Christmas in Killarney

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“Christmas in Killarney” combines a festive music with the most genuine Christmas tradition in South Ireland.

The text was composed in 1950 by the Americans John Redmond, James Cavanaugh and Frank Weldon, but Killarney is a tourist town (perhaps too crowded in the summer season) located in Ireland, in the county of Kerry, province of Munster: the town is pretty, “very picturesque” surrounded by the Killarney National Park , a true paradise, with breathtaking waterfalls and lakes and the inevitable castle, the Ross Castle.
The Christmas celebrations are particularly lively with float parades, an always open ice rink, Santa’s House and Christmas market stalls, and lots of music.

CHRISTMAS CANDLE

In Ireland it was customary to put a lighted candle in front of the window on Christmas Eve to welcome Mary and Joseph. It was also the way to signal to priests, in the period in which it was forbidden, that in that house they could enter to give the blessing.
Tradition has it that the candle is lit by the youngest member of the family and turned off by a girl named “Mary” (at one time the name was very common in Irish families). After dinner on the eve the table is prepared again with cumin and raisin bread in the middle, a jug of milk and a lit candle, leaving the front door ajar, so that Mary and Joseph or any tramp, can come in and sit down table to have a refreshment.

Irish Rovers

Barra McNeils


CHORUS
The holly green, the ivy green (1)
The prettiest picture you’ve ever seen
Is Christmas in Killarney
With all of the folks at home.
It’s nice, you know, to kiss your beau
While cuddling under the mistletoe (2)
And Santa Claus you know, of course
Is one of the boys from home.
I
The door is always open (3)
The neighbors pay a call
And Father John before he’s gone
Will bless the house and all (4).
Our Hearts are light, our spirits bright
We’ll celebrate our joy tonight
It’s Christmas in Killarney
With all of the folks at home
II
We’ll decorate the Christmas tree (5)
While all the family’s here
Around a roaring fire (6)
We will raise a cup of cheer (7)
There’s gifts to bring and songs to sing
And laughs to make the rafters ring
It’s Christmas in Killarney
With all of the folks at home
III
We’ll take the Horse and Sleigh (8)
All across the fields of snow
Listening to the jingle bells
And everywhere we go
How grand it feels to click your heels (9)
And dance away to the jigs and reels
It’s Christmas in Killarney
With all of the folks at home
IV
The holly green, the ivy green
The prettiest picture you’ve ever seen
I’m handing you no blarney
No matter where you roam
It’s Christmas in Killarney
With all of the folks at home
NOTE
1) decorating the house for the festivities of mid-winter is an ancient custom, maintained in the Middle Ages, till today (cf)
2) the kiss under the mistletoe has remote origins, perhaps dating back to the Saturnalia or the Celts. Of all the hypotheses, all what refers to the Scandinavian myth of Balder’s death is the most likely. The custom, as an auspicious gesture, is historically found in the Tudor era in the twelve days of Christmas. In the nineteenth century when it was a curse for women to remain unmarried, there were many superstitious gestures to be observed all year round, but in particular on New Year’s Eve: that of exchanging a kiss under the mistletoe with anyone who came within range was auspicious for an imminent engagement and if you did it with your boyfriend you were already certain of the wedding!
Once you could give as many kisses as the berries of the mistletoe bush, but now you can kiss at will without removing the berries to count the kisses.
3) we refer not only to the exchange of visits between neighbors and acquaintances, but also to the generosity towards the most needy and the poor who went around the houses with begging songs (cf)
4) in the homes of Catholics the priest used to blessing the rooms and the people gathered together at Christmas
5) Christmas tree was a typically Germanic custom introduced in England in 1840 by Queen Victoria, in love with her handsome prince Albert. Already the Romans for the Saturnalia and the Calendae decorated the house with fir branches, fertility spirits that they remained laden with leaves even in the middle of winter. And yet it is not possible to trace the passage from these twigs to the Christmas tree.
A legend tells of Wilfred of Credition a Christian priest of the 8th century, missionary in Germany: to dissuade the “pagans” in the ritual practices in honor of the old gods he had an oak, the sacred plant of Odin, cut down. But a fir tree was born nearby so Wilfred proclaimed it the emblem of the new faith.
6) Christmas log (what remains of the ancient tradition of Yule) a large trunk brought home on Christmas day which was to burn slowly for the 12 nights of the feast cf
7) toast of the wassail, the ancient cult of trees that became an auspicious drink (cf)
8) the horse-drawn buggies, in winter they were equipped with skates to slide on the snow. There were essentially two models, a small two or four-seater, a small intimate and comfortable sled, the second was a taller, bigger and sturdy sled to accommodate a family (which at the time was quite numerous among children and relatives) or a friends’ group. The bells were a sign of allert to prevent accidents between the sledges: especially with the haze and darkness the sound of bells alerted the approach of a sled; in the Christmas context the clinking recalls the Santa’s sleigh (Jingle bells)
10) typical way of dancing in Ireland

Killyburn brae, Jack O’Lantern in a dress

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The theme of the Devil who tries to take a sinner to hell is a classic of the Celtic tales. In the ballad “Devil and the Farmer’s wife” dating back to 1600, the woman deserves the hell for her spiteful and disrespectful behavior; but the devil himself cannot tame her, indeed he risks losing his tranquility. 

LITTLE DEVILS

The ballad has spread widely in England, Ireland, Scotland and America with fairly similar text versions, albeit with melodies declined in a different way.
THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN (english version)
Lilli burlero
THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE (american version)
KILLYBURN BRAE (Irish version)
KELLYBURN BRAES (Scottish version)

The song is also known as “The Women Are Worse Than The Men” already recorded by Tommy Mackem in “From The Archives”, but these hills do not exist in Ireland as the name is a distortion of the Scottish one. The hills of Kellyburn are mounds in Scotland that separate the northern part of Ayrshire from Renfrew.

The Dubliners in A Parcel of Rouges 1976

Tommy Makem

The Irish Rovers in “The Boys Come Rollin’ Home”.


There was an old man
in the Killieburn Brae
riful riful tidifol-dey
there was an old man
in the Killieburn Brae
had a curse of the wife
for the most of his days(1)
with me foldadle-dah diddyfol-dah
foldadle-dal-da-daldadle-day
One day as this man
he walked out in the glen
well he met the devil
says how are you
The devil he says
” I have come for your wife
for I hear she’s the curse
and the bane of your life”
So the devil he hoisted her
up on his back(2)
and away off to hell
with her he did whack
And when at last
they came to hell’s gate
well she lifted her stick
and she battered his pate
There were two little devils(3)
there tied up in chains
she lifted her stick
and she scattered their brains
There were two other devils
there roaring like bulls
well she lifted her stick
and she battered their skulls
There were two other devils
there playing at ball
well she lifted her stick
and she battered them all
So the devil he hoisted her
up on his back
they were seven years(5) coming
and days going back
And when they came back
to Killieburn Brae
well the devil he cried
and shouted hooray
Says he “my good man
here’s your wife safe and well
for the likes of herself
we would not have been hell”
Which proves that the women
are worse than the men
when they go to the hell
they’re thrown out again
NOTE
1) the sentence wants to underline the less than submissive character of the woman!
2) the image is supported by a vast iconography dating back to the Middle Ages of women straddling the devil
3) the image of the devils literally massacred by the woman is very funny, unfortunately the domestic reality was very different and in general it was women who suffered mistreatment and violences.
4) the game with the ball is a common place of classical ballads that even hell does not escape
5) presumably the old man during the umpteenth quarrel with his wife called the devil to take her to hell; the two must have entered into a seven-year agreement.

Peigín agus Peadar

Vladan Nikolic

Our Goodman, The Goodman, The Gudeman, The Traveler

American version
Four (Three) Nights Drunk, Four (Five) Drunken Nights,
Old Cuckold, Cabbage Head 
Drunkard’s Special

Seven Drunken nights (irish version)
Peigín agus Peadar (irish gaelic version)

Le repliche di Marion (italian version)

This is the Irish Gaelic version of the comic ballad “Our Goodman” released in Ireland as “Seven Drunken Nights
It is Joe Heaney who reconnects the ballad to an Irish story in which a laborer, returning home after spending twenty years working at a rich farm, finds his wife in bed with a bearded guy (whom his wife claims to be their little son who became an adult!).
E’ la versione in gaelico irlandese della ballata comica “Our Goodman” diffusa in Irlanda con il titolo “Seven Drunken Nights”
E’ Joe Heaney a ricollegare la ballata ad una storiella irlandese in cui un bracciante, ritornato a casa dopo vent’anni passati a lavorare presso una ricca fattoria, trova la moglie a letto con un tizio con tanto di barba (che la moglie sostiene essere il loro figlioletto diventato adulto!).

