Sweet Lemeney

Among the traditional celebrations in the midsummer this song of the aubade that the young men addressed to their sweethearts in the early hours of the Leman day, that is the midsummer day, which marked the period in which weddings were combined; in all probability the song was associated with the blueberry feast and was originally supposed to be the song of women.
Tra i festeggiamenti tradizionali di mezz’estate questo canto dell’aubade che i giovanotti rivolgevano alle loro innamorate nelle prime ore del leman day, cioè il giorno di mezz’estate che segnava il periodo in cui si combinavano i matrimoni; con buona probabilità la canzone era associata alla festa del mirtillo e in origine doveva essere il canto delle donne.

BILBERRY SUNDAY
[LA DOMENICA DEL MIRTILL]

It was celebrated mostly in July, when blueberry berries ripen or in August, often combined with the Celtic festival of Lughnasa. Boys and young girls went to the moors from morning to evening gathering blueberries and making friends, it was therefore a celebration dedicated to courtship and combining marriages. At the end of the day, the marriageable women would have prepared a cake with the collected blueberries, to give as a present for the next party, to the boy they were in love with.
Si celebrava per lo più a luglio, quando maturano le bacche del mirtillo o ad Agosto, spesso abbinata alla festa celtica di Lughnasa: giovinetti e le giovanette stavano su per i monti nella brughiera da mattino a sera a raccogliere i mirtilli e a fare amicizia, era perciò una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni (sotto i buoni uffici di Lugh). Alla fine della giornata le donne da marito avrebbero preparato una torta con i mirtilli raccolti, da regalare durante la festa successiva, al ragazzo di cui erano innamorate. 

From the repertoire of the Copper family the song is also known as “Arise and Pick a Posy”, “Lemady”, Sweet Lemany “,” One Midsummer’s Morn “
Dal repertorio della famiglia Copper il brano è conosciuto anche con il titolo ” Arise and Pick a Posy”, “Lemady”, Sweet Lemany” , “One Midsummer’s Morn”

Jarlath Henderson in  Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016 


I=VI
As I was a-walking
one fine summer’s morning,
the fields and meadows 
they looked so green and gay;
And the birds were singing
so pleasantly adorning,
Right early in the morning
at the break of the day.
II
Hark, oh hark,
the nightingale is singing,
the lark she is a-taking
her flight all in the air.
On yonder green bower
the turtle doves are building,
The sun is just a-glimmering.
Arise my dear.
III
Arise, oh, arise love
and get your charming posies,
They are the fairest flowers
that grow in yonder grove.
I will pluck off them all,
sweet lilies (1). pinks (2) and rosies,
All for my Sweet Lemeney,
the girl I adore
IV
Oh, Lemeney (3), oh, Lemeney,
you are the fairest creature,
you are the fairest creature
that ever my eyes did see.
And she played it all over
all upon her pipes (4) of ivory,
Right early in the morning
at the break of the day.
V
How could my true love,
how could she vanish from me
Oh, how could she go so
I never shall see her more.
it was her cruel parents
who looked so slightly on me,
And it’s all for the white robe (5)
that I once used to wear.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre stavo camminando
in un chiaro mattino d’estate
i campi e i prati sembravano tanto verdi
e dai vivaci colori;
e gli uccelli stavano cantando
e piacevolmente abbellendo
proprio al mattino presto
all’inizio del giorno
II
Alzati, alzati
l’usignolo canta
l’allodola s’invola
nell’aria
su quel verde nido
che le tortore stanno costruendo
il sole sta giusto splendendo
alzati mia cara
III
Alzati, o alzati amore
e prendi l’incantevole mazzolino di fiori
sono i fiori più belli
che crescono nel bosco
raccoglierò
i bei gigli, i cisti e le rose
tutti per la mia dolce innamorata
la ragazza che adoro
IV
Oh Lemeney
sei la più incantevole creatura
sei la più incantevole creatura
che mai i miei occhi videro
e lei danzava
sul piffero d’avorio
proprio al mattino presto
all’inizio del giorno
V
Come ha potuto il mio amore
come ha potuto dileguarsi
come ha potuto andarsene così
che non la rivedrò mai più
a causa dei suoi genitori crudeli
che mi guardarono con diffidenza
per via dell’abito bianco
che un tempo ero solito indossare
 

NOTE
1) Lily = purity [Giglio= purezza]
2) the pink indicates a large variety of pink flowers probably “pink rockrose“, ie the cistus, arrived in the English gardens around 1650. This flowers are more properly belonging to the Mediterranean vegetation called “May roses” both for the period of flowering and for the resemblance to wild roses.
[il temine è un po’ generico e sta a indicare una grande varietà di fiori rosa forse è il “pink rockrose”, ossia il cistus, arrivato nei giardini inglesi intorno al 1650. Sono fiori più propriamente appartenenti alla macchia mediterranea dette “rose di maggio” sia per il periodo della fioritura che per la somiglianza con le rose selvatiche.]
3) proper name [nome proprio]
4) double entendre. [inevitabile il doppio senso]
5) why was a white dress the sign of a suitor not suitable for marriage? [perchè un abito bianco era segno di un pretendente non idoneo al matrimonio?]

