Archivi tag: Bob Roberts

Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Leggi in italiano

The songs of the sea run from shore to shore, in particular “Windy old weather”, which according to Stan Hugill is a song by Scottish fishermen entitled “The Fish of the Sea”, also popular on the North-East coasts of the USA and Canada.
TITLES: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

A forebitter sung occasionally as a sea shanty, redating back to 1700 and probably coming from some broadsides with the title “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “This song appears on some broadsides as The Fishes’ Lamentation and seems to have survived as a sailor’s chantey or fisherman’s song. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) and Hugill (1964) include it in their chantey books. We also recorded it from Bob Roberts on board his Thames barge, The Cambria. It also appears in the Newfoundland and Nova Scotia collections of Ken Peacock and Helen Creighton“. (from here)

A fishing ship is practicing trawling on a full moon night, and as if by magic, the fishes start talking and warning sailors about the arrival of a storm. The fishes described are all belonging to the Atlantic Ocean and are quite commonly found in the English Channel and the North Sea (as well as in the Mediterranean Sea).
The variants can be grouped into two versions

FIRST VERSION  Blow the Man down tune

In this version the fish warn (or threaten) the fishermen on the arrival of the storm, urging them to head to the ground. The text is reported in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, from Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage from Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag
“Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk from Sea Music 2003 a fresh version between country and old time.

I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.

NOTES
1) Happisburgh lighthouse (“Hazeboro”) is located in the English county of ​​Norfolk, it was built in 1790 and painted in white and red stripes; It is managed by a foundation that deals with the maintenance of more than one hundred lighthouses throughout Great Britain. 112 are the steps to reach the tower that still works without the help of man. The headlights at the beginning were two but the lower one was dismantled in 1883 due to coastal erosion. The two lighthouses marked a safe passage through the Haagborough Sands
2) In the Nordic countries herrings (fresh or better in brine or smoked) are served in all sauces from breakfast to dinner. “It is a fish that loves cold seas and lives in numerous herds.The herring fishing in the North Seas has been widespread since the Middle Ages.It is clearly facilitated by the quantity of fish and the limited range of their movements. trawlers and start the fishing season on May 1, to close it after two months.In all the countries of North America and Northern Europe this fishing has an almost sacred character, because it has been for years the providence of fishermen and is a real natural wealth In the Netherlands and Sweden, for example, the first day of herring fishing is organized in honor of the queen and is proclaimed a national holiday ” (from here)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus.with a characteristic tail with a very elongated upper part (almost as much as the length of the body) that the animal uses as a whip to stun and overwhelm its prey. The name comes from Aristotle who considered this fish very clever, because he was skilled in escaping from the fishermen
4) the mackerel stanza is missing:
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) perhaps refers to halibut or halibut, of considerable size, has an oval and flattened body, similar to that of a large sole, with the eyes on the right side
6) the “conger” is a fish with an elongated body similar to eel but more robust, can reach a length of two or three meters and exceeds ten kilos of weight. It is a fundamental ingredient in the Livorno cacciucco dish!
7) another translation of the sentence could be: we recover our networks

SCOTTISH VERSION, Blaw the Wind Southerly tune

In this version the fish take possession of the ship, it seems the description of the ghost ship of “Davy Jone”, the evil spirit of the waters made so vividly in the movie “Pirates of the Caribbean”. An old Scottish melody accompanies a series of variations of the same song.
davy-jones

 

Quadriga Consort from Ship Ahoy, 2011 ♪ 

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown from, Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  titled “Fish in the sea” (stanzas from I to III and VIII)

I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”

NOTES
1) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.
2) the fishermen were / are very superstitious men, in all latitudes, it takes little or nothing to attract misfortune in the sea, it is still a widespread belief that the devil or the evil spirit has power over the sea and storms.

AMERICAN VARIANT: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Of the second version, the best-known in America bears the title “The Boston as-all-ye” as collected by Joanna Colcord in her “Songs of American Sailormen” which she writes”There can be little doubt that [this] song, although it was sung throughout the merchant service, began life with the fishing fleet. We have the testimony of Kipling in Captains Courageous that it was a favourite within recent years of the Banks fishermen. It is known as The Fishes and also by its more American title of The Boston Come-All-Ye. The chorus finds its origin in a Scottish fishing song Blaw the Wind Southerly. A curious fact is that Captain Whall, a Scotchman himself, prints this song with an entirely different tune, and one that has no connection with the air of the Tyneside keelmen to which our own Gloucester fishermen sing it. The version given here was sung by Captain Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger from  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962

I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder(6)
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!