Colm Keane  sings “A Pheigí na gCarad (Our Goodman)” AFC 2004/004 recorded by Alan Lomax 

Dervish – Peigín mo Chroí live, Playing with Fire 1996

A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ce he an fear fada ud timpeall an ti
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
Sin e do mhaicin nach bhfaca tu riamh
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheadar mo chroi

Shuil mise thoir agus shuil mise thiar
Is feasog ar leanbh ni fhaca me riamh
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
Eirigh do sheasamh ‘gus reitigh greim bia
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Nil ins an teach ach aon greim mine bui
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

A Pheadar mo chara is a Pheadar mo chroi
In iochtar mo mhala ta caca mine bui
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ta an caca seo ro fada nil in aon chaoi bui
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin mo chroi

‘S a Pheadar mo chara, suifimis sios
Na fagfas an baile chomh ‘s mhairfeas me riamh
O ho a Pheadar mo chroi
A Pheigin mo chara is a Pheigin mo chroi
Ce he an fear fada timpeall an ti

O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a Pheigin
O ho o hi ho ha O hi ho, a ghra geal mo chroi


I
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall strange man?
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Peggy, my heart
II
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
That is your baby (1) whom you never saw 
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Peter, my heart

III
I walked east and I walked west
But a beard on a baby
I have never before seen
IV
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
Rise up now and prepare some food
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
I have not a grain of yellow meal in the house
V
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
In the bottom of my bag
there is a yellow meal cake (2)
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
This cake you have is full of golden guineas (3)
VI
Peter, my friend we will sit down
I’ll never leave home again for as long as I live
O ho Peter, my heart
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall strange man?
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo barbuto alto e sconosciuto?
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Rita, cuore mio
II
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
è tuo figlio che non hai mai visto
O ho o hi ho ha
O hi ho, oh Piero cuore mio
III
Sono stato a Est e a Ovest
ma una barba su un bambino
non l’ho mai vista prima
IV
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
alzati ora e prepara del cibo
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
non c’è un granello di farina nella casa
V
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
nel fondo della mia sacca
c’è una torta di meliga
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
questa torta che hai è piena di sovrane d’oro
VI
Piero amore mio, ci sistemeremo
non  partirò mai più finchè avrò vita
oh Piero cuore mio
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo barbuto alto e sconosciuto?

NOTE
1) the story has a background (cf): Peter left twenty years earlier to go to work as a farm laborer and by seven years in seven years has always renewed his employment contract until one day he decides to return home. The owners of the farm then ask him if he prefers to receive compensation for his work or if he prefers to receive three valuable tips. He chooses the advices (which will save his life on the return journey). When he left twenty years before his wife was already waiting for a child who obviously is now a man
la storia ha un antefatto (vedi): Piero è partito vent’anni prima per andare a lavorare come bracciante in una fattoria e di sette anni in sette anni ha sempre rinnovato il contratto di lavoro finchè un bel giorno decide di ritornare a casa. I proprietari della fattoria allora gli chiedono se preferisce ricevere il compenso per il lavoro svolto o se in alternativa preferisce ricevere tre preziosi consigli. L’uomo sceglie i consigli (che gli salveranno la vita nel viaggio di ritorno). Quando è partito vent’anni prima la moglie era già in attesa di un bambino che ovviamente vent’anni dopo è diventato un uomo
2) The farmer’s wife had prepared two sweets for Peter, one to take home to his wife and the other to eat during the trip
La moglie del fattore aveva preparato a Piero due dolci, uno da portare a casa alla moglie e l’altro da mangiare durante il viaggio
3) In the second cake there was all the compensation for the 21 years of work done by Peter
Nella seconda torta c’era tutto il compenso per i 21 anni di lavoro svolto da Piero

Teada in Téada 2003

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
Cé hé an fear fada údan sínte leat síos?
Curfá: Ó a hó, ó a hó Ó a hó, a stóirín mo chroí

A Pheadair na gcarad ‘s a Pheadair mo chroí
Sin é do leanbh nach bhfaca tú riamh
Ó shiúil mise thoir agus shiúil mise thiar
Ach féasóg ar leanbh ní fhaca mé riamh

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
Éirigh i do sheasamh ‘gus réitigh greim bídh
A Pheadair na gcarad ‘s a Pheadair mo chroí
Níl ins an teach agam greim mine buí

A Pheigín na gcarad ‘s a Pheigín mo chroí
In íochtar mo mhála tá cáca mine buí

‘S a Pheigín ‘s a mhaicín suífidh muid síos
Ní fhágfad an baile chúns mhairfeas mé arís


I
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Who is that tall man stretched alongside you?
Chorus : Oh a ho, oh a ho Oh a ho,
my love, oh love of my heart
II
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
That is your baby (1) whom you never saw 
I walked east and I walked west
But a beard on a baby
I have never before seen
III
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
Rise up now and prepare some food
Peter, my friend, and Peter, my heart
I have not a grain of yellow meal in the house
IV
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
In the bottom of my bag
there is a yellow meal cake (2)
V
Peggy, my friend, and Peggy, my heart
I’ll never leave home again for as long as I live
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
chi è quell’uomo alto disteso accanto a te?
Coro Oh a ho, oh a ho Oh a ho,
amore mio, oh amore del mio cuore
II
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
è tuo figlio che non hai mai visto
Sono stato a Est e a Ovest
ma una barba su un bambino
non l’ho mai vista prima
III
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
alzati ora e prepara del cibo
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
non c’è un granello di farina nella casa
IV
Rita amore mio, Rita cuore mio
nel fondo della mia sacca
c’è una torta di meliga
V
Piero amore mio, Piero cuore mio
non  partirò mai più finchè avrò vita

LINK
https://songsinirish.com/peigins-peadar-teada-lyrics/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/teada/peigins.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/dervish/peigin.htm
https://www.joeheaney.org/en/peigin-agus-peadar/

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18132
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/seven-drunken-nights/

Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla (“Will You Come Home With Me?”)

Galway Hooker by Derek Biddulph

This old-style Irish Gaelic song was brought to Terre Celtiche by Stephen Salzano who writes in his post “This song is about a boatman who sails frequently between the two remote isles of Inis Ge off the West Coast of Ireland in County Mayo to Galway, and is besotted with a fair maiden. He wishes his love and ‘little treasure’ (a stóirín) her to elope with him. ” (from here)
Questo canto in gaelico irlandese nel vecchio stile è stato portato in Terre Celtiche da Stephen Salzano che scrive ” Questo canto narra di un barcaiolo che naviga frequentemente tra le due lontane isole di Inis Ge al largo della costa occidentale dell’Irlanda, nella contea Mayo e Galway e si è infatuato di una bella fanciulla. Desidera che il suo amore e “piccolo tesoro” (a stóirín) fugga con lui” (tradotto da qui)

Liam O Maonlai – The Highland Session 2012

Mike O’Laughlin at the Irish Roots Cafe, from the album: “Irish Song: Traditional and Sean Nós”

Lasairfhíona Ní Chonaola

I
Ní iarrfainn bó spré le Sadhbh (1) Ní Bhruinnealla,
Ach Baile Inis Gé (2) is cead éalú ar choinníní.
Óra a Shadhbh, a Shadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla,
A chuisle is a stóirín, [Tabhair dom do lámhín] éalaigh is imigh liom.
II
Máistir báid mhóir (3) mé a’ gabháil ród na Gaillimhe,
D’fhliuchfainn naoi bhfód is ní thóigfinn aon fharraige. (4)
III
“Máistir báid mhóir go deo ní ghlacfad,
Nuair a fhaigheann siad an chóir ‘sé is dóichí nach bhfanann siad.”
IV
Níl falach i gcabhail ar Shadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla,
Ach seanchóitín donn gan cabhail gan muinchille.
V
Mhionnóinn naoi n-uaire ar leabhar mór an Bhairéadaigh
Nach scarfainn go deo le Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla.
VI
Fear maith i mbád mé togha fear iomraimh,
Fear sluaisid’ is láí ar dhá cheann an iomaire.
VII
Nuair a théimse ‘un an chomhra ag comhaireamh an airgid
Bíonn an iníon is an bhean is iad caillte le gean orm.
VIII
Nuair a thiocfas lá breá ‘gus an ghaoth ón bhfarraige
Tabharfaidh mé Sadhbh liom go céibh na Gaillimhe.
IX
Óra a Shadhbh, a Shadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla,
A chuisle is a stóirín, ba rí-mhaith dhuit mise agat!