LINK
http://thewildsideoflife.tripod.com/id44.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/sweetlemeney.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13441

Outlander chapter 24: Up Among the Heather

 Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

Diana Gabaldon

A traditional Scottish song that Jamie sings as he leaves Claire one morning at Leoch to go off to work in the stables.
“.. singing rahter loudly the air from “Up Among the Heather”. The refrain floated back from the stairwell:
Sittin’ wi’ a wee girl holdin’ on my knee
When a bumblebee stung me, weel above the kneeee
Up among the heather, on the head o’ Bendikee

There are a lot of Scottish folk songs that tell of romantic encounters “amang the heather” this one is set over Bennachie Hills, the most famous and well-known of northeastern Scotland.
Located in the Garioch between the Don and the Gadie, Bennachie are a range of hills in Aberdeenshire. A destination for excursions, along many paths and running races like the Bennachie Hill Race. On the Mither Tap (the mother’s breast that takes its name from its shape) you can still visit the ruins of a Pitti fortress.

“Mither Tap” of Bennachie (Ian Johnston) -(see also here  and here)

UP AMONG THE HEATHER

“Up Amang The Heather” or “The Hill of Bennachie” shares its melody with another traditional scottish song “Come All Ye Fisher Lasses”.

The song is a classic bothy ballad with bawdy lyrics! The poet talks the talk, but doesn’t walk because first he tells of having had fun (all day long) with a fine girl, but then he advises ladies not to give more than a kiss to a soldier!

From the Highlands of Robert Burns  to the Moorlands of Emily Bronte, and up to the Baraggia of Vercellese (Northern Italy), heather and erica populate the moorlands. “Calluna is differentiated from erica by its corolla and calyx each being in four parts instead of five, Calluna is sometimes referred to as Summer (or Autumn) heather to distinguish it from winter or spring flowering species of Erica.” (from wiki)
A branch of wild white heather is a lucky charm in Scotland and is donated to wish a happy marriage. Once upon a time the Scottish girls who ventured alone on the moor always wore a sprig of heather to protect themselves from rape and robbery (or to make a lucky encounter).

The Irish Ramblers in The Patriot Game (1963) ( II and IV) -aka the Clancy Brothers

The Irish Rovers  the group has repeatedly recorded the song, this version is taken from “Still Rovin’” 1968

Up among the heather on the hill o’ Bennachie(1)
rolling with a wee lass (2) underneath a tree
A bum-bee stung me well above the knee
Up among the heather on the hill o’ Bennachie
I
As I went out a-roving on a summer’s day
I spied a bonnie lassie (3) strolling on the brae (4)
she was picking wild berries (5) and I offered her a hand
saying “Maybe I can help you fill your wee tin can(6)”
II (7)
Says “I me bonnie lass are you going to spend the day
up among the heather where the lads (8) and lassies play
they’re hugging and they’re kissing and they’re making fancy free
among the blooming heather on the hill o’ Bennachie”
III
We sat down together and I held her in me arms
I hugged her and I kissed her taken by her charms then
I took out me fiddle(9) and I fiddled merrily
among the blooming heather on the hill o’ Bennachie
IV (10)
Come all you bonnie lessies and take my advice
and never let a soldier laddie kiss you more than twice.
For all the time he’s kissing you he’s thinking out a plan
To get a wee bit rattle at your ould (11) tin can.

NOTE
1) (Irish Ramblers)
Up among the heather on the hellabenafee
It was there I had a bonny wee lass sitting on my knee
A bungbee stung me well above the knee
We rested down together on the hellabenafee
2) wee lass= tiny girl
3) bonnie lassie= fine girl
4) brae= hill
5)  a midsummer party called Bilberry Sunday (in Scotland “Blaeberry” in Ireland “Fraughan”). It was mostly celebrated in July, when the blueberry berries ripen or in August, often combined with the Lughnasa Celtic festival or on Sunday (or Monday) closest to the party. Once upon a time the youths and the young girls were up the hills on the moor from morning to evening gathering blueberries and making friends, it was therefore a party dedicated to courtship and to combine marriages (under the good offices of Lugh).
6) wee tin can =  female sexual organ
7) (Irish Ramblers)
Said I me bonny wee lassie are ya going to spend the day
Up amongst the heather on the hellabenafee
Where all the lads and lassies they’re having a sobree
Up among the heather on the hellabenafee
8) lads= boys
9) fiddle= male sexual organ
10)  (Irish Ramblers)
Said I me bonny wee lassie please take my advice
Don’t ever let a soldier laddie love you more than twice
For all the time you do, he’s a fixing how to plan
How to get a wee-be rattle at your old tin can
11) ould= old

Mary Mac
 Bennachie (“Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs”)
O’er the moor amang the heather

SOURCES
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/baraggia.htm#brugo
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/upamongtheheather.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=156417 http://www.horntip.com/mp3/1960s/1962ca_lyrica_erotica_vol_2
_a_wee_thread_o_blue_(LP)/09_the_hill_of_bennachie.htm

The Braes Of Balquhidder

BALQUHIDDER (or BALQUHITHER) pronounces ‘Balwhither’ is a small village in Scotland in the middle of the mountains in the MacGregor lands, next to a small lake where Robert Tannahill set this song; Francis McPeake in 1957 wrote his Wild Mountain Thyme on words and music of “The Braes of Balquhidder” by Robert Tannahill, however, the Irish version has become much more popular!
BALQUHIDDER (scritto anche come BALQUHITHER) è un piccolo villaggio della Scozia in mezzo ai monti nelle terre dei MacGregor, accanto a un piccolo lago dove Robert Tannahill ha ambientato questa canzone; conosciuta anche in Irlanda e resa famosa da Francis McPeake nel 1957 con il titolo di Wild Mountain Thyme, versione che finì per oscurare quella del primo autore!

Vexata quaestio

It is better not to go into the heated dispute over the authorship of text and melody that divides Irish and Scottish, but we take note of the wide popular diffusion of a theme that expresses the love for one’s own land and its beauties, and a melody that is a slow air with deep sweetness.
Meglio non addentrarsi nell’accesa disputa sulla paternità di testi e melodia che divide irlandesi e scozzesi, bensì prendiamo atto dell’ampia diffusione popolare di un tema che esprime l’amore per la propria terra e le sue bellezze, e una melodia che è una slow air dalla profonda dolcezza.

