Lady Greensleeves

Leggi in italiano

Greensleeves is a song coming from the English Renaissance (with undeniable Italian musical influences) that tells us about the courtship of a very rich gentleman and a Lady who rejects him, despite the generous gifts.

It was the year 1580 when Richard Jones and Edward White competed for prints of a fashion song, Jones with “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” and White with “A ballad, being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his frende “, then after a few days, White again with another version:” Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves “and a few months later Jones with the publication of” A merry newe “Northern Songe of Greene Sleeves” ; this time the reply came from William Elderton, who wrote the “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” in February 1581.
Finally, the revised and expanded version by Richard Jones with the title “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” included in the collection ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites‘ of 1584, was the one that became the final version, still performed today (at least as regards the melody and for most of the text with 17 stanzas).

The Melody

The melody is born for lute, the instrument par excellence of Renaissance (and baroque) music that has seen in England a fine flowering with the likes of John Jonson and John Dowland. As evidenced in the in-depth study of Ian Pittaway the ancestor of Greensleeves is the old Passamezzo.
By the late 15th century, plucked instruments such as the lute were just beginning to develop a new technique to add to their repertoire of playing styles, chordal playing, leading the way for grounds to be chordal rather than the single notes of the mediaeval period. One of the chordal grounds that developed was the passamezzo antico, meaning old passamezzo (there was also the passamezzo moderno), which began in Italy in the early 16th century before it spread through Europe. It’s a little like the blues today in that you have a basic, unchanging chord sequence and, on top of that, a melody is added. (from here)
The chorus of Greensleeves however follows the melodic trend of a  Romanesca which in turn is a variant of the passamezzo.

lute melody in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” written by Adriaen Smout for the Netherlands in 1595

Baltimore Consort  instrumental version in Renaissance style for dancing

We find a choreography of the dance  only in later times, in the “English Dancing Master” by John Playford (both in the edition of 1686 and then published several times in the eighteenth century) as an English country dance

The Legend

anne-boleyn-roseIn 1526 Henry VIII wrote “Greensleeves” for Anna Bolena, right at the beginning of their relationship.
A suggestive hypothesis because both the melody that the text well suited to the character, that of his own he wrote several piece still today in the repertoire of many artists of ancient music; however the poem was not transcribed in any manuscript of the time and therefore we can not be certain of this attribution.
The misunderstanding was generated by William Chappell who in his “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (London: Chappell & Co, 1859) attributes the melody to the king, misinterpreting a quote by Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th ‘Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.” (In Skialethia, or Shadow of Truth, 1598: the ballad “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” dates back to time of Henry VIII (King Harries) and, according to Chappell has always been sung on the melody Greensleeves.

The Tudor serie + The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Gregorian“,  ( I, III, VIII, IX)

Irish origins!?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1905) was the first to assume (without giving evidence) the irish origins. “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.
Since then the idea of Irish paternity has become more and more vigorous so much so that this song is present in the compilations of Celtic music labeled as irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

A courting song or a dirty trick?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-S
Roberto Venturi observes in his essay
Already at the time of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Tales of Canterbury (remember that Chaucer lived from 1343 to 1400) the green dress was considered typical of a “light woman”, that is a prostitute. She would therefore be a young woman of promiscuous customs; Nevill Coghill, the famous and heroic modern English translator of the Canterbury Tales, explains – referring to an interpretation of a Chaucerian step – that, at the time, the green color had precise sexual connotations, particularly in the phrase A green gown. It was the dress of a woman with some grass spots, who practiced (or suffered) a sexual intercourse in a meadow. If a woman was said to have “the green skirt”, in practice it was a whore.
The song would then be the lamentation of a betrayed and abandoned lover, or of a rejected customer; in short, you know, something far from regal (although in every age the kings were generally the first whoremongers of the Kingdom). Another possible interpretation is that the lover betrayed, or rejected, has wanted to revenge on the poor woman by devoting to her a delicious little song in which he calls her a whore through the metaphor of the “green sleeves” (translated from here)

Many interpreters, with versions both in ancient than modern style (also Yngwie Malmsteen plays it with his guitar and Leonard Cohen proposes a rewrite in 1974)
Today the text is rarely performed and only for two or four stanzas, but it is a song loved by choral groups that sing it more extensively.

In ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, from the collection of Israel G. Young (about twenty strophe see) all the gifts that the nobleman makes to his Lady to court her:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” with “sleeves of satin”, but also “men clothed all in green” and “dainties”!

So many versions (see) and a difficult choice, but here is:

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The Visit 1991 (I, III) interpreted “as if she were singing Tom Waits

Jethro Tull  in Christmas Album 2003 (instrumental version)

David Nevue amazing piano version!


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
NOTE
1) the first two sentences are sometimes reversed and start in the opposite direction
2) In the Middle Ages the green color was the symbol of regeneration and therefore of youth and physical vigor, meant “fertility” but also “hope” and with gold indicating pleasure. It was the color of medicine for its revitalizing powers. Color of love in the nascent stage, in the Renaissance it was the color used by the young especially in May; in women it was also the color of chastity.
But the other more promiscuous meaning is of “light woman always ready to roll in the grass”. And the charm of the ballad lies in its ambiguity!
Green is also the color that in fairy tales / ballads connotes a fairy creature.
The Gaelic words “Grian Sliabh” (literally translated as “sun mountain” or a “mountain exposed to the south, sunny”) are pronounced Green Sleeve (the song is also very popular in Ireland especially as slow air). Grian is also the name of a river that flows from Sliabh Aughty (County Clare and Galway)
3) the expressions are proper to the courtly lyric
4) sendal= light silk material

in the extended version the gifts of the suitor are many and expensive and it is all a complaint about “oh how much you costs me my dear!”

“Extended version
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

SOURCE
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm

GREEN GROW’TH THE HOLLY

Green groweth the Holly” è un madrigale rinascimentale attribuito a Enrico VIII. Una trentina di composizioni gli sono state attribuite  e compaiono nell'”Henry VIII Manuscript” (Add. MS 31922) compilato da un anonimo cortigiano coevo.
Un brano con lo stesso nome e con la stessa prima strofa che si sviluppa poi con versi differenti sulla stessa melodia rinascimentale, è stato scritto da Percy Dearmer (1867-1936), egli raccolse molti inni religiosi per reintrodurre la tradizione musicale e la musica medievale inglese nella Chiesa d’Inghilterra

LA VERSIONE RINASCIMENTALE

Enrico VIII, diventato re d’Inghilterra a 18 anni, parlava 4 lingue, suonava 3 strumenti musicali, cantava e componeva brani musicali. Nei primi anni del suo regno si comportava in effetti più come un principe dedito ai piaceri che un re preoccupato dagli affari del suo regno.
“Green grows the holly” (in italiano Verde cresce l’agrifoglio) è stato pubblicato nel 1522 come madrigale a 3 voci.
Nell’affermare la forza maschia e vigorosa dell’agrifoglio, il poeta dichiara la propria fedeltà all’amata: lei è l’edera che gli cresce attorno, e mentre nel rigore dell’inverno tutti gli altri alberi sono spogli, solo il re agrifoglio e la regina edera crescono verdeggianti e rigogliosi, così solo a lei, cortesemente, egli affida il suo cuore; anche che la poesia d’amore del tempo era espressa nelle forme convenzionali dell’amor cortese,  molto probabilmente, l’amore era sentito veramente dal poeta.
L’intreccio tra i due sempreverdi richiama il Nodo d’Amore celtico tra il rovo e la rosa già lungamente trattato nella categoria delle ballate celtiche e europee (vedi) in cui corollario all’amore romantico ma non socialmente approvato, è il nodo d’amore tra rovo e rosa, che cresciuti dalle rispettive tombe degli amanti si congiungono e intrecciano tra loro.

