The Coasts of High Barbary

Leggi in italiano

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary is considered both a sea shanty and a ballad (Child ballad # 285) and certainly its original version is very old and probably from the 16th century. So ‘in the seventeenth-century comedy “The Two Noble Kinsmen” we read: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

BARBARY PIRATES

The Muslim pirates of the African coasts came from what the Europeans called Barbary or Algeria Tunisia, Libya, Morocco (and more precisely the city-states of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, but also the ports of Salé and Tetuan).
The most correct definition is barbarian pirates because they attacked only the ships of Christian Europe (also doing raids in the Christian countries of the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean to get slaves or to get the best redemptions). The term included Arabs, Berbers, Turks as well as European renegades.
In the affair there were also for good measure the Christian corsairs, which carried out the same raids along the coasts of Barbary (mainly the orders of chivalry of the Knights of Malta and the Knights of St. Stephen, but obviously in these cases it was a matter of “crusade” and not piracy !!

Although pirate activities were endemic in the Mediterranean Sea, the period of maximum activity of the barbarian pirates was the first half of the 1600s.

FIRST VERSION: a forebitter

Stan Hugill in his bible “Shanties From The Seven Seas” shows two melodies: one more ancient when the song was a forebitter and a faster one as a capstan chantey.
The oldest version of the ballad tells of two merchant ships The George Aloe, and The Sweepstake with George Aloe who avenges the sinking of the second ship using the same “courtesy” to the crew of the French pirate ship who had thrown into the sea the Sweepstake crew.
Pete Seeger

Joseph Arthur from  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biography and records here) rock version

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea

SECOND VERSION: a sea shanty

The ballad resumed popularity in the years between 1795 and 1815 in conjunction with the attacks of Barbary pirates to American ships.

Tom Kines from “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960
a version of how it was sung in the Elizabethan era

Quadriga Consort from Ships Ahoy 2013

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag  sea shanty version

The Shanty Crew

“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”.
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285

A fierce song for halyard: Bully in the Alley

Leggi in italiano

“Bully in the Alley” is a halyard shanty with origins referable to the black slaves involved in loading and unloading cotton bales in the ports (cotton screwing).
The bully here is a boozing sailor left in an alley by his still “sober” companions, who will move on to pick him up when returning to the ship.

Shinbone Alley is an alley in New York but also in Bermuda, but metaphorically speaking it is found in every “sailor town”. More generally it is an exotic indication for the Caribbean, the alley of a legendary “pirates den” , where every occasion is good for a fist fight! (first meaning for bully). Or it is the alley of an equally generic port city of the continent full of pubs and cheerful ladies, where if you get drunk, you end up waking up “enlisted” on a warship or a merchant ship (second meaning for bully). So our victim in love with Sally instead of marrying her, he goes to sea!
And finally a last interpretation: a “very good”, or “first rate” sailor (the rooster of the henhouse!)
According to Stan Hugill “Bully in the Alley” has become a seafaring expression to indicate a “stubborn” ship that wants to go in its direction in spite of the helmsman’s intention
This song is nowadays among the most popular “pirate songs”!
Take a look to these bully boys!

Assassin’s creed IV black flag

Chorus
Help me, Bob(1),
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Help me, Bob, I’m bully in the alley, Bully down in “shinbone al“!
I
Sally(2) is the girl that I love dearly,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl that I spliced dearly(3),
Bully down in “shinbone al
 II
For seven long years I courted little Sally,
But all she did was dilly and dally(4).
III
I ever get back, I’ll marry little Sally,
Have six kids and live in Shin-bone Alley.

NOTES
1)  God
2) Sally (or Sal) is the generic name of the girls of the Caribbean seas and of South America
3) also written as “Spliced nearly” means “almost married”, and yet the meaning lends itself to sexual allusions
4) to wastetime, especially by being slow, or by not being able to make a decision

Morrigan: Text version identical to the previous one but with an additional stanza before the last closing that says:
“I’ll leave Sal and I’ll become a sailor,
I’ll leave Sal and ship aboard a whaler.”

Three Pruned Men from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys  ANTI 2006.