Air—“The three carles o Buchanan.”
This song appeared twice in R. A. Smith’s Scotish Minstrel,—Vol. I., page 49, and Vol. IV., page 89,—and he gives the Air, “The Braes o Balquither.”

John Croall in The Complete Songs of Robert Tannahill Volume I (2006) 

Skylark in “All of It”, 1979

Sam Monaghan

Tannahill Weavers in Capernaum 1994


Chorus
Let us go, lassie, go
Tae the braes o’ Balquhidder
Whar the blueberries (1) grow
‘Mang the bonnie Hielan’ heather
Whar the deer and the rae
Lichtly bounding thegither
Sport the lang summer day
On the braes o’ Balquhidder
I
I will twin thee a bow’r
By the clear silver fountain
And I’ll cover it o’er
Wi’ the flooers o’ the  mountain
I will range through the wilds
And the deep glens (2) 
 sae dreary
And return wi’ their spoils
Tae the bow’r o’ my dearie
II
When the rude wintry win’
Idly raves roun’ oor dwellin’
And the roar o’ the linn(3)
On the nicht breeze is swellin’
So merrily we’ll sing
As the storm rattles o’er us
Till the dear shielin’ ring
Wi’ the licht(4) liltin’  chorus.
III
Noo the summers in prime
Wi’ the flooers richly bloomin’
Wi’ the wild mountain thyme
A’ the moorlan’s perfumin’
Tae oor dear native scenes
Let us journey thegither
Whar glad innocence reigns
‘Mang the braes o’ Balquhidder
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
ritornello
Andiamo, ragazza, andiamo
per i pendii di Balquhidder
dove crescono i mirtilli (1)
tra la bella erica d’altura,
dove il cervo e il capriolo
vanno assieme con piede leggero,
passiamo l’interminabile estate,
sui pendii di Balquhidder
I
Ti intreccerò un frondoso riparo
vicino alla pura sorgente cristallina
e lo ricoprirò tutto
con i fiori di montagna,
cercherò per i boschi
e nelle profonde forre (2)  sì ombrose
e ritornerò con i loro tesori
alla capannuccia del mio amore.
II
Quando il forte vento invernale
vagherà inoperoso attorno alla nostra dimora e il rimbombo della cascata(3)
nella brezza notturna  si gonfierà,
così allegramente  canteremo,
mentre la tempesta  infurierà su di noi
fino a che il caro rifugio risuonerà
con un allegro coro melodioso.
III
Ora l’estate è in arrivo
con i fiori che sbocciano a profusione
con il timo selvatico di montagna
che profuma la brughiera,
per le nostre care terre natie
andiamoci tutti insieme
dove regna la lieta  innocenza
sui pendii di Balquhidder

NOTE
1) The song describes a social occasion still sporadically practiced in Scotland and Ireland: the harvest of blueberries, a mid-summer party called Bilberry Sunday It was celebrated mostly in July, when the berries of the blueberry ripen or in August, often combined with Celtic festival of Lughnasa or on Sunday (or Monday) closer to the party. At one time the youngsters and the young girls stood up in the mountains on the moors from morning to evening gathering blueberries and making friends, it was therefore a celebration dedicated to courtship and combining marriages.
Nella canzone si descrive una ricorrenza sociale ancora sporadicamente praticata in Scozia e Irlanda: la raccolta dei mirtilli, una festa di mezz’estate denominata Bilberry Sunday Si celebrava per lo più a luglio, quando maturano le bacche del mirtillo o ad Agosto, spesso abbinata alla festa celtica di Lughnasa o alla domenica (o lunedì) più prossima alla festa. Un tempo i giovinetti e le giovanette stavano su per i monti nella brughiera da mattino a sera a raccogliere i mirtilli e a fare amicizia, era perciò una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni. continua
2) glen: è una  tipica valle scozzese solitamente allungata e profonda con una forma ad U
3) linn:  cascata dal gaelico scozzese linne
4) licht:  termine scozzese per light qui con significato di allegro

LINK
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%2026.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/10655
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/752.html

Highland Fairy Lullaby (I left my baby lying here)

A Scottish Highland lullaby is the lament of a mother who has lost her baby in the woods. She fears that he was kidnapped by the fairies because she had left him unattended in his cradle, laying next to a bush of wild berries. The song describes a social occasion still sporadically practiced in Scotland and Ireland: the harvest of blueberries, a midsummer party called Bilberry Sunday (in Scotland they say “Blaeberry” in Ireland “Fraughan”).
Una ninna nanna delle Highland scozzesi è il lamento di una madre che ha smarrito il suo bambino nel bosco. Teme che sia stato rapito dalla fate poichè l’aveva lasciato incustodito nella sua culla, posandola accanto ad un cespuglio di bacche selvatiche. Nella canzone si descrive una ricorrenza sociale ancora sporadicamente praticata in Scozia e Irlanda: la raccolta dei mirtilli, una festa di mezz’estate denominata Bilberry Sunday (in Scozia si dice “Blaeberry”in Irlanda “Fraughan”).

bilberryfield

BILBERRY SUNDAY
[LA DOMENICA DEL MIRTILLO]

