I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – by Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Leggi in italiano

The lea-rig (The Meadow-ridge) is a traditional Scottish song rewritten by Robert Burns in 1792 under the title “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig“.
The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows. These bumps could reach up to the knee and hand sowing was greatly facilitated: the grass grew in the lea rigs.

THE TUNE

We find the beautiful melody in many eighteenth-century manuscripts, known by various names such as An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber

THE LYRICS

rigsA “romantic” meeting in the summer camps declined in many text versions with a single melody (albeit with many different arrangements) that has known, like so many other Scottish eighteenth-century songs, a notable fame among the musicians of German romanticism and in good living rooms over England, France and Germany.

The oldest text can be found in the manuscript of Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, by anonymous author who starts like this:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

With the title “My Ain Kind Dearie O” it is published later in the Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (see here) on Robert Burns’ dispatch to James Johnson with the note that it was the version originally written by the edinburgh poet Robert Fergusson ( 1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson died only 24 years old in the grip of madness while he was hospitalized in the Edinburgh Asylum because subject to a strong existential depression (and yet there are those who insinuate it was syphilis); he had just enough time to write about eighty poems (published between 1771 and 1773) and was the first poet to use the Scottish dialect as a poetic language; he lived for the most part a bohemian life, sharing the intellectual ferment of Edinburgh in the period known as the Scottish Enlightenment, always in contact with musicians, actors and editors; in 1772 it joined the “Edinburgh Cape Club”, not a Masonic lodge but a club for men only for convivial purposes (in which tables were laid out with tasty dishes and above all large drinks); for Robert Burns he was ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn rewrote the poem in October 1792 for the publisher George Thomson, to be published in the “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in what will be the most commonly known version of The Lea Rig) published with the musical arrangement of Joseph Haydn (who also arranged the traditional My Ain Kind Deary version); and he also wrote a more bawdy version published in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (1799) under the title My Ain Kind Deary (page 98) (text here)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

and in the classic version on arrangement by Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
english translation
I
When over the hill the eastern star
Tells the time of milking the ewes is near, my dear,
And oxes from the furrowed field
Return so lethargic and weary O:
Down by the burn where scented birch trees
With dew are hanging clear, my dear, I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
II
At midnight hour, in darkest glen,
I’d rove and never be frightened O, If thro’ that glen I go to thee,
My own kind dear, O:
Altho’ the night were  never so wild,
And I were never so weary O,
I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
III
The hunter loves the morning sun,
To rouse the mountain deer, my dear,
At noon the fisher takes the glen,
down the burn to steer, my dear;
Give me the hour o’ gloamin grey,
It maks my heart so cheary O
on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!

NOTES
1) the morning star
2) milking time is early in the morning
3) or “birken buds”
4) or irie
5) in the copy sent to Thomson Robert Burns wrote “wet” then corrected with wild: a summer night with severe air with lightning in the distance
6) or “I’d”

Compare with the version attributed to the poet Robert Fergusson

SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
english translation
I
Will you go the over the lea rigg,
My own kind dear, O
And cuddle there so kindly
with me, my kind deary-o!
At thorn dry-stone wall and birche tree,
we will make merry, and never be weary-o;
They’ll screen unfriendly eyes from you and me,
My own kind dear, O!
II
No herds, with sheep-dogs there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But larks whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for world’s riches, my sweetheart,
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
with you, my kind deary, O!

NOTES
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart, my dear

Scottish country dance: “My own kind deary”

The Scottish Country dance entitled “My own kind deary” with music and dance instructions appears in John Walsh’s Caledonian Country Dances (vol I 1735)


for dance explanation see

LINK
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

ROBERT BURNS: RANTIN’, ROVIN’ ROBIN

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

 Leggi in italiano

“Rantin ‘, rovin’, Robin” is an autobiographical song written by Robert Burns as a celebration of his 28th birthday (25 January 1787), also known under the title “There was a lad“.
Burns describes in joking terms his own birth in the presence of a midwife who predicts his destiny. A sort of fairy-tale in which the old woman next to the cradle is a kind of fairy-godmother who dispenses the gift of Poetry to the future Bard.
The cottage that saw his birth is located in Alloway in the district of Kyle, Ayr county and was built by his father William Burness (the name of the family at the origins), a cottage of straw and clay for a family of small sharecroppers (now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum)

Burns' s Cottage - Samuel Bough 1876
Burns’ s Cottage – Samuel Bough 1876

Shortly after his death (aged only 37), a group of friends dined together to commemorate him. It was 1802 and the dinners have become part of the Scottish tradition, and the song is among the favorites in the Burns’ Supper.

Jim Malcolm


The Corries
Sylvia Barnes & The Battlefield Band con immagini dell’ambiente quotidiano di Robbie
Andy M. Stewart

RANTIN’, ROVIN’, ROBIN *
I
There was a lad was born in Kyle (1),
But whatna day o’ whatna style,
I doubt it’s hardly worth the while
To be sae nice wi’ Robin.
Chorus.
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, rantin’, rovin’,
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, Robin!
II
Our monarch’s hindmost year but ane(2)
Was five-and-twenty days begun,
‘Twas then a blast o’ Janwar’ win’
Blew hansel(3) in on Robin.
III
The gossip keekit(4) in his loof(5),
Quo’ scho(6), “Wha lives will see the proof,
This waly(7) boy will be nae coof(8):
I think we’ll ca’ him Robin.
IV
He’ll hae misfortunes great an’ sma’,
But aye(9) a heart aboon(10) them a’,
He’ll be a credit till us a’-
We’ll a’ be proud o’ Robin.”
V
“But sure as three times three mak nine,
I see by ilka(11) score and line,
This chap will dearly like our kin’,
So leeze(12) me on thee! Robin.”
VI
“Guid(13) faith,” quo’, scho, “I doubt you gar(14)
The bonie lasses lie aspar(15);
But twenty fauts (16) ye may hae waur(17)
So blessins on thee! Robin.” 
NOTES

* english translation 
1) The cottage is in the village of Alloway in Ayrshire, now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum Burns’ start in life was a humble one. He was born the son of poor tenant farmers and was the eldest of seven children
2) hindmost year but one=January 25, 1759.The strong wind that blew in those days destroyed part of the house, so his mother with the little one in her arms preferred to challenge the storm to take refuge from the neighbor.
3) hansel=birth-gift
4) keekit=peered – glanced. Allan Connochie  notes “The “gossip” was the midwife, family friend or godparent telling the baby’s future”
5) loof=the palm, the hand outspread and upturned
6) said she: It is said that his father met the woman while he was crossing the river at the ford, but the river was in flood and the woman was in trouble, so Robert’s father helped her and took her home; the woman in exchange made a prophecy about the child.
7) waly=sturdy
8) coof=fool – dolt
9) aye= always
10) aboon=above
11) ilka=every
12) leeze=commend; blessings on thee; I am fond of you
13) guid= good
14) gar= make
15) asprar= wide apart
16) fauts=faults
17) waur=worse

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/therewasalad.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/6927
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/ThereWasALad.html

Silly Wizard

Silly Wizard (“il mago pazzo” delle fiabe, che farà capolino sulle loro copertine come un mago Merlino disneyano con il violino al posto della bacchetta, e il kilt sotto al mantello ) è una band scozzese formatasi a Edimburgo nel 1970 tra un gruppetto di studenti universitari, il nome viene coniato in tutta fretta solo nel 1972 in occasione del loro primo concerto pagato; saranno modello e punto di riferimento di un’infinità di giovani musicisti e gruppi musicali della scena scozzese e più in generale folk.
Dopo essersi fatti le ossa nei folk club e nelle feste in giro per la Scozia in tre (Jones, Thomas e Cunningham) partono in tournée in Francia già nell’anno successivo. La breve meteora di Maddy Taylor (voce) e i tanti concerti per la Gran Bretagna sono ancora i primi passi verso la nascita di una grande band che passerà alla storia con una caratteristico sound fatto da due chitarre (arricchite dal raddoppio di bouzouki, mandolino o banjo), fisarmonica, violino  e basso, con una spruzzata qua e là di sonorità prodotte dai sintetizzatori, arricchito da una voce vellutata e “verry scottish”. Niente percussioni o batteria (solo il bodhran in qualche strumentale) e nemmeno cornamuse ma l’alchimia e sintonia dei fratelli Cunningham che con violino e fisarmonica ci regalano live trascinanti di alto virtuosismo misto all’improvvisazione.
Oltre al sound caratteristico (che non si era mai sentito prima in Scozia) ciò che contraddistingue i Silly Wizard è la loro contemporaneità, una musica che riflette i gusti musicali giovanili degli anni 70-80 declinati nello stile della tradizione. Non solo interpreti ma anche compositori, molte song  sono scritte da Andy e molte melodie da Phil.
Il gruppo si scioglie nel 1988 dopo un’intensa attività concertistica: 17 anni di attività e 9 album!


da sinistra: Gordon Jones, Johnny Cunningham, Andy M. Stewart, Phil Cunningham, Martin Hadden

ATTRAVERSO GLI ANNI 70 e 80

Per la registrazione del disco d’esordio (1976) i chitarristi Gordon Jones  (di Liverpool) e Bob Thomas (ai quali già nel 1972 si era unito il violino di Johnny Cunningham) fanno entrare in campo la voce con l’accento del Pertshire (e il banjo) di Andy M. Stewart , l’organetto di Alasdair Donaldson (sostituito poco dopo da Phil Cunningham – fisarmonica, e all’occorrenza whistle, tastiere) e il basso di Freeland Barbour (a cui si avvicenda Martin Hadden).

dalla copertina “Live Again”

E’ proprio quest’ultima la formazione che registra l’album Caledonia’s Hardy Sons (1978), un punto saliente della “scottish wave”, con il giovane talento Phil Cunningham. Il gruppo è già famoso e viene invitato ai maggiori festival d’Europa. Poi iniziano gli abbandoni: Bob Thomas nel 1979 e il loro terzo l’album “So Many Partings” è registrato in cinque, e il successivo “Wild and Beautiful” in quattro. Ma il secondo album apre già le porte per l’America e a un tour frenetico da un festival folk all’altro: nel 1980 Johnny Cunningham lascia il gruppo per stabilirsi in America (sostituito per un breve periodo da Dougie MacLean prima di ritornare con i Tannahill Weavers ).
Ritroviamo il violino di Johnny Cunningham nel “Live in America” registrato nel 1985.
Nel 1987 il gruppo registra l’ultimo album “Glint of Silver” il più spinto verso l’elettronica; seguono due frenetici anni di tournée in America e lo scioglimento a New York nell’aprile del 1988 .