NOTES
1) In sailing, tack is a corner of a sail on the lower leading edge. Separately, tack describes which side of a sailing vessel the wind is coming from while under way—port or starboard. Tacking is the maneuver of turning between starboard and port tack by bringing the bow (the forward part of the boat) through the wind. (from Wiki)
2) porpoise is often considered as a small dolphin, has a distinctive rounded snout and has no beak like dolphins
3) it  is the helmsman shouting
4 ) smelt it (osmero) is a small fish that lives in the Channel and in the North Sea; its name derives from the fact that its flesh gives off an unpleasant odor
5) literally “stupid head” is a common saying among the fishermen that the cod is stupid, because it does not recognize the bait and lets himself hoist docilely on board.

Blow the Wind Southerly

LINK
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html

WORST OLD SHIP

Una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) per il lavoro alle pompe, anche conosciuta con il nome di The Collier Brig

La Versione Black Flag è più corta

The worst old ship that ever did sail,
Sailed out of Harwich on a windy day.
And we’re waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day
That we get our pay.
She was built in Roman time,
Held together with bits of twine
Nothing in the galley—nothing in the hold,
But the skipper’s turned in with a bag of gold.
Off Orford Ness she sprang a leak,
Hear her poor old timbers creak.
We pumped our way round scalby Ness,
When the wind backed round to the west-nor’-west.
Into the Humber and up the town,
Pump you blighters—pump or drown
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Il peggior brigantino che mai navigò
salpò da Harwich (1) in un giorno di vento
CORO
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
aspettiamo il giorno
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
in cui saremo pagati
Fu costruita ai tempi dei Romani
tenuta insieme con un pezzo di spago
Niente in cambusa, niente nella stiva
ma il capitano ritornò con una borsa piena d’oro
Nei pressi di Orford Ness (4) nella nave si aprì una falla, ascoltate le sue povere vecchie travi scricchiolare,
abbiamo azionato le pompe nei pressi di Lowestoft Ness (5) e allora il vento spingeva da ovest, nord-ovest
nell’Humber (7) e verso la città
“Pompate, bastardi, pompate o affogate”

ASCOLTA  Bob Roberts in “Sea Songs & Shanties”


The worst old brig that ever did weigh,
Sailed out of Harwich on a windy day;
Chorus:
And we’re waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day,
We’re waiting for the day
When we get our pay!
She (2) was built in Roman times,
Held together with bits of twine…
The skipper’s half drunk and the mate is too,
And the crew is fourteen men too few…
As we shoved off from the Surrey Dock,
The skipper caught his knickers in the main sheet block…
By Orford Ness she sprang a leak,
Hear her poor old timbers creak…
We pumped our way ‘round Lowestoft Ness,
When the wind backed round to the west-sou’-west…
Through the Cockles to Cromer Cliff,
She’s steering like a wagon with a wheel adrift…
Into the Humber and up to town,
“Pump, you bastards, pump or drown”…
Her coal was shot by a Keadby crew,
But her bottom was rotten and it all fell through…
So after all our fears and alarms,
We’re all ended up in “The Druid’s Arms.”
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Il peggior brigantino che mai navigò
salpò da Harwich (1) in un giorno di vento
CORO
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
aspettiamo il giorno
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
in cui saremo pagati
Fu costruita ai tempi dei Romani
tenuta insieme con un pezzo di spago
il comandante è mezzo ubriaco e il primo ufficiale pure
e la ciurma è di soli quattordici uomini
appena siamo smammati dal Surrey Dock (3)
il comandante stese le mutande..
sulla randa
nei pressi di Orford Ness (4) nella nave si aprì una falla, ascoltate le sue povere vecchie travi scricchiolare,
abbiamo azionato le pompe nei pressi di Lowestoft Ness (5) e allora il vento spingeva da ovest, sud-ovest
per il Cockles a Cromer Cliff (6)
sterzava come un carro senza una ruota
nell’Humber (7) e verso la città
“Pompate, bastardi, pompate o affogate”
Il suo carbone è stato pescato da un equipaggio di Keadby
perchè il suo fondo era marcio e tutto si è riversato
così dopo tutte le nostra paure e gli allarmi
siamo finiti sul The Druid’s Arms.”