It celebrated mostly in July, when the berries of the blueberry ripen or in August, often during the Celtic festival of Lughnasa or on Sunday (or Monday) closer to the feast: young boys and girls went to the moor from morning to evening, to pick blueberries and make friends, it was therefore a celebration dedicated to courtship and combining marriages (under Lugh’s name). At the end of the day, the maidens would have prepared a cake with the collected blueberries, to give as a present for the next party, to the boy they were in love with.
Si celebrava per lo più a luglio, quando maturano le bacche del mirtillo o ad Agosto, spesso abbinata alla festa celtica di Lughnasa o alla domenica (o lunedì) più prossima alla festa: giovinetti e giovanette stavano su per i monti nella brughiera da mattino a sera a raccogliere i mirtilli e a fare amicizia, era perciò una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni (sotto i buoni uffici di Lugh). Alla fine della giornata le donne da marito avrebbero preparato una torta con i mirtilli raccolti, da regalare durante la festa successiva, al ragazzo di cui erano innamorate e se il ragazzo accettava il dolce si poteva dichiarare iniziato il corteggiamento.. (altro che festa di San Valentino!!)
Sconosciuto nelle civiltà mediterranea antiche, [il mirtillo] è una creatura delle montagne settentrionali, che entrò a far parte del repertorio medico medievale, quando si scoprirono le sue virtù astringenti, toniche e depurative. Anche i medici del ‘700 lo consigliavano per “moderare l’ardore di una bile infiammata”. I mirtilli, come le more o i lamponi, sono il miglior pretesto per riunirsi in allegra compagnia e recarsi cantando nei monti. E’ per cosi dire un frutto “sociale”.
Nella tradizione estiva della montagna, c’era la “domenica del mirtillo”, giorno dedicato alla frivolezza, quando i giovanotti e le fanciulle muniti di secchielli, dovevano raccogliere i frutti, e invece si dedicavano agli amoreggiamenti e alle danze. Chi raccoglieva i mirtilli erano le madri, che poi li utilizzavano per fare marmellate. (tratto da qui)

They were harvested large amounts of blueberries not only for making cakes and jam but also for medicinal purposes and for dyes; in Donegal it was the boys who made the bracelets with blueberries (let’s not forget that once – for example the eighteenth century – men were much more familiar with needle and thread than today!) to give to the girl they were in love with.
Si raccoglievano grandi quantità di mirtilli non solo per fare le torte e le confettura ma anche a scopi medicinali e per le tinture; nel Donegal erano i ragazzi a confezionare i braccialetti con i mirtilli (non dimentichiamoci che un tempo -ad esempio il Settecento – gli uomini avevano molta più dimestichezza di ago e filo di quelli di oggi!) da regalare alla ragazza di cui erano innamorati.
La Valle d’Aosta è piena di mirtilli selvatici basta andare per i sentieri di montagna nel mese di luglio-agosto o approfittare di una sagra del mirtillo !

BLUEBERRY TART

Nothing fancy, almost a muffin, but the recipe from Wales is very good. Niente di sofisticato quasi una focaccina, ma che bontà la ricetta dal Galles


Another historical recipe is the blueberry pie and if it is too hot to cook even a cup of blueberries with yoghurt and honey can go well! Un'altra ricetta storica è la blueberry pie e se è troppo caldo per cucinare anche una coppa di mirtilli con lo yogurth e miele possono andare bene!

Lughnasa was therefore a festival of the heights in which they began the first harvest, that of the spontaneous fruits to propitiate the harvest season, an abundant collection of berries would in fact have meant a good year for subsequent harvests.
It was also an opportunity to make a pilgrimage on the heights (which have long been seen as sacred places).
La festa di Lughnasa era perciò una festa delle alture in cui si iniziava il primo raccolto, quello dei frutti spontanei ovvero si propiziava la stagione del raccolto, una raccolta abbondante di bacche avrebbe infatti significato una buona annata per i raccolti successivi.
Era anche l’occasione per fare un pellegrinaggio sulle alture (da tempo immemori considerati luoghi sacri).

HIGHLAND FAIRY LULLABY

In Scotland there is no lack of other examples of “frightening” lullabies, indirectly the mother says to her child “Be good and sleep otherwise the fairies will take you away”! The lullaby is sweet but the text is distressing with the mother looking for her child everywhere …
The original Scottish Gaelic text with musical line was transposed into English by Lachlan MacBean and published in the collection “The Celtic Lyre” by Henry Whyte, 1883 with the title “An Cóineachan” (in English The Fairy Lullaby) – # 56 (here )
In Scozia non mancano altri esempi di ninna-nanne “spaventevoli”, indirettamente la mamma dice al bambino “fai il bravo e dormi altrimenti ti portano via le fate”! La nenia è dolce ma il testo è angosciante con la mamma che cerca ovunque il suo bambino…
Il testo originale in gaelico scozzese con rigo musicale è stato trasposto in inglese da Lachlan MacBean e pubblicato nella raccolta “The Celtic Lyre” di Henry Whyte, 1883 con il titolo “An Cóineachan” (in inglese The Fairy Lullaby) -# 56 (qui)


Fhuair mi lorg na lach air an lòn,
Na lach air an lòn,
Na lach air an lòn
Fhuair mi lorg na lach air an lòn,
Cha d’fhuair mi lorg mo chubhrachain
Hovan, Hovan, Gorry og, O
Gorry og, O
Gorry og, O
Hovan, Hovan, Gorry og, O
Cha d’fhuair mi lorg mo chubhrachain
Fhuair mi lorg an laoigh bhric dheirg…
Fhuair mi lorg and eich’s a phairc…
Fhuair mi lorg na bà’s a pholl…
Fhuair mi lorg na caorach geala…
Fhuair mi lorg a cheo’s a bheinn…
Traduzione inglese
I found the track of the duck on the pond,
on the pond, on the pond
I found the track of the duck on the pond,
I found no track/trace of my fragrant wee one
CHORUS nonsense
I found the track of the mottled, russet, young deer…
I found the track of the horse from the meadow…
I found the track of the milk cow from the pool…
I found the track of the white sheep…
I found the track of the mountain mist…