 


I
I would ask no dowry for Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla (1),
but the village of Inishkea (2) and a permit to hunt rabbits.
Óra, Sadhbh, Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla,
My heart’s beloved, [Give me your wee hand] elope and leave with me.
II
I’m the master of a hooker (3) on the way to Galway,
I’d wet nine sods of turf but would not take any water in. (4)
Óra, Sadhbh
III
The master of a hooker I’d never accept,
when the wind is favourable they are not inclined to stay. (5)
Óra, Sadhbh ..

IV
Sadhbh is not wearing a stitch on her body,
except an old brown coat without bodice or sleeve.
Óra, Sadhbh..
V
I’d swear nine times on Barrett’s book
that I’d never part with Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla.
Óra, Sadhbh ..
VI
I’m a good boatman, a fine oarsman,
skillful with shovel or loy
on either end of the ridge (6).
Óra, Sadhbh
VII
When I go to the chest to count the money,
the daughter and her mother are overcome with fondness for me.
Óra, Sadhbh ..
VIII
When a fine day comes and the wind is from the sea,
I’ll take Sadhbh with me to the pier in Galway.
Óra, Sadhbh ..
IX
Óra, Sadhbh, Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla,
my heart’s beloved, you would do right well to have me!

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Non chiederei la dote per Sabha figlia di Bhruinnealla
ma il villaggio di Inishkea e la licenza di cacciare i conigli.
Salve Sabha, Sabha figlia di Bhruinnealla
amata dal mio cuore, [dammi la tua manina,] fuggi e vieni via con me
II
Sono il padrone di una barca a vela diretta a Galway
si bagnerebbero solo nove zolle di torba e non imbarcherei mai acqua di mare
Salve Sabha
III
“Il padrone di una barca a vela non lo accetterei mai, quando il vento è favorevole non sono inclini a restare”
Salve Sabha..
IV
Sabha non indossa abiti su misura
tranne un vecchio camice marrone senza corpetto e maniche
Salve Sabha..
V
Giurerei nove volte sul libro di Barrett
che non mi separerò mai da Sabha figlia di Bhruinnealla
Salve Sabha
VI
Sono un bravo barcaiolo, un ottimo rematore
abile con badile e vanga
su entrambi i lati della porca
Salve Sabha..
VII
Quando vado alla cassa a contare il denaro,
la figlia e sua madre mi vogliono un mucchio di bene
Salve Sabha
VIII
Quando verrà un bel giorno e il vento arriverà dal mare
porterò Sabha con me al porto di Galway
Salve Sabha
VIII
Salve Sabha, Sabha figlia di Bhruinnealla
amata dal mio cuore, faresti un buon affare ad avermi

FOOTNOTE by Stephen Salzano
1) The name Sadhbh is a girl’s name of Irish origin meaning “sweet, goodness”. Sadhbh was the name of several real and legendary Irish princesses, including the daughters of Conn of the Hundred Battles, of Queen Medb of Connacht, and of King Brian Boru. It’s also written Sabha. One of the most authentic Irish names for girls, it is also unfortunately one of the most difficult to export.( https://nameberry.com/babyname/Sadhbh)
Sadhbh è un nome femminile di origine irlandese che significa “dolcezza, bontà”. Sadhbh fu il nome di diverse principesse irlandesi, vere e leggendarie, tra cui le figlie di Conn delle Cento Battaglie, della regina Medb delConnacht e del re Brian Boru. Si scrive anche come Sabha. Uno dei nomi irlandesi più originari ma anche uno dei più difficili da reasmettere.
Sadhbh is a popular Irish girls name but is pronounced as S – eye – v. But in the song it is pronounced as ‘how’. This is because in Connmara, Sadhbh is pronounced as Sow. The name changes from Sadhbh to ‘ a Shadhbh’ in all but the very first line, as this is the common way that the Irish people address familiar friends and family and ‘Sh’ is caused by the Irish language mutation (lenition) of the start of words.  Finally, the S becomes silent with the lenition.
Sadhbh è un nome popolare per le ragazze irlandesi che si pronuncia  S – eye – v. Ma nella canzone è pronunciato come “how”. Questo perché nel Connmara, Sadhbh si pronuncia come “Sow”. Il nome cambia da Sadhbh a ‘a Shadhbh’ tranne che nel primo verso, poiché questo è il modo comune in cui gli irlandesi si rivolgono agli amici e parenti e ‘Sh’ è causato dalla mutazione in lingua irlandese (lenizione) dell’inizio di parole. Alla fine, la S diventa silenziosa con la lenizione.
2) The islands of Inis Gé or ‘Inishkea’ (North and South) are part of County Mayo, off the West Coast of Ireland, and are now uninhabited. The name means ‘Goose Islands’. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inishkea_Islands ) This article says there is evidence of habitation from at least 5,000 years ago, pure white sandy beaches and crystal clear water, it was home to fishermen and pirates, and escaped the ravishes of the potato blight on the mainland due to the prevailing winds largely keeping the blight away from Inis Gé 
Le isole di Inis Gé o “Inishkea” (nord e sud) fanno parte della contea di Mayo, al largo della costa occidentale d’Irlanda, e ora sono disabitate. Il nome significa “Isole dell’oca”. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inishkea_Islands. Questo articolo dice che ci sono resti di insediamenti risalenti ad almeno 5.000 anni fa, spiagge di sabbia bianca e acqua pura e cristallina, fu la patria di pescatori e pirati e sfuggì alla pestilenza della malattia delle patate  sulla terraferma a causa dei venti predominanti che mantennero il morbo lontano da Inis Gé!
3) ‘Bád Mór’ – a Galway hooker; a large boat for transporting cargo including the turf, which was used for fuel – (presumably scarce on the islands), from the mainland to the islands, and then limestone, wood, and livestock, wood, potatoes, fish etc. on the way back; through the seas of Galway Bay to Galway: “a’ gabháil ród na Gaillimhe”, as referred to in the song; the largest in its class; to own one was to mean you had status in the community “is Máistir báid mhóir mé “; the roads in Connemara were only few and only fit for donkey and mule carts in those days, so these boats were relied on for transportation of all kinds of cargoe along the coast and to the islands; they slept and cooked in the hold of these boats under the deck, with access through a hatch which acted as a chimney
una grande barca per il trasporto merci tra cui la torba, che è stata utilizzata come combustibile- (presumibilmente carente sulle isole), dalla terraferma alle isole, e poi calcare, legno e bestiame, legno, patate, pesce ecc. sulla via del ritorno; attraverso i mari della baia di Galway fino a Galway: “a’ gabháil ród na Gaillimhe “, come indicato nella canzone; il più grande della sua categoria; possederne una significava avere uno status nella comunità “is Máistir báid mhóir mé”; in quei giorni le strade in Connemara erano poche e adatte solo al transito di asini e carretti a mulo, quindi queste barche erano affidabili per il trasporto di ogni tipo di merce lungo la costa e verso le isole; si dormiva e cucinava nella stiva di queste barche sotto il ponte, con accesso attraverso una botola che fungeva da camino;
4) the line in the song probably means, while some of my sods of turf may get wet (only nine, a tiny amount – ‘D’fhliuchfainn naoi bhfód’), the boat is of a sound construction, seaworthy, and watertight to seawater, meaning its a really great boat that he has (ní thóigfinn aon fharraige) ! so perhaps he is boasting of how good his boat is to Sadhbh, and that he is an important person higher in status than others like tradesmen and fishermen, and presumably wealthy; he has a chest of money right? (Nuair a théimse ‘un an chomhra ag comhaireamh an airgid).
il verso della canzone probabilmente significa “mentre alcune delle mie zolle di torba possono bagnarsi (solo nove, una piccola quantità – ‘D’fhliuchfainn naoi bhfód’)”, la barca ha una costruzione solida, idonea alla navigazione e impermeabile all’acqua di mare, nel senso che è il proprietario di una grande barca (ní thóigfinn aon fharraige)! quindi forse si sta vantando con Sadhbh di quanto sia bella la sua barca e di essere una persona importante di più alto grado rispetto agli altri commercianti e pescatori, e presumibilmente ricco; ha una mucchio di soldi vero? ((Nuair a théimse ‘un an chomhra ag comhaireamh an airgid).
NOTE Cattia Salto
5) Joe Heaney translates “When they get what they want they likely won’t stay!”
6) se non ho capito male la traduzione iomair= ridge of land, rig

Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla is an old sean-nós song attributed to Labhrás Mac Con Raoi from Mace Head, Co. Mayo, a boatman who ranged the coasts of Mayo and Galway. He is said to have composed it between 1815 and 1821, and the woman in the song is said to have been from Inishkea, Co. Mayo. It is often called “Sadhbh Ní Mhuinghile.”
(https://songsinirish.com/sadhbh-ni-bhruinneallaigh-lyrics/)
Sadhbh Ní Bhruinnealla è una vecchia canzone in sean-nós attribuita a Labhrás Mac Con Raoi da Mace Head, Co. Mayo, un barcaiolo che bazzicava le coste di Mayo e Galway. Si dice che l’abbia composta tra il 1815 e il 1821 e che la donna nella canzone fosse originaria di Inishkea, nella contea di Mayo. Viene spesso chiamata “Sadhbh Ní Mhuinghile”. 

