Bonny Portmore: the ornament tree

Leggi in italiano

When the great oak of Portmore was break down in 1760, someone wrote a song known as “The Highlander’s Farewell to Bonny Portmore“; in 1796 Edward Bunting picked it up from Daniel Black, an old harpist from Glenoak (Antrim, Northern Ireland), and published it in “Ancient Music of Ireland” – 1840.
The age-old oak was located on the estate of Portmore’s Castle on the banks of Lugh Bege and it was knocked down by a great wind; the tree was already famous for its posture and was nicknamed “the ornament tree“. The oak was cut and the wood sold, from the measurements made we know that the trunk was 13 meters wide.

LOUGH PORTMORE

1032910_tcm9-205039Loch un Phoirt Mhóir (lake with a large landing place) is an almost circular lake in the South-West of Antrim County, Northern Ireland, today a nature reserve for bird protection.
The property formerly belonged to the O’Neill clan of Ballinderry, while the castle was built in 1661 or 1664 by Lord Conway (on the foundations of an ancient fortress) between Lough Beg and Lough Neagh; the estate was rich in centenarian trees and beautiful woods; however, the count fell into ruin and lost the property when he decided to drain Lake Ber to cultivate the land (the drainage system called “Tunny cut” is still existing); the ambitious project failed and the land passed into the hands of English nobles.
In other versions more simply the Count’s dynasty became extinct and the new owners left the estate in a state of neglect, since they did not intend to reside in Ireland. Almost all the trees were cut down and sold as timber for shipbuilding and the castle fell into disrepair.

Bonny Portmore could be understood symbolically as the decline of the Irish Gaelic lords: pain and nostalgia mixed in a lament of a twilight beauty; the dutiful tribute goes to Loreena McKennitt who brought this traditional iris  song to the international attention.
Loreena McKennitt in The Visit 1991
Nights from the Alhambra: live

CHORUS
O bonny Portmore,
you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
I
O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many’s the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.
II
All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, “Where will we shelter or where will we sleep?”
For the Oak and the Ash (1), they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.
NOTE
1) coded phrase to indicate the decline of the Gaelic lineage clans

Laura Marling live
Laura Creamer

Lucinda Williams in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006


Dan Gibson & Michael Maxwell in Emerald Forest instrumental version
And here I open a small parenthesis recalling a personal episode of a long time ago in which I met an ancient tree: at the time I lived in Florence and I had the opportunity to turn a bit for Tuscany, now I can not remember the location, but I know that I was in the Colli Senesi and it was summer; someone advised us to go and see an old holm oak, explaining roughly to the road; in the distance it seemed we were approaching a grove, in reality it was a single tree whose foliage was so leafy and vast, the old branches so bent, that to get closer to the trunk we had to bow. I still remember after many years the feeling of a presence, a deep and vital breath, and the discomfort that I tried to disturb the place. I do not exaggerate speaking of fear at all, and I think that feeling was the same feeling experienced by the ancient man, who felt in the centenarian trees the presence of a spirit.
SOURCE
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/immie/bonny.html
http://www.sentryjournal.com/2010/10/11/the-fate-of-bonny-portmore/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15567
http://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/guide/p/portmorelough/about.aspx

Carrickfergus or Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Leggi in italiano

“Carrickfergus” comes from a Gaelic song titled Do Bhí Bean Uasal (see) or “There Was a Noblewoman” and is also known by the name of “The Sick Young Lover”, which appeared in a broadside distributed in Cork and dated 1840 and also in the collection of George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 with the name of “The Young Lady”. Text and melody passed through the oral tradition have spread and changed, without leaving a consistent trace in the collections printed in the nineteenth century. This song has been attributed to the irish bard Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756) a rake-poet from Co. Cavan.
Curious character nicknamed “Buil” the yellow, a bard vagabond storyteller and composer of poems, which have spread throughout Ireland and are still sung today.
The scholar Breandán Ó Buachalla has published his collection in the book “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” in 1975. In Blacklion County of Cavan there is also a small stele in his memory and it is celebrated the Cathal Bui Festival (month of June).
A incomplete priest able with words and with women, he also had a lot of “irish humor” and was obviously a heavy drinker, he went around Breifne, the Irish name of the area including Cavan, Leitrim, and south of Fermanagh ( one of the many traveler with his caravan or even less).

PETER O’TOOLE

But it is the version known by Peter O’Toole that was the origin of the version of Dominic Behan recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman“, and also the version recorded by Sean o’Shea always in the same years with the title “Do Bhí Bean Uasal”. Also the Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem made their own version with the title “Carrickfergus” in the 1964 “The First Hurray” LP.

Chieftains from “The Chieftains Live” 1977

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

This version has been attributed musically to Seán Ó Riada (John Reidy 1931-1971) it is not clear if it is only an arrangement or a real writing of the melody. Certainly the text is taken from the poetry of Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino with the Ceoltóirí Chualann, 1969.

English translation
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself,
But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me,
And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!

I

Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)/Sailing over the deep blue waters/ I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim./For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;/I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

NOTE
1) “baile cuain”= “quiet town” or Harbour Town

THE VERSION OF THE YEARS 60 AND MEANING

And we come to what remains of this song in our day, that is the version of Carrickfergus spread by the major interpreters of Celtic music.
The sweet melancholy of the melody and its uncertain textual interpretation have made the song very popular, some capture the romantic side and also play it at weddings, others at the funeral (for example that of John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Certainly it has something magical, sad and nostalgic, the man drowns in alcohol the pain of separation from his beloved (or more likely he drinks because he has a particular predilection for alcohol): a vast ocean divides them (or a stretch of sea) and he would like to be in Ireland, in Carrickfergus: he would like to have wings or to swim across the sea or more realistically find a boatman to take him to her, and finally he can die in her arms ( or at her tombstone) now that he is old and tired.

In my opinion, the general meaning of the text remains clear enough, but if you go into detail then many doubts arise, which I tried to summarize in the notes.

Loreena McKennitt & Cedric Smith  from Elemental, 1985


I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)

II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

NOTES
1) Carrickfergus (from the Gaelic Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) is a coastal town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, one of the oldest settlements in Northern Ireland. Here the protagonist says he wants to be at Carrickfergus (but evidently he is somewhere else) while in other versionssays “I wish I had you in Carrickfergus”: the meaning of the song changes completely.
Some want to set the story in the South of Ireland and they see the name of Fergus,as the river that runs through Ennis County of Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. There are three interpretations: the first that Ballygrant is in Scotland on the Hebrides (Islay island), the second that is the village of Ballygrot (from the Gaelic Baile gCrot means “settlement of hills”), near Helen’s Bay that it is practically in front of Carrickfergus over the stretch of sea that creeps over the north-east coast of Ireland (the Belfast Lough). It seems that the locals call it “Ballygrat” or Ballygrant “and that it is an ancient settlement and that at one time there were some races with the Carrickfergus boats at Ballygrat.The third is a corrupt translation from the Gaelic” baile cuain “of the eighteenth-century version and therefore both a generic quiet location, a small village.
But between the two sentences there is already an incongruity or better there is need of an interpretation, ascertained that Ballygrant is not a particular place of Carrickfergus for which the protagonist feels nostalgia for some specific connection with his love story passed in youth, then it is the place where it is at the moment. So the protagonist could be an Irishman who found himself in the Hebrides, but who would like to return to Carrickfergus from his old love or he is a Scot (who was a young soldier in Ireland) and remembers with regret the Irish woman loved in youth.
The protagonist could be in Helen’s Bay on the opposite side of the inlet that separates it from Carrickfergus: if he were healthy and young nothing would prevent him to go to Carrickfergus even on foot, but he is tired and he is dying and so in his fantasy or delirium he is looking at the sea in the direction of Carrickfergus deaming of flying towards his love of the past or he wants to be ferried by a boatman to be able to die next to her.
3) “and die” tells us that the protagonist who is in Ballygrant (wherever he is) would like to go to Carrickfergus to die in the arms of his love of youth.
In other versions the phrase is written as “To ferry me over my love and I” the protagonist would like to be transported by the boatman, together with his woman, to Carrickfergus. So nostalgia is about the place where the protagonist is supposed to have spent his youth and would like to see again before he died.
4) and 5)
Now on the Kilkenny stone it is written,
on black marble like ink,
with gold and silver I would like to comfort her
Replacing the verb “to transport” used by Loreena with “to support” more used in other versions. That is: on the black stone of Kilkenny (in the sense that it is usually a type of stone such as Carrara marble,  the black stone extracted from Kilkenny but also used in Ballygrant, wherever it is) that will be my tombstone where I have recorded my epitaph, I also wrote a sentence of comfort for my love
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny some see a typo and note that Kilmeny is the parish church of Ballygrant (Islay Island) formerly a medieval church, also here there is a stone quarry, which was the main industry of Ballygrant in the eighteenth century and XIX. Now I ask myself: but with all these references to the Islay Island, (where at least there should be the tomb of the protagonist) how is it that the song is not known in the local tradition of the Hebrides and instead is it in Belfast?
6) the protagonist urges his friends to bury him

Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

Jim McCann in Dubliners Now 1975 (I and III)

Jim McCann live (with the second stanza written by Dominic Behan for his version recorded in the mid-1960s under the title “The Kerry Boatman”.

JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
 

III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

LINK
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070

Ould Lammas Fair

Read the post in English

La più lunga (come estensione) fiera dell’Irlanda del Nord che si snoda lungo la via centrale della cittadina di Ballycastle, Co. Antrim si tiene l’ultimo lunedì e martedì di agosto: è la Lammas Fair le cui origini risalgono al XVII secolo.

Le Lammas Fairs come si dice nelle isole britanniche o le Country fairs come sono più comunemente chiamate in America sono le grandi fiere che si svolgono dopo il raccolto del grano: Già Fiere Medievali  collegate al Santo protettore che attiravano folle di visitatori e i venditori ambulanti.
Man mano che le fiere si ingrandivano si aggiunsero divertimenti di ogni tipo: giochi campestri e tornei, ma anche spettacoli.
Un tempo principalmente mercato del bestiame (in particolare cavalli) dove gli agricoltori si ritrovavano per vendere e comprare i prodotti dell’estate, ma anche un importante evento di socializzazione per le fattorie isolate.

Nella stagione dell’abbondanza si ringraziava la terra per i suoi frutti, e si condivideva la gioia con musica, danze, giochi. Nella tradizione celtica era Lughnasad, il momento delle assemblee plenarie, di grandi mercati e fiere, delle corse di cavalli unitamente ad altri giochi nei quali si cimentavano i guerrieri, ma anche di certami poetici e musicali in omaggio alla pace.

Ould Lammas Fair

Un discreto numero di ballate celtiche hanno come sfondo un giorno di mercato o più in particolare un giorno di fiera, Ould Lammas Fair
è stata scritta da John Henry MacAuley di  Ballycastle, proprietario negli anni 20-30 del Bog Oak Shop di Ann Street: era un violinista e un abile intagliatore di legno rinomato sia per la sua musica che per le sue sculture. Il Bog oak ( o più in generale bog wood) è un legno che è rimasto imprigionato nel fango paludoso e che è stato “mummificato” (essiccato) dai processi naturali di acidità in modo tale da presentarsi compatto e privo di fessurazioni, particolarmente adatto a lavorazioni di pregio. In inglese si dice morta. Più conosciuto da noi è il legno portato dal mare (in inglese definito con una parola sola driftwood).
Ottilie Patterson 1966 (che omette i versi scritti tra parentesi)

Ruby Murray in ‘Irish and Proud of it’ 1962


I
At the Ould Lammas Fair
in Ballycastle long ago
I met a pretty colleen
who set me heart a-glow
She was smiling at her daddy
buying lambs from Paddy Roe
At the Ould Lammas Fair
in Ballycastle-O
(Sure I seen her home that night
When the moon was shining bright
From the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O )
CHORUS
At the ould Lammas Fair boys
were you ever there
Were you ever
at the Fair In Ballycastle-O?
Did you treat your Mary Ann
to some Dulse and Yellow Man(1)
At the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O

II
In Flander’s fields afar
while resting from the War(2)
We drank Bon Sante (3)
to the Flemish lassies O
But the scene that haunts my memory is kissing Mary Ann
Her pouting lips all sticky
from eating Yellow Man
(As we passed the silver Margy (4)
and we strolled along the strand
From the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O)
III
There’s a neat little cabin on the slopes of fair Knocklayde (5)
It’s lit by love and sunshine
where the heather honey’s made
With the bees ever humming (6)
and the children’s joyous call
Resounds across the valley
as the shadows fall
(Sure I take my fiddle down
and my Mary smiling there
Brings back a happy mem’ry
of the Lammas Fair )
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alla vecchia fiera di Lammas
a Ballycastle una volta,
incontrai una graziosa ragazza
che mi ha attizzato il cuore.
Sorrideva al suo papà
che comprava agnelli da Paddy Roe
Alla vecchia fiera di Lammas
a Ballycastle
(ovvio che  andai a trovarla a casa
quella sera con la luna che  speldeva luminosa, alla vecchia fiera di Lammas a Ballycastle
Coro
Siete mai stati alla vecchia fiera di Lammas ragazzi,
siete mai stati alla vecchia fiera di Lammas a Ballycastle?
Avete regalato alla vostra Mary Ann
Dulse e Yellowman
alla vecchia fiera di Lammas a Ballycastle

II
Nei campi delle Fiandre, mentre riposavamo lontano dalla Guerra
bevevamo alla salute
delle ragazze fiamminghe;
ma la scena che ossessiona i miei ricordi è baciare Mary Ann, le sue labbra imbronciate tutte appiccicose per aver mangiato Yellowman
mentre superavamo l’argeneo Margy
e passeggiavamo per il corso
alla vecchia fiera di Lammas a Ballycastle
III
C’è una bella casupola sui pendii del bel Knocklayde
riscaldata dall’amore e dal sole
dove si produce il miele d’erica
con le api sempre ronzanti
e le grida allegre dei bambini
risuonano per la valle
mentre scende la sera;
prendo il mio violino
e la mia Mary che sorride,
richiama un felice ricordo
della Fiera di Lammas

NOTE
1) dulse e yellowman (alga rossa e caramelle mou) è un’accoppiata tipica della fiera, uno street food con un abbinamento di gusto dolce e salato che viene addentando una gommosa alga rossa essiccata insieme a un appiccicoso toffee giallo-
Yellowman (in italiano l’uomo giallo) è una specialità da fiera nella contea di Antrim: è un toffee dallo spiccato colore giallo: la preparazione è a base di zucchero, burro, sciroppo di mais (corn syrup), acqua con l’aggiunta di bicarbonato e aceto per ottenere l’effetto honeycomb (areato) e il colore giallo. La preparazione è semplice ma occorre stare attenti alla temperatura perché lo zucchero caramelli senza bruciare (o si cristallizzi perché troppo mescolato); il caramello deve raggiungere la temperatura di 150° C per essere allo stadio definito “hard crack”, (quando dopo essere stato raffreddato si romperà in pezzi relativamente duri)
Approfondimento sull’alga dulse 
2) la prima guerra mondiale a cui peraltro MacAuley non partecipò essendo disabile a seguito di un incidente nella fattoria paterna quando era ragazzo
3) francese per toasting
4) il fiume Margy
5) Knocklayde è una montagnola che sovrasta Ballycastle ottimo punto panoramico per ammirare il mare e la campagna circostante
6) l’immagine richiama Yeats e la sua Isola di Innisfree

La fiera in un filmato d’epoca anni 1950

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/shemoved.htm
https://www.ballycastlehistory.com/ould-lammas-fair-by-margaret-bell.html
http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/ACalend/LammasFair.html
http://www.countysongs.ie/song/ould-lammas-fair
https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/dulse-and-yellowman-northern-ireland
http://oakden.co.uk/yellowman/

Ould Lammas Fair ( Ballycastle)

Leggi in italiano

The longest (as an extension) fair in Northern Ireland that runs along the central street of the town of Ballycastle, Co. Antrim is held on the last Monday and Tuesday in August: it is the Lammas Fair whose origins date back to the seventeenth century .