Frances Tolmie collected further stanzas in One Hundred and Five Songs of Occupation from the Western Isles of Scotland (Journal of the Folk Song Society, No. 16, 1911) with the title “An Cùbhrachan” (in English “The sweet little one”) from Janet Anderson, Contin Manse, Ross-shire, 1870
Frances Tolmie riporta ulteriori strofe in One Hundred and Five Songs of Occupation from the Western Isles of Scotland (Journal of the Folk Song Society, no. 16, 1911) con il titolo “An Cùbhrachan” (in inglese “The sweet little one”) come collezionate da Janet Anderson, Contin Manse, Ross-shire, 1870
“O, I walked the hill from end to end,
From side to side, to the edge of the becks,
O, I walked the hill from end to end,
I did not find my Cùbhrachain.
I heard the curlew crying far,
Crying far, crying far,
I heard the curlew crying far,
But never heard my baby-o.”

Michael Dunnigan.


I
I left my baby lying here,
lying here, lying here;
I left my baby lying here
to go and gather blaeberries(1) o.
Chorus:
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,
gorry o go, gorry o go;
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,
I lost my darling baby o.
II
I saw the wee brown otter’s track,
Otter’s track, otter’s track,
I saw the wee brown otter’s track,
But never found  my baby-o.
III
I saw the swan upon the lake
upon the lake, upon the lake
I saw the swan swin on the lake
but never saw my baby, O!
IV
I searched the moorland tarns(2) and then,
Wandered through the silent glen,
I saw the snow (mist)(3) upon the ben(4),
But never found my baby-o.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ho lasciato il mio bambino, sdraiato qui
sdraiato qui, sdraiato qui
Ho lasciato il mio bambino, sdraiato qui
per andare a raccogliere i mirtilli.
CORO
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,
gorry o go, gorry o go;
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,

ho perduto il mio caro bambino
II
Ho visto le tracce della lontra bruna,
le tracce della lontra,
ho visto le tracce della piccola lontra bruna,
ma non ho più trovato il mio bimbo
III
Ho visto il cigno sul lago,
sul lago, sul lago
ho visto il cigno che nuotava sul lago,
ma non ho più visto il mio bambino.
IV
Ho cercato nei laghetti(2) della brughiera, vagando per la valle silenziosa,
ho visto la neve (la nebbia)(3) sulle cime dei monti(4)
ma non ho mai trovato il mio bambino.

NOTE
1) blaeberries= bilberries, blueberries. Blackberries sono invece le more. Il mirtillo selvatico contrariamente alle more è una pianta strisciante e forma bassi cespugli (10-30 cm) ed è blu scuro, la varietà rossa è detta in inglese cranberry.
2) tarn= small mountain lake
3) dice neve perchè può capitare in Scozia che a luglio sui monti nevichi!
4) ben= mountain

Silene

Moira Kerr  Highland Fairy Lullaby

I
I left my baby lying here,
lying here, lying here;
I left my baby lying here
to go and gather blaeberries.
Chorus:
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,
gorry o go, gorry o go;
Ho-van, ho-van gorry o go,
I never found my baby o.
II
I saw the little yellow faw,
The yellow fawn, the yellow faw:
I saw the little yellow faw,
But never saw my baby, O!
III
I tracked the otter on the lake
on the lake, on the lake, on yonder lake
I tracked the otter on the lake,
but could not tracked my baby o

Patricia Clark I Left My Darling Lying Here

CHORUS
O! Hovan, Hovan Gorry og O,
Gorry og, O, Gorry og
O, Hovan, Hovan Gorry og O
I’ve lost my darling baby, O!
I
I left my baby (darling) lying here,
a lying here, a lying here,
I left my baby (darling) lying here,
To go and gather blaeberries.
II
I’ve found the wee brown otter’s track,
the otter’s track, the otter’s track
I’ve found the wee brown otter’s track
But ne’er a trace o’ my baby, O!
III
I found the track of the swan on the lake
the swan on the lack, the swan on the lake
I found the track of the swan on the lake,
But not the track of baby, O!
IV
I found the track of the yellow fawn, the yellow fawn
I found the track of the yellow fawn,
But could not trace my baby, O!
V
I found the trail of the mountain mist,
the mountain mist, the mountain mist
I found the trail of the mountain mist,
But ne’er a trace of baby, O!

see more

LINK
http://www.thecelticjunction.com/mission/newsletter/issue-9-lughnasa-2013/
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/medioevale/orto-frutti/Mirtillo-gioiello-del-bosco.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/fairylul.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59163
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=77643
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1005
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=3495
http://www.academia.edu/1536150/The_Celtic_Lyre
http://www.bilberrytart.co.uk/2012/09/welsh-cakes.html

Huckleberry hunting (We’ll Ranzo Way)

For this sea shanty it is more correct to speak of family, in fact it is connected to the vast vein containing the word Ranzo in the chorus. (Ranzo Ray, Ranzo me ranzo ray, We’ll Ranzo Way, Hilo me Ranzo R(w)ay, Huckleberry Hunting..). (see)
Per questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) è più corretto parlare di famiglia, si collega infatti al vasto filone contenente la parola Ranzo nel ritornello. (vedi)