Silly Wizard Live At Center Stage -New York un ora e mezza di musica e di siparietti tra Andy e Johnny (un’esilarante spalla)

Andy M. Stewart

Andrew Michael ossia “Andy M.” Stewart frontman dal 1974 della folk band Silly Wizard  originario del Perthshire, con il suo timbro vocale e il suo stile è la controparte scozzese di Andy Irvine  degli irlandesi Planxty. Compositore, sensibile interprete di ballate tradizionali, affascinante affabulatore..  “The Andy M Stewart Collection” pubblicato nel 1998 contiene ben 60 canzoni (cito solo le più popolari: “The Ramblin’ Rover”, “Golden, Golden”, “The Queen of Argyll”,  “The Valley of Strathmore”)

Da ragazzo fonda i “Puddock’s Well” con Dougie MacLean e Martin Hadden, negli anni 80 pubblica 4 album di cui tre prima dello scioglimento dei Silly Wizard, collaborano con lui Phil Cunningham, Martin Hadden, Manus Lunny. Nel 1989 registra per la Wundertüte il cd “Songs of Robert Burns” (ristampato dalla Green Linnet nel 1991) Negli anni 90 registra con la Green Linnet tre album: At it Again, Man in the Moon, Donegal Rain. Nell’intervista rilasciata al folk magazie Dirty Linen (1991) Andy dice: “I suppose I’d like a legacy really of just being remembered fondly by whomever, my friends and the folk I left behind. It would be nice for them to remember me in a positive way. It would be nice for my songs to survive. It would be nice for my family. I’d like them to last.” (tratto da qui)

Muore poco dopo il Natale nel 2015, aveva 63 anni.

I FRATELLI CUNNINGHAM

Allo scioglimento dei Silly Wizard i due fratelli entrano nel supergruppo Relativity (con la coppia di fratelli irlandesi Michael e Triona O’Domnaill). i fratelli seguono poi carriere solistiche separate.
Duetto live del 1986 (Johnny muore nel 2003)

PHIL CUNNINGHAM

Tra le molteplici attività di Phil anche la carriera televisiva, la composizione di musica per film e tv, la produzione di dischi per vere e proprie celebrità del folk internazionale. Feconda la collaborazione con il violinista Aly Bain (il loro sito qui) con il quale registra nove album dal 1995 al 2013

tag Silly Wizard e tag Andy M. Stewart

FONTI
https://alchetron.com/Silly-Wizard-4375116-W
http://www.sillywizard.co.uk/about_the_band.html
http://www.theballadeers.com/scots/sw_01.htm
http://www.nigelgatherer.com/perf/group2/silw.html
https://projects.handsupfortrad.scot/hall-of-fame/andy-m-stewart-1952-2015/
http://www.scotsman.com/news/obituaries/obituary-andy-m-stewart-singer-and-songwriter-1-3989156
http://www.theballadeers.com/scots/as_d01.htm
https://thesession.org/recordings/5299

http://www.philandaly.com/
http://www.johnnycunningham.com/

Hey how Johnie Lad (Robert Burns)

“Johnny Lad” is a scottish traditional song with many text versions combined with different melodies.
“Johnny Lad” è una canzone tradizionale scozzese con molte versioni testuali abbinate a diverse  melodie.
Johnny Lad: street ballad/ nursery song version
Jinkin’ You, Johnnie Lad: bothy ballad
Cock Up Your Beaver (Robert Burns)
Hey how Johnie Lad (Robert Burns)
Och, Hey! Johnnie, Lad (Robert Tannahill)

HEY HOW JOHNNIE LAD

ritratto di Robert BurnsRobert Burns has reworked the song already reported in the “Ancient And Modern Scottish Songs” Vol II (pg 215) by David Herd combining it with the melody “Lasses of the Ferry” keeping the two strophes and the refrain (for SMM 
Robert Burns ha rielaborato la canzone già riportata  in “Ancient And Modern Scottish Songs” Vol II (pg 215) di David Herd abbinandola alla melodia“Lasses of the Ferry” mantenendo le due strofe e il ritornello.

Andy M. Stewart in ‘Songs of Robert Burns’ 1989
There is an unsigned version of Hey How in the fourth volume of ‘The Scots Musical Museum’ containing some alterations and an extra verse from that found in David Herd’s manuscript (1776). It is unclear as to how much Burns had to do with this song, but according to an authority on Burns, Robert D. Thornton, Burns had to find a tune, as Herd mentions none, and work out words and melody. These words are set to the tune The Lasses of the Ferry. Apparently, no one before Burns had ever set these words to that melody. (Notes Andy M. Stewart, ‘Songs of Robert Burns’)
C’è una versione non firmata di Hey How nel quarto volume di “The Scots Musical Museum” contenente alcune modifiche e un verso in più rispetto a quello trovato nel manoscritto di David Herd (1776). Non è chiaro quanto Burns abbia rimaneggiato questa canzone, ma secondo un’autorità di Burns, Robert D. Thornton, Burns ha dovuto trovare una melodia, poiché Herd non ne ha menzionate e ha elaborato parole e melodia. Queste parole sono aggiustate sulla melodia “The Lasses of the Ferry”. Apparentemente, nessuno prima di Burns aveva mai messo queste parole su quella melodia. (nota di Andy M. Stewart, “Canzoni di Robert Burns”)

A woman is complaining because the handsome Johnny misses their appointment and leaves her alone.
Una donna si lamenta perché il bel Johnny manca  al loro appuntamento  e la lascia sola

Rebecca Pidgeon

The Poozies


Chorus:
Hey how my Johnny lad
Ye’re no’ sae kind’s (1) ye should have been;
I
Hey how my Johnny lad
Ye’re no’ sae kind’s ye should have been;
Gin yer voice I hadna kent,
I couldna either trow ma een (2).
Sae weel’s ye micht hae tousled me (3)
And sweetly prie’d my mou bedeen (4): 
II 
My faither he was at the pleugh,
My mither she was at the mill,
My Billie he was at the moss,
an’ no ane near our sport tae spill.
The feint a body(5) was therein,
There was nae fear o’ bein’ seen
III
Wad ony lad wha lo’ed her weel
Hae left his bonny lass her lane
Tae sigh an’ greet (6) ilk (7) langsome hour
And think her sweetest minutes gane?
O had ye been a wooer leal.
We would hae met wi’ hearts mair keen
IV
But I maun (8) get anither jo,
Wha’s love gangs never oot o’ sight
And never lets the moments pass
When to a lass he can be kind.
So gang yer wa’s tae blinkin’ Bess,
Nae mair for Johnny shall she green (9): 
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Hei Johnny, ragazzo mio
non sei stato così bravo come avresti dovuto;
I
Hei Johnny, ragazzo mio
non sei stato così bravo come avresti dovuto
Se non avessi riconosciuto la tua voce
non avrei creduto ai miei occhi!
Così bene avresti potuto spettinarmi
e insieme dolcemente baciare la mia bocca
II
Mio padre era all’aratro
mia madre al mulino
il mio Billy era nella palude
non c’era nessuno nelle vicinanze a spiarci,
non non c’era un’anima nei paraggi
e proprio nessun pericolo d’essere visti: 
III
Potrebbe un ragazzo che ami veramente lasciare la sua bella ragazza tutta sola per ore
a sospirare e lamentarsi  al pensiero che i suoi momenti più felici siano passati?/O se tu fossi stato un amante fedele! Ci saremmo incontrati con cuori più appassionati
IV
Ma io posso trovarne un altro compagno
meno dimentico dell’amore,
che quando è il momento giusto
corre a dare piacere a una ragazza.
Così vai dunque da Bess che ti ammira,
non più  per Johnny sospirerà

NOTE
french translation here

stanzas II and V already in Herd [strofe II e V già in Herd]
1) a woman is complaining because the handsome Johnny is not so diligent in making love, in fact instead of taking advantage of the possibility of being necking with his girlfriend in a solitary place, he misses that court appointment and leaves her alone to wait in vain [la ragazza si lamenta perchè il bel Johnny non è tanto solerte nel fare l’amore, infatti invece di approfittare della possibilità di appartarsi con la fidanzatina fuori dagli occhi dei genitori, manca all’appuntamento e la lascia sola ad aspettare invano]
2) eithly – easily; trow my een = “believe(trust) my eyes”
3) sae weel ye micht hae tousled me= so well you might have tousled me
4) prie’d my mou bedeen = to taste my mouth at once
5) feint a body = not a soul
6) greet: to weep, cry
7) ilk, ilka= each-every
8) maun – must, will
9) green=long for