NOTE
1) Harwich è una cittadina portuale della contea dell’Essex, in Inghilterra
2) brigantino è al maschile, nave è al femminile così viene usato she per riferirsi alla nave
3) molo di Londra
4) Orford Nesso vero il Suffolk : un tratto di costa paranoica che ha difeso se stessa da invasioni che per secoli non sono mai arrivate. scrive Robert Macfarlane: “Linee umane e linee alluvionali si scontrano, si collegano e si intersecano, creando un’unica gigantesca impronta digitale di ghiaia, che si allunga a perdita d’occhio.” E dove Winfried Sebald ebbe “la sensazione di ritrovarsi fra i relitti della nostra civiltà, andata a picco nel corso di una catastrofe a venire”.
“Quando scendemmo dalla nave sul pontile, lo stato selvaggio di quella lingua di terra ci apparve evidente. Guardando il cordone litorale dall’imbarcadero, era impossibile capire dove il marrone del deserto lasciasse spazio al marrone del mare. L’orizzonte era svanito, dissolto in un unico beige ondulato di sassi, di mare e di cielo. Una coppia di Harrier sfrecciò sopra di noi in direzione sud, scartavetrando l’aria con il suo frastuono. Calcammo i primi passi sulla ghiaia.”
(in Luoghi Selvaggi Robert Macfarlane)
5) Ness Point, anche conosciuto come Lowestoft Ness, rappresenta il punto più orientale dell’Inghilterra, (contea del Suffolk.)
6) Norfolk
7) L’Humber è un ampio estuario che forma parte del confine tra nord e sud dell’Inghilterra. Vi si trovano i porti di Hull, Grimsby, Immingham e New Holland.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=42400
http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=615806
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Worst_Old_Ship.html

Windy old weather (Fishes Lamentation)

Read the post in English

Le canzoni del mare si rincorrono da sponda a sponda, in particolare “Windy old weather“, che secondo Stan Hugill è una canzone dei pescatori scozzesi dal titolo “The Fish of the Sea, popolare anche sulle coste Nord- Est degli USA e del Canada.
TITOLI: Fishes Lamentation, Fish in the Sea, Haisboro Light Song (Up Jumped the Herring), The Boston Come-All-Ye, Blow Ye Winds Westerly, Windy old weather

Una forebitter song cantata occasionalmente come canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) risalente al 1700 e proveniente con tutta probabilità da alcuni broadsides con il titolo di “The Fishes’ Lamentation“. “Questa canzone appare su dei broadsides comeThe Fishes’ Lamentation potrebbe essere il resto di una canzone marinaresca o canzone dei pescatori. Whall (1910), Colcord (1938) e Hugill (1964) la includono nelle loro raccolte di shanty. E’ stata registrasta da Bob Roberts a bordo della sua chiatta sul Thames, The Cambria. La troviamo anche nelle raccolte di Terranova e Nuova Scozia di  Ken Peacock e Helen Creighton“. (tratto da qui)

Una nave di pescatori sta praticando la pesca a strascico in una notte di luna piena, e come per magia i pesci si mettono a parlare per avvisare i marinai dell’arrivo di una tempesta. I pesci descritti sono tutti appartenenti all’oceano atlantico e si trovano abbastanza comunemente nel Canale della Manica e nel Mare del Nord (come pure nel Mar Mediterraneo).
Le varianti si possono raggruppare in due versioni

PRIMA VERSIONE Melodia Blow the Man down

In questa versione i pesci avvisano (o minacciano) i pescatori  sull’arrivo della tempesta esortandoli a dirigersi verso terra. Il testo è riportato in “Oxford Book of Sea Songs”, Roy Palmer

Bob Roberts, in Windy old weather, 1958

David Tinervia · Nils Brown · Sean Dagher · Clayton Kennedy · David Gossage in Assassin’s Creed – Black Flag con il titolo di “Windy Old Weather”

Dan Zanes &  Festival Five Folk in Sea Music 2003 una piacevole versione tra il country e l’ Old Time.