Text version identical to the previous one but with a closing stanza that says:


Sally got down and dirty last night,
Sally got down and she spliced (5),
The sailors left last night,
The sailors got a ball of wax (6),
NOTES
5) in slang to splice it means having sex (uniting parts of the body in sexual activity) but also uniting with marriage
6) It is an idiom that means the totality of something; a hypothesis on the origin of the term: This is a form of initiation of freemasons. The freemasons took it from the scarab beetle, which is said to roll a ball of earth, which is a microcosm of the universe. I believe it is thought to spring from the ancient mysteries of Egypt. There was much amateur Egyptology during the 19th and early 20th century. The ball of wax has transcendental meaning. It represents a mystery of human godlike creativity which a person aspiring to the mystery of masonic lore carries with him. In the initiation, the person was given a small ball of earwax or some such, which would represent the cosmos. Reference to this ball of wax was a secret symbol of brotherhood. (from here)

Paddy and the Rats

Short Sharp version

The curators of the project write: “It feels as though this version is far closer to a cotton-screwing chant than the Hugill version. (Carpenter makes a note beside the version from Edward Robinson that it also was for ‘cotton screwing’).  There is only one complete verse and a couple of phrases from Short to Sharp, so the additional words are from Hugill’s version but ignoring location aspects and reworked to fit Short’s significantly different structure” (from here)

Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 ♪ 

I=V
So help me, Bob ,
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Bully down in an alley
Chorus
So help me, Bob, 
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
(solo) Bully in Teapot alley
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
II
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Have you seen on Sally?
Chorus
(solo) I could love her cheerly
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
III
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
She is the girl in the alley
Chorus
Oh I’ll spliced to nearly
Way, hey, bully in the alley
IV
I’ll leave my Sally go a sailin’
I’ll leave my Sally go a wailin’
One day I’ll wed Sally
Chorus
Wedding bed my Sally
Way, hey, bully in the alley

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/sally-brown/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/bullyinthealley.html http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bully-in-the-alley.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31335
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43912
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm#bully%20alley

My Bonnie Highland Lassie sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

Under the title Hieland laddie (Highland lassie) a series of texts are grouped with the same melody (a traditional Scottish air) entitled “If thou’t play me fair play” or “The Lass of Livingston”

“Tune first published under the title “Cockleshell” in Playford‘s “Apollo’s Banquet” (London, 1690) and “Dancing Master”, 11th edition of 1701. It then appears in the “Drummond Castle Manuscript”, inscribed “A collection of Country Dances written for the use of His Grace the Duke of Perth, By Dav. Young, 1734.”
Earliest printing in Robert Bremner (1720 – 1789, music seller in Edinburgh) ‘s 1757 Collection” (from here)

MILITARY MARCH

In Scotland, the “marcing song” is synonymous with bagpipes! “Hieland laddie” was the march of all Scottish regiments before “Scotland the Brave”.

THE SCOTTISH DANCE

A particularly energetic dance competition

SEA SHANTY: Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie)

The melody was also used as a capstan and a “stamp and go” shanty, and (without the grand chorus) as a halyard shanty. It was popular on the Dundee Whalers, then later used (c. 1830’s and 40’s) as a work song for stowing lumber and cotton in the Southeastern and Gulf ports of the United States. Highland Laddie was used for long and slow maneuvers: hoisting sails above (2 pulls per chorus) or hauling up the anchor. It was sung in two voices: a solo asking the question (Where have been ye all the day, my Bonnie Laddie Hieland?) and the answer given in chorus by the crew (Way hay and away we go, Bonnie Laddie, Laddie Hieland). (from here)

Pete Seeger live

I
Was you ever in Quebec?
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
Stowing timber on the deck,
My bonny Highland laddie.
CHORUS
High-ho, and away we goes,
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
High-ho, and away we goes,
My bonny Highland laddie.

II
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen(1).
III
Was you ever in Baltimore
Dancing on the sanded floor?
IV
Was you ever in Callao(2)
Where the girls are never slow?
V
Was you ever in Merasheen(3)
Where you stayed fast to tree(4)?

NOTES
1) scottish song and scottish beauty
2) large port of Peru
3) or Merrimashee: there is an island of Merasheen in Newfoundland (Canada), but more likely is Miramichi, a small town in Canada, located in the province of New Brunswick; Merrimashee is also a large river that gives its name to the bay where flows into the Gulf of San Lorenzo. Often the sailors crippled the names of the places that they  did not know.
Italo Ottonello found this note: Merasheen, located on the southwestern tip of Merasheen Island in Placentia Bay, was one of the larger and more prosperous communities resettled. Settled by English, Irish and Scottish in the late 18th century, the community eventually became predominantly Roman Catholic with families of Irish descent. In an ideal location to prosecute the inshore cod fishery along with the herring and lobster fisheries in the ice-free harbour during winter and spring, it appeared that Merasheen would not succumb to the same fate as other small resettled communities.
This is how Ottonello observes: “it seems to hint at a generic stormy place, rather than a particular site”.
4) or “you tie up to a tree”, “Where you make fast to a tree”;

The Kingston Trio.
The checked stanzas are an addition of the group

Was you ever in Quebec
Bonny Laddie, Hielan’ laddie
Stowing timber on the deck
Bonny Hielan’ Laddie