Ranzo is a recurring name in the sea shanties, probably a diminutive of Orenso, or Lorenzo, but the hypotheses are open, the full name is Reuben Ranzo: “Ranzo may have been an abbreviation of Lorenzo, a common Portuguese name. In this theory Ranzo was a native of the Azores who, like many of the island, shipped aboard a whaler as a harpooner.
A Danish naval hero of the sixteenth century was named Daniel Rantzau. He was a hero of Denmark’s Seven Years’ War with Sweden and is often referred to in Danish sea songs. However, Hugill says it is unlikely he had a connection with whalers. Another theory is that Ranzo was a Russian or Polish Jew with a name similar to Ronzoff. Jews were rarely at sea and were rumored to not like soap and water. In addition tailor was a common occupation of Jews. He may have been a Latin-American greenhorn. ‘Reuben,’ ‘Reub’ and ‘Rube’ were common terms for farmer. Because many shantymen sang ‘Renzo,’ Hugill believes the Lorenzo origin is most probable“. (from here)
Ranzo è un nome ricorrente nelle sea shanties probabilmente un diminutivo di Orenso, ovvero Lorenzo, ma le ipotesi sono aperte. il nome completo è Reuben Ranzo. Così su contemplator.com leggiamo: “Ranzo potrebbe essere stata un’abbreviazione di Lorenzo, un nome portoghese comune. In questa teoria Ranzo era originario delle Azzorre che, come molti dell’isola, si imbarcavano su una baleniera come fiocinatore.
Un eroe navale danese del XVI secolo si chiamava Daniel Rantzau. Era un eroe della guerra dei sette anni della Danimarca con la Svezia ed è spesso citato nelle canzoni danesi del mare. Tuttavia, Hugill afferma che è improbabile che avesse una connessione con i balenieri.
Un’altra teoria era che Ranzo fosse un ebreo russo o polacco con un nome simile a Ronzoff. Raramente gli ebrei andavano in mare e si diceva che non apprezzassero acqua e sapone. Inoltre il sarto era un’occupazione comune tra gli ebrei. Potrebbe essere stato un giovincello latinoamericano. “Reuben”, “Reub” e “Rube” erano termini comuni tra gli agricoltori.. Poiché molti shantymen hanno cantato “Renzo”, Hugill ritiene che l’origine di Lorenzo sia molto più probabile “.

Thus A.L. Lloyd writes “One of the great halyard shanties, seemingly better-known in English ships than American ones, though some versions of it have become crossed with the American song called Huckleberry Hunting. From the graceful movement of its melody it is possible that this is an older shanty than most. Perhaps it evolved out of some long-lost lyrical song.
Così  scrive A.L. Lloyd Così  scrive A.L. Lloyd “Una delle grandi halyard shanties, apparentemente più conosciuta nelle navi inglesi rispetto a quelle americane, anche se alcune versioni sono state incrociate con la canzone americana chiamata Huckleberry Hunting. Dal movimento aggraziato della melodia è possibile che questa sia una shanty più antica della maggior parte. Forse si è evoluto da una canzone lirica perduta da tempo

In this version we listen the robust maneuvers of the sailor dealing with a maid.
In questa versione si narrano le gagliarde manovre del marinaio alle prese con una fanciulla.

Hulton Clint

Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2

Forebitter of the Mystic Seaport

These versions are almost identical except for the final stanza in which Barbara Brown refers to the “wild goose”
Le due versioni testuali sono pressochè identiche tranne che per la strofa finale in cui Barbara Brown fa riferimento alle “wild goose” (oche selvatiche)


Oh, the boys and the girls went a-huckleberry hunting (1),
To me way hey o way! (2)
Oh, the boys and the girls went a-huckleberry hunting,
To me Hilo (3), me Ranzo Ray!
yes the boys and the girls went a-
huckleberry hunting
the girls begun to cry a
nd the boys they stop hunting (4)
Then a girl ran off, and a boy ran after,
The little girl fell down
and he saw her little garter.
He said, “I’ll be your beau
if you’ll have me for a feller,”
But the little girl said “No, for me sweetheart’s Johnny Miller.”
Then took her on his knee,
an’ he kissed her right and proper
She kissed him back again,
an’ he didn’t try to stop ‘er
An’ then he put his arm
all about her waspy waist
She sez “Oh um, young man
you are in great haste”
An’ then he put his hand all upon her knee
She sez “Oh um, young man
you’re a little bit to free”
An’ then he put his hand yet higher still.
She sez “Oh um, young man
that is really quite a thrill!”
Last  stanza
Oh, I’m shantyman
of the workin’ party
So sing lads, pull lads,
so strong and hearty
Barbara Brown Version
I’m shantyman
of the Wild Goose nation (5),
I got a girl I met
on the old plantation (6)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I ragazzi e le ragazze andarono
a caccia tra i mirtilli,
To me way hey o way!
I ragazzi e le ragazze andarono
a caccia tra i mirtilli,
A me Hilo, mio Ranzo Ray
si, ragazzi e le ragazze andarono
a caccia tra i mirtilli,
le ragazze iniziarono a gridare
e i ragazzi smisero di cacciare
poi una ragazza corse via e un ragazzo le corse dietro, la ragazzina cadde
e il ragazzo le vide la giarrettiera
“sarò il tuo bello 
se mi prenderai come compagno”
ma la ragazza disse “No, perchè
il mio innamorato è Johnny Miller”.
Lui la prese sulle ginocchia
e la baciò più che bene
e lei lo ricambiò
e lui non cercò di fermarla.
Così lui mise le braccia
intorno alla vita di vespa di lei
dice lei “Oh giovanotto
come vai di fretta!”
così lui mise la sua mano sulle sue ginocchia
dice lei “Oh giovanotto
sei un po’ troppo sciolto”
Allora lui mise la mano ancora più in alto
“Oh giovanotto
questo è proprio emozionante!”
Ultima strofa
Sono il cantore
del partito dei lavoratori,
così cantate ragazzi, tirate ragazzi
con forza e coraggio
VERSIONE Barbara Brown
Sono il cantore
della nazione delle Oche selvatiche
e ho avuto la ragazza che conobbi
nella vecchia piantagione