LINK
https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Hoch_Hey_Johnny_Lad
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/heyhowjo.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/heyhowjohnnylad.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25865
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29962
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/johnlad.htm

THE GABERLUNZIE MAN WITH HAPPY END

Con il titolo “Hi for the beggarman” “A beggarman cam ower the lea“, “A Beggar, A Beggar“, “The Auld Beggarman“, “The Beggarman”  oppure “The Gaberlunzie Man” la storia è sempre la stessa: il mendicante trova asilo per la notte in una fattoria, la bella figlia del fattore si lascia sedurre nella speranza si tratti di un gentiluomo sotto mentite spoglie, i due spesso fuggono insieme.
Prima parte THE JOLLY BEGGAR
Seconda parte THE GABERLUNZIE MAN 

IL LIETO FINE

La fanciulla si mette d’accordo con il mendicante per fuggire di casa e così facendo trova la sua fortuna perchè il mendicante è in realtà un gentiluomo travestito che voleva mettere alla prova i sentimenti della fanciulla prima di sposarla.

ASCOLTA su Spotify June Tabor in Apples, 2007


I
As I was a-linking(1) o’er the lea,
The finest weel(2) that I ever did see
Looking for his charity,
“Would you lodge a lame poor man?”
II
For the night being wet and it being cold
She took pity on the poor old soul,
She took pity on the poor old soul
And she bade him to sit down.
Chorus:
With his tooran nooran nan tan nee
Right ton nooran fol the doo-a-dee
Toraan nooran noraan nee
With his tooran nooran-i-do
III
He sat himself in the chimbley neuk(3)
And the bonny young daughter gave him the look.
With all his bags behind the crook(4)
Right merrily he did sing(5).
IV
Now he grew canty and she was fain,
But little did her mother ken
Just what the two of them were saying
As they sat sae thrag(6).
V
“O if I was black as I am white
Like the snow on yon fell-dyke(7),
I’d dress myself so beggar-like
And away with you I’d gang.”
VI
“O lassie, lassie, you’re far too young,
And you haven’t got the lilt of the begging tongue,
You haven’t got the lilt of the begging tongue,
So with you cannot gang.”
VII
“I’ll burden my back and I’ll bend my knee,
I’ll draw a black patch o’er my e’e,
And for a beggar they’ll take me,
And away with you I’ll gang.”
VIII
For all that the doors were locked quite tight,/ The old woman rose in the middle of the night,/The old woman rose in the middle of the night/ For to find the old man gone.
IX
She’s run to the cupboard, likewise to the chest,
All things there and nothing missed.
Clapping her hands and the dear be blessed,
Wasn’t he an honest old man?
X
When the breakfast was ready and the table laid/ The old woman went for to waken the maid:/ The bed was there but the maid was gone,
Away with the lame poor man.
XI
Now seven years were passed and gone,
And this old beggar came back again
Looking for his charity,
“Will you lodge a lame poor man?”
XII
“I never lodged any but the one,
And with him my one daughter did gang,
And I chose you to be the very one
And I’ll have you to be gone.”
XIII
“If it’s your daughter you want to see,
She has two bairnies on her knee,
She has two bairnies on her knee
And a third one coming round.
XIV
“For yonder she sits, yonder she stands,
The fairest lady in all Scotland.
She has servants at her command
Since she went with the lame poor man.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo di buona lena (1) per i campi, (incontrai) il più bel gentiluomo (2) mai visto, chiedere la carità “Dareste riparo ad un pover’uomo zoppo?”
II
Poichè la notte era umida e fredda
lei provò pietà per quella povera vecchia anima
e lo invitò a sedersi.
CORO
With his tooran nooran nan tan nee
Right ton nooran fol the doo-a-dee
Toraan nooran noraan nee
With his tooran nooran-i-do
III
Si sedette in un angolo del camino (3)
e la bella giovane figlia (del fattore)
gli diede un’occhiata con tutto il suo bagaglio, l’impostore (4) tosto lietamente si mise a cantare (5).
IV
Lui divenne allegro, lei era contenta
ma poco la madre poteva capire,
solo quello che i due si dicevano
e loro stavano così vicini (6)
V
“Oh se potessi essere scura invece di essere pallida (7) come il cigno su quell’argine, mi vestirei come una mendicante e potrei venire con te.”
VI
“O ragazza, sei troppo giovane
e non conosci le abitudini di un mendicante,
non conosci le abitudini di un mendicante,
così con te non posso andare”
VII
“Mi ingobbirò la schiena e piegherò le ginocchia
e metterò una benda nera sull’occhio
così da sembrare una mendicante
e in giro con te andrò”.
VIII
Per serrare per bene tutte le porte
la vecchia si alzò nel cuore della notte
la vecchia si alzò nel cuore della notte
e scoprì che il vecchio se n’era andato.
IX
Corse alla dispensa come pure alla cassapanca
ma c’era tutto e non mancava niente,
battendo le mani disse “che sia benedetto il signore
se non era un uomo onesto!?”
X
Quando la colazione fu pronta e la tavola apparecchiata
la vecchia andò a svegliare la figlia:
il letto era fatto ma la fanciulla era andata via
via con il povero uomo zoppo.
XI
Sette anni passarono e se ne andarono
e quel vecchio mendicante ritornò
a chiedere la carità
“Volete dare un riparo ad un pover’uomo zoppo?”
XII
” Non ho dato riparo che ad uno solo
e con lui la mia sola figlia se ne andò,
e preferirei che fossi proprio tu  quello,
e tu sarai il benvenuto”
XIII
“Se è tua figlia che vuoi vedere
ha due figli alle sue ginocchia
ha due figli alle sue ginocchia
e il terzo in arrivo.
XIV
Che lontano lei risiede e lontano lei abita,
la più bella fanciulla di tutta la Scozia,
ha servitori al suo comando
da quando se ne andò con il pover’uomo zoppo.”

NOTE
1) to link= to move smartly or agilely with short quick steps, to trip along, to walk at a brisk pace
2) weel= dall’inglese weal, welfare, well-being. Qui l’inganno è subito manifesto il vecchio mendicante zoppo è in realtà un gentiluomo travestito
3) chimney nook
4) anche qui si avverte che il mendicante è sotto mentite spoglie
5) i mendicanti in cambio dell’ospitalità si esibivano per la famigliola con canzoni e racconti portando le novità o i fatti di cronaca anche nelle più remote campagne, spesso suonavano uno strumento o insegnavano passi di danza, erano quindi una sorta di menestrelli, giullari ambulanti
6) thrag= To pack full, fill, cram; to load. Also intr. for pass (da qui) non riesco a tradurre il termine forse si tratta di un refuso. A senso mi viene da tradurre come vicini, uniti, ma potrebbe anche voler dire che si trovavano in sintonia
7) espressione del gergo contadino scozzese che si potrebbe tradurre con “zolle” ma anche un argine erboso fatto con le zolle o pietre

ASCOLTA Assasin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition) HI FOR THE BEGGARMAN con la stessa melodia di June Tabor

Che cosa ci faccia la ballata in una compilation di Sea Shanties non è ben chiaro, a parte per il coro nonsense, probabilmente era una canzone così popolare da essere finita sulle navi! La variante è più succinta della precedente versione.


I
The night being dark and very cold,
A woman took pity on a poor soul.
She took pity on a poor old soul
And asked him to come in.
CHORUS
With a too-roo roo-roo rantin hi,
A too-roo roo-roo rantin hi
Too-roo roo-roo rantin hi,
And hi for the beggarman
II
He sat him down in a chimney nook;
He hung his coat up on a hook.
He hung his coat up on a hook,
And merrily he did sing.
III
In the middle of the night the old woman rose;
She missed the beggarman and all his clothes.
She clapped and clapped and clapped again, Says, He has my daughter gone!
IV
Three long years have passed and gone,
When this old man came back again,
Asking for a charity:
Would you lodge a beggarman?
V
I never lodged any but the one,
And with that one me daughter’s gone,
With that one me daughter’s gone
So merrily you may gang.
VI
Would you like to see your daughter now,
With two babies on her knee,
With two babies on her knee
And another coming on?
VII
For yonder she sits and yonder she stands,
The finest lady in all the land;
Servants there at her command
Since she went with the beggarman.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Poichè la notte era umida e fredda
lei provò pietà per quella povera vecchia anima
e lo invitò a sedersi.
CORO
With a too-roo roo-roo rantin hi,
A too-roo roo-roo rantin hi
Too-roo roo-roo rantin hi,
urrà per il mendicante
II
Si sedette in un angolo del camino (3)
appese il mantello al gancio
appese il mantello al gancio
e lietamente si mise a cantare (5).
III
La vecchia si alzò
nel cuore della notte
mancavano il mendicante con tutte le sue cose
battendo le mani disse:
“Si è preso mia figlia!”
IV
Tre lunghi anni passarono e se ne andarono
e quel vecchio mendicante ritornò
a chiedere la carità “Volete dare un riparo ad un mendicante?”
V
” Non ho dato riparo che ad uno solo
e con lui la mia sola figlia se ne andò,
e preferirei che fossi proprio tu  quello,
e tu sarai il benvenuto”
VI
“Vorresti vedere tua figlia adesso
con due figli alle sue ginocchia
con due figli alle sue ginocchia
e il terzo in arrivo?
VII
Che lontano lei risiede e lontano lei abita,
la più bella fanciulla di tutto il paese,
ha servitori al suo comando
da quando se ne andò con il mendicante”