I
As we were a-fishing
off Happisburgh(1) light
Shooting and hauling
and trawling all night,
In the windy old weather,
stormy old weather
When the wind blows
we all pull together
II
When up jumped a herring,
the queen (king) of the sea(2)
Says “Now, old skipper,
you cannot catch me,”
III
We sighted a Thresher(3)
-a-slashin’ his tail,
“Time now Old Skipper
to hoist up your sail.”
IV (4)
And up jumps a Slipsole
as strong as a horse(5),
Says now, “Old Skipper
you’re miles off course.”
V
Then along comes plaice
-who’s got spots on his side,
Says “Not much longer
-these seas you can ride.”
VI
Then up rears a conger(6)
-as long as a mile,
“Winds coming east’ly”
-he says with a smile.
VII
I think what these fishes
are sayin’ is right,
We’ll haul up our gear(7)
now an’ steer for the light.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre eravamo a pescare
al largo del faro di Happisburgh
calando e recuperando
le reti da strascico per tutta la notte
con un tempo ventoso
un vento di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia
allora tiriamo tutti insieme.
II
Ecco che saltò in alto un’aringa,
la regina del mare
“Vecchio capitano
non riesci a prendermi!”
III
Avvistammo uno squalo volpe
che dimenava la coda
“E’ tempo vecchio capitano
di issare la vela”
IV
Salta su una sogliola
forte come un cavallo
“Vecchio capitano
sei fuori rotta”
V
Poi arrivò una platessa
con le macchie sul fianco
“Per non molto ancora
potrai solcare questi mari”
VI
Poi salta su un grongo
lungo un miglio
“I venti provengono da est”
dice con un sorriso.
V
Credo che questi pesci
dicano la verità
dispieghiamo le vele ora
e dirigiamoci verso la luce !

NOTE
1) il faro di Happisburgh (“Hazeboro”) si trova nella conta inglese di Norfolk, costruito nel 1790 è verniciato a righe bianche e rosse; è gestito da una fondazione che si occupa del mantenimento di più di cento fari in tutta la Gran Bretagna. 112 sono gli scalini per raggiungere la torre che funziona tutt’ora senza l’ausilio dell’uomo. I fari all’inizio erano due ma quello più basso è stato smantellato nel 1883 a causa dell’erosione costiera. I due fari segnavano un passaggio sicuro attraverso le Haagborough Sands
2) Nei paesi nordici (Scozia in testa of course) le aringhe (fresche o meglio in salamoia oppure affumicate)  sono servite in tutte le salse dalla prima colazione alla cena. “E’ un pesce che ama i mari freddi e vive in branchi numerosi. La pesca dell’aringa nei mari del Nord è diffusa sin dal Medioevo. È chiaramente facilitata dalla quantità dei pesci e dal raggio limitato dei loro spostamenti. I pescatori adoperano la rete a strascico e iniziano la stagione di pesca il primo maggio, per chiuderla dopo due mesi. In tutti i paesi del Nord America e del Nord Europa questa pesca ha un carattere quasi sacro, perché è stata per anni la provvidenza dei pescatori ed è una vera e propria ricchezza naturale. In Olanda e in Svezia, per esempio, il primo giorno di pesca all’aringa viene organizzato in onore della regina e viene proclamata festa nazionale. (tratto da qui)
3) Thresher shark thresher, thrasher, fox shark, alopius vulpinus. In italiano è lo “squalo volpe” dalla caratteristica coda con la parte superiore molto allungata (quasi quanto la lunghezza del corpo) che l’animale utilizza come scudiscio per stordire e sopraffare le prede. Il nome gli viene da Aristotele che considerava tale pesce molto furbo, perchè abile nello sfuggire ai pescatori
4) manca la strofa dello sgombro
then along comes a mackerel with strips on his back
“Time now, old skipper, to shift yout main tack”
5) forse si riferisce all’ippoglosso o halibut, di dimensioni notevoli, ha corpo ovale e schiacciato, simile a quello di una grande sogliola, con gli occhi sul lato destro
6) il “conger” (grongo) è un pesce dal corpo allungato simile all’anguilla ma più robusto, può arrivare alla lunghezza di due o tre metri e supera i dieci chili di peso. E’ un ingrediente fondamentale nel cacciucco livornese!
7)un’altra traduzione della frase potrebbe essere: recuperiamo le nostre reti

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE Melodia Blaw the Wind Southerly

In questa versione  i pesci s’impossessano della nave, sembra la descrizione della nave-fantasma di “Davy Jone”, lo spirito maligno delle acque reso così vividamente nel film “I pirati dei caraibi”.
davy-jones

Una vecchia melodia scozzese accompagna una serie di varianti della stessa canzone.