Enrico vide per la prima volta Anna nel marzo del 1522 che partecipava, assieme a sua sorella Maria, a un ballo organizzato da Wolsey in onore degli ambasciatori imperiali. Era un ballo in maschera sul tema dell’assalto al castello d’Amore dal titolo Chateau Vert.

IL CASTELLO D’AMORE CORTESE

Un castello in miniatura era stato allestito nella sala del ricevimento con alti bastioni e torri merlate, l’impalcatura di legno era strata rivestita con carta verde, per un effetto spettrale la carta era stata tinteggiata con il verderame. Abbiamo un resoconto scritto dal cronista di corte Edward Hall, che descrive tutto lo svolgimento del balletto, ma guardiamolo nella trasposizione della Serie Tv I Tudors (vedi).


E’ il momento dell’Assalto dei cavalieri Amorosità, Nobiltà, Giovinezza, Assistenza, Lealtà, Piacere, Garbo e Libertà che gettano sui difensori arance e datteri contro ai petali di rose e confetti lanciati dalle dame. Subito le protettrici del castello, (nel video indossano abiti neri) cioè i sentimenti più ostili all’amore, fuggono e i cavalieri possono scalare le mura del castello per avventarsi sulle otto ragazze biancovestite: Bellezza, Onore, Perseveranza, Costanza, Cortesia, Generosità, Misericordia e Pietà. Anna impersonava la Perseveranza e fu subito notata dal re che si mise a corteggiarla durante il ballo per festeggiare la  conquista del Castello Verde. O almeno è così che potrebbe essere andata…

Pare che lei gli avesse sussurrato “Seducetemi, scrivetemi lettere, poesie! Io adoro le poesieIncantatemi con le parole, seducetemi.. ” e la “Grene growth the holy” potrebbe essere proprio una di queste poesie messe in musica per meglio aiutare il Re nel suo corteggiamento..

I Fagiolini: Grene growth the holy madrigale a 3 voci “Henry VIII Manuscript” (Add. MS 31922 British Library, Londra)

Anonymous 4

Henry VIII
I
Green groweth the holly,
so doth the ivy.
Though winter blasts
blow never so high,

Green groweth the holly.
II
As the holly groweth green
And never changeth hue,
So I am, and ever hath been,
Unto my lady true.
III
As the holly groweth green,
With ivy all alone,
When flowerys cannot be seen
And green-wood leaves be gone,
IV
Now unto my lady
Promise to her I make:
From all other only
To her I me betake.
V
Adieu, mine own lady,
Adieu, my specïal,
Who hath my heart truly,
Be sure, and ever shall.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera,
sebbene le raffiche invernali non abbiamo mai colpito così forte,
verde cresce l’agrifoglio.
II
Come l’agrifoglio cresce verde
e mai cambia tono,
così io, mai son cambiato
verso la mia amata Signora.
III
Come l’agrifoglio cresce verde
con l’edera, tutto solo,
quando i fiori non ci son più
e le foglie del bosco sono cadute.
IV
Ora innanzi alla mia Signora
una promessa faccio:
fra tutti gli altri,
solo a lei, mi affiderò.
V
Addio, mia Signora.
Addio mia favorita,
colei che tiene il mio cuore,
ora e per sempre
Enrico VIII e Anna Bolena nella serie I Tudors

LA VERSIONE VITTORIANA

Percy Dearmer prende spunto dal madrigale rinascimentale per modificare il testo in chiave salvifica ma anche per celebrare il ciclo agrario e il lavoro dei campi.
Susan McKeown & Lindsey Horner