The melody is similar to “Pheigin Mo Chroi” (Peigín is Peadar)
La melodia richiama “Pheigin Mo Chroi” (Peigín is Peadar)

LINK
https://celticandhistoryobsessions.music.blog/2019/08/24/sadhbh-ni-bhruinnealla/
https://songsinirish.com/sadhbh-ni-bhruinneallaigh-lyrics/
https://www.joeheaney.org/en/sadhbh-ni-bhruinniligh/

https://www.itma.ie/digital-library/score/claisceadal-2
https://podcasts.apple.com/ug/podcast/sadhbh-ni-bhruinneallaigh-mayo-boatmans-love/id269126035?i=1000087765133

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/the-lost-world-of-the-galway-hooker-1.2655097
https://www.reportage.co.uk/featured-stories/huiceir-na-gallimhe-the-galway-hooker/

Courting is a pleasure/Farewell to Ballymoney

“Farewell Ballymoney” (Roud number 454) in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People called also “Handsome Molly”, “Courting is a Pleasure”, is a variant of a song widespread in the north Ireland called, “Going to Mass (or church) last Sunday”, found in tradition most frequently in the North of America (see  the old-time country song “Handsome Molly”).
“Farewell Ballymoney” in Songs of the People (Sam Henry) intitolata anche “Handsome Molly”, “Courting is a Pleasure”, è la variante di una canzone diffusa in tutto il Nord Irlanda dal titolo “Going to Mass last Sunday”, trovata più frequentemente nella tradizione del Nord America. 

Jarlath Henderson in  Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016 


I
Courting is a pleasure
Between my love and I;
And it’s down in yonder valley
I’ll meet her by and by.
II
It’s down in yonder valley
She is my heart’s delight:
“It’s with you, lovely Molly,
I will stay till broad daylight.”
III
Going to church on Sunday,
My love she passed me by
and I knew her mind was altered
By the roving of her eye.
IV
I knew her mind was altered
by a lad of high degree:
“Oh Molly, lovely Molly,
Your looks have wounded me.”
V
I then took out a bottle 
that I helded in my hand
Saying, “here is a glass dear Molly,
For our courtship is at an end.

VI
“So here is a glass dear Molly,
drink the bottle dry for me.
for there are ten guineas wagered,
That married we ne’er be.”
VI
Never court a wee girl 
With a dark and a roving eye,
just you kiss her and embrace her
never tell her the reason why.
VII
Just kiss her and embrace her
Till you cause your heart to yield;
For a faint-hearted soldier
never gain a battlefield.”
VIII
Oh farewell Ballymoney
and to County Antrim too,
Likewise farewell dear Molly
I’ll bade you a fond adieu;
IX
America lies far away,
across the ocean blue,
I am bound for there dear Molly
and again I’ll never see you
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Amoreggiare è un piacere
tra il mio amore e me
e in quella valle lontana
la incontrerò tra poco
II
E’ in quella valle lontana
lei è la delizia del mio cuore
“Con te Molly cara
starei fino al farsi del giorno”
III
Mentre andavo in chiesa la domenica
il mio amore mi passò accanto
e seppi che aveva cambiato idea
dal suo sguardo vago
IV
Seppi che aveva cambiato idea
per un ragazzo di alto livello
“O Molly, cara Molly
 i tuoi sguardi mi hanno assassinato”
V
Allora tirai fuori una bottiglia
che tenevo in mano
dicendo ” Ecco un brindisi Molly cara
perchè il nostro amore è finito”
VI
“Così ecco un brindisi Molly cara
svuota la bottiglia per me
perchè ci sono 10 ghinee scommesse
che non saremo mai sposati”
VI
Non corteggiare mai una ragazzina
con gli occhi neri e inquieti;
ma baciala solo e abbracciala
senza mai dirle il motivo
VII
Baciala solo e abbracciala
fino a che ti regge il cuore
perchè un soldato dal cuore debole
non conquisterà mai un campo di battaglia”
VIII
Addio Ballymoney
e anche addio alla contea di Antrim,
come pure addio a te Molly cara
ti saluto con un addio appassionato
IX
L’America è lontana
oltre l’oceano profondo
là sono diretto Molly cara
e non ti rivedrò mai più

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51900
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138481
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/meetingisapleasure.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Courting_is_a_Pleasure(Lovely_Molly).htm
http://www.evergreentrad.com/down-in-yonder-valley/
https://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/going_to_mass_last_sunday_charlie_mcgonigle
https://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/going_to_mass_last_sunday_denis_mcdaid
https://archive.comhaltas.ie/compositions/61
http://www.folklorist.org/song/Farewell_Ballymoney_(Loving_Hannah%3B_Lovely_Molly)
https://songoftheisles.com/2013/09/06/going-to-mass-last-sunday/
http://songbook1.tripod.com/goingtomasslastsunday.htm

Raggle Taggle Gypsy Davey

A traditional ballad about gypsies and the charm of the “exotic”: a Lady abandons her husband to follow a gypsy, and although pursued and recalled to her responsibilities by her husband, she refuses to go home.
From Scotland the ballad spread to England, Ireland and America in a great variety of lyrics and melodies.
Una ballata tradizionale sugli zingari e il fascino dell’”esotico”: una bella lady abbandona il marito per seguire un fascinoso zingaro, e sebbene inseguita e richiamata alle sue responsabilità dal marito, si rifiuta di tornare a casa.
Dalla Scozia la ballata si diffuse in Inghilterra, Irlanda e America in una grande varietà di testi e melodie.

Johnny Deep nel ruolo di Caesar nel film "The man who cried" - L'uomo che pianse 2000 Story background

SCOTTISH VERSIONS
RAGGLE TAGGLE GISPY (standard version)
THE ROVIN PLOUGHBOY (Bothy Ballads version)
JOHNNY FAA – THREE GYPSIES
 – Child #200 A
GYSPY LADDIE – SEVEN YELLOW GYPSIES – Child #200 B

SEVEN GYPSIES english versions
The Whistling Gypsy irish version
Gypsy Davey (irish version)

AMERICAN VERSIONS:
Black Jack Davey
Gypsy Davvy (Peter Seeger, Woody Guthrie)
Gypsy Davvy (Doc Watson, Sandy Danny)
Roving Gypsy

Furey Brothers & Davey Arthur in Emigrant 1977
one of the many variants of Gypsy Davey, but with an irish style
una delle tanti varianti di Gypsy Davey, ma con un taglio decisamente irish


I
It was late at night when the squire came home,
Enquiring for his lady.
The servants all replayed “She’s gone,
She’s away with the gypsy Davey.”
Chorus
Raggle taggle gypsy, gypsy,
Raggle taggle gypsy Davey
II
Saddle me me old grey mare
for the brown he is not so speedy.
I’ll ride all night and I’ll ride all day
Till  I’ll overtake my lady.
III
So he rode all night and he rode all day
And overtook his lady.
He rode all night and he rode all day
till he overtook his fair lady.
IV
Would you come back me dearest dear
Would come back me me honey
Would you come back me dearest dear
I’ll give you all of my money
V
I’ll not come back me dearest dear
I’ll not come back me honey.
I’ll not come back me dearest dear
For you nor all your money.”
VI
So take off your snow-white glove,
All made of Spanish leather.
So take off your snow-white glove
And bid farewell forever.
VII
Oh she took off her snow-white glove,
All made of Spanish leather.
she took of fher snow-white glove
And bade farewell for ever.
VIII
“Last night I slept in a bed ??
With the sheet an blanket in a ??
But the night time I lie on the cold cold ground
in the arms of my lovely gypsy -o.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Era tardi quando il cavaliere ritornò a casa 
chiedendo di sua moglie
i servi tutti risposero “E’ andata via,
con Davey il gitano” 
Coro
Raggle taggle gypsy, gypsy,
Raggle taggle gypsy Davey
II
“Sellatemi la cavalla grigia
perchè il morello non è così veloce.
Cavalcherò notte e giorno
finchè raggiungerò mia moglie”
III
Così cavalcò l’intera notte e l’intero giorno
per raggiungere la sua signora
cavalcò l’intera notte e l’intero giorno
finchè raggiunse la sua bella signora
IV
“Vorresti ritornare a casa, mia carissima
Vorresti ritornare a casa, tesoro
Vorresti ritornare a casa, mia carissima
ti darò tutti i miei averi?”
V
Non tornerò indietro mio caro
Non tornerò indietro tesoro mio
Non tornerò indietro mio caro
nè per te e neppure per tutti i tuoi soldi.”
VI
“Così togliti il ​​guanto bianco come la neve,
fatto in cuoio di Spagna
Così togliti il ​​guanto bianco come la neve,
e di’ addio per sempre”
VII
Si tolse il ​​guanto bianco come la neve,
fatto in cuoio di Spagna
si tolse il ​​guanto bianco come la neve,
e disse addio per sempre
VIII
“Ieri sera ho dormito in un letto ??
Con il lenzuolo una coperta in  ??
Ma la notte mi sdraio sulla fredda terra fredda
tra le braccia mio adorabile zingaro -o. ”