Was you ever in Dundee
There some pretty ships you’ll see
“This Boston town don’t suit my notion
And I’m bound for far away
So, I’ll pack my bag and sail the ocean
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Mobile Bay
Loading cotton by the day
Was you ever ‘round Cape Horn
With the Lion and the Unicorn (1)
“One of these days and it won’t be long
And I’m bound for far away
You’ll take a look around and find me gone
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Monterey
On that town with three months pay
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen
“Farewell, dear friends, I’m leaving soon
And I’m bound for far away
We’ll meet again this coming June
And I’ll see you on another day”

NOTES
1) it is the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, the lion symbolizes England and the unicorn of Scotland;

Bonnie Highland Lassie

Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage from Assassin’s Creed Rogue (sea shanty edition)

I
Were you ever in Roundstone Town (1)?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Roundstone Town
Drinking milk and eating flour
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
II
Were you ever in Bombay
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Bombay
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in old Bombay
Drinking coffee and bohay (2)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

III
Were you ever in Quebec?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Quebec?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Quebec
Stowing timber up on deck
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
IV
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I am fit to sweep the floor
As the lock is for the door
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

NOTE
1) Roundstone is a small fishing village near Connemara (County Galway)
2) Roundstone is a small fishing village near Connemara (County Galway)
2) bohea is a blend of black tea originating in the Wuyi mountain region of southeastern China; in practice it was once synonymous with tea

LINK
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hielladd.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/danze-scozzesi.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bonnie-hieland-lassie.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/wasuever.htm
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/1524
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_laddiegone.htm
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2009/11/ktpete-seegertommy-makemludwig-von.html
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/donkey-riding.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/donkeyriding.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41062
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54643
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/hielandl.html
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/3031lyr5.htm

JOHNNY BOKER SEA SHANTY

Titoli simili sono riferiti a due filoni della canzone, uno diffuso in Gran Bretagna, Irlanda e Terranova l’altro proveniente dall’America. Da questi si è ulteriormente ramificata una canzone marinaresca. Ma che queste canzoni abbiano una radice comune (oltre al titolo) è ancora tutto da verificare, di fatto le melodie tra le due sponde del mare sono diverse. Il tema più generale è quello delle tinkers songs in cui si descrive un personaggio vagabondo e bizzarro, povero ma libero. Nelle versioni americane in alcune versioni si delinea lo stereotipo dell’afro-americano di quei tempi, rozzo, malmesso e da prendere in giro (per non dire di peggio)

Al momento non ci sono delle ricerche accurate in merito, solo un mucchio di ipotesi. (prima parte)

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

La minstrel song passa nel canto marinaresco verso gli anni 1850-60.
Doerflinger scrive “Johnny Boker was one of the many characters shanghaied into shanty lore from the songs of the blackface minstrels, or possibly from Negro folksong, to which both sailors and minstrels were indebted.” (in Shantymen and Shantyboys)
A Terranova il canto era noto come, “Jolly Poker” Nel loro “Ballads and Sea Songs of Newfoundland,” (1993) Greenleal e Mansfield scrivono “Used to haul houses across the ice, boats on the land, and all kinds of heavy pulling. The men line up on the rope, sing this in unison, pull on the last “O!” and repeat until the job is done.”
And it’s O my jolly poker
And we’ll start this heavy joker,
And it’s O my jolly poker—O!”

Versione riportata da Stan Hugill “Shanties From the Seven Seas,” 1961


Oh! Do, my Johnny Bo(w)ker,
Come rock and roll me over(1).
Do! My Johnny Bo(w)ker, do (2)!
The skipper is a rover.
The mate he’s never sober.
The Bo’sun is a tailor.
We’ll all go on a jamboree (3).
The Packet is a Rollin’.
We’ll pull and haul together.
We’ll haul for better weather.
And soon we’ll be in London Town.
Come rock and roll me over.
Traduzione Cattia Salto
Fallo per me Johnny Boker
vieni e fammi andare (1)
fallo per me Johnny Boker, aiutami (2)
Lo skipper è un vagabondo
l’ufficiale non è mai sobrio
il nostromo è un sarto
andremo tutti a far baldoria (3).
Il postale sta filando,
tireremo e aleremo insieme
aleremo per il bel tempo
e presto saremo nella città di Londra
vieni e fammi andare

NOTE
1) Rock and roll = “the sweating or tightening of the sails”
2) è un bunting shanty in cui lo sforzo viene concentrato aull’ultima parola del coro in questo esempio DO
3) jamboree: un festival o un grande raduno di persone

FONTI
http://www.shantynet.com/lyrics/johnny-bowker/

OH ROLL AND GO

Una breve sea shanty, proveniente dalla raccolta di Frank Shay “Iron Man & Wooden Ships”

ASCOLTA Black Flag


There was a ship, she sailed to Spain
O ho, roll and go!
There was a ship came home again.
Tommy’s on the topsail yard!
And what do you think was in her hold?
There was diamonds, there was gold.
And what was in her lazarette?
Good split peas and bad bull meat.
O, many a sailorman gets drowned,
Many a sailorman gets drowned.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
C’era una nave diretta in Spagna
o ho, salpa e vai!
C’era una nave che ritornava a casa
Tommy è sul pennone
E cosa credete avesse nella stiva?
C’erano diamanti, e oro.
Che cosa c’era nella sua cambusa?
Buoni piselli secchi e della pessima carne di toro.
Più di un marinaio affogò,
più di un marinaio affogò

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://www.thepirateking.com/music/rollandgo.htm
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/roll_and_go/index.html

Hieland laddie, Bonny laddie

Read the post in English

Sotto il titolo Hieland laddie (Highland lassie) si raggruppano una serie di testi con la stessa melodia (un tradizionale scozzese) dal titolo “If thou’lt play me fair play” ovvero “The Lass of Livingston”
Melodia dapprima pubblicata sotto il titolo “Cockleshell’s” in Apollo’s Banquet di Playford (Londra, 1690) e il Dancing Master del 1701. Poi ccompare nel “Manoscritto del castello di Drummond” con la scritta “Una raccolta di danze di campagna scritta per l’uso di sua Grazia il Duca di Perth da Dav. Young, 1734.” La prima stampa della canzone è nella raccolta del 1757 di Robert Bremner. (tradotto da qui)

Vediamoli in ordine sparso

LA MARCIA MILITARE

In Scozia la “marcing song” è sinonimo di cornamuse! “Hieland laddie” era la marcia di tutti i reggimenti scozzesi prima di “Scotland the Brave”.

LA DANZA SCOZZESE
Una danza da competizione particolarmente energica

SEA SHANTY: Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie)

Una versione testuale la colloca nelle canzoni marinaresche (vedi)
La melodia era anche usata come un capstan e una “stamp and go” shanty, e (senza il grande coro) come una halyard shanty. Era popolare tra le baleniere di Dundee, poi utilizzata (intorno al 1830 e agli anni ’40) come canzone di lavoro per stivare legname e cotone nei porti del sud-est e del Golfo degli Stati Uniti. Highland Laddie è stata utilizzata per lunghe e lente manovre: issare le vele  (2 tiri per coro) o levare l’ancora. Era cantata a due voci: lo shantyman che faceva la domanda (Dove sei stato tutto il giorno, mio bel ragazzo scozzese?) E la risposta data in coro dall’equipaggio (Way hay and away we go, Bonnie Laddie, Laddie Hieland)”. (tradotto da qui)

Pete Seeger live


Was you ever in Quebec?
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
Stowing timber on the deck,
My bonny Highland laddie.
CHORUS
High-ho, and away we goes,
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
High-ho, and away we goes,
My bonny Highland laddie.
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen(1).
Was you ever in Baltimore
Dancing on the sanded floor?
Was you ever in Callao(2)
Where the girls are never slow?
Was you ever in Merasheen(3)
Where you stayed fast to tree(4)?
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) in Quebec?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
A stivare il legname sul ponte?
Mio bel ragazzo delle Highland
CORO
In alto saliamo
bel ragazzo delle Highland
In alto saliamo
Mio bel ragazzo delle Highland
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) ad Aberdeen?
Ci sono le ragazze più belle che abbiate mai visto.
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Baltimora
a ballare sul pavimento tirato a lucido?
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Callao
dove le ragazze non sono per niente stupide?
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Merasheen
dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta?

NOTE
1) essendo la canzone originaria della Scozia ovviamente non si poteva non celebrare la bellezza delle sue donne
2) grande porto del Perù
3) anche scritto come Merrimashee c’è un isola di Merasheen a Terranova (Canada), ma più probabilmente è Miramichi, una cittadina del Canada, situata nella provincia del Nuovo Brunswick, ma anche un grande fiume che da il nome alla baia in cui sfocia, nel Golfo di San Lorenzo. Spesso i marinai ripetevano le canzoni ad orecchio ed era più probabile che venissero storpiati i nomi delle località che non si conoscevano.

La ricerca di Italo Ottonello ha trovato questa nota: Merasheen, located on the southwestern tip of Merasheen Island in Placentia Bay, was one of the larger and more prosperous communities resettled. Settled by English, Irish and Scottish in the late 18th century, the community eventually became predominantly Roman Catholic with families of Irish descent. In an ideal location to prosecute the inshore cod fishery along with the herring and lobster fisheries in the ice-free harbour during winter and spring, it appeared that Merasheen would not succumb to the same fate as other small resettled communities.
Così osserva Ottonello: “sembra accennare ad un generico luogo tempestoso, piuttosto che ad un sito in particolare“.

 4) letteralmente ” dove stavi saldo sull’albero” lo stesso concetto è espresso anche in una versione alternativa “you tie up to a tree” (con la precisazione di legarsi bene ad un albero), oppure è scritto anche come “Where you make fast to a tree”; ma Italo Ottonello traduce giustamente “tree” con “crocetta” [così imparo un nuovo (per me) termine nautico!] e la frase come “dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta” (durante un periodo di mare cattivo)

 APPROFONDIMENTO: MA QUANTI ALBERI SU UNA NAVE!!
a cura di Italo Ottonello

TREE, n. In ship-building, pieces of timber are called chess-trees, cross-trees, roof-trees, tressel-trees, &c. (da DANA Seaman’s friend – Dictionary of sea terms) =quasi tutte parti della crocetta, che è la piattaforma al di sopra della coffa
Chess-trees. Pieces of oak, fitted to the sides of a vessel, abaft the fore chains, with a sheave in them, to board the main tack to. Now out of use. = gruetta o rinvio della mura
Il bozzello fisso a murata rappresenta il rinvio della mura o scotta di trinchetto. Qui è la scotta di trinchetto- foresheet>/span>
Cross-trees. Pieces of oak supported by the cheeks (*)and trestle-trees, at the mast-heads, to sustain the tops on the lower mast, and to spread the topgallant rigging at the topmast-head. barre costiere =parti della crocetta
(*)[Cheeks. The projections on each side of a mast, upon which the trestle-trees rest. = Maschette (sostegni della crocetta) – The sides of the shell of a block. =maschette di un bozzello]
Rough-trees (roof-trees). An unfinished spar = abete di rispetto (uno dei pezzi della dorma)
Trestle-trees (trassle-tree). Two strong pieces of timber, placed horizontally and fore-and-aft on opposite sides of a mast-head, to support the cross-trees and top, and for the fid of the mast above to rest upon = barre traverse (parti della crocetta)

The Kingston Trio. Le strofe vigolettate sono un’aggiunta del gruppo


Was you ever in Quebec
Bonny Laddie, Hielan’ laddie
Stowing timber on the deck
Bonny Hielan’ Laddie
Was you ever in Dundee
There some pretty ships you’ll see
“This Boston town don’t suit my notion
And I’m bound for far away
So, I’ll pack my bag and sail the ocean
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Mobile Bay
Loading cotton by the day
Was you ever ‘round Cape Horn
With the Lion and the Unicorn(1)
“One of these days and it won’t be long
And I’m bound for far away
You’ll take a look around and find me gone
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Monterey
On that town with three months pay
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen
“Farewell, dear friends, I’m leaving soon
And I’m bound for far away
We’ll meet again this coming June
And I’ll see you on another day”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Siete mai stati in Quebec?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
A stivare il legname sul ponte?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
Siete mai stati a Dundee,
ci sono delle belli navi da vedere.
“La città di Boston non mi soddisfa
e mi sono imbarcato per lidi lontani,
così farò la mia borsa e navigherò sull’oceano
-ci vedremo un altra volta. “
Siete mai stati a Mobile Bay
a caricare cotone tutto il giorno?
Siete mai stati a Capo Horn
con il Leone e l’Unicorno ?
“Uno di questi giorni e non ci vorrà molto
salperò per lidi lontani,
ti guarderai intorno e io me ne sarò andato.
-ci vedremo un altra volta. “
Siete mai stati a Monterey
con la paga di tre mesi (da spendere)?
Siete mai stati ad Aberdeen,
ci sono le ragazze più belle mai viste!?
“Addio miei cari amici, preso me ne andrò
mi sono imbarcato per lidi lontani,
ci rivedremo di nuovo il prossimo giugno
-ci vedremo un altra volta.”

NOTE
1) su una nave inglese: è lo stemma reale del Regno Unito, il leone  simboleggia l’Inghilterra e l’unicorno la  Scozia;

Bonnie Highland Lassie

Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage in Assassin’s Creed Rogue (sea shanty edition)


I
Were you ever in Roundstone Town (1)?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Roundstone Town
Drinking milk and eating flour (2)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
II
Were you ever in Bombay
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Bombay
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in old Bombay
Drinking coffee and bohay (3)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

III
Were you ever in Quebec?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Quebec?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Quebec
Stowing timber up on deck
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

IV
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Are you fit to sweep the floor (4)?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I am fit to sweep the floor
As the lock is for the door
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sei mai stata a Roundstone?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata a Roundstone?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso a Roundstone
a bere latte e farinata
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
II
Sei mai stata a Bombay?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata a Bombay?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso nella vecchia Bombay
a bere caffè e tè.
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
III
Sei mai stata in Quebec?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata in Quebec?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso in Quebec
a stivare il legname sul ponte.
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
IV
Sei pronta a spazzare il pavimento?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei pronta a spazzare il pavimento?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Sono pronta a spazzare il pavimento,
come la serratura lo è con la porta
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.

NOTE
1) Roundstone è un piccolo villaggio di pescatori vicino a Connemara (County Galway)
2) letteralmente “bere latte e mangiare farina” potrebbe voler dire fare colazione, ma potrebbe esserci un doppio senso
3) bohea è una miscela di tè nero originario della regione di montagna Wuyi del sud-est della Cina; in pratica un tempo era sinonimo di tè
4) anche questa strofa potrebbe avere un doppio senso erotico

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hielladd.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/danze-scozzesi.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bonnie-hieland-lassie.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/wasuever.htm
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/1524
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_laddiegone.htm
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2009/11/ktpete-seegertommy-makemludwig-von.html
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/donkey-riding.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/donkeyriding.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41062
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54643
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/hielandl.html
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/3031lyr5.htm

High Barbary

Read the post in English

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary è considerata sia una sea shanty che una ballata (Child ballad #285) e di certo la sua versione originale è molto antica e probabilmente cinquecentesca. Così’ nella commedia seicentesca  “The Two Noble Kinsmen” leggiamo: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

CORSARI BARBARESCHI

I pirati musulmani delle coste africane provenivano da quella che gli europei chiamavano Barberia (in inglese Barbary e in francese Côte des Barbaresques) ovvero Algeria Tunisia, Libia, Marocco (e più precisamente le città-stato di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli, ma anche i porti di Salè e Tetuan). La definizione più corretta è corsari barbareschi perchè assalivano solo le navi dell’Europa cristiana (compiendo inoltre razzie anche nei paesi cristiani della costa atlantica e del mediterraneo per procacciare schiavi o per ottenere lauti riscatti). Nel termine barbareschi si comprendevano arabi, berberi, turchi nonché i rinnegati europei. “I più attivi e organizzati corsari musulmani furono quelli con base nelle città costiere del Maghreb, soprattutto Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli. Con i loro entroterra, queste città costituivano degli stati corsari pressoché indipendenti dal lontano potere dei sultani di Istanbul. La pirateria contro i cristiani era una lucrosa attività (da non dimenticare il commercio o il riscatto degli schiavi catturati) perfettamente legale, spesso incoraggiata dagli stessi sultani ottomani, specialmente quando questi erano in guerra contro paesi cristiani. Nonostante varie spedizioni punitive da parte di Stati europei e persino dei neonati Stati Uniti d’America (contro Tripoli), l’attività corsara delle reggenze maghrebine (talvolta con strane, ma non troppo, alleanze come ad esempio quella con la Francia) continuò per alcuni secoli”. (tratto da qui)
Nell’affare c’erano anche per buona misura i corsari cristiani, che compivano uguali razzie lungo le coste della Barberia (principalmente gli ordini cavallereschi e marinari dei Cavalieri di Malta e dei Cavalieri di Santo Stefano, ma ovviamente in questi casi si parlava di “crociata” e non di pirateria!!) “Se per le reggenze di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli il prigioniero valeva essenzialmente il riscatto per i cristiani, invece, i prigionieri diventavano “schiavi” maghrebini – che raramente venivano richiesti indietro – i quali diventavano oggetto di commercio interno e venivano impegnati nel servizio pubblico (ad esempio come rematori sulle galere) o in ambito domestico (specie le donne), e particolarmente rilevante è il fenomeno degli schiavi africani utilizzati in Sicilia tra la fine del Quattrocento e l’inizio del Cinquecento per il lavoro nei campi. Da qui il famoso detto “Cu pigghia un turcu, è sou” (Chi arraffa un turco ne diventa proprietario) che fa da controcanto al più famoso “Mamma li turchi!” (Aiuto, arrivano i turchi!)”. (tratto da qui)

Per quanto le attività piratesche fossero endemiche nel Mar Mediterraneo il periodo di massima attività dei corsari barbareschi fu la prima metà del 1600.

PRIMA VERSIONE

Stan Hugill nella bibbia “Shanties From The Seven Seas” riporta due melodie una più antica quando la canzone era una forebitter e una più veloce come canto marinaresco (capstan chantey).
La versione più antica della ballata racconta di due navi mercantili The George Aloe, e The Sweepstake con la George Aloe che vendica l’affondamento della seconda nave usando la stessa “cortesia” alla ciurma delle nave pirata francese la quale aveva gettato in mare l’equipaggio della Sweepstake.
Pete Seeger

Joseph Arthur in  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biografia e dischi qui) in versione rock


There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low(1)
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano due alteri  vascelli
provenienti dalla vecchia Inghilterra, (tira forte, tira piano
che così salpiamo
)
Uno era il “Prince of Luther”
e l’altro il “Prince of Wales”,
entrambi a farsi un giretto per le coste della Barberia.
“A riva là
– il nostromo gridò –
guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
“Non c’è niente a poppa, signore,
non c’è niente sottovento
ma c’è un vascello a sopravvento
e naviga veloce e spedito.”
“Maledizione, maledizione
– il nostro capitano gridò –
siete un militare
o un corsaro?”
“Non sono un militare
e nemmeno un corsaro – disse lui –
ma sono un pirata del mare
in cerca del mio compenso”
Siamo stati a sparare bordate
per molto tempo
finchè alla fine la Prince of Luther
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare

NOTE
1) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma il significato resta quello di “tira”

SECONDA VERSIONE: la sea shanty

La ballata riprende popolarità negli anni tra il 1795 e il 1815 in concomitanza degli attacchi dei corsari barbareschi alle navi americane.

Tom Kines in “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960 un versione di come era cantata in epoca elisabettiana

Quadriga Consort from Ships Ahoy 2013

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag in versione sea shanty

The Shanty Crew in versione sea shanty più estesa


“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”. (1)
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
“Guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
(tira forte, tira piano
che così siamo salpati)
“Vedo un relitto a sopravvento
e una nave altera  sottovento
che naviga lungo
la costa di Barberia.”
“Siete un militare
o un pirata?”
“Non sono un pirata
ma un soldato” – disse lui “Ammaineremo le vele
per l’abbordaggio
perchè abbiamo delle lettere da farvi portare a casa”
A bordate
si combatterono tutti sul mare
finchè alla fine la fregata
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare.
Con sciabola e pistola
ci siamo battuti per tre ore
e la nave divenne la loro bara
e il mare la loro tomba.
Fu uno spettacolo crudele
che ci addolorò tanto
vedere il loro annegamento
mentre cercavano di nuotare fino alla riva.

NOTE
1) I pirati usano l’inganno per l’abbordaggio

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285

Bully in the Alley

Read the post in English

“Bully in the Alley” è un halyard shanty con origini riferibili agli schiavi neri addetti al carico e scarico delle balle di cotone nei porti (cotton screwing).
hells-pavementIl bully qui è più comunemente inteso come un marinaio ubriaco fradicio lasciato in un vicolo dai suoi compagni ancora “sobri” che passeranno a riprenderlo al momento di ritornare sulla nave.

Shinbone Alley è un vicolo di New York ma anche delle Bermuda, ma metaforicamente parlando si trova in ogni “sailor town”. Più genericamente è una indicazione esotica per i Caraibi, il vicolo di una leggendaria “città” covo dei pirati, luogo dove ogni occasione è buona per una scazzottata! (primo significato per bully). Oppure è il vicolo di una altrettanto generica cittadina portuale del continente piena di pubs e allegre donnine, dove se ti ubriachi finisci per svegliarti “arruolato” su una nave da guerra o un mercantile (secondo significato per bully). Così il nostro malcapitato innamorato di Sally invece di sposarla va per mare!
E infine un’ultima interpretazione per bully in the Alley: inteso come “very good”, o “first rate” così il nostro marinaio è il gallo del pollaio!
Secondo Stan HugillBully in the Alley” è diventata un’espressione marinaresca per indicare una nave “testarda” che vuole andare nella sua direzione a dispetto dell’intenzione del timoniere. Di fatto la sua versione è quella preferita dal revival folk

La canzone è al giorno d’oggi  tra le “pirate songs” più gettonate!
Date un occhio a questi bully boys!