NOTE
1) it could be a rabbit hunt in the blueberry bushes. But also a love hunting, a social occasion still sporadically practiced in Scotland and Ireland: the harvest of blueberries, a midsummer party called Bilberry Sunday (in Scotland they say “Blaeberry” in Ireland “Fraughan”). (see more)
potrebbe trattarsi di una caccia dei conigli tra i cespugli di mirtilli. Ma anche di una caccia amorosa, una ricorrenza sociale ancora sporadicamente praticata in Scozia e Irlanda: la raccolta dei mirtilli, una festa di mezz’estate denominata Bilberry Sunday (in Scozia si dice “Blaeberry”in Irlanda “Fraughan”). continua
2) (Timme hey, timme way, timme he ho hay)
3)  (An’ sing Hilo, me Ranzo Ray)
Stan Hugill writes: “ Hilo is a port in the Hawaiian group, and, although occasionally shellbacks may have been referring to this locality, usually it was a port in South America of which they were singing–the Peruvian nitrate port of Ilo. But in some of these Hilo shanties it was not a port, either in Hawaii or Peru, to which they were referring. Sometimes the word was a substitute for a ‘do’, a ‘jamboree’, or even a ‘dance’. And in some cases the word was used as a verb–to ‘hilo’ somebody or something. In this sense its origin and derivation is a mystery. Furthermore, since shanties were not composed in the normal manner, by putting them down, it is on paper quite possible many of these ‘hilos’ are nothing more than ‘high-low’, as Miss Colcord has it in her version of We’ll Ranzo Ray. Take your pick!” (from here) see more
Hilo è un porto nelle isole hawaiane e, sebbene occasionalmente i marinai possono voler riferirsi a questa località, di solito era un porto del Sud America di cui cantavano: Ilo, il porto peruviano dei nitrati. Ma in alcune di queste shanty Hilo non era un porto, né alle Hawaii né in Perù. A volte la parola stava per “do”, “jamboree” o persino “dance”. E in alcuni casi la parola è stata usata come un verbo per “hilo” qualcuno o qualcosa. In questo senso la sua origine e derivazione è un mistero. Inoltre, dal momento che le shanties non sono state composte nel modo normale, mettendole giù sulla carta, è abbastanza possibile che molti di questi “hilos” non siano altro che “high-low”, come Miss Colcord ha nella sua versione di “We’ll Ranzo Ray”. Vedete voi!” (Stan Hugill)
4) The gals began to cry an’ the boys they dowsed their buntin’
5) Wild goose is the name given to the Irish diaspora see origins  And yet some believe, in light of the origin of the song in the plantations of the black slaves that it refers to the African homeland or to the native Indian American
Wild goose è il nome dato alla diaspora irlandese vedi origini qui E tuttavia alcuni ritengono, alla luce dell’origine del canto nelle piantagioni degli schiavi neri che si riferisca alla patria africana oppure all’america dei nativi indiani
6) Got a maid that I left on the big plantation or  I’ve left my wife on a big plantation

Folk Version (second part)

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/wildgooseshanty.html
http://www.capstanbars.com/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/ilo_man.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45241
http://www.judybwebdesign.com/handspikes/time_ashore/taio_lyrics/ilo_man.htm

THE HILL OF BENNACHIE aka UP AMONG THE HEATHER

Read the post in English  

DA OUTLANDER SAGA: La Straniera

Diana Gabaldon

Un canzone un po’ sconcia che Jamie canticchia mentre si dirige nelle stalle di Leoch; si stralcia dal primo libro:
.. e se ne andò, direttamente alle stalle, cantichianndo ad alta voce l’aria di “Lassù in mezzo all’edera”. Il ritornello riecheggiò lungo le scale
Con una fanciulla in grembo, seduta su di me,
un calabrone mi punse, ohi povero me,
ben sopra al ginocchio, ahimè,
lassù in mezzo all’erica, in cima a Bendikee!

Sono numerose le canzoni popolari scozzesi che narrano di incontri romantici “among the heather”( o come dicono in Scozia “amang the heather”) cioè in camporella, tra procaci pastorelle e baldi giovanotti, questo filone ha come luogo dell’appuntamento lo scenario delle Bennachie Hills, la montagna o collina come dir si voglia più famosa e conosciuta della Scozia nord-orientale.
Situata nel Garioch tra il Don e il Gadie è più precisamente una catena di alture, punto di riferimenti dell’Aberdeenshire della Scozia con la più alta, Oxen Craig, che arriva a circa 500 metri. Meta di escursioni, lungo i numerosi sentieri e gare di corsa.

Un bellissimo reportage fotografico sul Bennachie (qui  e qui): un buon punto di partenza per organizzare una gita è il Bennachie Centre a Chapel of Garioch vicino a Inverurie (Inverness)

“Mither Tap” di Bennachie foto di Ian Johnston

La ripresa da drone di Callum McKain: sul Mither Tap (la mammella della madre che prende il nome dalla sua forma) si possono ancora visitare i resti di una fortezza dei Pitti.