Quadriga Consort in Ship Ahoy, 2011 (versione completa)

Michiel Schrey, Sean Dagher, Nils Brown in Assasin’s Creed – Black Flag  con il titolo di “Fish in the sea” (da I a III e VIII)


I
Come all you young sailor men,
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish in the sea;
(Chorus)
And it’s…Windy weather, boys,
stormy weather, boys,
When the wind blows,
we’re all together, boys;
Blow ye winds westerly,
blow ye winds, blow,
Jolly sou’wester, boys,
steady she goes.
II
Up jumps the eel
with his slippery tail,
Climbs up aloft
and reefs the topsail.
III
Then up jumps the shark
with his nine rows of teeth,
Saying, “You eat the dough boys,
and I’ll eat the beef!”
IV
Up jumps the lobster
with his heavy claws,
Bites the main boom
right off by the jaws!
V
Up jumps the halibut,
lies flat on the deck
He says, ‘Mister Captain,
don’t step on my neck!’
VI
Up jumps the herring,
the king of the sea,
Saying, ‘All other fishes,
now you follow me!’
VII
Up jumps the codfish
with his chuckle-head (1),
He runs out up forward
and throws out the lead!
VIII
Up jumps the whale
the largest of all,
“If you want any wind,
well, I’ll blow ye a squall(2)!”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi, giovani marinai, ascoltatemi,
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
(coro)
è tempo ventoso, ragazzi,
tempo di tempesta,

quando il vento soffia,
stiamo tutti insieme.
Soffiate voi venti occidentali
soffiate venti, soffiate
vivaci (venti) di sud-ovest, ragazzi,

la barca dritta va.
II
A bordo salta l’anguilla
con la sua coda scivolosa
si arrampica in alto
e fa scendere le vele di gabbia.
III
Poi salta dentro lo squalo
con la sua chiosa di denti
dicendo ” Mangiatevi la pasta ragazzi che io mi mangio l’arrosto”
IV
Salta dentro l’aragosta
con le sue pesanti chele
morde il boma
proprio con le ganasce
V
Salta dentro l’ippoglosso
e si appiattisce sul ponte
dice “Singor Capitano
non pestarmi il collo!”
VI
Salta dentro l’aringa
il re del mare
dicendo ” Che tutti gli altri pesci
mi seguano!”
VII
Salta dentro il merluzzo
con la sua testina
corre avanti e indietro
e getta fuori i pesi!
VIII
Poi salta dentro la balena,
il pesce più grosso di tutti
“Se volete vento,
bene vi darò una burrasca!”

NOTE
1) letteralmente “testa da stupido”  è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo.
2) i pescatori erano/sono uomini molto superstiziosi, a tutte le latitudini, ci vuole poco o niente per attirarsi la sfortuna in mare, è infatti ancora una credenza molto diffusa che il diavolo ovvero lo spirito maligno abbia potere sul mare e sulle tempeste.

LA VARIANTE AMERICANA: THE BOSTON COME-ALL-YE

Della seconda versione quella più conosciuta in America porta il titolo “The Boston come-all-ye” come collezionata da Joanna Colcord nel suo “Songs of American Sailormen” che così scrive “Non c’è dubbio che [questa] canzone, sebbene fosse cantata sulle navi mercantili, era nata sulle flotte dei pescatori. Abbiamo la testimonianza di Kipling in Capitani Coraggiosi che sia stata una delle preferite negli ultimi anni dei pescatori sui Banchi [di Terranova]. È conosciuta come The Fishes e anche con il titolo più americano di The Boston Come-All-Ye. Il coro trova la sua origine in una canzone di pesca scozzese Blaw the Wind Southerly. Un fatto curioso è che il Capitano Whall, proprio uno scozzese, stampò questa canzone con un motivo completamente diverso, senza collegamento con la melodia delle chiatte sul Tyneside con cui i nostri pescatori di Gloucester la cantano. La versione data qui è stata cantata dal capitano Frank Seeley.”