NOTE
mia trascrizione del testo, alcune parole non mi sono ben chiare, sorry

The text including the choir is similar to the English version recorded by Suzie Adams and Helen Hockenhull in 1983 with the title Gypsy Davy
La struttura del testo compreso il coro è simile alla versione inglese registrata da Suzie Adams and Helen Hockenhull nel 1983 con il titolo Gypsy Davy 

Fay Hield in Old Adam 2016 learned Raggle Taggle Gypsy from Suzie Adams and Helen Hockenhull’s album [Songbird 1983]

LINK
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-GypsyDavy.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/gypsydavey.html

A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó (Sweet Comeragh)

The song “A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó” written in Irish Gaelic by Maurus Ó Faoláin (1853-1931) a Cistercian priest born in Kilrossanty, Co Waterford, expresses love for the Sweet Comeragh the land of the Decies, the homeland to which the emigrant returns for his homesick.
Il canto scritto in gaelico irlandese da Maurus Ó Faoláin (1853-1931), frate cistercense nato a Kilrossanty contea di Waterford esprime l’amore per lo Sweet Comeragh la terra dei Decies, la terra natia alla quale l’emigrato fa ritorno per la troppa nostalgia. 

Up The Déise!

County Waterford, Ireland, is known locally as “An Déise” in Gaeilge. Sometime between the 4th and 8th centuries AD, a tribe of native Gaelic people called the Déisi were driven from the southern parts of the country, conquering and settling here. The Déise region is a beautiful region with two mountain ranges, beautiful rivers and lakes and over 30 beaches along its unique volcanic coast line. It is one of the few regions in Ireland with a Gaeltacht, an area with native Irish speaking people. The Déise has a rich history from megalithic tombs and Ogham stones. (from here)
La contea di Waterford, in Irlanda, è conosciuta localmente come “An Déise” in gaelico. A un certo punto tra il IV e l’VIII secolo d.C., una tribù di nativi celti i Déisi furono cacciati dalle parti meridionali del paese, e si stabilirono qui sui territori conquistati. La regione di Déise è una bellissima regione con due catene montuose, bellissimi fiumi e laghi e oltre 30 spiagge lungo la sua unica linea costiera di origine vulcanica. È una delle poche regioni in Irlanda con un Gaeltacht, un’area con nativi di lingua irlandese. Il Déise ha una ricca storia di tombe megalitiche e pietre Ogham.

Three versions always with the same singer, Karan Casey originally from County Waterford, who learned this song from Ann Mulqueen
Tre versioni sempre con la stessa cantante, Karan Casey originaria della contea di Waterford,  che imparò il canto da Ann Mulqueen

Solas in The Words That Remain, 1998

Karan Casey & Paul Halley · Paul Winter & Friends in Celtic Solstice 1999

Karan Casey live for Highland Sessions

Fiona Kelleher & Mel Mercier & Kate Ellis in My Love Lies 2008

I
Mo bheannacht óm’ chroí Dod’ thir ‘s dod’ shléibhte
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó Is dod’ mhuintir shuairc
Ar dual dóibh féile A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó
Do shrutháin gheala ‘S do choillte craobhach
Do ghleannta meala ‘S do bhánta léire
Ó grá mo chroí Iad siúd le chéile
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó
II
Is dathúil breá Do chruacha scéimchruth
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó Nuair a lasaid suas
Le hamharc gréine A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó
Na faillte ‘s leacain Ar gach taobh diot
Mar bhrata sróil Le seolta gleásta
Nuair a scaipeann an drúcht Anuas ón spéir ort
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó
III
Do bhíos thar sáile Seal i gcéin uait
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó I ndúthaigh fáin
Ag déanamh saoithair A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó
Ach b’obair tháir liom Cnuasach gréithre
I bhfad óm’ ait Fé scáil do shléibhte
Is chas mé arís ort A phlúr na nDéise
A chomaraigh aoibhinn ó

I
My heartfelt blessings
On your valleys and mountains
Sweet Comeragh
And on your cheeful people
So naturally kind
Sweet Comeragh
On your shining streams
And your leafy woodlands
Your honeyed slopes
And your gleaming meadows
My heart fills with love
For all of them surely
Sweet Comeragh
II
Your rugged peaks
Are a handsome sight
Sweet Comeragh
As the rising sun
Sets them aflame
Sweet Comeragh
Cliffs and steep slopes
In every direction
Like a satin weave
From a magic loom
As the dew falls
From the heavens high
Sweet Comeragh
III
I was a while away (1)
From your beauty
Sweet Comeragh
Slaving so hard
In a foreign land
Sweet Comeragh
Base work it was
Just making a living
Far from my home
‘Neath the shade of your mountains
So I came back to you
The flower of the Déise (2)
Sweet Comeragh
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Le mie benedizioni sincere
alle tue valli e montagne
Dolce Comeragh
e alla tua gente allegra
tanto gentile di natura
Dolce Comeragh
ai tuoi chiari ruscelli
e i tuoi boschi frondosi
e i dolci pendii
e i tuoi prati scintillanti.
Il mio cuore si riempie d’amore
vero per tutto quanto
Dolce Comeragh
II
Le tue vette accidentate
sono una bella vista
Dolce Comeragh
quando il sole nascente
le infiamma
Dolce Comeragh
Scogliere e pendii ripidi
in ogni direzione
come una trama di raso
da un telaio magico
mentre la rugiada cade
dall’alto dei cieli
Dolce Comeragh
III
Mi è mancata
la tua bellezza
Dolce Comeragh
a sgobbare duramente
in una terra straniera
Dolce Comeragh
Il lavoro principale era
guadagnarsi da vivere
lontano da casa mia
all’ombra delle tue montagne
Quindi sono tornato da te
fiore della Dessia
Dolce Comeragh
NOTE
1) letteralmente “Sono stato via per un po’”
2) flower of na Déise  = The Decies, The county is based on the historic Gaelic territory of the Déise, anglicised ‘Decies’ or ‘Dessia’. There is an Irish-speaking area, Gaeltacht na nDéise, in the south-west of the county. The Celtic tribe of the Decies or An Déise, established in present-day Waterford County, converted to Christianity as early as the mid-fourth century.
[La contea è basata sullo storico territorio gaelico della Déise, anglicizzata “Decies” o “Dessia”. C’è un’area di lingua irlandese, Gaeltacht na nDise, nel sud-ovest della contea. La tribù celtica dei Decies o An Déise, stanziati nell’attuale contea di Waterford si sono convertiti al Cristianesimo già nella metà del IV secolo]

LINK
https://www.aletterfromireland.com/up-the-deise/
https://www.bellsirishlyrics.com/a-chomaraigh-aoibhinn-o.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34502
https://thesession.org/tunes/15714
http://www.waterfordmuseum.ie/exhibit/web/Display/article/312/2/Early_Waterford_History_The_Decies_.html
https://outsider.ie/ireland/hiking-comeragh-mountains/

Zoological Gardens ballad

The “Zoological Gardens” is an Irish ballad often attributed to Dominic Behan (or to his brother Brendan) is actually a Dublin street song coming perhaps from the repertoire of late 19th century music halls. We find it recorded by Dominic in his album “Irish Songs” (1958) which in the notes writes “The Zoological Gardens I got from Mr Brown who sings it regularly in a public house in Kimmage
Finding no written lyrics in the archives and the collections of nineteenth-century Dublin music hall songs, it can be assumed (from some references in the text) that the song could date back to 1920.
La ballata irlandese “Zoological Gardens” attribuita spesso a Dominic Behan( o al fratello) è in realtà una Dublin street song proveniente forse dal repertorio dei music hall di fine Ottocento. La troviamo registrata da Dominic nell’album “Irish Songs” (1958) che nelle note di copertina scrive “The Zoological Gardens l’ho presa dal signor Brown che la canta regolarmente in un pub a Kimmage
Non trovando traccia scritte negli archivi e le raccolte delle music hall songs della Dublino ottocentesca si può presumere (da alcuni riferimenti nel testo) che la canzone risalga al 1920. 

