who died that Eastertide
In the springing of the year
And the world did gaze in deep amaze
On those fearless men but few
Who bore the fight that Freedom’s light
Might shine though the foggy dew
 IV
‘Twas   England bade our Wild Geese(4) go
That small nations might be free
But their lonely graves are by Suvla’s waves
At the fringe of the great North Sea
Oh had they died by Pearse’s side(5)
Or fought with Chatal Brugha(6)
Then their graves we’d keep (7) where the Fenians (8) sleep
‘Neath the hills of the foggy dew
V (NON DI O’NEIL)
Back through the glen I rode again
And my heart with grief was sore
For I parted then with valiant men
Whom I ne’er shall see more
But to and fro in my dreams I go
And I kneel and pray for you
For slavery fled oh glorius dead
When you fell in the foggy dew
TRADUZIONE ed. musicali Rodaviva
I
Una mattina di Pasqua
attraversavo una valle
a cavallo verso una bella città (1),
mi passarono davanti marciando
file di uomini armati.
La zampogna non suonò
il tamburello non rullò.
Si sentì solo la campana dell’Angelus
suonare e di lontano lo scorrere
del fiume(2) nella nebbia di quel mattino.
II
Innalzarono fieramente la bandiera
della battaglia sopra Dublino.
Sarebbe stato meglio
morire sotto il cielo irlandese
piuttosto che combattere con inglesi a Sulva o a Sud-el-Bar(3). Dalle pianure di Royal Meath arrivarono correndo altri uomini forti, mentre con i cannoni arrivarono gli inglesi invasori sulle loro navi nella nebbia di quel mattino.
III
I più coraggiosi caddero
e nel silenzio le campane
suonarono tristemente il requiem per coloro che morirono in quella Pasqua di primavera.
Il mondo guardò con grande stupore
quei pochi uomini coraggiosi
che sostennero la lotta perché la luce della libertà risplendesse nella nebbia di quel mattino.
[IV
Se l’Inghilterra  avesse lasciato fare alle nostre Oche Selvatiche(4), quelle piccole nazioni  avrebbero potuto essere libere.
Ma le loro tombe solitarie stanno ora nelle acque del Sulva o sulle rive del gran Mare del Nord.
Oh, fossero morti al fianco di Pearse(5)
o avessero combattuto con Cathal Brugha(6)! Allora si serberebbero i loro nomi(7) dove dormono i Feniani (8), sotto le colline fra la nebbia dell’aurora]*
V
Tornai in quella valle cavalcando
e il mio cuore pianse di dolore,
perché avevo lasciato uomini valorosi
che non avrei mai più visto.
Ma quando il mio pensiero torna a voi m’inginocchio e prego,
perché la schiavitù è fuggita quando voi,
o morti gloriosi,
siete caduti nella nebbia di quel mattino.

NOTE *integrazione traduzione di Cattia Salto
1) Dublino
2) il Liffey è il fiume che attraversa Dublino
3) nella I Guerra Mondiale
4) Oche selvatiche   sono i soldati irlandesi che emigrarono per prestare servizio negli eserciti   continentali dal sedicesimo al diciottesimo secolo; nello specifico si   riferisce ai soldati giacobiti che lasciarono l’Irlanda per poter continuare   a prestare servizio nella Brigata irlandese di Giacomo II (ottobre 1691)
5) Pádraig (Patrick) Pearse  (18791916), è stato un poeta irlandese, teorico della rinascita dell’identità gaelica.  A diciassette anni si unì alla Gaelic League e nel 1913 entrò nell’Irish Republican Brotherhood per poi diventare capo dell’Irish Volunteer. Fu uno dei comandanti maggiori dell’Easter Rising, e fu lui a leggere la Poblacht na hÉireann, la proclamazione della Repubblica d’Irlanda, sulle scale del General Post Office, davanti ad una folla per la verità un po’ disorientata. Fu giustiziato il 3 maggio 1916.
6) Cathal Brugha (1874 – 1922) uomo politico irlandese,  attivo nell’insurrezione di Pasqua
7) l’autore si rammarica che i tanti soldati irlandesi morti nella I Guerra Mondiale nell’esercito inglese non abbiano potuto combattere gloriosamente per l’Irlanda, allora i loro nomi sarebbero stati ancora ricordati come eroi invece di andare dispersi
8) Fenians ovvero la Fenian Brotherhood  fondata da James Stephens nel 1858 a Dublino per la creazione di una repubblica irlandese indipendente dal Regno Unito. I Feniani   presero il nome dai Fianna ovvero i mitici guerrieri guidati da Fionn Mac Cumhail. Si fa riferimento agli antichi luoghi di sepoltura di questi mitici eroi ossia le tombe a tumulo.

ASCOLTA Alberto Cesa con i Cantovivo

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO  ALBERTO CESA
I
Era il giorno di Pasqua e scendevo giù –sulla strada per la mia città – quando vidi protetti dalla bruma del mattino – mille uomini marciare.
E nell’aria non c’eran cornamuse e tamburi solo i passi che battevan la sterpaglia, – mentre al colle di Liffey la campana suonava – come il tuono che attraversa la battaglia.
II
Con orgoglio scoprii che a sfidare il destino – sventolavan le bandiere della guerra: – era meglio crepare sotto il cielo di Dublino – che   regalare il cuore all’Inghilterra. – Dalle verdi pianure di Royal Meath – ogni uomo lasciava la dimora – mentre i barbari inglesi con i loro fucili – salpavan fra le nebbie dell’aurora.
III
Ma i più forti morirono e la campana suonò –il canto   triste della terra violentata – mentre il vento tagliava il dolore nuovo e antico – come una folle, tremenda sciabolata.
Ed il mondo pensava quanto fossero strani – questi uomini liberi e leali – che morivan “soltanto” per riaccendere ancora la libertà nella nebbia dell’aurora.

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1929