UP AMONG THE HEATHER

erica bianca, si notino i fiori a forma di botticella

“Up Amang The Heather” o “The Hill of Bennachie”  condivide la melodia con un altro brano tradizionale “Come All Ye Fisher Lasses”.
La canzone è una classica  bothy ballad ricca di doppi sensi che si commentano da soli! L’uomo predica bene ma razzola male perchè prima racconta di essersela spassata (per tutto il giorno a sentire lui!) con una bella fanciulla, e alla fine raccomanda a tutte le altre di non concedere più di un bacio a un soldatino (preso come modello di donnaiolo) perchè al secondo bacio si ritroverebbero già belle che distese tra l’erica! O meglio tra la calluna, il brugo celtico colonizzatore delle brughiere, uno dei fiori nazionali della Scozia.
Dalle Highlands di Robert Burns alle Moorlands di Emily Bronte, e fino alla Baraggia del Vercellese il brugo (ma anche l’erica) popola quelle che in suo nome vengono definite brughiere. Il brugo seppure parente stretto dell’erica è una pianta distinta, classificata come calluna vulgaris, detta anche  erica selvatica: Calluna dal greco kallyno (pulisco, spazzo), erba per fabbricare ramazze rustiche, grazie alla flessibilità e alla resistenza dei suoi ramoscelli e vulgaris per l’estrema diffusione della pianta.
Un rametto d’erica selvatica bianca (Calluna vulgaris) o d’erica è un portafortuna  in Scozia e viene donato per augurare un felice matrimonio. Un tempo le fanciulle scozzesi che si avventuravano da sole nella brughiera indossavano sempre un rametto d’erica per proteggersi dagli stupri e dalle rapine (o per fare un incontro fortunato).
Per riconoscere le due piante basta guardare il calendario: l’erica fiorisce al termine dell’inverno e in primavera (e in alcune varietà fino a giugno), mentre la calluna fiorisce alla fine dell’estate e in autunno restando fiorita fino ai primi mesi dell’inverno! (continua)

ASCOLTA The Irish Ramblers in The Patriot Game (1963) (strofe II e IV) -ovvero i Fratelli Clancy nella loro prima formazione in trio

ASCOLTA The Irish Rovers il gruppo ha registrato più volte il brano questa versione è tratta da “Still Rovin’” 1968


Up among the heather on the hill o’ Bennachie
rolling with a wee lass underneath a tree
A bum-bee stung me well above the knee(2)
Up among the heather on the hill o’ Bennachie
I
As I went out a-roving on a summer’s day
I spied a bonnie lassie strolling on the brae
she was picking wild berries and I offered her a hand
saying “maybe I can help you fill your wee tin can”
II
Says “I me bonnie lass are you going to spend the day
up among the heather where the lads and lassies play
they’re hugging and they’re kissing and they’re making fancy free
among the blooming heather on the hill o’ Bennachie”
III
We sat down together and I held her in me arms
I hugged her and I kissed her taken by her charms then
I took out me fiddle and I fiddled merrily
among the blooming heather on the hill o’ Bennachie
IV
Come all you bonnie lessies and take my advice
and never let a soldier laddie kiss you more than twice.
For all the time he’s kissing you he’s thinking out a plan
To get a wee bit rattle at your ould tin can.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Lassù in mezzo all’erica sulla collina di
Bennachie[1] ,
mi rotolavo con una fanciulla sotto all’albero, un calabrone mi punse ben sopra il ginocchio[2] ,
lassù in mezzo all’erica sulla collina di
Bennachie

I
Mentre me ne andavo a passeggio in un giorno d’estate,
vidi una bella ragazza che camminava per la collina,
stava raccogliendo i mirtilli [3] e mi offrii di darle una mano,
dicendole “Forse ti posso aiutare a riempire la sua lattina”[4]
II
Dice ” Sono una bella ragazza , e tu hai intenzione di trascorrere la giornata lassù in mezzo all’erica? Dove i ragazzi e le ragazze giocano,
si abbracciano e si baciano e si divertono senza legami[5],
in mezzo all’erica in fiore sulla collina di Bennachie?!”
III
Ci siamo seduti insieme e l’ho presa tra le mie braccia,
l’ho abbracciata e baciata preso dal suo fascino, poi
ho tirato fuori il mio violino [6] e ho suonato allegramente,
lassù in mezzo all’erica in fiore sulla collina di Bennachie.
IV
Venite tutte voi ragazze belle e ascoltate il mio consiglio
e non lasciate mai che un soldato vi baci più di due volte,
perchè per tutto il tempo che vi bacia lui sta pianificando
come sbattere un po’ la vostra vecchia lattina .

NOTE
nella canzone si menziona una ricorrenza particolare, la raccolta dei mirtilli, una festa di mezz’estate denominata Bilberry Sunday (in Scozia si dice “Blaeberry”in Irlanda “Fraughan”). Si celebrava per lo più a luglio, quando maturano le bacche del mirtillo o ad Agosto, spesso abbinata alla festa celtica di Lughnasa o alla domenica (o lunedì) più prossima alla festa. Un tempo i giovinetti e le giovanette stavano su per i monti nella brughiera da mattino a sera a raccogliere i mirtilli e a fare amicizia, era perciò una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni (sotto i buoni uffici di Lugh). Alla fine della giornata le donne da marito avrebbero preparato una torta con i mirtilli raccolti, da regalare durante la festa successiva, al ragazzo di cui erano innamorate e se il ragazzo accettava il dolce si poteva dichiarare iniziato il corteggiamento.. (altro che festa di San Valentino!!) continua

Continua Mary Mac
Continua Bennachie (“Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs”)
Continua  “O’er the moor amang the heather

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/baraggia.htm#brugo
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/upamongtheheather.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=156417
http://www.horntip.com/mp3/1960s/1962ca_lyrica_erotica_vol_2
_a_wee_thread_o_blue_(LP)/09_the_hill_of_bennachie.htm