Peggy Seeger in  Whaler Out of New Bedford, 1962


I
Come all ye young sailormen
listen to me,
I’ll sing you a song
of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly,
westerly blow;
we’re bound to the southward,
so steady she goes
.
II
Oh, first came the whale,
he’s the biggest of all,
he clumb up aloft,
and let every sail fall.
III
Next came the mackerel
with his striped back,
he hauled aft the sheets
and boarded each tack(1).
IV
The porpoise(2) came next
with his little snout,
he grabbed the wheel,
calling “Ready? About!(3”
V
Then came the smelt(4),
the smallest of all,
he jumped to the poop
and sung out, “Topsail, haul!”
VI
The herring came saying,
“I’m king of the seas!
If you want any wind,
I’ll blow you a breeze.”
VII
Next came the cod
with his chucklehead (5),
he went to the main-chains
to heave to the lead.
VIII
Last come the flounder
as flat as the ground,
saying, “Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound”!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti voi,  giovani marinai
ascoltatemi
vi canterò una canzone
sui pesci del mare,
allora soffiate voi venti occidentali
occidentali soffiate
siamo diretti a sud

così la barca dritta va.
II
Prima venne la balena
che è la più grande
si arrampicò in alto
e fece scendere ogni vela.
III
Poi venne lo sgombro
con il suo dorso a strisce
alò a poppa le vele e virò di bordo per cambiare di mura.
IV
La focena venne poi
con il suo piccolo muso
afferrò il comando del timone
“Pronti a virare”
V
Poi arrivò lo sperlano
il più piccolo di tutti
saltò a poppa
urlando”tira le vele di gabbia”
VI
Venne l’aringa dicendo
“Sono il re dei mari!
Se vuoi del vento,
ti soffierò una brezza”
VII
Poi venne il merluzzo
con la  sua testina,
si recò all’ancora
per tirare la cima.
VIII
Per ultimo venne la passera
piatta come una suola
dicendo ” Dannati i tuoi occhi,
stupido, bada a come parli!”

NOTE
1) in termini nautici tack = mure indica il lato della barca a vela da cui arriva il vento; virare, manovrare per cambiare di mura, vale a dire per ricevere il vento da un’altra direzione in modo da cambiare l’andatura;
2) la focena è considerato spesso come un delfino piccolo, ha un caratteristico muso arrotondato e non ha il becco come i delfini
3) è il timoniere a gridare “Pronti a virare” (to go about)
4) lo sperlano (osmero) è un piccolo pesce che vive nella Manica e nel Mare del Nord; il suo nome deriva dal fatto che le sue carni emanano un odore sgradevole
5) “testa da stupido” è un detto comune tra i pescatori che il merluzzo sia stupido (minchione) perchè non riconosce le esche e si lascia issare docilmente a bordo. Tutti i pescatori desiderano un mare pescoso e una preda ingenua!

Blow the Wind Southerly

FONTI
http://www.pubblicitaitalia.com/ilpesce/2013/1/12262.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/fishes.html
http://moodpoint.com/lyrics/unknown/song_of_the_fishes.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/windy-old-weather.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/windyoldweather.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149445
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49498
https://thesession.org/tunes/11479
http://bestpossiblejob.blogspot.it/2008/09/come-all-ye-young-and-not-so-young.html

WHISKEY JOHNNY

maglione guernseySottotitolato “Whiskey is the life of man”, Whiskey Johhny è una sea shanty  diventata popolare anche nel circuito folk. Dato il tema non poteva diventare che una favorita drinking song irlandese!

A.L. Lloyd commenta nelle note “This halyard shanty was most often sung when the men were working aft near the skipper’s quarters, in the enduring hope that his heart might melt, and he would order a tot for all hands.” (Blow Boys Blow 1957).
Per alare la cima all’unisono i marinai si distendono lungo la drizza trascinano all’unisono la parola Whisky! fino a Whiski-i-i-i. alla successiva, John-ny! Enfatizzata come un segnale, la squadra ala con tutte le forze riunite, iniziando a sollevare il pennone lungo l’albero, trascinando con sè la vela.” (da Italo Ottonello)

ALTRI TITOLI: Whisky Johnny, Whisky for my Johnny, Whiskey O, Whiskey oh and Johnny oh, John, Rise Her Up, Rise’r Up, Rise Me Up From Down Below

ASCOLTA da Assassin’s Creed


Whiskey(1) is the life of man,
Whiskey, Johnny(2)!
O, whiskey is the life of man,
Whiskey for my Johnny O!
O, I drink whiskey when I can(3)
Whiskey from an old tin can(4),
Whiskey gave me a broken nose!
Whiskey made me pawn my clothes,
Whiskey drove me around Cape Horn(5),
It was many a month when I was gone,
I thought I heard the old man say:
“I’ll treat my crew in a decent way(6)
A glass of grog(7) for every man!
And a bottle for the Chantey Man”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey(1) è la vita dell’uomo,
Whiskey, marinaio!(2)
Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
Whiskey, per il mio marinaio!
Oh bevo whiskey a più non posso(3)
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina(4)
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
il Whiskey mi ha portato a Capo Horn(5)
e sono molti mesi che sono partito.
Credo di aver sentito il capitano dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio(6)
Un bicchiere di grog(7) per ogni uomo
e una bottiglia per il cantante”

NOTE
1) Gli Irlandesi si attribuiscono l’invenzione del whiskey partendo nientemeno che da San Patrizio che, nel V sec, avrebbe portato dal suo viaggio in Terra Santa l’alambicco, all’epoca utilizzato per distillare solo i profumi, e convertito dai monaci irlandesi in divina macchina per produrre l’Uisce Beathe (in gaelico) ossia “l’acqua di vita”, dal latino “aquavitae” pronunciata come “Iish-kee” e inglesizzato a partire del XII secolo in whisky. Fu sempre un monaco, San Colombano, a insegnare i segreti della distillazione agli Scozzesi. Tuttavia gli Scozzesi si ostinano a dire che loro distillavano già tre secoli prima della nascita di Cristo! Così whiskey è il termine più appropriato per indicare il whisky irlandese. (vedere le differenze)
2) Il marinaio per antonomasia è  Johnny una nota in contemplator.com che dice “The name John was used from the time of Packet Ships for merchant seamen and particularly for mariners from Liverpool.”
3) Joanna Colcord in Songs of American Sailormen, scrive “I’ll drink whiskey while I can,”
4) si riferisce all’alambicco rudimentale con cui si  distilla whisky illegale. Al poitin (come dicono gli irlandesi) si attribuiscono poteri di guarigione da tutti i mali (utilizzato più comunemente come digestivo o per la cura del raffreddore), è considerato più genericamente un elisir  contro l’invecchiamento, ma il suo scopo principale è quello di “deliziare il cuore” o più   poeticamente “bring a shock of joy  to the blood” ( in italiano: “dare una scossa di gioia al sangue”).
5) il marinaio si è ubriacato ed è stato arruolato a forza oppure ha finito i suoi soldi e ha ripreso il mare. Un vero peccato per un così appassionato amante di whisky perchè sulle navi si beveva rum (diluito con acqua)!
6) capitano e ufficiali facevano rispettare una dura disciplina a bordo delle navi, ma da loro dipendevano i premi consistenti soprattutto in razioni extra di grog!
7) grog
: colloquiale termine usato in Irlanda come sinonimo di drinking; è un termine molto antico e ha il significato di “liquore” o “bevanda alcolica”, ma nello specifico è una bevanda introdotta nella Royal Navy nel 1740, dopo la conquista britannica della Giamaica: ai marinai venivano date varie razioni giornaliere di rum diluito con l’acqua. continua

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


Whisky—Johnny

O whisky is the life of man
Whisky for me Johnny
Oh I wish I had some whisky now
Whisky—Johnny
Oh I wish I had some whisky now
Whisky for me Johnny
whisky gave my this red nose
whisky made me pawn my clothes.
O if whisky comes here me now
it’s something that comes and goes
O whisky killed my mam and dad
And whisky drove my brother mad
whisky killed my sister Sue
whisky killed the all ship crew
I whish I was in London town
Till make that girl fly high
A girl for every sailor man
and Whisky in an old tin can
Whisky here whiskey there
whisky whisky everywhere
Oh whisky made the old man say
“One more pull and than belay”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whisky, marinaio!
Whisky è la vita dell’uomo,
Whisky per il mio marinaio!
vorrei avere del whisky,
Whisky, marinaio!
vorrei avere del whisky
Whisky per il mio marinaio!
il whisky mi ha dato questo naso rosso
per whisky ho impegnato i vestiti
se il whisky venisse da me
è qualcosa che va e viene
il whisky ha ucciso mamma e babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mio fratello
il whisky ha ucciso mia sorella Sue
il whisky ha ucciso tutta la ciurma della nave, vorrei essere a Londra
per far volare in alto quella ragazza
una donna per ogni marinaio
eil  whisky in una vecchia lattina
whisky su e whisky giù
whisky dappertutto
whisky fece dire al vecchio
“Ancora un tiro e poi lasciare”

WHISKEY, O (JOHN, RISE HER UP)

Una seconda versione ha un coro che si sviluppa su più versi e viene ripetuto dopo ogni due frasi dello shantyman; la versione, resa popolare da Louis Killen e i Clancy Brothers, si presenta in un’infinità di varianti

ASCOLTA The Clancy brothers & Tommy Makem

Whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
Whiskey, O, Johnny, O
Rise her up from down below.
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, O
Up aloft this yard must go,
John rise her up from down below.
Now whiskey made me pawn me clothes
And whiskey gave me a broken nose
Now whiskey is the life of man
Whiskey from an old tin can
I thought I heard the first mate say
I treats me crew in a decent way
A glass of whiskey all around
And a bottle full for the shanty man
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
da che mondo è mondo
Whiskey, marinaio!
Issala in alto.
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey
in alto questo pennone (8) deve andare
John portala (9) su dal basso.
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
Il Whiskey è la vita di un uomo,
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina
Credo di aver sentito il primo ufficiale dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio
Un bicchiere di whisky per tutti
e una bottiglia piena per il cantante”

NOTE
8) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela.
9) si riferisce alla vela trascinata in alto con il pennone

LA VERSIONE FOLK

e così diventa una canzone d’intrattenimento ..

ASCOLTA Bob Roberts in Sea song and shanties 1950

ASCOLTA Michael Gira in “Son of Rogues Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys” ANTI 2013


O whisky is the life of man
Whisky—Johnny
O I’ll get whisky where I can
Whisky for me Johnny
O whisky here and whisky there,
Whisky—Johnny
O I’ll get whisky everywhere
Whisky for me Johnny
O whisky made me pawn my clothes
And whisky gave my this red nose
O whisky killed my poor old dad
And whisky drove my mother mad
O whisky hot and whisky cold
O whisky new and whisky old
O whisky up and whisky down
O whisky all around the town
O champagne’s good and rum is free
But whisky’s good enough for me
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il whisky è la vita dell’uomo
Whisky – marinaio
e avrò whisky a go-go
whisky per me marinaio
whisky qui e whisky là
Whisky — marinaio

ci sarà whisky ovunque
whisky per me, marinaio
per whisky ho impegnato i vestiti
e il whisky mi ha dato questo naso rosso
il whisky ha ucciso il mio povero babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mia madre
whisky caldo e whisky freddo
whisky giovane e whisky invecchiato
whisky su e whisky giù
whisky per tutta la città.
Lo champagne è buono e il rum è gratis, ma il whisky è il meglio!

…e una irish song
ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm – Whiskey Johnny in The Boathouse che riprende in gran parte la versione dei Clancy Brothers (1973)


Whiskey-o, Johnny-o
Rise her up from down below
I
Oh whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
O whiskey made me pawn me clothes
And whiskey gave me a broken nose
Chorus
Whiskey-o, Johnny-o
Rise her up from down below
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey-o
Up aloft this yard must go
John rise her up from down below
II
O whisky killed my poor old dad
And whisky drove my mother mad
III
Whiskey from an old tin can(4)
Oh whiskey for the celtic man
Whiskey here whiskey there
whiskey almost everywhere
IV
I thought I heard the first mate say
I treats me crew in a decent way(6)
whisky up and whisky down
A glass of whiskey all around
V
Oh whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey, marinaio
issala su
I
Oh Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
da quando il mondo ha avuto inizio
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
CORO
Whiskey, marinaio!
issala su
Whiskey, Whiskey, Whiskey,
in alto questo pennone deve andare
John portala su.

II
Il whisky ha ucciso il mio povero babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mia madre
III
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina(4)
whiskey per il celtico
whisky qui e whisky là
whisky dappertutto
IV
Credo di aver sentito il primo ufficiale dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio”(6)
Whisky su e whisky giù
un bicchiere di whisky per tutti
V
Whisky è la vita dell’uomo
così è da che mondo è mondo

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/whiskeyjohnny.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/WhiskeyJohnny/colcord.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/whiskey2
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/330-whiskey-is-the-life-of-man
http://anitra.net/chanteys/whiskey.html