Barry&Beth Hall

Percy Dearmer
I
Green grow’th the holly
So doth the ivy
Though winter blasts blow na’er so high
Green grow’th the holly
II
Gay are the flowers
Hedgerows and ploughlands
The days grow longer in the sun
Soft fall the showers
III
Full gold the harvest
Grain for thy labor
With God must work for daily bread
Else, man, thou starvest
IV
Fast fall the shed leaves
Russet and yellow
But resting buds are smug and safe
Where swung the dead leaves
V
Green grow’th the holly
So doth the ivy
The God of life can never die
Hope! Saith the holly
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera,
sebbene le raffiche invernali
non abbiamo mai colpito così forte,
verde cresce l’agrifoglio.
II
Gai sono i fiori
le siepi e i campi arati
i giorni si snodano lenti nel sole,
piano cadono le piogge.
III
L’oro accende il raccolto
del grano per il tuo lavoro,
in Dio si lavora per il pane quotidiano altrimenti, uomo, tu morirai di fame
IV
Presto cadono le foglie
rossicce e gialle
ma i germogli riposano sani e salvi
dove giacciono le foglie morte.
V
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera
il Dio della Vita non può mai morire
Speranza! Dice l’agrifoglio!

FONTI
http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/MASQUERADES+on+The+Tudors
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/holly.htm
http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/greengroweth.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/grene_growith_the_holy.htm

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/green_growth_the_holly.htm

Lady Greensleeves

Read the post in English

Il brano Greensleeves giunge dal rinascimento inglese (con innegabili influenze musicali italiane) e ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo molto ricco e di una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i  generosi regali.

Era l’anno 1580 che vide un susseguirsi di pubblicazioni  di un canto d’amore di un gentiluomo alla sua Lady Greensleeves,  [in italiano la Signora dalle Maniche Verdi]; Richard Jones e Edward White si contendevano  le stampe di una canzone di gran moda, nel mese di settembre, lo stesso giorno Jones con  “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” e White con “A ballad,  being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his   frende“, poi dopo pochi giorni, ancora White con  un’altra versione: “Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves” e  qualche mese dopo Jones  con la pubblicazione di “A merry newe Northern   Songe of Greene Sleeves“; questa volta la replica venne da William Elderton,  che, nel febbraio del 1581, scrisse la “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” .
In ultimo la versione riveduta e ampliata da Richard Jones  con il titolo “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” inclusa nella collezione ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites’  del 1584, fu quella che diventò la versione finale, ancora oggi eseguita  (almeno per quanto riguarda la melodia e per buona parte del testo con ben 17  strofe).

LA MELODIA

La melodia nasce per liuto, lo strumento per eccellenza della musica  rinascimentale (e barocca) che ha visto in Inghilterra una pregevole fioritura con autori del calibro di John Jonson e di John Dowland (consiglio l’ascolto del Cd di Sting Labirinth). Come evidenziato nello studio approfondito di Ian Pittaway l’antenato di Greensleeves è il Passamezzo antico.
Verso la fine del XV secolo, gli strumenti a pizzico come il liuto stavano appena iniziando a sviluppare una nuova tecnica da aggiungere al loro repertorio espressivo, suonando corde per accordi piuttosto che suonando le note del periodo medievale. Uno degli accordi che si sviluppò fu il passamezzo antico (c’era anche il passamezzo moderno), che nacque in Italia all’inizio del XVI secolo prima di diffondersi in tutta Europa. Oggi è un po’ come il blues, ci sono una prefissara sequenza di accordi di base sulla quale viene aggiunta una melodia. (tradotto da qui)
Il coro però di Greensleeves segue l’andamento melodico di una Romanesca che a sua volta è stata una variante del passamezzo.

Melodia per liuto in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” scritto da Adriaen Smout per i Paesi Bassi  nel 1595

Baltimore Consort nella versione strumentale in stile  rinascimentale con andamento a ballo

Una coreografia della danza la ritroviamo solo  in epoca più tarda, nell'”English Dancing Master” di John Playford (sia nell’edizione del 1686 e poi pubblicata a più riprese nel Settecento) come english country dance