The Lammas Fairs as they say in the British Isles or the Country fairs as they are more commonly called in America are the big fairs that take place after the wheat harvest: already Medieval Fairs connected to the patron saint who attracted crowds of visitors and street vendors.
As the fairs grew, all kinds of entertainment were added: country games and tournaments, but also shows.
At one time it was mainly a livestock market (especially horses) where farmers gathered to sell and buy summer products, but also an important socialization event for isolated farms.
In the season of abundance, the earth was thanked for its fruits, and joy was shared with music, dance and games. In the Celtic tradition it was Lughnasad, the time of the plenary assemblies, of great markets and fairs, of horse races together with other games for the warriors, but also of poetic and musical certams in homage to peace.

Ould Lammas Fair

A fair number of Celtic ballads are about a market day, particularly a fair day, “Ould Lammas Fair” was written by John Henry MacAuley of Ballycastle, owner in the 20-30 years of the Bog Oak Shop on Ann Street: he was a violinist and a skilled wood carver, renowned for his music and his sculptures. Bog oak (or more generally bog wood) is a wood that has been imprisoned in the marshy mud and has been “mummified” (dried) by the natural acidic processes in such a way as to present itself compact and without cracks, particularly suitable for fine workmanship. In English it is said “morta”.
Ottilie Patterson 1966 (which omits the verses written in brackets)

Ruby Murray from ‘Irish and Proud of it’ 1962

I
At the Ould Lammas Fair
in Ballycastle long ago
I met a pretty colleen
who set me heart a-glow
She was smiling at her daddy
buying lambs from Paddy Roe
At the Ould Lammas Fair
in Ballycastle-O
(Sure I seen her home that night
When the moon was shining bright
From the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O )
CHORUS
At the ould Lammas Fair boys
were you ever there
Were you ever
at the Fair In Ballycastle-O?
Did you treat your Mary Ann
to some Dulse and Yellow Man(1)
At the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O

II
In Flander’s fields afar
while resting from the War(2)
We drank Bon Sante (3)
to the Flemish lassies O
But the scene that haunts my memory is kissing Mary Ann
Her pouting lips all sticky
from eating Yellow Man
(As we passed the silver Margy (4)
and we strolled along the strand
From the ould Lammas Fair in Ballycastle-O)
III
There’s a neat little cabin on the slopes of fair Knocklayde (5)
It’s lit by love and sunshine
where the heather honey’s made
With the bees ever humming (6)
and the children’s joyous call
Resounds across the valley
as the shadows fall
(Sure I take my fiddle down
and my Mary smiling there
Brings back a happy mem’ry
of the Lammas Fair )

NOTE
1) dulse and yellowman (red alga and toffee) is a typical combination of the fair, a street food with sweet and savory taste by biting a gummy red seaweed dried with a sticky yellow toffee.
Yellowman is a specialty of the fair in the county of Antrim: it is a toffee with a strong yellow color: the preparation is based on sugar, butter, corn syrup, water with the addition of bicarbonate and vinegar to obtain the honeycomb effect (aerated) and the yellow color. The preparation is simple but you need to be careful about the temperature because the caramel sugar does not burn (or crystallize because it is too mixed); the caramel must reach a temperature of 150 ° C to be at the “hard crack” stage (when it has cooled it will break into relatively hard pieces)
Pulling the sea-dulse
2) the first world war which MacAuley did not participate in because he was disabled following an accident on his father’s farm when he was a boy
3) French for toasting
4)  Margy river
5) Knocklayde is a hilltop overlooking Ballycastle excellent vantage point to admire the sea and the surrounding countryside
6) the image recalls Yeats and his Innisfree isle

The fair in a vintage movie of the 1950s

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/shemoved.htm
https://www.ballycastlehistory.com/ould-lammas-fair-by-margaret-bell.html
http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/ACalend/LammasFair.html
http://www.countysongs.ie/song/ould-lammas-fair
https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/dulse-and-yellowman-northern-ireland
http://oakden.co.uk/yellowman/

CRAIGIE HILL, IRISH SONG OF EMIGRATION

Emigrants_leave_Ireland“Craigie Hill” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese collezionata dalla madre di Paddy Tunney il quale riteneva che la canzone fosse originaria di Larne, Contea di Antrim, il porto da cui partivano gli emigranti nord-irlandesi. Come è scritto su Wikipedia (qui) “Un monumento di Curran Park commemora i Friends Goodwill, la prima nave di emigranti a salpare da Larne nel maggio 1717, per raggiungere Boston negli Stati Uniti. Le radici irlandesi di Boston derivano infatti da Larne. Anche Larne è stata investita dalla grande carestia irlandese della metà dell’Ottocento.” Ma per dirla come Paddy stesso “every Irish port had an emigrant ship” (vedi emigration songs)

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan 1981
ASCOLTA Dolores Keane 1982
ASCOLTA Susan McKeown 1998
ASCOLTA Cara Dillon in Cara Dillon 2003

ASCOLTA Caladh Nua in Happy Days 2009


I
It being the spring time,
and the small birds were singing,
Down by yon shady arbour
I carelessly did stray;
The thrushes they were warbling,
The violets they were charming:
To view fond lovers talking,
a while I did delay.
II
She said, “My dear don’t leave me all for another season,
Though fortune does be pleasing
I ‘ll go along with you.
I ‘ll forsake friends and relations and bid this holy nation,
And to the bonny Bann banks(1) forever I ‘ll bid adieu.”
III
He said, “My dear, don’t grieve or yet annoy my patience.
You know I love you dearly the more I’m going away,
I’m going to a foreign nation to purchase a plantation,
To comfort(2) us hereafter all in Amerikay.
IV
Then after a short while a fortune does be pleasing,
It’ll cause them for smile at our late going away,
We’ll be happy as Queen Victoria, all in her greatest glory,
We’ll be drinking wine and porter all in Amerikay.
V
The landlords(3) and their agents, their bailiffs and their beagles
The land of our forefathers we’re forced for to give o’er
And we’re sailing on the ocean for honor and promotion
And we’re parting with our sweethearts, it’s them we do adore
VI
If you were in your bed lying and thinking on dying,
The sight of the lovely Bann banks, your sorrow you’d give o’er,
Or if were down one hour, down in the shady bower,
Pleasure would surround you, you’d think on death no more.
VII
Then fare you well, sweet Cragie Hill(4), where often times I’ve roved,
I never thought my childhood days I ‘d part you ever more,
Now we’re sailing on the ocean for honour and promotion,
And the bonny boats are sailing, way down by Doorin shore(5).”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era primavera
e gli uccellini cantavano,
per quell’ombreggiato boschetto sbadatamente camminavo;
i tordi gorgheggiavano e le violette erano incantevoli; a guardare gli amanti appassionati che chiacchieravano mi sono un po’ attardato.
II
Disse lei “Non lasciarmi tutta sola
per un’altra stagione,
se la fortuna ci arriderà,
io verrò via con te.
Abbandonerò amici e parenti e a questa santa nazione
e alle belle rive del Bann (1)
per sempre dirò addio.”
III
Disse lui “Non rattristare e mettere alla prova la mia pazienza,
lo sai che ti amo teneramente anche se sto andando via,
andrò in una nazione straniera per acquistare una piantagione
per dare conforto (2) a tutti noi d’ora in poi in America.
IV
Dopo un po’ la fortuna
ci arriderà
e loro saranno contenti della nostra partenza;
saremo felici come la Regina Vittoria in pompa magna,
berremo vino e porter
in America.
V
Ai proprietari terrieri (3) e i loro agenti, gli ufficiali giudiziari con i loro cani,
la terra dei nostri padri siamo stati costretti a cedere
e solcheremo l’oceano per l’onore e la carriera
e ci separeremo dalle nostre fidanzate,
le sole e uniche che amiamo.”
VI
“Se tu fossi steso nel letto in procinto di morire
la vista delle belle rive del Bann ti avrebbero allevato il dolore,
o se andassi per un ora fino al pergolato ombroso,
il piacere ti circonderebbe e non penseresti più alla morte.”
VII
“Addio amata Craigie Hill (4) dove spesso sono andato in giro,
mai pensavo nei giorni della mia fanciullezza che ti avrei lasciato,
ora stiamo navigando sul mare per l’onore e la carriera
e le belle navi navigano via dalla spiaggia di Doorin (5)”