In questa versione testuale la ragazza ritorna a casa come una gran signora dopo essere diventata la moglie del finto mendicante. Si riporta questa versione perchè presenta alcune interessanti contaminazioni con una ballata molto famosa “Raggle Taggle Gypsy”

ASCOLTA Andy M. Stewart in Man in the Moon 1993 THE GABERLUNZIE MAN
(Testo: attribuito a Re Giacomo V di Scozia (1512-1542); Musica: Trad./Arr. da Andy M. Stewart) – al momento non ci sono registrazioni in rete da poter ascoltare


I
Oh the pawky auld carle(1) cam o’er the lea
Wi’ mony guild-e’ens and guid-days tae me/ Sayin’, “Guid wife for your charity
Would you lodge a leal poor man?”
Laddie wi my tow-ro-ae
II
Well the nicht being cauld, the carle being wat
It’s doon ayant the ingle he sat
My dochters shouthers he began tae clap/ And cadgily ranted and sang
III
Between the twa was made a plot
They’d rise a wee afore the cock
And wilily they shot the lock
And fast to the bent they are gane
IV
The aul wife gaed whaur the beggar lay
The strae was cauld, he was away
She clappit her hands cryin
“Waladay! For some of our gear will be gane”
V(2)
The servant gaed whaur the dochtor lay
The sheets were cauld, she was away
And fast to the guid wife she gan say
“Shes awa wi the Gaberlunzieman”
VI
“O fy gar ride and fy gar rin
And haste ye find these traitors again!
For she’s be burnt and he’s be slain(3)
The wearyful beggarman”
VII
Meanwhile farhind oot o’er the lea
Fu-snug in a glen where nane could see
The twa wi’ kindly sport and glee
Would lo’e the hale day lang
VIII
Oh the lady cam riding o’er the lea,
efter mony years her guidwife tae see
She had wedded a lord, nae begger he,
That had gaed as the beggarman
IX
Well the lady came riding(4) o’er the strand
Wi’ fower and twenty at her command
She was the brawest in the land
And she went wi’ the beggarman
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Un vecchio astuto venne dai campi
con molte notti e giorni da vagabondo (venne) da me
dicendo “Signora vorreste alloggiare un onesto pover’uomo per carità?”
Verrai in giro con me ragazza?
II
Siccome la notte era fredda e il vecchio bagnato
si sedette davanti al fuoco,
alle spalle di mia figlia egli cominciò a battere le mani e a gran vocea cantare.
III
Tra i due ci fu un accordo, si alzarono prima del canto del gallo,
chiusero la serratura
e di corsa per i campi andarono.
IV
La vecchia moglie andò dove giaceva il mendicante, ma il posto era freddo, lui era andato via, lei battè le mani dicendo Ahimè! Qualcosa di nostro se n’è andato”
V
La serva andò dove dormiva la figlia,
le lenzuola erano fredde lei era fuggita e di corsa dalla padrona andò dicendo “E’ fuggita con il mendicante”.
VI
“Cavalca in lungo e in largo e in fretta per ritrovare quei due traditori. Perchè lei sarà bruciata e lui ucciso,
il mendicante miserabile”.
VII
Nel frattempo lontano oltre i prati capitarono in una valletta dove nessuna poteva trovarli, i due con gioia e delizia poterono amarsi per tutto il giorno.
VIII
La Lady venne cavalcando dalla campagna, dopo molti anni per vedere sua madre, lei aveva sposato un Lord, lui non era un mendicante, quello che sembrava un mendicante.
IX
La Lady venne cavalcando dalla strada con ventiquattro (servi) al suo comando era la più bella del paese
ed fuggì via con il mendicante

NOTE
1) auld carle: old peasant, common man.
2) la struttura di questa strofa e della successiva, richiama la ballata Raggle taggle Gypsy
3) una punizione piuttosto drastica per una fuitina! Si descriva in pratica una della varie forme di matrimonio del tempo: quello con il rapimento e la notte d’amore vedi
4)la strofa inizia con la stessa veduta dai campi ma la persona che arriva non è più a piedi, anzi a guardare bene ha anche tanto di servitori al seguito!

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://ingeb.org/songs/oabeggar.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_279
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_280
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C279.html
http://www.contemplator.com/child/gaberlunz.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/beggar.html
http://www.waterbug.com/calhoun/lyrics/beggarman.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thebeggarman.html
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/JollyBeggarman.html
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/
secondary/genericcontent_tcm4554493.asp
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1954
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118078
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54744
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thebeggarladdie.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5884
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/280-the-beggar-laddie.aspx

The Lea Rig (ti incontrerò tra i campi)

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Read the post in English

The lea-rig (in inglese The Meadow-ridge) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese riscritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 con il titolo di “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig”.
Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche”, una tecnica colturale che prevede la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate ovvero il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale di un tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio  e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare il Mugellese che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto la dimensione opportuna. Si formavano con questo tipo di lavorazione i corn rigs e i lea rigs ossia le porche di grano e gli argini d’incolto dove cresceva l’erba.

LA MELODIA

Troviamo la bella melodia in molti manoscritti setteceneschi, conosciuta con vari nomi quali An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber in Unexpected Songs 2006

LE VERSIONI TESTUALI

rigsUn incontro “romantico” nei campi estivi declinato in molte versioni testuali con un’unica melodia (sebbene con molti diversi arrangiamenti) che ha conosciuto, come tante altre canzoni scozzesi settecentesche, una notevole fama tra i musicisti del romanticismo tedesco e nei salotti bene  d’Inghilterra, Francia e Germania.

Il testo più antico si trova nel manoscritto di Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, di autore anonimo che inizia così:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

Con il titolo “My Ain Kind Dearie O” è pubblicata successivamente nello Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (vedi qui) su invio di Robert Burns a James Johnson con la nota che si trattava della versione scritta originariamente dal poeta edimburghese Robert Fergusson (1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson morì a soli 24 anni in preda alla pazzia mentre era ricoverato nel Manicomio di Edimburgo perchè soggetto a una forte depressione esistenziale (e tuttavia c’è chi insinua si sia trattato di sifilide); fece in tempo a scrivere appena un’ottantina di poesie (pubblicate tra il 1771 e il 1773) e fu il primo poeta a usate il dialetto scozzese come lingua poetica; visse per lo più una vita da bohemien, condividendo il  fermento intellettuale di Edimburgo nel periodo conosciuto come l’Illuminismo scozzese, sempre a contatto con musicisti, attori ed editori; nel 1772 aderì alla loggia “Edinburgh Cape Club”, non proprio una loggia massonica ma un club per soli uomini per scopi conviviali (in cui si imbandivano tavolate con gustose pietanze e soprattutto grandi bevute); per Robert Burns fu ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn riscrisse la poesia nell’ottobre del 1792 per l’editore George Thomson, affinchè fosse pubblicata nel “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in quella che sarà la versione più comunemente detta The Lea Rig) pubblicata con l’arrangiamento musicale di Joseph Haydn (il quale arrangiò anche la versione tradizionale My Ain Kind Deary); e scrisse anche una versione più bawdy pubblicata nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“(1799) con il titolo My Ain Kind Deary (pag 98) (testo qui)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

e nella versione classica su arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Quando sulla collina la stella dell’est(1)
dice che l’ora (2) di mungere le pecore è vicina, mia cara
e i buoi dal campo arato
ritornano così svogliati e stanchi;
giù al ruscello dove le betulle (3)
profumate di rugiada pendono bianche, mia cara,
ti incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
II
A mezzanotte, nella valle più tenebrosa
vagavo senza mai avere paura (4)
perchè per quella valle andavo da te
mia cara amata;
anche se la notte fosse sì tempestosa (5) e io sì tanto stanco
t’incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
III
Il cacciatore ama il sole del mattino
che risveglia il cervo della montagna, mia cara;
a mezzogiorno il pescatore cerca la valle e verso ruscello si dirige, mia cara
dammi l’ora del grigio crepuscolo
che fa diventare il mio cuore così allegro, per incontrarti tra gli argini erbosi, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) è la stella del mattino
2) bughtin-time = the time of milking the ewes; il tempo della mungitura è di prima mattina (una bella descrizione qui)
3) in altre versioni “birken buds” in effetti la frase ha più senso essendo Down by the burn, where birken buds
Wi’ dew are hangin clear = giù al ruscello dove le gemme rugiadose delle betulle pendono bianche

4) scritto anche come irie
5) nella copia mandata a Thomson Robert scrisse “wet” poi corretta con wild: una notte estiva  dall’aria grave con lampi in lontananza
6) ma anche “I’d”

Si confronti con la versione attribuita al poeta Robert Fergusson

anonimo in SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Verrai tra gli argini erbosi (1)
mia cara amata
per stare abbracciati là con tenerezza
con me, mia cara amata.
Accanto alla siepe (2) e alla betulla
saremo felici (3) e non ci stancheremo mai;
ci schermeranno (4)dagli sguardi malevoli (5) mia cara amata
II
Nessun gregge con bastone da pastore o cani lì, mai verrà a spaventarti
ma le allodole (8) che cantano nel cielo
e corteggiano come me , il loro amore.
Mentre gli altri conducono gli agnelli e le pecore
e si affaticano per le ricchezze (9) terrene mia cara (10),
nei campi cresce il mio divertimento
con te, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen. (come si dice in italiano “infrattarsi”)
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart

LA DANZA: “My own kind deary”

La Scottish Country dance dal titolo “My own kind deary”con tanto di musica e istruzioni per la danza compare in Caledonian Country Dances di John Walsh (vol I 1735)
VIDEO
Le istruzioni qui

FONTI
The Forest Minstrel, James Hogg (1810) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

IF I WAS A BLACKBIRD

Una canzone piuttosto recente sebbene di autore anonimo risalente forse alla fine dell’ottocento o più probabilmente ai primi del novecento, “If I was a Blackbird” è stata resa molto popolare in Gran Bretagna e America negli anni 30 e 40 da Delia Murphy e negli anni 50 da Ronnie Ronalde. La melodia tradizionale è un valzer, rallentato spesso come slow air.
Molti studiosi ritengono il brano un lavoro di ricucitura  ottenuto mettendo insieme dei ‘floating verses’ presi da varie canzoni popolari (un mash-up si direbbe oggi) .