The Dublin Zoo was inaugurated in 1831 in the Phoenix Park and it has been one of the most popular tourist attractions in Ireland since its inception, nowaday it has become a beautiful nature park!
Lo zoo di Dublino è stato inaugurato nel 1831 nel Phoenix Park ed è stato fin dagli esordi una delle attrazioni turistiche più popolari dell’Irlanda, diventato oggi un bel parco naturalistico.

The Dubliners in The Dubliners’ Guide to Dublin City

The Wolfe Tones (I, II, V, III)


Chorus
Thunder and lightning is no lark
When Dublin city is in the dark
So if you’ve any money (1) go up to the park (2)
[Would you care to go to the Pheonix Park]

And view the zoological gardens
I (The Dubliners)
We went out there to see the zoo (3)
We saw the lion (4) and the kangaroo
There was he-males and she-males (5) of every hue/ Up in the zoological gardens
I (The Wolf tones)
Last sunday night I have no dough
so I took the moth (6) up to see the zoo 
We saw the lions and the kangaroos
Inside the zoogical gardens
II
We went out there by Castleknock
says she [the mot] to me
“Sure! We’re caught on the lock [lough]” (7)
Then I knew she was one of
the rare old stock (8)
from outside [Inside] the zoological gardens
Chorus
III
We went out there on our honeymoon
Says she to me “If you don’t come soon
I’ll have to get [jump] in with the hairy baboon (9)/ up in [Inside] the zooligical gardens
IV
Says she to me “It’s seven o’clock
And it’s time for me to be changin’ me frock
For I long to see the old (10) cockatoo”
Up in the zoological gardens
V
Says she to me “‘My lovely Jack’/ Would you like a ride on the elephant’s back (11)
If you dont get out of that
I’ll give ye such a crack (12)”
Up in the zoological gardens
Chorus
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Tuoni e fulmini non sono uno scherzo
quando la città di Dublino è al buio
così se hai pochi soldi vai al parco
[ti piacerebbe andare al Pheonix Park]

a vedere il giardino zoologico
I (The Dubliners)
Andammo là a vedere lo zoo
vedemmo il leone e il canguro
C’erano lui-maschi e lei-femmine per tutti i gusti
nel giardino zoologico
I (The Wolf Tones)
Domenica sera scorsa non avevo un quattrino
così ho portato la ganza a vedere lo zoo
vedemmo i leoni e i canguri
nel giardino zoologico
II
Andammo là da Castleknock
mi dice lei [la ganza]/ “Dai andiamo ad amoreggiare alla diga [laghetto]”,
allora capii che era
quella giusta per me
fuori dal [nel] giardino zoologico
Coro
III
Andammo là in luna di miele
mi dice lei  “Se non vieni presto,
dovrò mettermi con il babbuino pieno di peli”
nel giardino zoologico
IV
Dice a me “Sono le sette
ed è tempo per me di cambiarmi d’abito
Perché desidero vedere il cacatua “
nel giardino zoologico
V
Dice a me “Carissimo Jack 
ti piacerebbe andare a spasso sulla schiena dell’elefante?
Se non ci vieni, ti prenderò in giro”
nel giardino zoologico
Coro

NOTE
I believe there are two levels of translation, one apparent and one subtext, the translation also presents some jargon terms that can be misleading. The most obscure points are in fact also those that present multiple alternative versions
in brackets [] the alternative verses
[credo ci siano due livelli di traduzione, uno apparente e un sotto testo, la traduzione presenta inoltre alcuni termini gergali che possono essere fuorvianti. I punti più oscuri infatti sono anche quelli che presentano più versioni alternative
in parentesi [] i versi alternativi]
1)  In 1840, the [Zoological] society decided to open the zoo on Sundays for a penny.  Dubliners responded with enthusiasm and cheap entry was extended to public holidays and evenings. (from here)
 Nel 1840, la società decise di aprire lo zoo la domenica per un centesimo. I dublinesi hanno risposto con entusiasmo e l’entrata economica è stata estesa ai giorni festivi e alla sera. 
2) the name Pheonix (or Phoenix) has nothing to do with the phoenix, it is a distortion of “Finn Uisce” = the Waters of Finn 
According to the legend of the Oxianic cycle the gigantic body of Fionn Mac Cumhaill, mythical king of the Fianna, lying in Dublin, his head formed the promontory of Howth Castle, his body extends along the northern bank of the river Liffey, and the feet were in Phoenix Park, at the northwestern end of the city.
il nome Pheonix (o Phoenix) del parco non ha niente a che vedere con la fenice, è una storpiatura di “Finn Uisce “= the Waters of Finn (l’acqua di Finn)
Secondo la leggenda del ciclo ossianico il corpo gigantesco di Fionn Mac Cumhaill mitico re dei Fianna giace a Dublino, la sua testa formò il promontorio di Howth (Howth Head o Howth Castle), il suo corpo si distende lungo la sponda settentrionale del fiume Liffey, ed i piedi si trovavano a Phoenix Park, all’estremità nord-occidentale della città. 
3) the first to coin the term zoo (as abbreviation of zoological) was Hugh Willoughby Sweny with his hugely popular “Walking in the Zoo” written in 1869 (with music by Alfred Lee), one of the greatest successes of Alfred Vance of London’s Musc hall .
il primo a coniare il termine zoo (come abbreviativo di zoological) è stato Hugh Willoughby Sweny con la sua popolarissima “Walking in the Zoo” scritta nel 1869 (su musica di Alfred Lee), uno dei maggiori successi di Alfred Vance del Musc hall londinese.
4) the first pair of lions in the Dublin zoo dates back to 1855: among the many curiosities the lion Cairbre became famous with the name of Leo as mascot of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (year 1928) [la prima coppia di leoni dello zoo di Dublino risale a 1855: tra le tante curiosità il leone Cairbre divenne famoso con il nome di Leo come mascotte della Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (anno 1928)]
5) shemales=transvestite; I imagine there is a hint of malice in the verse, it is known that many urban parks at night are places for promiscuous meetings
[immagino ci sia una punta di malizia nel verso, è risaputo che molti parchi urbani di notte sono luoghi per incontri promiscui]
6) mot= girl in questo contesto significa “fidanzatina”
7) Dominic says “shall we court on the lock”  or we’ll court by the lough
caught, court= make out [amoreggiare, pomiciare]
lough= old irish for loch=lake
lock= pound lock
A distortion of the verse sees the encounter between the protagonist and a lady of pleasure and so the verse becomes “Hang your coat on the lock” to have some privacy [Una storpiatura della strofa vede l’incontro tra il protagonista e una donnina (a lady of pleasure) e così il verso diventa “Hang your coat on the lock” per avere un po’ di privacy]
8) special reserve [“riserva speciale”]
9) or “If you don’t come home soon
You’ll have to sleep with a hairy baboon!”
[se non vieni a casa presto andrai a letto con il babbuino pieno di peli”
 The first half of the 20th century was one of mixed fortunes.  It began with a golden period when Irish people serving in British colonies sent giraffe, baboons, snow leopards and other exotic animals to Dublin Zoo. At the outbreak of the First World War, the society was particularly proud to have a gorilla, a chimpanzee, an orangutan and a gibbon. 
[Nella prima metà del 20 ° secolo la sorte del parco fu altalenante. Cominciò con un periodo d’oro in cui il popolo irlandese che serviva nelle colonie britanniche mandò giraffe, babbuini, leopardi delle nevi e altri animali esotici allo zoo di Dublino. Allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale, la società era particolarmente orgogliosa di avere un gorilla, uno scimpanzé, un orangutan e un gibbone.]
10) old= vecchio è usato come intercalare in senso affettivo
11) In 1835 the zoo rented an elephant and a rhino for the summer months. In 1836, the London Zoo gave Dublin an elephant that remained as a tourist attraction for exotic walks
Nel 1835 lo zoo affittò un elefante e un rinoceronte per i mesi estivi. Nel 1836, lo zoo di Londra donò a Dublino un elefante che rimase come attrazione turistica per esotiche passeggiate
12) to give a crack= to fuss, to tease
[dare il tormento, prendere in giro]

Brendan Behan sang different versions on the same melody [ha cantato diverse versioni pur sulla stessa melodia]

The Dubliners’ Guide to Dublin City

LINK
https://www.dublinzoo.ie/142/Zoo-History.aspx
https://www.theballadeers.com/ire/db_d1958_t28_recalled.htm
https://alanlomaxarchive.bandcamp.com/track/zoological-gardens
http://research.culturalequity.org/rc-b2/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=7486
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/xyz/zoologic.html
http://ingeb.org/songs/lastsund.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15382

The Ragman’s Ball

Among the Dublin street songs released by Frank Harte, The Ragman’s Ball was recorded in the 1960s by the Dubliners. An extended version (“The Night of the Ragman’s Ball”) was collected by Colm O’Lochlainn from a Thomas Street storyteller in 1913, on the “It was in Dublin city” melody.
The song describes the annual dance for the Christmas holidays that was held in the Liberties, the popular neighborhood in the old Dublin, organized in Ash street by the ragmen.
One of the old crafts, but not entirely lost, the ragman’s work is the first forms of separated collection in history.
Tra le street songs di Dublino diffuse da Frank Harte The Ragman’s Ball fu ripresa negli anni 60 anche dai Dubliners. Una versione estesa (“The Night of the Ragman’s Ball”) è stata raccolta da Colm O’Lochlainn da un cantastorie di Thomas Street nel 1913, sulla melodia “It was in Dublin city”.
La canzone descrive il ballo annuale per le feste di Natale che si teneva nelle Libertà di Dublino, il quartiere popolare nella città vecchia, organizzato in Ash street dagli stracciai.
Uno dei vecchi mestieri, ma non del tutto perduto, quello dello straccivendolo, (straccino, stracciaio) detto anche cenciaiolo, cenciaio che possiamo considerare tra le prime forme di raccolta differenziata nella storia, in parallelo con la raccolta dei ferrivecchi o parallelo al mestiere di rigattiere.
A rag-and-bone man  passed through the street with his cart to collect a bit of everything, rags, glass, metals, bones and rabbit skins, but also went to empty out cellars or attics or to withdrew bulky objects, recovering the metals as copper, brass, aluminum, iron but also old magazines, fabrics or skins and paying the owners according to the goods or by weight. The ragmen were much loved by children because they exchanged candy or balls to play but also thread, needles, thimbles, combs, hair pins, soap, and other small objects or toys.

In the centuries before the twentieth century the ragman rummaged in the garbage of the streets to collect all that could be resold (or transformed to make paper)
Lo stracciaio era l’ambulante che con il suo carrettino passava per la strada a raccogliere un po’ di tutto,
stracci, vetro, metalli, ossa e pelli di coniglio, ma andava anche a svuotare cantine o solai o ritirava gli oggetti ingombranti, recuperava i metalli che si riciclavano come rame, ottone, alluminio, ferro ma anche vecchie riviste, stoffe o pelli e pagava i proprietari in base alla merce o a peso. Gli stracciai erano molto amati dai bambini perchè ricevevano in cambio delle robe vecchie delle caramelle o le biglie per giocare ma anche filo, aghi, ditali, pettini, mollette per capelli, sapone, ed altri piccoli oggetti o giocattoli.
Nei secoli precedenti al Novecento gli stracciai rovistavano nella spazzatura delle strade per raccogliere tutto quanto poteva essere rivenduto (o trasformato per fare la carta) 

Ronnie Drew from “The Dubliners’ Guide to Dublin” (I, VIII, V, IX)

Alf Edwards


I
Come listen to me for a while
Me good friends one and all
And I’ll sing to you a verse or two
About a famous ball
Now the ball was given by some friends
Who lived down Ashe Street (1)
In a certain house in the Liberties (2)
Where the ragmen (3) used to meet
II
When the names were called (4) at seven o’clock
every man was on the spot
And to show respect for the management
Every ragman brought his mot (5)
I must admit that I brought mine
At twenty five minutes to eight
And the first to stand up was Kieran Grace (6)
For to tell me I was late
III
Then up jumps Humpy Soodelum
And he says: ‘I think somehow
By the ways are all going on tonight
Is a looking for a row (7)
Now listen here, Grace if you want your face (8)
You’d better not shout or bawl
There’s a lot of hard chews
gonna be here tonight
To respect the ragman’s ball
IV
Then we all sat down to some
fish and chips (9),
and every man was there
And as a post of honour Billy Boland
took the chair
He swiped the chair and sold it to an old one in Carmen Hall
And danced on the face of poor Kieran Grace the night of the Ragman’s Ball
V
Then says my one “ou’re quare (10) one now
And Biddy you’re hard to beat”
Oh when up jumps Liza Boland
And she told her to hold her prate
Then my one made a clout at her
She missed her and hit the wall
And the two of them went in the ambulance
The night of the Ragman’s ball
VI
Just to make the thing a swell affair,
we all brought friends a few
We brought up blind Gort Whelan
and big Dan Kenny too
And the gallant Jack Tar (11) smoked his cigar,
and slipped coming through the hall
He lost a new bag and all his swag
the night of the Ragman’s Ball
VII
To keep the house alive my boys,
we brought some music too
We brought up Tommy Reynolds
and his old tin whistle too
He played that night with all his might
till coming on to dawn
But we couldn’t find many
to dance with Dan Kenny
that night at the Ragman’s Ball
VIII
Well for eating we had plenty now
As much as we could hold
We drank Brady’s Loopline porter (12)
Until round the floor we rolled
In the midst of all the confusion
Someone shouted for a song
When up jumps oul’ John Lavin and sings
‘Keep rollin’ your barrel along’
IX
Then we all sat down to some ham parings
When everything was quiet
And for broken noses I must say
We had a lovely night
Black eyes they were in great demand
Not to mention split heads and all
So if anyone wants to commit suicide
Let them come to the Ragman’s ball
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Venite ed ascoltatemi per un momento
miei buoni amici, uno per uno
e vi canterò un paio di strofe
su di una famosa festa da ballo
ora la festa fu organizzata da alcuni amici,
che vivevano ad Ash Street
in una certa casa delle Libertà,
dove gli stacciai si radunavano di solito
II
Quando i nomi furono annunciati alle sette in punto/ ogni uomo era sul posto
e per mostrare rispetto all’organizzatore
ogni stracciaio portò la sua ganza,
devo confessare che io portai la mia
alle otto e venticinque
e il primo ad alzarsi fu Kieran Grace
per dirmi che ero in ritardo
III
Poi salta su Humpy Soodelum
e dice “Penso che per
come vadano le cosa stasera
tutti vogliano far schiamazzo!
Ora ascolta qui, Grace se vuoi salvarti la faccia
faresti meglio a non urlare o a sbraitare,
ci sarà un sacco di roba
da masticare stasera
per rispettare il ballo dello stracciaio”
IV
Allora tutti ci sedemmo
per un po’ di pesce e patatine
e c’erano proprio tutti
e a capotavola era seduto
Billy Boland
rubò la sedia e la rivendette a un vecchio di Carmen Hall
e ballò sulla faccia del povero Kieran Grace,
la notte del Ballo dello Stracciaio
V
Allora mi dice la mia ganza; “Sei un tipo strambo Biddy, duro da battere”
Allora salta su Liza Boland
e le disse di tenere a freno la lingua,
così la mia ganza le tirò un ceffone
la mancò  e colpì il muro
e le due sono finite sull’ambulanza
la notte del Ballo dello Stracciaio
VI
Proprio per fare una cosa molto distinta
tutti portammo alcuni amici
portammo Gort Whelan il cieco
e Dan Kenny il grosso
e  il valoroso Jack Tar fumò il sigaro
e prese uno scivolone nel corridoio
perse la borsa nuova e tutto il suo malloppo
la notte del Ballo dello Stracciaio
VII
Per mantenere la casa in allegria, ragazzi, portammo anche della musica
portammo Tommy Reynolds
e il suo vecchio flauto
suonò quella notte con tutte le sue forze
fino all’arrivo dell’alba,
ma non ne trovammo tante
a ballare con Dan Kenny
quella notte al Ballo dello Stracciaio
VIII
Beh di mangiare ce n’era in abbondanza
quanto ne potevamo contenere
bevemmo la birra scura economica di Brady
finchè sul pavimento rotolammo
in mezzo a tutta la confusione
qualcuno urlò per una canzone
alloro salta su il vecchio John Lavin e canta
‘Keep rollin’ your barrel along’
IX
Poi ci sedemmo tutti intorno a un po’ di prosciutto quando tutto fu tranquillo,
e per i nasi rotti devo dire
che abbiamo passato una bella serata,
gli occhi neri erano molto richiesti
per non parlare delle teste rotte e del resto.
Quindi se qualcuno vuole suicidarsi
fallo venire al Ballo dello Stracciaio

NOTE
1)  the area’s placenames refer to the former trades that took place here over the centuries [i nomi dei luoghi della zona si riferiscono ai precedenti commerci che vi hanno avuto luogo nel corso dei secoli]
2) The Liberties  is the oldest district of Dublin still traditionally popular, the heart of the Auld Dublin.
The area now known as The Liberties developed to the west of the Norman city of Dublin, along the main western approach known as the Sligh Mor. In the 12th century, a royal abbey was established in the townland of Donore and given extensive estates in counties Meath, Dublin and Wicklow, including an area of its own jurisdiction and certain privileges and entitlements to regulate trade and commerce within the ‘liberty’.  And hence the name, The Liberties. At its height in the 15th century, the abbey would have formed one of the largest complexes in the city, with its main commercial throughfare – Thomas Street – lying to the north (from here)
[L’area ora conosciuta come The Liberties si sviluppò a ovest della città normanna di Dublino, lungo l’accesso occidentale principale conosciuto come Sligh Mor. Nel dodicesimo secolo fu fondata un’abbazia reale nella città di Donore e le furono date vaste proprietà nelle contee di Meath, Dublino e Wicklow, comprendenti un’area di propria giurisdizione e determinati privilegi e diritti per regolare traffici e commerci all’interno della “libertà”. E da qui il nome, The Liberties. Al suo apice nel 15 ° secolo, l’abbazia formava uno dei più grandi complessi della città, con la sua principale via commerciale – Thomas Street – situata a nord]
3) often synonymous with a beggar, the ragman was actually a trade [spesso sinonimo di mendicante, quello dello stacciaio era in realtà un mestiere]
4) in the more formal parties and gala dinners the guests were (and still are) announced by a butler (or a master of ceremonies) before entering the hall [nelle feste più formali e i pranzi di gala gli invitati erano (e sono ancora) annunciati da un maggiordomo (o un maestro delle cerimonie) prima di fare il loro ingresso nella sala]
5) Originally from the Irish maith meaning good. It became associated with ‘girl’ as a shortened form of maith an cailín – literally ‘good girl’, but used to mean girlfriend. 
Originariamente dall’irlandese maith che significa buono. Venne associato a “ragazza” come forma abbreviata d imaith an cailín – letteralmente “brava ragazza” come sinonimo di fidanzata. 
6) some names of prominent people of Dublin gentry were used with satirical intent [alcuni nomi di personaggi in vista della Dublino bene erano usati con intento satirico]
7) se ho ben compreso la frase essendo have a row= litigare
8) sottointeso : se non vuoi fare a cazzotti
9) fish and chips: a popular street food that cannot be missed at any working class gathering. We know that the product was already known in the days of Dickens, who listed it in his most famous work, “Oliver Twist” (1838), some claim that it was Italian immigrants who introducing it into the eating habits of the British and the Irish, according to others it was the Spanish.
[uno street food popolare immancabile ad ogni raduno della working class, Si sa che il prodotto era già conosciuto ai tempi di Dickens, che lo annoverò nella sua opera più celebre, “Oliver Twist” (1838), alcuni sostengono che furono gli immigrati italiani a introdurlo nelle abitudini alimentari dei britannici e degli irlandesi, secondo altri invece furono gli spagnoli.]
10) This is fairly common in the south of Ireland. It’s an odd pronunciation of “queer,” and it’s used as a replacement for “very.” Abbastanza comune nel sud dell’Irlanda. È una bizzarra pronuncia di “queer” e si usa per dire “molto”.
11) Jack Tarr is the synonym of sailor who often ends up drunk and robbed of his equipment / pay [Jack Tarr è il sinonimo di marinaio che finisce spesso ubriaco e derubato del suo equipaggiamento/paga]
12) loopline porter=cheap porter 

LINK
https://www.rte.ie/radio1/doconone/2013/0129/647331-radio-documentary-ragmans-ball-folklore-liberties-dublin-doconone/
http://www.countysongs.ie/song/night-of-the-ragmans-ball
https://wikivisually.com/wiki/The_Ragman%27s_Ball
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27067

https://libertiesdublin.ie/visit-the-liberties/history-liberties/

The Secret of Roan Inish

Cinematic transposition of the novel “Secret of the Ron Mor Skerry” by Rosalie K. Fry (1959) it tells of a blood bond between a family community of the island and the selkies. The version of the film is fairly faithful to the novel, but it transposes the story from the islands of Scotland to Ireland, both countries that still retain the same legendary tales about aquatic shapeshifters. (first part)
Trasposizione cinematografica del romanzo “Il segreto di Ron Mor Skerry” di Rosalie K. Fry (1959) si racconta di un legame di sangue tra una comunità familiare dell’isola e le selkie. La versione del film è abbastanza fedele al romanzo, ma traspone la storia dalle isole della Scozia all’Irlanda, paesi che conservano ancora le stesse storie leggendarie sui mutaforma acquatici.
(prima parte)

Selkie Song (An Mhaighdean Mhara)

The soundtrack curated by Mason Daring combines traditional pieces with compositions by the author, in particular “Selkie Song” is taken from a traditional Donegal song in Gaelic entitled “An Mhaighdean Mhara“.
La colonna sonora a cura di Mason Daring accosta brani tradizionali a composizioni dell’autore, in particolare Selkie Song è tratto da un tradizionale del Donegal dal titolo in gaelico “An Mhaighdean Mhara“.

Eileen Loughanne -Selkie Song 1994

I
Is cosuil gura bheath tu, No do rugadh tu an gcrann.
Ta an sneachta go freasach Fa a bhialainn ann.
Do shiuil bi deitil (1), Is do bhealain samh,
Suid thugaibh mEire chinnle (2), Is e an Eire naomh (3).
II
Mathairin mhilis, A duirt Maire Bhain,
Ar bharr na dtoinnti, Is ar bhruach na tra.
Mathair an bharr, Mo mhathair in ard,
Suid thugaibh mEire chinnle, Is e an Eire naomh.
III
Taimse tuirseach, Agus beidh go neal,
Mo bha ar a bhruinne, Is mo phadraic ban.
Ar bharr na dtoinnti, Is ar bhruach na tra,
Suid thugaibh mEire chinnle, Is e an Eire naomh.
English translation*
I
It seems that you have faded away
and abandoned the love of life
The snow is spread
about the mouth of the sea 
Your yellow curly hair
and your gentle mouth,
I give you Mary Kenny (2),
to swim in the Éirne (3)
II
“Sweet Mother” – said blonde Mary
On the crest of the waves,
And the opening of the strand
Maid of the Sea
my mother, my pride”
I give you Mary Kenny,
to swim in the Éirne
III
I am weary now
And soon it will be
my fair maiden
and my pale Pádraig
On the crest of the waves,
And the opening of the strand
I give you Mary Kenny,
to swim in the Éirne
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sembra che ti strugga
e abbia perso il buon umore.
La neve si accumula
all’imboccatura del mare
i tuoi riccioli biondi
e la tua dolce boccuccia
ecco Mary Kenny
che nuota nell’oceano

II
“Cara Madre -grida la bionda Maria
sulla cresta delle onde
e l’imboccatura della spiaggia-
Fanciulla del mare
mia nobile madre”
ecco Mary Kenny
che nuota nell’oceano

III
Sono stanca 
e presto accadrà
la mia bella bambina
e il mio biondo Patrick
sulla cresta delle onde
e l’imboccatura della spiaggia
ecco Mary Kenny
che nuota nell’oceano

NOTE
1) Do chúl buí daite= Your fair hair
2) la frase è una storpiatura di “Siúd chugaibh Máirí Chinidh”, Mary Cinidh= Mary Heaney or Kinney is the merrow or selkie
3) ‘s í ‘ndiaidh ‘n Éirne ‘shnámh= to swim forever in the Éirne; ) Eirne is an old word for the Atlantic [è una vecchia parola per l’Atlantico]

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sule-skerry.htm
https://thesession.org/recordings/4322