NOTE
1) The Banks Of The Bann è il titolo di un’altra canzone irlandese sulla separazione. il fiume Bann scorre nel Nord-Est dell’Irlanda ed è il fiume che ha portato lo sviluppo economico nell’Ulster con l’industria del lino. Il fiume fa un po’ da spartiacque tra cattolici e repubblicani a ovest e protestanti e unionisti a est.
2) se ho capito il senso della frase
3) Ai primi del XVII secolo inglesi e scozzesi andarono alla “conquista” dell’Irlanda: la terra fu per lo più confiscata agli irlandesi e la parte cattolica degli Irlandesi venne emarginata; la maggioranza queste “colonie” si concentrò nella parte nord dell’Irlanda
4) Craggy è la roccia scoscesa a più livelli, Craige o Craig si dice anche per il sito di una fortezza preistorica, in inglese “hillfort” o “ring-fort”, in italiano “forte ad anello” ovvero fortificazioni a forma circolare risalenti all’età del ferro (o secondo le ultime datazioni, all’età del primo Medioevo). Le fortezze sono state assorbire dalla campagna ma la memoria storica è rimasta nella credenza che il luogo fosse la dimora delle fate.
5) Doorin Point e un promontorio su Inver Bay, vicino a Mountcharles, nel Donegal

FONTI
http://comhaltasarchive.ie/compositions/5
https://thesession.org/discussions/23580
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=155019 http://songoftheisles.com/2013/04/29/craigie-hills/ http://filstoria.hypotheses.org/tag/irlanda-del-nord

A man’s in love

In the popular tradition there are many ballads called “night visiting songs” with a stereotypical love adventure in which a young man obtain the virtue of a young girl, entering her bedroom at night (usually on a rainy night).
Nella tradizione popolare sono assai numerose le ballate dette  “night visiting song” ovvero le avventure amorose abbastanza stereotipate in cui un giovanotto riesce a ottenere la virtù di una giovane ragazza, spesso intrufolandosi in camera sua nottetempo (in genere in una notte di pioggia). 
The suitor, in front of a maiden who look at all unsure because her parents consider him a bad catch, prefers to emigrate!
Lo spasimante davanti a una fanciulla che tentenna perchè i genitori non lo considerano un buon partito decide di emigrare.

The Overseas crossing [il viaggio oltremare]

The text is by the poet / schoolmaster of Antrim Hugh McWilliams, born in Glenavy in 1783; he published two collections of songs with the same title “Poems and Songs on Various Subjects”, one in 1816 and the other in 1831, the year of his death. In this book the melody combined with “A man in Love” is “Moses Gathering the Children”. A selection of McWilliams’s compositions was collected by John Moulden in his “Ulstersongs” from 1993. Re-elaborated by the Irish folk tradition, this song landed in America and was combined with different melodies
Il testo è del poeta/maestro di scuola di Antrim Hugh McWilliams, nato a Glenavy nel 1783; egli pubblicò due raccolte di canzoni con lo stesso titolo “Poems and Songs on Various Subjects”, uno nel 1816 e l’altro nel 1831, anno della sua morte. In questo libro la melodia abbinata a “A man in Love” è “Moses Gathering the Children“. Una selezione delle composizioni di McWilliams è stata inserita da John Moulden nel suo “Ulstersongs” del 1993. Rielaborata dalla tradizione popolare irlandese questa canzone è sbarcata in America ed è stata abbinata a diverse melodie

In addition to the theme of thwarted love (mostly due to the family’s economic expectations) the boy is determined to emigrate and goes to greet his love for the last time (with the hope of a night of passion !!): in front at separation the girl has no choice, she follows him to America!
In aggiunta al tema dell’amore contrastato (perlopiù per le aspettative economiche della famiglia)  il ragazzo è deciso ad emigrare e va a salutare il suo amore per l’ultima volta (con la speranza di una notte di passione!!): di fronte alla separazione la ragazza non ha scelta, lo segue verso l’America!
Usually the reality was less “romantic” it was just the boy leaving to try his luck, and only after years of sacrifices and underpaid work, he could perhaps put the money aside to pay for the trip to his girlfriend who had left at home waiting.
Nella realtà la situazione era meno “romantica” era solo il ragazzo a partire per tentare la fortuna, e solo dopo anni di sacrifici e lavoro sottopagato, forse riusciva a mettere i soldi da parte per pagare il viaggio alla fidanzata rimasta a casa ad aspettare.

Although there are some textual variations, the interpretations selected for listening follow the Paddy Tunney one (1965 recording) which learned the song from Uncle Michael (Mick) Gallagher of Fermanagh in 1948
Sebbene esistano alcune variazioni testuali le interpretazioni selezionate per l’ascolto seguono quella di Paddy Tunney (registrazione del 1965) che ha imparato il brano dallo zio Michael (Mick) Gallagher di Fermanagh nel 1948

The Chieftains in Boil the Breakfast Early 1989

Mary Dillon in North 2013, l’album debutto da solista dopo la sua ottima performance con i Déanta [the solo debut album after her excellent performance with the Déanta]


I
When a man’s in love he feels no cold
As I not long ago
As a hero bold to see my girl
I ploughed through frost and snow
II
And moon she gently shed her light
Along my dreary way
Until at length I came to the spot
Where all my treasure lay.
III
I knocked on my love’s window saying
“My dear, are you within?”
And softly she undid the latch
So slyly I stepped in.
IV
Her hand was soft and her breath was sweet
And her tongue it did gently glide
I stole a kiss, it was no miss
And I asked her to be my bride.
V
“Oh take me to your chamber love,
Oh take me to your bed
Oh take me to your chamber love
To rest my weary head”.
VI
“But to take you to my chamber love
My parents would never agree
So sit you down there by yonder fire
And I’ll sit close by thee.”
VII
“Oh many’s the time through frost and snow
I’ve come to visit you
Whether tossed about by cold wintery winds
Or wet by the morning dew
VIII
But tonight our courtships at a close
Between you Love and me
So fair you well my own favorite girl
A long fair well to thee
IX
Yes many’s the time I’ve courted you
Against your parent’s will
But you’ve never said you’d be my bride
So now my girl, sit still
X
For tonight I am going to cross the sea
To far off Columbia’s shore
And you will never ever see
Your youthful lover more”
XI
“Oh are you going to leave me now
Oh pray what can I do?
I will break through every bond of home
And come along with you.
XII
I know my parents won’t forget
Ah but surely they’ll forgive
So from the soul I am resolved
Along with you I will live.”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Quando un uomo ama non sente il freddo
così anch’io non molto tempo fa
da eroe coraggioso, per vedere la mia ragazza,
arrancai tra ghiaccio e neve,
II
mentre la luna versava lieve la sua luce
sul mio faticoso cammino,
finche alla fine giunsi proprio là
dov’era il mio tesoro.
III
Bussai alla finestra dell’amor mio, dicendo
“Mia cara ci sei?”
e piano lei aprì il chiavistello
così furtivamente scivolai dentro.
IV
La sua mano era delicata e il respiro profumato e la sua lingua si muoveva piano, 
le rubai un bacio, non c’era storia,
e le chiesi di diventare mia sposa.
V
“O portami nella tua camera amore
portami nel tuo letto
O portami nella tua camera, amore
per riposare la mia testa stanca”
VI
“Se ti facessi entrare nella mia stanza, amore
i miei genitori non approverebbero mai,
così siediti qui accanto al fuoco
e io siederò accanto a te”
VII
“Sebbene sia la stagione del gelo e della neve
sono venuto a trovarti
anche se sospinto dai freddi venti invernali
e bagnato dalla rugiada del mattino
VIII
Ma stanotte il nostro rapporto è alle strette,
tra te, amore e me,
così addio mia amata ragazza
un lungo addio a te.
IX
Si, ti corteggiai per tanto tempo
contro la volontà dei tuoi genitori, ma tu non mi hai mai detto che saresti stata la mia sposa, così adesso ragazza mia, stai tranquilla!
X
Perchè stanotte andrò per il mare
lontano fino alla riva della Colombia
e tu non vedrai mai più
il tuo amore giovanile”
XI
“Se stai per lasciarmi proprio ora
ti prego dimmi cosa posso fare?
Io spezzerò ogni vincolo famigliare
per venire con te.
XII
So che i miei genitori non dimenticheranno, ah ma di certo perdoneranno, 
così in fede mia sono decisa:
insieme a te vivrò”.