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

E’ quella che va per la maggiore sulla falsariga di Delia Murphy, la versione testuale riportata è ripresa  in Colm O Lochlainn, “Irish Street Ballads” (Dublino, 1939)
Il tema è quello tipico dell’amore abbandonato qui unito con la disapprovazione del matrimonio da parte dei genitori a causa della bassa estrazione sociale del ragazzo.

ASCOLTA Joe Heaney

ASCOLTA Siobhan Owen live

ASCOLTA Cécile Corbel in Songbook Vol 1, 2006


I
I am young maiden, my story is sad
For once I was courted by a brave sailor lad (1);
He courted me truly by night and by day,
And now he has left me and gone far away.
CHORUS
If I were a blackbird I’d whistle and sing
I’d follow the ship (2) that my true love sails in
On the top rigging I’d there build my nest
And I’d pillow my head on his lily-white breast (3).
II
He sailed o’er the ocean, his fortune to seek
I miss(ed) his caresses, his kiss on my cheek
He courted my truly, his friendship was warm
And I long for the sight of his brave manly form (4)
III
He promised to take me to Donnybrook Fair (5)
And he’d buy me a red ribbon to tie up my hair
He then left me with a turn of the tide
And he promised to make me his own darling bride (6)
IV
His parents they chided me, I would not agree
That me and my bonnie (7) boy married should be
But let them deride me, or say what they will
While I’ve blood (8) in my body, he’s the lad I love still.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono una giovane fanciulla e la mia è una storia triste, una volta ero corteggiata da un coraggioso marinaio (1)
che mi amava sinceramente notte e giorno
ma oggi mi ha lasciato ed è partito.
RITORNELLO
Se fossi un merlo, potrei fischiettare e cantare,
seguirei la nave (2) su cui naviga il mio amore
e sulla crocetta potrei costruire il mio nido
e accoccolarmi sul suo candido
petto (3)

II
Navigava sull’oceano, in cerca di fortuna
mi mancavano le sue carezze e i suoi baci sulle  guance,
mi corteggiava con sincerità e la sua amicizia mi scaldava
e io desideravo la vista del suo corpo virile (4)
III
Mi promise di portarmi alla Fiera di Donnybrook (5)
e di comprarmi un nastro rosso da legare ai capelli,
poi mi lasciò al mutare della marea
e mi promise che mi avrebbe fatta la sua amata moglie (6)
IV
I suoi genitori mi rimproveravano e non erano d’accordo,
che io e il mio bel ragazzo (7) ci sposassimo,
ma lasciate che mi deridano e che dicano quello che vogliono,
finchè avrò sangue (8) nelle mie vene, lui è il ragazzo che amerò.

NOTE
1) oppure “For once I was carefree and in love with a lad”
2) oppure “vessel”
3) oppure “And I’d flutter my wings o’er his broad golden chest” (= dispiegare le ali sul suo ampio petto biondo)
4) oppure “He returned and I told him my love was still warm, He turned away lightly and great was his scorn” (= ritornava e io gli dicevo che il mio amore era ancora acceso, ma lui si voltava velocemente con grande sdegno)
5) Donnybrook Fair  era una grande fiera che si teneva a Dublino dal Medioevo e fino al 1850 e durava una quindicina di giorni: nell’Ottocento la fiera era incentrata principalmente sui divertimenti e gli spettacoli pubblici e sul gran consumo di bevande alcoliche. Una testimonianza di Charles William Grant (nato a Dublino nel 1881) ce la descrive: “I also remember Donnybrook Fair, which in olden days had provided revel for the Dublin populace. The crowds gathered on a Bank Holiday from all parts of Dublin to Irishtown Green, which was not far from my home in Sandymount. Outside cars, long cars, and every type of conveyance brought them to Irishtown during the Easter and Whit holidays (continua)
6) gli ultimi due versi nella versione di Delia Murphy dicono:
“And I know that some day he’ll come back o’er the tide,
And surely he’ll make me his own loving bride.”
oppure diventano “He offered to marry and to stay by my side
But then in the morning he sailed with the tide (= si offrì di sposarmi e di starmi accanto, ma al mattino salpò con la marea)
7) Delia dice “sailor”
8) Delia dice “While there’s breath in my body”

 LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

La versione più conosciuta è però oggi quella di Andy M. Stewart, per i Silly Wizard, il quale l’aveva imparata dalla madre; Andy riarrangiò il testo trasponendolo dal punto di vista maschile, forse per questo alcuni sono portati a credere che la melodia sia un tradizionale scozzese.

Silly Wizard in Wild & Beautiful, 1981


I

I am a young sailor, my story is sad
Though once I was carefree and a brave sailor lad
I courted a lassie by night and by day
Ah, but now she has left me and sailed far away
CHORUS
Oh, if I was a blackbird, could whistle and sing
I’d follow the vessel my true love sails in/And in the top rigging, I would there build my nest
And I’d flutter my wings over her lily-white breast
II
Or if I was a scholar and could handle a pen
One secret love letter to my true love I’d send
And I’d tell of my sorrow, my grief and my pain
Since she’s gone and left me in yon flowery glen
III
I sailed over the ocean, my fortune to seek
And though I missed her caress and her kiss on my cheek
I returned and I told her my love was still warm
But she turned away lightly and great was her scorn
IV
I offered to take her to Donnybrook Fair
And to buy her fine ribbons to tie up her hair
I offered to marry and to stay by her side
But she says in the morning she sailed with the tide
V
My parents they chide me and will not agree
Saying that me and my false love, married should never be
Ah, but let them deprive me or let them do what they will
While there’s breath in my body, she’s the one that I love still
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un giovane marinaio e la mia storia è triste
eppure un tempo ero un bravo marinaio spensierato
che corteggiava una ragazza notte e giorno, ma oggi mi ha lasciato ed è salpata lontano.
RITORNELLO
Se fossi un merlo, potrei fischiettare e cantare, seguirei la nave su cui naviga il mio amore
e sulla crocetta potrei costruire il mio nido
e dispiegare le ali sul suo seno bianco come giglio
II
Se fossi uno studioso e sapessi maneggiare la penna
manderei in segreto, una lettera d’amore al mio vero amore
e le direi del mio dispiacere, rimpianto e piena
da quando se n’è andata e mi ha lasciato in questa valle fiorita
III
Navigavo sull’oceano, in cerca di fortuna
e sebbene mi mancassero le sue carezze e i suoi baci sulle guance,
ritornavo e le dicevo che il mio amore  era ancora acceso,
ma lei si girava velocemente facendo mostra di grande sdegno.
IV
Mi offrii di portarla alla Fiera di Donnybrook
per comprarle dei bei nastri da legare ai capelli,
le promisi di sposarla e di starle accanto
ma al mattino lei salpò con la marea
V
I miei genitori mi rimproveravano e non erano d’accordo,
dicevano che io e il mio falso amore
non avremmo dovuto sposarci,
ma lasciate che mi deridano e che dicano quello che vogliono,
finchè avrò fiato in corpo, lei sarà quella che amerò sempre.

LA VERSIONE GALLESE continua
FONTI
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/FSC38.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8648
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=74827
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/ifiwereablackbird.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/2618
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/blackbird.htm

TAE THE WEAVER’S GIN YE GO

Una vecchia canzone scozzese trascritta da Robert Burns in modo integrare per la parte del ritornello, mentre le strofe sono di sua invenzione fu pubblicata nello ‘Scots Musical Museum’ Vol II stampato del 1788 da James Johnson, la più importante collezione di canzoni scozzesi del XVIII e XIX secolo.

Purtroppo non ho trovato altre informazioni in merito tranne una “Weavers’ march” (anche Morris dance) che però non ha attinenza con la melodia di questo brano (vedi)
Non possiamo che prendere atto della sfrenata fantasia di Robbie che ci riporta ancora una volta un quadro della Vecchia Scozia, quando gli uomini tessevano, perché ci voleva una buona massa muscolare per maneggiare i grossi (e pesanti) telai!

prentices

La storia è gustosamente piccante e allusiva: una ragazza di campagna (mandata dalla madre) porta la lana dal tessitore artigiano di Calton per farne una coperta (proprietario di un telaio pre-rivoluzione industriale: erano proprio quelli gli anni della grande trasformazione e cominciavano a comparire le prime fabbriche tessili in Scozia vedi Calton weaver);  lei è al filarello (a filare la lana) e lui al telaio ma alla fine del lavoro lei è in dolce attesa; da qui l’avvertimento del ritornello di non andare a tessere di notte!

ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers con the Blackberry Bush reel in The Tannahill Weavers 1979 (traccia 3) strofe I, III, IV, V e VI. – Per il reel vedi

ASCOLTA The McCalmans
ASCOLTA Andy M. Stewart & Manus Lunny


VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS 1788
I
My heart was ance as blithe and free
As simmer days were lang;
But a bonie, westlin weaver lad
Has gart me change my sang.
Chorus.
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go, fair maids(1),
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go;
I rede you right, gang ne’er at night,
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go.
II
My mither sent me to the town,
To warp a plaiden wab(2);
But the weary, weary warpin o’t
Has gart me sigh and sab.
III
A bonie, westlin weaver lad
Sat working at his loom;
He took my heart as wi’ a net,
In every knot and thrum.
IV
I sat beside my warpin-wheel(3),
And aye I ca’d it roun’;
But every shot and evey knock,
My heart it gae a stoun.
V
The moon was sinking in the west,
Wi’ visage pale and wan,
As my bonie, westlin weaver lad
Convoy’d me thro’ the glen.
VI
But what was said, or what was done,
Shame fa’ me gin I tell;
But Oh! I fear the kintra soon
Will ken as weel’s myself!

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Il mio cuore una volta era così spensierato e libero, mentre i giorni estivi erano lunghi: ma un affascinante ragazzo tessitore dell’Ovest mi ha fatto cambiare canzone
Se andate dal tessitore belle ragazze,
se andate dal tessitore
vi ammonisco in verità, non andateci di notte, se andate dal tessitore
II
Mia madre mi mandò in città
per tessere una coperta di lana grezza
ma il lavoro faticoso
mi ha fatto sospirare e piangere.
III
Un affascinante tessitore dell’Ovest era al lavoro al suo telaio;
mi ha preso il cuore come in una rete,
in ogni nodo e frangia.
IV
Sedevo dietro al filatoio a ruota
e sempre lo facevo girare;
e a ogni tiro e a ogni colpo,
il mio cuore mi faceva male
V
La luna tramontava ad Ovest
con il volto pallido ed esangue,
mentre il mio affascinante tessitore dell’Ovest, mi scortava verso la valle.
VI
Che cosa fu detto e che cosa fu fatto,
vergogna su di me se lo dicessi;
ma ahimè temo che presto tutti
lo sapranno meglio di me!

NOTE
* per la versione inglese qui
1) I Tannies dicono “my lass”
2) wab=web: homespun tweeled woolen
3) warpin-wheel e spinnig-wheel non sono però lo stesso attrezzo, qui è chiaramente descritto l’uso di un filatoio a ruota infatti nel verso successivo dice “a ogni tiro e a ogni colpo”, il tiro è riferito alla quantità di fibra tirata via dalla conocchia: si tiene il fascio di fibra con una mano (la mano che lavora la fibra), mentre con l’altra si tiene il filo di avvio e la fibra (la mano che tira). Il meccanismo viene azionato con il piede sul pedale (il colpo) che imprime la velocità della lavorazione facendo torcere la fibra, la ruota prende la fibra e contemporanemente se ne tira dell’altra

FONTI

http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-103,-page-106-to-the-weavers-gin-ye-go.aspx
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/597.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/103lyr3.htm

http://abchobby.it/hobby-creativi/filatura-tintura/112-arcolaio-filatoio-ad-alette.html

Ca’ the Yowes to the Knows

“Ca ‘the Yowes to the Knows’ (“Drive the ewes to the hills”) is a pastoral love song transcribed by Robert Burns in 1789. A tune “touched by fairies” enveloping and hypnotic, with a sound that drops slowly and then vibrate under the moonlight.
“Ca ‘the Yowes to the Knows” (Porta le pecore sulle colline) è una canzone bucolica trascritta da Robert Burns nel 1789. Tra le melodie celtiche “toccata dalle fate” avvolgente e ipnotica, con la voce che scende goccia a goccia e poi vibra sotto la luce della luna.

There are actually two versions of this song (on the same tune)
Del brano si hanno in realtà due versioni (con la stessa melodia)

Drouthy Neebors in Battle Tunes and Ballads, 2018 

FIRST ROBERT BURNS VERSION

The version coming from the popular tradition was attributed to Mrs. Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan (c. 1741-1821), an eccentric character of Muirkirk (East Ayrshire, south-west Scotland) who sold smuggled whiskey in her cottage converted into a brewery, a place frequented by locals, but also by elegant gentlemen who went hunting in the area. She was a singer with a beautiful voice, who also composed her songs and poems published in “A collection of Poems and Songs” – Glasgow, 1805
La versione proveniente dalla tradizione popolare è stata attribuita alla signora Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan (c. 1741-1821), un personaggio eccentrico di Muirkirk (East Ayrshire, sud-ovest Scozia) che vendeva whisky di contrabbando nel suo cottage trasformato in una birreria, un luogo frequentato dalla gente del posto, ma anche dai signorotti eleganti che andavano a caccia nella zona. Era una cantante dalla bella voce, che compose anche sue canzoni e poesie pubblicate in “A collection of Poems and Songs” – Glasgow, 1805

As reported by Burns himself, he listened to the song sung by the Reverend John Clun(z)ie to Mcrkinchde and he refers to ‘Ca’ the Ewes to the Knows’ as ‘a beautiful song’ in ‘the old scotch taste, yet I do not know that ever air or words were in print before.’ In a first version Burns transcribed that song modifying some parts and adding the last stanza.
A quanto riferito dallo stesso Burns egli ascoltò la canzone cantata dal reverendo John Clun(z)ie a Mcrkinchde definendola semplicemente come “una bellissima canzone su di una vecchia aria scozzese, tuttavia non so se la melodia e le parole siano mai stati dati alle stampe prima“. Nella prima versione Burns la trascrisse modificando alcune parti e aggiungendo l’ultima strofa.

The first version of this song was sent by Robert Burns to James Johnson to be included in the “Scots Musical Museum”, the singer is a shepherdess who meets her love (also a shepherd), among the heather hills: they swear eternal love with a courtship song.
La prima versione della canzone fu inviata da Robert Burns all’editore James Johnson per essere inserita nello “Scots Musical Museum“; chi canta è una pastorella che incontra il suo amore (anche lui pastore), tra le colline d’erica: si giurano amore eterno con un canto di corteggiamento!

The Corries, live

Sileas in “Beating Harps” 1987
the Scottish duo of harp and voice, with very few touches, creates a dreamy atmosphere; the melody of the harp caresses the voice and the delicate counter-voice  in the resumption of the refrain expands like an echo.
il duo scozzese di arpa e voce, con pochissimi tocchi crea un’atmosfera sognante; la melodia dell’arpa accarezza la voce e il delicato controcanto della seconda voce nella ripresa del ritornello si espande come un eco.

ROBERT BURNS SMM 1790*
Chorus
“Ca’
the yowes tae the knowes
Ca’ them whare the heather grows
Ca’ them whare the burnie rows
My bonie dearie”
I (1)
As I gaed doon the water-side
There I met my shepherd lad
He row’d me sweetly in his plaid
And he ca’d me his dearie
II
Will ye gae doon the water-side
And see the waves sae sweetly glide
Beneath the hazels spreading wide
The moon it shines fu’ clearly
III
I was bred up at nae sic school
My shepherd-lad, to play the fool
And a’ the day to sit in dool
and naebody to see me
IV
Ye sall get gowns and ribbons meet
Cauf-leather shoon upon your feet
And in my arms ye’se lie and sleep
And ye sall be my dearie
V
If ye’ll but stand to what ye’ve said
I’ll gyang wi’ you, my shepherd lad
And ye maun rowe me in your plaid (1)
And I sall be your dearie
VI 
While waters wimple to the sea, 
While day blinks in the lift sae hie, 
Till clay-cauld death sall blin’ my e’e (2), 
Ye sall be my dearie
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
“Porta le pecore sulle colline
portale dove cresce l’erica
portale dove il torrente scorre
amor mio bello”
I LEI
Appena scendevo per il rivo
lì incontravo il mio pastorello
mi avvolgeva con tenerezza nel mantello,
e mi chiamava “amore mio”
II LUI
“Scenderai per il rivo
a guardare l’acqua che scorre piano
tra il boschetto di noccioli,
la luna brilla così luminosa”
III LEI 
“Sono cresciuta senza essere andata a scuola, mio pastorello, che mi prendi in giro,
e tutto il giorno sono triste
e nessuno mi vede”
IV LUI
“Tu metterai vestiti guarniti su misura,
scarpe di vitello ai piedi
e tra le mie braccia starai a riposare
e sarai il mio amore”
V LEI
“Se manterrai la tua promessa
verrò con te mio pastorello
e tu mi avvolgerai nel tuo mantello
e io sarò il tuo amore”
VI LUI
“Finchè le acque scorrono verso il mare,
Finchè il giorno risplende alto nel cielo
prima che la fredda terra mi chiuderà gli occhi
tu sarai il mio amore”

NOTE
* english translation here
1) Woman was under the mantle of man, that is under his protection, in the ritual of medieval marriage the groom’s cloak was supported on the shoulders of the bride to witness this dominion, but also the commitment of the man to take care of the woman
un tempo la donna stava sotto il mantello dell’uomo ovvero sotto la sua protezione, nel rituale del matrimonio medievale si appoggiava il mantello dello sposo sulle spalle della sposa per testimoniare questo dominio, ma anche impegno da parte dell’uomo di farsi carico della donna
2) it looks like a handfasting  ritual with relative marriage vows
sembra un rituale da handfasting con relative promesse matrimoniali

SECOND ROBERT BURNS VERSION

ritratto di Robert BurnsA few years later Robert Burns rewrote it, and sent it to Thomson: only the first stanza remained the same. Now the protagonist is the poet himself hopelessly in love with his beautiful shepherdess, the description of the surrounding landscape becomes predominant, nocturnal and supernatural, so that all poetry is more in tune with the melody itself.
Qualche anno dopo Robert Burns ne fece una revisione e riscrittura che inviò a Thomson: solo la prima strofa rimase uguale. Adesso il protagonista è il poeta stesso perdutamente innamorato della sua bella pastorella, la descrizione del paesaggio circostante diventa predominante, notturna e soprannaturale, di modo che tutta la poesia e più in sintonia con la melodia stessa.