LA LEGGENDA

anne-boleyn-roseLa leggenda  vuole che sia stato Enrico VIII, nel 1526, a  scrivere “Greensleeves”  per Anna Bolena, proprio  all’inizio della loro relazione, quando lei lo faceva sospirare (e gli anni  furono sette prima che i due si sposassero).
Un’ipotesi suggestiva in quanto sia la melodia che il testo ben si adattano al personaggio, che di suo ha scritto svariati brani ancora oggi nel repertorio  di molti artisti di musica antica; tuttavia la  poesia non è stata trascritta in nessun manoscritto dell’epoca e quindi non possiamo essere certi dell’attribuzione.
L’equivoco è stato generato da William Chappell che nel suo “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (Londra: Chappell & Co, 1859) attribuisce la melodia al re, mal interpretando una citazione di Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th’ Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.”(in Skialethia, or a Shadow of Truth, 1598: la ballata “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” risale al tempo di Enrico VIII (King Harries) e, secondo Chappell è sempre stata cantata sulla melodia Greensleeves.

Così nella Serie Tv “The Tudors” si segue la leggenda e noi possiamo ammirare Jonathan Rhys Meyers tutto assorto mentre “trova” la melodia sul liuto…
The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Per restare in tema il gruppo tedesco  “Gregorian“, con le immagini del film “The Tudors” (strofe I, III, VIII, IX)

L’ORIGINE IRLANDESE?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublino: Browne e Nolan, 1905) è stato il primo a presumere (senza addurre prove) l’irlandesità della melodia.  “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music however), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.”
Da allora l’idea della paternità irlandese ha preso sempre più vigore tant’è che il brano è presente nelle compilations di musica celtica  etichettato come irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

Lirica cortese o uno scherzo pesante?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-SIl testo ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo verso una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i suoi generosi e principeschi regali; più ironicamente, si può interpretare come il lamento di un gentiluomo verso la moglie o l’amante bisbetica!
Roberto Venturi propende per un contesto un po’ più piccante
Già ai tempi di Geoffrey Chaucer e dei Racconti di Canterbury (ricordiamo che Chaucer visse dal 1343 al 1400) l’abito verde era considerato tipico di una “donna leggera”, leggasi di una prostituta. Si tratterebbe quindi di una giovane donna di promiscui costumi; Nevill Coghill, il celebre ed eroico traduttore in inglese moderno dei Canterbury Tales, spiega -in riferimento ad un’interpretazione di un passo chauceriano- che, all’epoca, il colore verde aveva precise connotazioni sessuali, particolarmente nella frase A green gown, una gonna verde. Si trattava, in estrema pratica, delle macchie d’erba sul vestito di una donna che praticava (o subiva) un rapporto sessuale all’esterno, in un prato, “in camporella” come si direbbe oggigiorno. Se di una donna si diceva che aveva “la gonna verde”, in pratica era un pesante ammiccamento e le si dava di leggera se non tout court della puttana.
La canzone sarebbe quindi la lamentazione di un amante tradito e abbandonato, o di un cliente respinto; insomma, come dire, qualcosa di tutt’altro che regale (sebbene in ogni epoca i re siano stati generalmente i primi puttanieri del Regno). Un’altra possibile interpretazione è che l’amante tradito, o respinto, si sia voluto come vendicare sulla poveretta indirizzandole una deliziosa canzoncina in cui le dà della puttana mediante la metafora delle “maniche verdi”.” (Riccardo Venturi da qui)

Moltissimi gli interpreti, con versioni in stile antico e moderno (anche Yngwie Malmsteen la suona con la sua chitarra e Leonard Cohen ne propone una riscrittura nel 1974 ) di una melodia antica che non ha mai perso il suo fascino e popolarità.
Oggi il testo viene raramente eseguito e  solo per due o quattro strofe, ma è un brano amato dai gruppi corali che lo cantano più estesamente.

Nella versione in ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, dalla raccolta di Israel G. Young (una ventina di strofe vedi testo qui) ci si dilunga sui regali che il nobiluomo fa alla sua bella per vezzeggiarla:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” con “sleeves of satin”, che la fanno essere “our harvest queen”, “garters” decorate d’oro e d’argento, “gelding”, e servitori “men clothed all in green”, e non ultimo tante leccornie ( “dainties”).