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8508
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/whenamansinlove.html

Bonny Portmore: la grande quercia di Portmore

Read the post in English

Quando fu abbattuta la grande quercia di Portmore nel 1760 qualcuno scrisse una canzone conosciuta con il nome di “The Highlander’s Farewell to Bonny Portmore“; nel 1796 Edward Bunting la raccolse dalla voce di Daniel Black un vecchio arpista di Glenoak (Antrim, Irlanda del Nord) e la pubblicò in “Ancient Music of Ireland” – 1840. La quercia secolare si trovava sulla proprietà del castello di Portmore sulle rive di Lugh Bege e fu abbattuta da un grande vento, l’albero era già famoso per il suo portamento ed era soprannominato “the ornament tree“. La quercia venne tagliata e il legno venduto, dalle misurazioni fatte sappiamo che il tronco era largo 13 metri.

LOUGH PORTMORE

Bonny Portmore
Loch Portmore

Loch un Phoirt Mhóir (lago dal grande approdo) ovvero  Lough Portmore è un laghetto quasi circolare nel Sud-Ovest della contea di Antrim, Irlanda del Nord, oggi riserva naturale per la protezione degli uccelli.
La proprietà anticamente apparteneva al clan O’Neill di Ballinderry, mentre il castello fu costruito nel 1661 o 1664 da Lord Conway (sulle fondamenta di una antica fortezza) tra Lough Beg e Lough Neagh; la tenuta era ricca di alberi centenari e di bellissimi boschi; il conte però cadde in rovina e perse la proprietà quando decise di prosciugare il lago Ber per mettere la terra a seminativo (il sistema di drenaggio detto “Tunny cut” è tutt’ora esistente); l’ambizioso progetto fallì e la terra passò in mano a dei nobili Inglesi.
In altre versioni più semplicemente la dinastia del Conte si estinse e i nuovi proprietari lasciarono la tenuta in stato di abbandono, non essendo intenzionati a risiedere in Irlanda. Quasi tutti gli alberi vennero abbattuti e venduti come legname per la costruzione navale e il castello cadde in rovina.

Il canto potrebbe essere inteso simbolicamente per indicare il declino dei signori gaelici irlandesi, dolore e nostalgia mescolati in un lamento di una bellezza crepuscolare; l’omaggio doveroso va a Loreena McKennitt che ha portato il brano alla ribalta internazionale.
Loreena McKennitt in The Visit 1991
Nights from the Alhambra: una versione live


CHORUS
O bonny Portmore,
you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
I
O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many’s the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.
II
All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, “Where will we shelter or where will we sleep?”
For the Oak and the Ash, they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.
traduzione in italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
O bella Portmore,
la risplendente
e più penso a te,
più ti penso intensamente.

Se tu fossi mia come lo fosti un tempo
nemmeno tutti i Lord nella vecchia Inghilterra potrebbero acquistare Portmore.
I
O bella Portmore, che pena vedere
la tua quercia secolare distrutta malamente
rimanere sulla spiaggia per molto tempo in quel lungo giorno
finché la barcaccia da Antrim venne per trasportarla lontano.
II
Tutti gli uccelli nella foresta amaramente piangono
cantando “Dove ci ripareremo
o dove dormiremo?”
Poichè la Quercia e il Frassino, sono stati tutti abbattuti
e le mura della bella Portmore sono crollate a terra.

Laura Marling live

Laura Creamer

Lucinda Williams in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006


Dan Gibson & Michael Maxwell in Emerald Forest in versione strumentale con il canto degli uccelli

LO SPIRITO DELL’ALBERO
E qui apro una piccola parentesi ricordando un episodio personale di molto tempo fa in cui ho incontrato un albero secolare: all’epoca vivevo a Firenze e ho avuto l’occasione di girare un po’ per la Toscana, ora non ricordo più la località, ma so che mi trovavo nelle colline del senese ed era estate; qualcuno ci consigliò di andare a vedere un vecchio leccio spiegandoci grosso modo  la strada, arrivati in zona ovviamente ci siamo persi, ma un contadino ci fece la cortesia di accompagnarci nei paraggi; in lontananza sembrava ci stessimo avvicinando ad un boschetto, in realtà si trattava di un solo albero le cui chiome erano così frondose e vaste, i vecchi rami così piegati, che per avvicinarci al tronco ci siamo dovuti chinare. Radici poderose rendevano ondulato il terreno e subito fatti pochi passi ci siamo trovati in un’ombra via via più fitta. Adesso non ricordo se si sentiva freddo o se faceva sempre caldo come pochi attimi prima sotto il sole estivo, ma ricordo ancora dopo tanti anni la sensazione di una presenza, di un respiro profondo e vitale, e il disagio che provavo a disturbare il luogo. Non esagero affatto parlando di timore, e credo che quel sentimento fosse lo stesso provato dall’uomo antico, che sentiva negli alberi centenari la presenza di uno spirito.

FONTI
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/immie/bonny.html
http://www.sentryjournal.com/2010/10/11/the-fate-of-bonny-portmore/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15567
http://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/guide/p/portmorelough/about.aspx

ALASDAIR MHIC CHOLLA

“Alasdair Mhic Cholla Ghasda”: waulking song
Melodia tradizionale scozzese XVII secolo

Nelle note del brano riportate dai Capercaillie leggiamo che si tratta di una waulking song dell’isola di Barra ossia di una canto in gaelico che accompagnava la battitura dei panni di tweed, un lavoro manuale di pertinenza delle donne, spesso svolto con i ..piedi! (vedi)
La ban dhuan (ovvero la donna-canzone) intonava la strofa e il resto delle altre donne la seguiva nel ritornello: mentre la strofa era in genere breve, di uno o due versi il ritornello era spesso lungo con almeno 4-5 versi con abbondante uso di “vocables” ovvero suoni sillabici senza senso . Del resto anche tutta la canzone non aveva un vero e proprio significato, essendo le parole scelte principalmente per mantenere costante il ritmo della lavorazione tuttavia la ban dhuan più abile riusciva a metterci i gossip del momento. Ovviamente si finì per codificare le canzoni in una sorta di versione tramandata anche se di volta in volta i versi delle strofe finivano per variare a piacere di chi cantava. Queste canzoni ci narrano così vicende storiche del XV-XVI secolo, oppure descrivono attività e usanze molto antiche.

In particolare “Alasdair Mhic Cholla Ghasda” ricorda le gesta di un capo clan scozzese, Alaster McDonald nativo delle Ebridi, dalla grande statura, forza e coraggio, un eroe popolare sia in Irlanda che in Scozia per le sue imprese nella guerra civile della seconda metà del 600.

maccollaAlexander (o Alaster) McDonald (c. 1610-1647) fu un guerriero scozzese nato nelle Ebridi Interne (isola di Colonsay) e primogenito di un capo clan (uno dei più potenti clan scozzesi delle Highlands). Nella annosa faida con il clan Campbell però il Clan Donald finì per soccombere con il devastante corollario di perdita della terra, case bruciate, uccisioni o cattura della maggior parte degli uomini. Così Alasdair si trasferì in Irlanda del Nord in esilio presso i suoi parenti MacDonnels di Antrim, con un pugno di guerrieri, finendo nel bel mezzo della guerra civile irlandese del 1641.

Noto per la sua gigantesca statura e prestanza fisica nel 1644 fu nominato comandante di quasi 2.000 uomini per una spedizione in Scozia a sostegno della guerra civile scozzese, ben determinato a vendicarsi di coloro che lo avevano offeso.
Non perdendo l’occasione di saccheggiare le terre dei Campbell (bruciò vivi anche donne e fanciulli con l’unica colpa di appartenere al clan dei Cambell, devastò castelli e città meritandosi il nome di “il devastatore” per la sua crudeltà) vinse una serie di battaglie alleandosi con il generale scozzese James Graham primo marchese di Montrose tra il 1644 e il ’45 (Tippermuir, Aberdeen, Inverlochy, Auldearn, Alford e Kilsyth). Ma le sorti della guerra si decidevano in ambiti più vasti e vanamente MacColla continuò la sua battaglia nel Nord della Scozia, circondato dai nemici e senza più rinforzi. Nel maggio del 1647 si ritirò in Irlanda per servire nell’esercito del Munster e trovò la sua morte nella battaglia di Knocknanuss, dove venne catturato e fucilato subito dopo il combattimento.. così divenne un eroe popolare sia in Irlanda che in Scozia, con canti e melodie scritte in suo onore.

Come struttura la canzone ha la particolarità di prendere gli ultimi due versi di una strofa per farli diventare i primi due della strofa successiva (mantenendo sempre l’alternanza tra strofa e ritornello). Spesso i versi delle strofe venivano riciclati da una canzone all’altra, ma il ritornello, invece, per quanto senza senso, è sempre diverso, forse perché è la parte corale del canto che in qualche modo lo connota rispetto agli altri.

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in Sidewaulk , 1989; The Blood is Strong 1988 e 1995 (la III strofa è omessa)
Nel 1988 il gruppo ha inciso le musiche di “The Blood is Strong” per una serie televisiva sull’esodo forzato di tanti Highlander nel Nord America, Australia e Nuova Zelanda, (Highland clearance), alcune tracce sono confluite anche nell’album dell’anno successivo Sidewaulk. L’album  The Blood is Strong è stato ripubblicato dalla Survival Record bel 1995 con delle tracce aggiuntive tratte dai commenti sonori ad altri due programmi televisivi, il primo Prince Among the Island del ’92 e Highlander del ’95

ASCOLTA Clannad in Lore 1996

ORIGINALE GAELICO SCOZZESE
I
Alasdair Mhic o ho
Cholla Ghasda o ho
As do laimh-s’ gun o ho
Earbainn tapaidh trom eile
Sèist:
Chall eile bho chall a ho ro
Chall eile bho chall a ho ro
Chall eile huraibh i chall a ho ro
Haoi o ho trom eile
II
As do laimh-s’ gun o ho
Earbainn tapaidh o ho
Mharbhadh Tighearna o ho
Ach-nam-Brac leat trom eile
III
Mharbhadh Tighearna o ho
Ach-nam-Breac leat o ho
Thiolaigeadh e o ho
An oir an lochain trom eile
IV
‘S ged ‘s beag mi fein o ho
Bhuail mi ploc air o ho
Chuala mi’n de o ho
Sgeul nach b’ait leam trom eile
V
Chuala mi’n de o ho
Sgeul nach b’ait leam o ho
Glaschu a bhith o ho
Dol ‘na lasair trom eile
VI
Glaschu a bhith o ho
Dol ‘na lasair o ho
‘S Obair-Dheathain o ho
‘N deidh a chreachadh trom eile
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
Alexander son,
Of gallant(1) Cholla,
Into your hand,
I would heroic entrust deeds,
II
Into your hand,
I would entrust heroic deeds,
The Lord of Ach-nam-breac,
Would be killed by you,
III
The Lord of Ach-nam-breac,
Would be killed by you,
He would be buried,
At the edge of the loch,
IV
And although I myself was small,
I threw a clot of earth on him,
I heard yesterday,
A sad story,
V
I heard yesterday,
A sad story,
That Glasgow,
Was going down,
VI
That Glasgow,
Was going down,
And Aberdeen,
Is being pillaged,
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Alessandro figlio
del cavalleresco Donald,
nella tua mano
vorrei affidare eroiche imprese,
II
Nella tua mano
vorrei affidare eroiche imprese,
il Signore di Ach-nam-breac,
fu ucciso da te,
III
il Signore di Ach-nam-breac,
fu ucciso da te,
e seppellito,
in riva al lago,
IV
E sebbene fossi fanciullo,
ho gettato un pugno di terra su di lui,
Ho sentito ieri,
una triste storia,
V
Ho sentito ieri,
una triste storia,
che Glasgow,
stava per essere travolta,
VI
Che Glasgow,
stava per essere travolta,
e Aberdeen,
saccheggiata,

NOTE
1) tradotto anche come exile ossia esule

GOL NA MBAN SAN AR

Gol na mBan san ar (“The Crying Of The Women At The Slaughter ”  in italiano il Lamento delle donne nel massacro) è una melodia composta in memoria di MacColla, più nota con il nome di The Eagle’s Whistle (in italiano “il richiamo dell’aquila” e in gaelico Fead An Iolair).

Il brano è stato registrato sotto molti nomi, anche se le melodie non sono del tutto simili specialmente per i tempi che vanno dalla slip jig, walzer alla marcia o polka: Arrane Ny Niee, The Eagle’s Whistle March. Con il nome di “The O’Donovan Clan March” è anche la melodia ufficiale del Clan O’Donovan. Tuttavia Gol na mBan e The Eagle’s Whistle non sono lo stesso brano, pare che la confusione sia insorta da una delle prime registrazioni di Seámus Ennis (vedi Bonny Bunch of Roses), errore poi rettificato nelle registrazioni successive.

THE EAGLE’S WHISTLE

ASCOLTA Crubeen in versione marcia, così scrivono nelle note : “This tune is said by some to be the march of the O’Donoghue clan. while others claim it to relate to the O’Donovans. It is strangely reminiscent of an old lullaby in which an eagle is singing to the young eaglets. However. played as a march it conveys the spirit of the old Irish clans.”
Ecco come è arrangiata in versione slow-air
ASCOLTA William Coulter

ASCOLTA The Highland Session con Allan Henderson al violino

ASCOLTA The Sea Stallions

ALLISDRUM’S MARCH

Gol na mBan san ar è ricordato più propriamente con il titolo di Allisdrum’s march o anche Battle of Cnoc na nDos, ovvero la battaglia di Knocknanuss combattuta non lontano da Mallow (contea di Cork) il 13 novembre 1647

La melodia è raccolta in “Tunes of the Munster Pipers” dal manoscritto di James Goodman (1828-1896), una melodia senz’altro più in tono come lament o marcia funebre per la morte di Alasdair e il lamento delle donne, che si conclude a volte con un cenno di danza al tempo di una vecchia jig “Church Hill” nota anche come “Church Street” comparsa in “Dance Music of Irland” di Francis O’Neil: alcune spiegazioni sono state azzardate in merito, ovvero che la vedova fosse ben felice di essersi liberata da un marito soprannominato “il devastatore” peraltro di sana e robusta costituzione duro a morire; oppure si dice che la vedova abbia ballato per non iniziare a piangere prima delle altre donne


ASCOLTA Téada

ASCOLTA Peter Browne all’uilleann pipes

FONTI
http://www.badassoftheweek.com/maccolla.html
http://www.british-civil-wars.co.uk/military/ireland-1647-knocknanuss.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/alasdair.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/alasdair.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/4192
http://thesession.org/tunes/9853
http://www.thesession.org/tunes/1837
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=26498
http://source.pipers.ie/documents/item.arc?mediaId=16749
http://thesession.org/tunes/9497
http://thesession.org/tunes/6567

Carrickfergus ovvero Do Bhí Bean Uasal

Read the post in English

Il brano “Carrickfergus” proviene da un canto in gaelico dal titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal (vedi) ovvero “There Was a Noblewoman” ed è conosciuto anche con il nome di “The Sick Young Lover“, comparso in un broadside distribuito a Cork e datato 1840 e anche nella raccolta di George Petrie “Ancient Music of Ireland” 1855 con il nome di “The Young Lady”. Testo e melodia passati attraverso la tradizione orale si sono diffusi e modificati, senza però lasciare una traccia consistente nelle raccolte stampate nell’Ottocento. E’ stato attribuito al bardo irlandese Cathal “Buí”

IRISH BREIFNE
cathal buiCathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna (c1680-c1756).
Curioso personaggio soprannominato “Builil giallo, un bardo vagabondo di cui non si ha notizia suonasse uno strumento particolare, ma sicuramente cantastorie e compositore di poesie, che si sono diffuse per tutta l’Irlanda e ancora oggi cantate.
Lo studioso Breandán Ó Buachalla ha pubblicato una raccolta nel libro “Cathal Bui: Amhráin” nel 1975. A Blacklion contea di Cavan c’è anche una piccola stele in sua memoria e si celebra il Cathal Bui Festival (mese di Giugno).
Sacerdote mancato ci sapeva fare con le parole e con le donne, era inoltre dotato di molto “irish humour” ed era ovviamente un forte bevitore, girava per il Breifne, il nome irlandese della zona che comprende Cavan, Leitrim, e a sud di Fermanagh (uno dei tanti traveller con il suo carrozzone o anche meno).

PETER O’TOOLE

Ma è la versione conosciuta da Peter O’Toole ad essere stata l’origine della versione di Dominic Behan registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”, e anche della versione registrata da Sean o’Shea sempre negli stessi anni con il titolo Do Bhí Bean Uasal. Anche i Clancy Brothers con Tommy Makem fecero una loro versione con il titolo “Carrickfergus” nell’LP “The First Hurrah” del 1964.

E qui è doveroso aprire una parentesi sugli anni 60: in America il presidente è John F. Kennedy, un discendete di emigranti irlandesi, gli irlandesi Clancy Brothers diventano delle star; in Irlanda e Inghilterra scoppia il “Ballad boom” e si affermano i Dubliners e i Wolfe Tones. Ma a questo successo riscosso dalla musica irlandese sulla scena internazionale per gran parte contribuì il lavoro dei Ceoltóirí Chualann, da cui si formerà il gruppo più rappresentativo della musica irlandese: i Chieftains.

Chieftains in “The Chieftains Live” 1977 quando c’era ancora l’arpa di Dereck Bell (1935-2002).

DO BHÍ BEAN UASAL

Questa versione è stata attribuita musicalmente a Seán Ó Riada (ovvero John Reidy 1931-1971) non è chiaro se si tratti solo di un arrangiamento o di una vera e propria scrittura della melodia. Di certo il testo è preso dalla poesia di Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna.

Sean o’Shea in “Ò Riada Sa Gaiety” live in Dublino con i Ceoltóirí Chualann nel 1969.

I
Do bhí bean uasal seal dá lua liom,
‘s do chuir sí suas díomsa faraoir géar;
Do ghabhas lastuas di sna bailte móra
Ach d’fhag sí ann é os comhair an tsaoil.
Dá bhfaighinnse a ceannsa faoi áirsí an
teampaill,
Do bheinnse gan amhras im ‘ábhar féin;
Ach anois táim tinn lag is gan fáil ar leigheas agam.
Is beidh mo mhuintir ag gol im’ dhéidh.
II
I wish I had you in Carrickfergus
Ní fada ón áit sin go Baile Uí Chuain(1)
Sailing over the deep blue waters
I ndiaidh mo ghrá geal is í ag ealó uaim.
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I.
III
Tá an fuacht ag teacht is an teas ag tréigint
An tart ní féidir liom féin é do chlaoi,
Is go bhfuil an leabhar orm ó Shamhain go Fébur
Is ní bheidh sí reidh liom go Féil’ Mhichíl;
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, a stóirín, now lay me down!

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
A lady was betrothed to me for a while
And she refused me, oh my hundred woes
I went to towns with her
And she made a cuckold (or a fool ) of  me before the world,
If I had got that head of hers into the church
And if I were again  n command of myself, But now I’ weak and sore,  and there’s no getting of a  cure for me, And my people will be weeping after me
II
I wish I had you in   Carrickfergus
not far from that place ‘Quiet Town”
Sailing over the deep blue waters
my bright love from a northern sky
For the seas are deep, love, and I can’t swim over
And neither have I wings to fly,
I wish I met with a handy boatman,
Who would ferry over my love and I
III
The cold and the heat are going together [in me]
and I can’t quench my thirst
And if I took my oath from November to February
I wouldn’t be ready until Michaelmas
I’m seldom drunk though I’m never sober!
A handsome rover from town to town.
But now I am dead and my days are over
Come Molly, my little darling, now   lay me down!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una Lady mi fu promessa sposa per un certo tempo,
e lei mi rifiutò,
oh i miei cento affanni
andai in città con lei
e lei mi ha reso pazzo (o cornuto) di fronte a tutti
se avessi avuto lei al fianco in quella chiesa
e se fossi ancora padrone di me stesso
ma ora sono debole e malato e nessuno si prende cura di me
e la mia gente mi piangerà
II
Vorrei essere a Carrickfergus
non lontano da quella città portuale
a navigare sul vasto oceano
il mio amore che brilla nel cielo del Nord
perché il mare è profondo, amore, e non riesco restare a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare,
vorrei incontrare un abile barcaiolo
che possa trasportare il mio amore e me.
III
Caldo e freddo dentro di me
e non riesco a placare la mia sete
e se ho fatto il giuramento da Novembre a Febbraio
non sarà pronto che al giorno di San Michele
Sono raramente ubriaco, senza mai essere completamente sobrio
un bel vagabondo da città in città.
Vieni Molly, mia cara, e fammi distendere ora.

NOTE
1) “baile cuain” letteralmente significa “quiet town” tradotta anche come Harbour Town

LA VERSIONE DEGLI ANNI 60 E SIGNIFICATO

E veniamo a ciò che resta del brano ai nostri giorni, ovvero della versione di Carrickfergus diffusa dai maggiori interpreti della musica celtica.
La dolce malinconia della melodia e la sua incerta interpretazione testuale hanno reso il brano molto popolare, alcuni ne colgono il lato romantico e lo suonano anche ai matrimoni, altri ai funerali (ad esempio quello di John F. Kennedy Jr -1999).
Di certo ha un che di magico, triste e nostalgico, l’uomo annega nell’alcool il dolore per la separazione dalla sua amata (o più probabilmente beve perché ha una particolare predilezione per l’alcool): un vasto oceano li divide (o un tratto di mare) e lui vorrebbe essere in Irlanda, a Carrickfergus: vorrebbe avere le ali o poter attraversare la distesa d’acqua a nuoto o più realisticamente trovare un barcaiolo che lo porti da lei, e finalmente potrà morire tra le sue braccia (o presso la di lei lapide) adesso che è vecchio e stanco.

Il senso generale del testo resta quindi a mio avviso abbastanza chiaro, ma se si va nel dettaglio allora nascono molte perplessità, che ho cercato di riassumere nelle note.

Carrighfergus (Music Video) versione di Loreena McKennitt e Cedric Smith  in Elemental, 1985


VERSIONE DI LOREENA MCKENNITT
I
I wish I was
in Carrighfergus (1)
Only for nights
in Ballygrant (2)
I would swim over
the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrant.
But the sea is wide,
and I can’t swim over
Neither have I wings to fly
If I could find me a handsome boatman
To ferry me over
to my love and die(3)
II
Now in Kilkenny (4), it is reported
They’ve marble stones there as black as ink,
With gold and silver
I would  transport her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now,
till I get a drink
I’m drunk today,
but I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah, but I am sick now,
my days are over
Come all you young lads
and lay me down.(6)

traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrant
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettarmi fino
al mio amore e morire.
II
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
un marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più ora,
se non prendo da bere.
Adesso sono ubriaco,
ma raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah, eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

NOTE
1) Carrickfergus (dal gaelico Carraig Fhearghais, ‘Rocca di Fergus’) è una città costiera nella Contea di Antrim , Irlanda del Nord, uno dei più antichi insediamenti in Irlanda del Nord. Qui il protagonista dice di voler essere a Carrickfergus (ma evidentemente è da qualche altra parte) mentre in altre versioni troviamo I wish I had you in Carrickfergus: il significato della canzone cambia completamente.
Alcuni vogliono ambientare la storia nel Sud dell’Irlanda ed ecco che allora vedono il nome del Fergus, il fiume che attraversa Ennis contea di Clare.
2) Ballygran – Ballygrant – Ballygrand. Ci sono ameno tre interpretazioni: la prima che Ballygrant sia in Scozia sulle Isole Ebridi (l’isola di Islay), la seconda che sia il villaggio di Ballygrot (dal gaelico Baile gCrot significa “insediamento di collinette”), vicino a Helen’s Bay che si trova in pratica di fronte a Carrickfergus oltre il tratto di mare che si insinua a frastagliare la costa Nord-est dell’Irlanda (il Belfast Lough). Pare che gli abitanti del posto lo chiamino “Ballygrat” o Ballygrant” e che sia un antico insediamento e che un tempo si tenevano delle gare con le barche da Carrickfergus a Ballygrat. La terza che sia una traduzione corrotta dal gaelico “baile cuain” della versione settecentesca e quindi sia una generica località tranquilla, un piccolo paesello.
Ma tra le due frasi c’è già un incongruenza o meglio c’è bisogno di un’interpretazione, appurato che Ballygrant non sia un posto particolare di Carrickfergus per il quale il protagonista prova nostalgia per qualche collegamento specifico con la sua storia d’amore passata in gioventù, allora si tratta del posto in cui invece si trova al momento. Quindi il protagonista potrebbe essere un irlandese che si è ritrovato nelle Isole Ebridi, ma che vorrebbe ritornare a Carrickfergus dal suo vecchio amore o che è uno scozzese (che quando era giovane faceva il soldato in Irlanda) e ricorda con rimpianto la donna irlandese amata in gioventù; oppure che il protagonista si trova a Helen’s Bay dalla parte opposta dell’insenatura che lo divide da Carrickfergus. Ma qui il ragionamento fa un po’ acqua (tanto per restare in tema), però solo fino a un certo punto: se fosse infatti sano e giovane niente gli impedirebbe di andare a Carrickfergus anche a piedi, ma lui è stanco e morente e quindi nella sua fantasia o delirio guardando il mare in direzione di Carrickfergus sogna di volare verso il suo amore del passato o desidera essere traghettato da un barcaiolo per poter morire accanto a lei.
3) “and die” ci dice che il protagonista che si trova a Ballygrant (ovunque esso sia) vorrebbe andare a Carrickfergus per morire tra le braccia del suo amore di gioventù.
In altre versioni la frase è scritta come “To ferry me over my love and I” e questo a parte la sgrammaticatura vorrebbe significare che il protagonista vorrebbe essere trasportato dal barcaiolo, insieme con la sua donna, a Carrickfergus. Quindi la nostalgia si condensa sulla località in cui si presume il protagonista abbia trascorso la gioventù e che vorrebbe rivedere prima di morire.
4) e 5) io per dare un senso compiuto alla frase ho tradotto come:
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny è scritto,
su marmo nero come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento che vorrei confortarla

Sostituendo il verbo “to transport” utilizzato da Loreena con “to support” più utilizzato nelle altre versioni. Ossia: sulla pietra nera di Kilkenny (nel senso che si da in genere ad una tipologia di pietra ad esempio marmo di Carrara, quindi la pietra nera estratta a Kilkenny ma utilizzata anche a Ballygrant, ovunque esso sia) che sarà la mia pietra tombale dove ho inciso il mio epitaffio, ho scritto anche una frase di conforto per il mio amore
4) Kilkenny = Kilmeny alcuni vedono un refuso e notano che Kilmeny è la chiesa parrocchiale di Ballygrant (Isola di Islay) già località di una chiesa d’epoca medievale, anche qui c’è una cava di pietre, che era l’industria principale di Ballygrant nei secoli XVIII e XIX. Ora io mi domando: ma con tutte questi riscontri nell’Isola di Islay, (dove come minimo dovrebbe esserci la tomba del protagonista) com’è che il brano non è noto nella tradizione locale delle Isole Ebridi e invece lo è a Belfast?
6) il protagonista esorta gli amici a seppellirlo

Ho selezionata per l’ascolto anche questa versione che mi piace molto per la sua raffinata sobrietà nell’arrangiamento strumentale e l’interpretazione vocale di Jim McCann. Nella versione live aggiunge anche la strofa intermedia che è stata scritta da Dominic Behan per la sua versione registrata a metà degli anni 1960 con il titolo di “The Kerry Boatman”.

The Dubliners (voce Jim McCann) in Dubliners Now 1975 dove canta la I e la III strofa

live Jim McCann con tutte e tre le strofe


VERSIONE DI JIM MCCANN
I
I wish I was
in Carrickfergus
Only for nights
in Ballygrand(2)
I would swim
over the deepest ocean
Only for nights in Ballygrand.
But the sea is wide
and I cannot swim over
And neither have I the wings to fly
I wish I had a handsome boatman
To ferry me over my love and I(3)
II
My childhood days
bring back sad reflections
Of happy time there spent so long ago
My boyhood friends
and my own relations
Have all passed on now
like the melting snow
And I’ll spend my days
in this endless roving
Soft is the grass and my bed is free
How to be back now
in Carrickfergus
On the long road down to the sea
III
And in Kilkenny
it is reported
On marble stone
there as black as ink
With gold and silver
I would support her (5)
But I’ll sing no more now
till I get a drink
‘cause I’m drunk today
and I’m seldom sober
A handsome rover
from town to town
Ah but I am sick now
my days are numbered
Come all me young men
and lay me down

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere
a Carrighfergus
solo per le notti
a Ballygrand
avrei nuotato
nell’oceano più profondo
solo per le notti a Ballygrant.
Ma il mare è vasto
e non posso rimanere a galla
e nemmeno ho ali per volare
se potessi trovare un abile barcaiolo
per traghettare il mio amore e me.
II
I giorni della gioventù
richiamano tristi pensieri
di momenti felici oramai trascorsi
gli amici di gioventù
e le mie storie d’amore
sono svaniti adesso
come neve al sole
e trascorrerò i giorni
in questo eterno girovagare.
Soffice è l’erba e il giaciglio è gratis
come vorrei ssere di nuovo
a Carrickfergus
sulla lunga strada verso il mare
III
Ora sulla pietra di Kilkenny
è scritto,
marmo nero
come l’inchiostro,
con oro e argento
che vorrei confortarla
ma non canterò più,
se non prendo da bere,
perché oggi sono ubriaco,
e raramente sono sobrio
un bel vagabondo
da città in città
Ah,eppure adesso sono malato
i miei giorni stanno finendo,
venite tutti ragazzi
e fatemi distendere.

FONTI
Su Cathal “Buí” Mac Giolla Ghunna
http://www.eofeasa.ie/cathalbui/public_html/danta_CB/who_was_CB.html
http://lookingatdata.com/m/204-mac-giolla-ghunna-cathal-bui.html
http://www.munster-express.ie/opinion/views-from-the-brasscock/the-yellow-bitternan-bonnan-bui/

http://jungle-bar.blogspot.it/2009/03/carrickfergus-ballad-of-peter-otoole.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16707
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=90070