William Strang

Tannahill Weavers! in Are ye sleeping Maggie 1976 (I, II, III, V, VI)
masterly interpretation; a fairy-tale-like chant with the notes of the flute that accentuate the nocturnal character of the vision, (flute and violin duet of the final is almost baroque)
magistrale interpretazione; un’atmosfera fatata, cantilenata e le note del flauto traverso nello strumentale accentuano il carattere notturno della visione, e poi semplicemente sublime il duetto flauto e violino del finale, quasi barocco

Andy M. Stewart in Songs of Robert Burns 1991

Dougie McLean in Tribute 1996
velvety voice, seductively Scottish pronunciation, equally unforgettable interpretation; the instrumental theme is anticipated by the guitar and punctuated by the piano; after having sung the first three strophes Dougie lets the notes of the piano flow and entrusts the song to the harmonica, and what expressiveness in that breath !! Then he starts again to sing, only the last verse, with the repetition of the first stanza and, as a romantic seal, again the duet between piano and harmonica.
voce vellutata, pronuncia seducentemente scozzese, altrettanto indimenticabile interpretazione; il tema strumentale è anticipato dalla chitarra e punteggiato dal pianoforte; dopo aver cantato le prime tre strofe Dougie lascia scorrere le note di pianoforte e affida il canto all’armonica, e che espressività in quel soffio!! Riprende a cantare poi, solo l’ultima strofa, con la ripetizione della prima e, a romantico suggello, ancora il duetto tra piano e armonica.

Ian Bruce in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Volume 3, 1997

Maz O’Connor in ‘Upon a Stranger Shore’ 2012
I and VI stanzas are as Burns version but then she segues into Over Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie [Le strofe I e VI sono come la versione di Burns, ma poi continua con Over Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie]

ROBERT BURNS Thomson’s Collection, 1794 *
I
Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
Ca’ them where the heather grows,
Ca’ them where the burnie rowes,
My bonie dearie.
II
Hark, the mavis e’ening sang
Sounding Clouden’s woods amang
Then a-faulding let us gang.
My bonie dearie.
III
We’ll gae down by Clouden side,
Thro the hazels, spreading wide
O’er the waves that sweetly glide
To the moon sae clearly.
IV
Yonder Clouden’s silent towers
Where, at moonshine’s midnight hours,
O’er the dewy bending flowers
Fairies dance sae cheery.
V
Ghaist nor bogle shalt thou fear
Thou’rt to Love and Heav’n sae dear
Nocht of ill may come thee near,
My bonie dearie.
VI
Fair and lovely as thou art,
Thou hast stown my very heart;
I can die – but canna part,
My bonie dearie.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Porta le pecore sulle colline
portale dove cresce l’erica
portale dove il torrente scorre
amore mio bello.
II
Ascolta il verso serale dell’usignolo
tra i boschi del Clouden(1) canterino
poi portaci all’ovile
amore mio bello
III
Scenderemo alla riva del Clouden
tra il boschetto di noccioli
accanto alle acque che scorrono piano
sotto la luna così luminosa
IV
Alle torri ruinose (2) del Clouden laggiù
dove, alla luna di mezzanotte
sopra i rugiadosi fiori dormienti
le fate danzano allegramente
V
Fantasmi e demoni non ti faranno paura,
tu che sei all’Amore e al Cielo così cara,
nessun male può venirti vicino,
mio amore bello.
VI
Dolce e bella sei tu
tu che hai rubato il cuore mio
potessi morire se ti lascio,
amore mio bello.

NOTE
english translation  here
1) Clouden is a tributary of the Nith River [Clouden è un affluente del fiume Nith]
2) the ruins of Lincluden Abbey, still a destination for visitors today, a hidden gem in the Border, one of Scotland’s best Gothic architecture [le rovine di Lincluden Abbey, ancora oggi meta di visitatori, una gemma nascosta nel Border, una delle migliori architetture gotiche della Scozia]

ca-yowes
William Forrest (1805-1889) “The Land of Burns, a Series of Landscapes and Portraits” (Glasgow 1840), the ruins of Lincluden Abbey, Dumfriesshire

The Yowe Lamb / Lovely Molly

A third version is to considered apart, perhaps the original one sung by Mrs. Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan. According to Robert B. Waltz in the Traditional Ballad Index, The Yowe Lamb or Lovely Molly “is apparently the original of the Burns song Ca’ the Ewes to the Knowes, but he changed it so substantially that they must be considered separate songs, and the reader must be careful to distinguish.
Una terza versione è da considerare a parte, forse la versione originale cantata da Tibbie Pagan. Secondo Robert B. Waltz in Traditional Ballad Index, The Yowe Lamb o Lovely Molly “sembra essere l’originale della canzone di Burns Ca ‘the Ewes to the Knowes, ma è cambiata in modo così sostanziale che devono essere considerati brani separati, e il lettore deve fare attenzione a distinguere.
Lyrics from Robert Ford’s ‘Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland’ (1899) 
La versione è raccolta in “Vagabond songs and Ballads of Scotland” (1899) di Robert Ford

Gillian Frame in Pendulum 2016


I
As Molly was milking her yowes on a day,
Oh by came young Jamie who to her did say,
“Your fingers go nimbly, your yowes they milk free.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
II
“Oh where is your father?” the young man he said,/“Oh where is your father my tender young maid?”
“He’s up in yon greenwood a-waiting for me?”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
III
“My father’s a shepherd has sheep on yon hill,
If you get his sanction I’ll be at your will,
And if he does grant it right glad will I be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
IV
“Good morning old man, you are herding your flock,
I want a yowe lamb to rear a new stock;
I want a yowe lamb and the best she maun be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly! (1)
V
“Go down to yon meadow, choose out your own lamb,/And be sure you’re as welcome an any young man;/You are heartily welcome—the best she maun be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
VI
He’s down to yon meadow, taen Moll by the hand,/ And soon before the old man the couple did stand;/ Says, “This is the yowe lamb I purchased from thee.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
VII
“Oh was e’er an auld man so beguiled as I am,
To sell my ae daughter instead of a lamb;
Yet, since I have said it, e’en sae let it be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un giorno quando Molly mungeva le sue pecore
ecco venire il giovane Jamie che le disse
“Le vostre dita si muovono agilmente mentre mungete le vostre pecore”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
II
“Dov’è vostro padre?” disse il giovanotto
“Dov’è vostro padre, mia giovane e fresca fanciulla?”
“E’ in quel bosco che mi aspetta?
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
III
“Mio padre è un pastore che ha le pecore sulla collina, se ottenete la sua approvazione sarò a vostra e se sarà contento anch’io sarò felice”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
IV
“Buongiorno vecchio che state radunando il vostro gregge, vorrei una pecorella per crescere una nuova stirpe, vorrei una pecorella e che sia la migliore!”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
V
“Andate in quel prato e sceglietevi la vostra pecorella e assicuratevi di essere bene accetto come giovanotto, di essere accolto calorosamente come meglio lei sappia fare”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
VI
E giù verso il prato prese Molly per mano
e in breve la coppia davanti al vecchio si presentò e dice
“Questa è la pecorella che ho comprato da voi”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
VII
“Mai ci fu vecchio così ingannato come lo fui io,
per vendere la mia sola figlia invece di un agnellino; tuttavia poichè ho dato la parola, così sarà”/ Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara

NOTE
1) or “We’ll ca the yowes tae the knowes lovely Molly.”

 

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/catheewes.html
http://www.robertburnsfederation.com/poems/translations/ca_the_yowes_to_the_knowes.htm
http://www.robertburnsfederation.com/poems/translations/ca_the_yowes_to_the_knowes_second_set.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/9039
The Song of Isabel Pagan in http://tibbiepagan.blogspot.it/
Women, Poetry and Song in Eighteenth-Century Lowland Scotland (Margery Palmer McCulloch)
https://www.ramshornstudio.com/yowes.htm

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9127
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1021

BRID OG NI MHAILLE

morte-Chatterton-dettaglioBríd Óg Ní Mháille  (in inglese Bridget O’Malley) è una dolente slow air diffusa nel Donegal in cui l’innamorato si dispera per essere stato abbandonato da una donna bellissima di nome Bridget.
Toccanti le immagini rivolte alla natura con la quale l’innamorato cerca di descrivere la bellezza di lei, dalle labbra di miele.
La sofferenza è profonda, il cuore desolato, il ricordo di lei straziante: la sua bella invece di sposarsi con lui, sta per convolare a nozze con un altro!

L’innamorato respinto chiede un ultimo appuntamento, eppure la attende invano, tormentandosi nell’attesa, con le immagini di lei che ha scelto di vivere con altro uomo. Il lamento è così cupo, con ripetute immagini di morte che inducono a credere in un imminente suicidio. Così ho inserito come immagine a commento, il dettaglio del dipinto di Henry Wallis – Death of Chatterton 1856.

ASCOLTA: Altan in Island Angel 1993

vi consiglio di guardare il video realizzato da Alessandro Tosi che si è ispirato alla nostra traduzione (versione interpretata da The Corrs)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
I
Is a Bhríd Óg Ní Mháille
‘S tú d’fhág mo chroí cráite
‘S chuir tú arraingeacha
An bháis trí cheartlár mo chroí
Tá na mílte fear i ngrá
Le d’éadan ciúin náireach
Is go dtug tú barr breáchtacht’
Ar Thír Oirghiall(1) más fíor
II
Níl ní ar bith is áille
Ná’n ghealach os cionn a’ tsáile
Ná bláth bán na n-airne
Bíos ag fás ar an droigheann
Ó siúd mar bíos mo ghrá-sa
Níos trilsí le breáchtacht
Béilín meala na háilleachta’
Nach ndearna riamh claon
III
Is buachaill deas óg mé
‘Tá triall chun mo phósta
‘S ní buan i bhfad beo mé
Mura bhfaighidh mé mo mhian
A chuisle is a stóirín
Déan réidh agus bí romhamsa
Cionn deireanach den Domhnach
Ar Bhóithrín Dhroim Sliabh
IV
Is tuirseach ‘s brónach
A chaithimse an Domhnach
Mo hata I’ mo dhorn
‘S mé ag osnaíl go trom
‘S mé ag amharc ar na bóithre
‘Mbíonn mo ghrá-sa ag gabhail ann
‘S í ag fear eile pósta
Is gan í bheith liom
‘S í ag fear eile pósta
Is gan í bheith liom
TRADUZIONE INGLESE (tratta da qui)
I
Oh Bríd Óg O’Malley
You have left my heart breaking
You’ve sent the death pangs
Of sorrow to pierce my heart sore
A hundred men are craving
For your breathtaking beauty
You’re the fairest of maidens
In Oriel for sure
II
No spectacle is fairer
Than moonbeams on the harbor
Or the sweet scented blossoms
Of the sloe on the thorn
But my love shines much brighter
In looks and in stature
That honey-lipped beauty
Who never said wrong
III
I’m a handsome young fellow
Who is thinking of wedlock
But my life will be shortened
If I don’t get my dear
My love and my darling
Prepare now to meet me
On next Sunday evening
On the road to Drum Slieve
IV
‘Tis sadly and lonely
I pass the time on Sunday
My head bowed in sorrow
My sights heavy with woe
As I gaze upon the byways
That my true love walks over
Now she’s wed to another
And left me forlorn
 tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh Bridget O’ Malley
hai lasciato il mio cuore a pezzi
mi hai mandato la morte, spasmi
di dolore trafiggono il mio cuore desolato./A centinaia gli uomini desiderano/la tua bellezza mozzafiato/ tu sei per certo la più bella delle fanciulle di Orial!
II
Nessuno spettacolo è più bello
dei raggi di luna sul mare
o dei soavi boccioli profumati
del prugnolo spinoso,
ma il mio amore brilla più luminoso
nell’aspetto e nella forma,
della bellezza labbra di miele
che non ha mai mentito.
III
Sono un bel giovane ragazzo
che pensava al matrimonio
ma la mia vita finirà
se non otterrò che la mia cara,
il mio amore e tesoro,
si prepari ad incontrarmi adesso
la prossima domenica sera
sulla strada di Drumslieve.
IV
Così triste e solitario
trascorro le ore della domenica
la testa chinata dal dolore
i sospiri oppressi dal dolore
mentre fisso le nuove vie
che il mio vero amore percorre
adesso che è sposa di un altro
e mi ha abbandonato

NOTE
1) Airgialla (o Orial): antico regno nell’Irlanda del Nord, situato nell’odierno Ulster

BRIDGET O’MALLEY

Dall’antica melodia di Bhríd Óg Ní Mháille con testo in gaelico, Andy M. Stewart ha scritto una “traduzione” in inglese che riprende il doloroso lamento mantenendone la metrica. Nato nel 1952 a Alyth (Perthshire) Andy era un musicista scozzese, cantante e cantautore (da non confondere con l’altro Andy Stewart nato nel 1933 e morto nel 1993) che ha esordito nella formazione dei Silly Wizard (ahimè sciolti nel 1988)

Silly Wizard, in So Many Partings 1979 così scrivono nelle note di copertina “This beautiful Irish song was given to us by Ruth Morgan of Essex. It is basically her collation of several versions, translated from the Irish Gaelic, which we have slightly adapted“. (tratto da qui)

Versione Andy M. Stewart*
I
Oh Bridget O’Malley, you’ve left my heart shaken
With a hopeless desolation I’d have you to know
It’s the wonders of admiration your quiet face has taken
And your beauty will haunt me wherever I go.
II
The white moon above the pale sands, the pale stars above the thorn tree
Are cold beside my darling, but no purer than she
I gaze upon the cold moon till the stars drown in the warm seas
And the bright eyes of my darling are never on me.
III
My Sunday it is weary, my Sunday it is grey now
My heart is a cold thing, my heart is a stone
All joy is dead within me, my life has gone away now
For another has taken my love for his own.
IV
The day is approaching when we were to be married
And it’s rather I would die than live only to grieve
Oh, meet me, My Darling, e’er the sun sets o’er the barley.
And I’ll meet you there on the road to Drumslieve.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh Bridget O’ Malley, mi hai trafitto il cuore
e vorrei che tu lo sapessi (lo hai lasciato) desolato e privo di speranza. Il tuo volto garbato ha colto le meraviglie da ammirare
e la tua bellezza mi perseguiterà ovunque io vada.
II
La bianca luna sopra le sabbie chiare,
le stelle pallide sopra il biancospino, sono freddi rispetto al mio amore, ma non più puri di lei,
guardo la gelida luna finchè le stelle tramontano nel caldo mare
e gli occhi lucenti della mia bella sono su di me.
III
La mia domenica è cupa, la mia domenica adesso è un giorno grigio,
il mio cure è cosa fredda, il mio cuore è di pietra.
Ogni gioia è morta dentro di me, la mia vita ora mi ha abbandonato,
perchè un altro si è preso il mio amore tutto per sè.
IV
Il giorno del nostro matrimonio (di quando avremmo dovuto sposarci)
è vicino e vorrei morire piuttosto che continuare a vivere solo per soffrire. Oh, incontriamoci, mia cara, prima che il sole tramonti sul campo d’orzo,
e ci vedremo lì sulla strada di Drumslieve.

NOTE
* (tratta da qui)

Appena ho sentito il brano mi è venuto in mente “Where are you tonight I wonder“, sempre scritto da Andy, non perché la melodia sia la stessa, ma per la stessa atmosfera di desolazione: anche qui l’uomo è stato abbandonato

ASCOLTA Dèanta con la voce di Mary Dillon in Whisper of a Secret, 1997

WHERE ARE YOU
CHORUS
Where are you tonight I wonder
Where will you be tonight when I cry
Will sleep to you come easy
Though alone I can’t slumber
Will you welcome the morning
to another man’s side?
I
How easy for you
the years slipped under,
and left me with a shadow
the sun can’t dispelled
I have builded for you a tower
of love and admiration
I set you so high
I could not reach, myself.
II
I look through my window
at a world filled with strangers
the face in my mirror
is the one face I know
you’ve taken all that’s in me
so my heart is in no danger
my heart is in no danger
but I’d still like to know
III
If there is a silence
then it can be broken
If there beats a pure heart
to her I will go
and time will work its healing
and my spirit will grow stronger
But in the meantime
I still like to know.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Coro
M i chiedo dove sei stasera
e dove sarai quando mi lamenterò? Dormire a te viene facile
mentre io da solo non riesco a prendere sonno, darai il buongiorno al fianco di un altro uomo?
I
Come è facile per te,
che gli anni ti scivolano addosso, lasciarmi nell’ombra
che il sole non può dissolvere,
ti ho costruito una torre
con amore e ammirazione,
ma l’ho fatta così alta,
che da solo non riesco a raggiungerla. II
Vedo alla finestra
un mondo pieno di estranei,
la faccia nello specchio
è l’unica che conosco,
mi hai preso tutto,
così il mio cuore non è in pericolo,
il mio cuore non è in pericolo
ma mi piacerebbe ancora saperlo.
III
Se c’è un silenzio,
allora può essere infranto,
se là batte un cuore puro,
da lei andrò
e il tempo opererà la sua guarigione
e il mio spirito si rafforzerà
ma nel frattempo vorrei ancora saperlo

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33723
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/BridOgNiMhaille.html