Assassin’s creed IV black flag


Chorus
Help me, Bob(1),
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Help me, Bob, I’m bully in the alley,
Bully down in “shinbone al
“!
I
Sally(2) is the girl that I love dearly,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl that I spliced dearly(3),
Bully down in “shinbone al
II
For seven long years I courted little Sally,
But all she did was dilly and dally(4).
III
I ever get back, I’ll marry little Sally,
Have six kids and live in Shin-bone Alley.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
Aiutami, Signore,
sono ubriaco nel vicolo

Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
Aiutami, Bob, sono ubriaco nel vicolo
Ciucco perso a Shinbone Alley
I
Sally(2) è la ragazza che amo tanto
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
Sally è la ragazza che sposerei
Ciucco perso a Shinbone Alley
II
Per sette lunghi anni ho corteggiato la piccola Sally/ ma tutto quello che faceva era perdere tempo
III
Non ritornerò più (in mare), mi sposerò Sally
avremo sei bambini e vivremo a Shinbone Alley

NOTE
1) termine colloquiale per “God”
2) Sally ( e come diminutivo Sal) è il nome delle ragazze dei mari caraibici e del Sud America; Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola con la quale il nostro marinaio di turno cerca di spassarsela.
3) anche scritto come “Spliced nearly” significa “almost married”, e tuttavia il senso si presta ad allusioni sessuali; ci sono anche versi extra ben più spinti
4) Sally era indecisa e prendeva tempo. Il termine ha origini settecentesche come gioco di parole su “dally”

Morrigan
Versione testuale identica alla precedente ma con una strofa aggiuntiva prima dell’ultima di chiusura che dice:
I’ll leave Sal and I’ll become a sailor, (Lascerò Sally e diventerò un marinaio)
I’ll leave Sal and ship aboard a whaler ( e mi imbarcherò su una baleniera)

Three Pruned Men in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys  ANTI 2006.

Versione testuale identica alla precedente ma con una strofa di chiusura che dice


Sally got down and dirty last night,
Sally got down and she spliced(5),
The sailors left last night,
The sailors got a ball of wax(6),
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Sally ci andò pesante l’altra sera,
Sally ci diede dentro,
i marinai sono partiti l’altra sera
i marinai si sono beccati tutta la palla di cerume

NOTE
5) in termini gergali to splice significa fare sesso (unire parti del corpo in un’attività sessuale) ma anche unire con matrimonio
6) espressione idiomatica, per far luce sull’origine “Questa è una forma di iniziazione dei massoni. I massoni l’hanno preso dallo scarabeo, che si dice rotoli una palla di terra, che è un microcosmo dell’universo. Probabilmente scaturisce dagli antichi misteri dell’Egitto. C’era molta egittologia amatoriale durante il 19 ° e l’inizio del 20 ° secolo. La palla di cera ha un significato trascendentale. Rappresenta un mistero della creatività umana divina che una persona che aspira al mistero della tradizione massonica porta con sé. Nell’iniziazione, alla persona era data una piccola palla di cerume o qualcosa del genere, che rappresentava il cosmo. Il riferimento a questa palla di cera era un simbolo segreto della fratellanza” (tratto da qui)

Paddy and the Rats

La versione Short Sharp

Scrivono i curatori del progetto: “Sembra che questa versione sia molto più vicina a un canto per il carico e scarico delle balle di cotone nei porti (cotton screwing) rispetto alla versione Hugill. C’è solo ]nel manoscritto di Sharp] una strofa completa e un paio di frasi di Short, quindi le parole che abbiamo aggiunto sono tratte dalla versione di Hugill, ma non nella sua sequenza e sono rielaborate per adattarsi alla struttura del canto significativamente diversa di Short” (tradotto da qui)
Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 ♪  


I=V
So help me, Bob (1),
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Bully down in an alley
Chorus
So help me, Bob, 
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
(solo) Bully in Teapot (2) alley
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
II
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Have you seen on Sally?
Chorus
(solo) I could love her cheerly
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
III
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
She is the girl in the alley
Chorus
Oh I’ll spliced to nearly
Way, hey, bully in the alley
IV
I’ll leave my Sally go a sailin’
I’ll leave my Sally go a wailin’
One day I’ll wed Sally
Chorus
Wedding bed my Sally
Way, hey, bully in the alley
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I=V
Così aiutami, Signore,
sono ubriaco nel vicolo
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo!
Ciucco perso in un vicolo
Coro
Aiutami, Signore,
sono ubriaco nel vicolo

Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
(solo) Ubriaco nella via delle Case del Tè 
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
II
Sally è la ragazza giù nel vicolo
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
Sally è la ragazza giù nel vicolo
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
Avete visto Sally?
II
Potrei amarla con tutto il cuore
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
III
Sally è la ragazza che amo tanto
Sally è la ragazza che amo tanto
lei è la ragazza nel vicolo
Coro
Oh se me la sposerei!
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo
IV
Lascerò la mia Sally per andare in mare
lascerò la mia Sally per andare su una baleniera, ma un giorno sposerò Sally
Coro
Sposerò e dormirò con Sally
Via, hey, ubriaco nel vicolo

NOTE
1) termine colloquiale per “God”
2) le case da te equivalgono ai bordelli

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/sally-brown/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/bullyinthealley.html http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bully-in-the-alley.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31335
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43912

http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm#bully%20alley