Le proposte per l’ascolto sono veramente tante e fare una cernita è ardua impresa (vedi qui), così mi limiterò a un paio di suggerimenti (il primo di parte!)

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The   Visit 1991 (strofe I, III)
Jethro Tull in Christmas Album 2003 versione strumentale

David Nevue un arrangiamento per pianoforte stupefacente!

Da non perdere la traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (sommo poeta e traduttore) (qui) del Nouo Sonetto Cortese su la Signora da le Verdi Maniche. Su la noua Melodia di Verdi Maniche.
Verdi Maniche era ogni mia Gioja,
Verdi Maniche, la mia Delizia.
Verdi Maniche, lo mio Cor d’Oro;
Chi altra, se non la Signora da le Verdi Maniche?


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
Traduzione italiano
coro(1)
Greensleeves era la gioia mia
Greensleeves era la mia delizia,
Greensleeves era il mio cuore d’oro,
chi se non la mia Signora dalle Maniche Verdi?(2)
I
Ahimè amore mio, non mi rendete giustizia, a respingermi con scortesia
vi ho amata per tanto tempo
deliziandomi della vostra compagnia.
II
I vostri voti avete spezzato,
come il mio cuore.
Oh perché così mi  avete rapito?
Ora resto in un mondo a parte
e il mio cuore resta in prigione
III
Ero pronto al vostro fianco, a concedervi ciò che bramavate e avevo impegnato vita e terre, per restare nelle vostre buone grazie.
IV
La gonna di zendalo bianco(4)
con sfarzosi ricami d’oro,
la gonna di seta bianca
vi ho comprato con gioia.
V
Se così intendete disprezzarmi,
ancor più m’incantate
e anche così, continuo a rimanere
un amante in prigionia
VI
I miei uomini erano tutti di verde vestiti , ed erano al vostro servizio
tutto ciò era galante da vedersi
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VII
Voi non potreste desiderare cosa terrena senza che l’abbiate prontamente, la vostra musica sempre suonerò e canterò
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VIII
Pregherò Iddio lassù
che voi possiate accorgervi della mia costanza e che una volta prima
che io  muoia voi possiate infine amarmi
IX
Ed ora Greensleeves  vi saluto, addio
Pregherò Iddio che voi prosperiate
sono ancora il vostro fedele amante
venite ancora da me ed amatemi

NOTE
1) l’ordine in cui sono cantate le prime due frasi del coro a volte sono  invertite e iniziano in senso contrario
2) Nel medioevo il colore verde era il simbolo  della rigenerazione e quindi della giovinezza e del vigore fisico, significava “fertilità” ma anche “speranza” e accostato  all’oro indicava il piacere. Era il colore della medicina per i suoi poteri  rivitalizzanti. Colore dell’amore allo stadio nascente, nel  Rinascimento era il colore usato dai giovani specialmente a Maggio; nelle donne  era anche il colore della castità. E tale attribuzione mal si accosta all’altro significato più promiscuo  di “donnina sempre pronta a rotolarsi nell’erba”. E il fascino della ballata sta proprio nella sua ambiguità!
Il verde è anche il colore che nelle fiabe/ballate connota una creatura fatata.
Le parole gaeliche “Grian Sliabh” (letteralmente tradotte come “sole montagna” ovvero una “montagna esposta a sud, soleggiata”)  si pronunciano Green Sleeve (il brano è peraltro molto popolare in Irlanda soprattutto come slow air). Grian è anche il nome di un fiume che scorre dalle Sliabh Aughty (contea Clare e Galway)
3) le espressioni sono proprie della lirica cortese
4) lo zendalo è un velo di seta

Nella versione estesa i regali dello spasimante sono molti e costosi assai ed è tutto un lagnarsi di “oh quanto mi costi bella mia!”
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm