The Dreadnought shanty

Leggi in italiano

A sea song about The Dreadnought an American packet ship launched in 1853, flagship of the “Red Cross Line”, dubbed “The Wild Boat of the Atlantic”: competing companies like the Swallow Tail and the Black Ball never succeeded in exceed its performance. Yet the era of the great sailing ships was over and her life seems to be the swan song.

A red cross, the company’s logo, was drawn on her fore-topsail, and she could carry up to 200 passengers.

Montague Dawson (1890–1973) The Red Cross – ‘Dreadnought

The Dreadnought sailed into the Atlantic, mostly on the New York-Liverpoo route, to her sinking to the infamous Cape Horn after she set sail from Liverpool to San Francisco (1869).

Derry Down, Down, Derry Down

According to Stan Hugill this song was a forebitter sung on the melody known as “La Pique” or “The Flash Frigate” (which recalls “Villikins and His Dinah”). Even Kipling in his book “Captains Courageous” has it sing by fishermen on the Banks of Newfoundland.
In the capstan shanty version a longer refrain is added, sung in chorus
Bound away! Bound away! 
where the wide [wild] waters flow,
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnaught we’ll go!

The melody with which the shanty is associated is not univocal, since the “The Dom Pedro” tune is also used. The forebitter version bears the refrain of a single verse, a nonsense phrase sometimes used in the most ancient ballads. The melody is sad, looking like a lament to the memory of a famous wrecked ship; while praising her merits it’s a farewell at the time of sailing ships, now outclassed by steam ships.

Ewan MacColl

Iggy Pop & Elegant Too  from “Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys” ANTI 2013


The Dreadnoughts,
the Vancouver band took its name not from the nineteenth-century packet ship but from an innovative battle ship called “armored monocaliber” developed since the early twentieth century (Dreadnought, from English “I fear nothing”)
(stanzas I, III, IV, V)

full version (here)
I
There’s a flash packet,
a flash packet of fame,
She hails to (from) New York
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She’s bound to the westward
where the strong winds blow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the westward we go.
Derry down, down, down derry down.
II
Now, the Dreadnought
she lies in the river Mercey,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea;
Out around the Rock Light
where the salt tides do flow,
Bound away to to the westward
in the Dreadnought, we’ll go.
III (1)
(O, the Dreadnought’s a-howlin’
down the wild Irish Sea,
Her passengers merry,
with hearts full of glee,)
As sailors like lions
walk the decks to and fro,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!
 

IV (2)
O, the Dreadnought’s a-sailin’
the Atlantic so wide,
While the high roaring seas
roll along her black sides,
(With her sails tightly set
for the Red Cross to show,
She’s the Liverpool packet,
O Lord, let her go!)
V
Now, a health to the Dreadnought,
to all her brave crew,
To bold Captain Samuel (3),
his officers, too,
Talk about your flash packets,
Swallowtail and Black Ball (4),
The Dreadnaught’s the flier
that outsails them all.

NOTES
1)  TheDreadnoughts sings:
With the gale at her back/ What a sight does she make
A skippin’ so merry/With the west in her wake
2)  the Dreadnoughts sings:
With her sails tight as wires/And the Black Flag to show
All away to the Dreadnought/To the westward we’ll go
3) her first captain was called Samuel Samuels,, “In his own words: “Swearing, which appeared to me so essential in the make-up of an officer, I found degrading in a gentleman and I prohibited its indulgence. I also insisted that the crew should be justly treated by the officers.” He seems to have known when to turn a blind eye to the particular brand of justice which had to be handed out to over-troublesome “packet rats” by his mates. To the passengers and his officers he was the model of the young clipper captain, respected, well-groomed and quietly spoken, but always perfectly self-confident and calm in an emergency. The Dreadnought undoubtedly owed her conspicuous success at a difficult time to the personality of her master.(from here) the Dreadnoughts sings ” To bold captain Willy”
4) companies competing in the “Red Cross Line”

STAN HUGILL VERSION

Hulton Clint sings it on the tune “Dom Pedro.” It is the most extensive version of the previous one, with some variations

I
There’s a saucy wild packet,
a packet of fame;
She belongs to New York,
and the Dreadnought’s her name;
She is bound to the westward
where the wide water flow;
Bound away to the west’ard
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.
Chorus
Derry down, down, down derry down
II
The time of her sailing
is now drawing nigh;
Farewell, pretty maids,
we must bid you good-bye;
Farewell to old England
and all we hold dear,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll steer.
III
And now we are hauling
out of Waterlock dock,
Where the boys and the girls
on the pierheads they do flock;
They will give us their cheers
as their tears they do flow,
Saying, “God bless the Dreadnought, where’er she may go!”
IV
Now, the Dreadnought she lies
in the Mersey so free,
Waiting for the Independence
to tow her to sea,
For to around that rock light
where the Mersey does flow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
where’er we’ll go.
V
Now the Dreadnaught’s a-howling
down the wild Irish Sea,
Where the passengers are merry,
their hearts full of glee,
her sailors like tigers
walk the decks to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
VI
Now, the Dreadnought’s
a-sailing the Atlantic so wide,
While the high rolling seas
roll along her black sides,
With her topsails set taut
for the Red Cross to show
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
 

VII
Now the Dreadnought’s has reached the banks of Newfoundland,
Where the water’s so green
and the bottom so sand;
Where the fish in the waves
They swim to and fro,
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
with the ice and the snow
VIII
Now the Dreadnought’s lying
on the long .. shore
??
as we have done before
? your main topsail ?
Bound away in the Dreadnought,
to the west’ard we’ll go
IX
And now we arrived
in New York once more,
We’ll go to the land we adore,
we call for strong liquors
and merry we’ll be
Drink to the health to the Dreadnought, where’er she may be.
X
So here’s health to the Dreadnought
and all her brave crew;
To bold Captain Samuels
and his officers too.
Talk about your flash packets, Swallowtail and Black Ball,
but the Dreadnought’s
he clipper to beat one and all
XI
Now my story is finish
and my tale it is told
forgive me, old shipmates,
if you think that I’m bold;
for this song was composed
while the watch was below
and at the health
in the Dreadnought we’ll go.

LINK
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LD13.html
http://www.shippingwondersoftheworld.com/dreadnought.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/Dreadnought.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/dread.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/isingofa.htm
http://czteryrefy.pl/data/dskgrtx/teksty/eteksty/eng_flashfrigate.html
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/dreadnaught.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62355
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85200

L’empoisonneuse ancient murder ballad from France

Leggi in italiano

“Donna Lombarda” (“Dame Lombarde” means “Lady from Lombardy,”) or “Dona Bianca”  (Dame White) is perhaps the most famous of the Italian ballads, also widespread in France and French Canada (Quebec). The ballad handed down to the present day through an infinity of regional variations, tells the story of a young wife instigated by her lover to poison her husband and of a newborn baby who miraculously begins to speak to reveal the intrigue. A typical murder ballad of Celtic area with a supernatural event!(first part)

FRENCH VERSIONS

Born in the Piedmont area, soon with the title of “L’empoisonneuse “(The poisoner) or Dame Lombarde the ballad “Dona Bianca” crosses the Alps and arrives in French soil, the versions shown have the same melody (although the arrangements they can not be more different) and similar texts.

Véronique Chalot from J’ai Vu Le Loup, 1978. Medieval, dreamlike and hypnotic atmospheres and the enchanting fairy voice of Veronique
Malicorne from Colin 1975

Audrey Le Jossec-Nicolas Quemener Quartet live


Allons au bois, charmante dame
allons au bois;
Nous trouverons le serpent verde,
nous le tuerons.
Dans une pinte de vin rouge
nous le mettrons;
Quand ton mari viendra de chasse,
grand soif aura.
Tirez du vin, charmante dame,
tirez du vin!
– Oh, par ma foi, mon amant Pierre(1),
n’y a de tiré.
L’enfant du brés jamais ne parle,
a bien parlé:
– Ne buvez pas de ça, mon père,
vous en mourrez!
– Buvez ça vous, charmante dame,
buvez ça vous.
– Ah, par ma foi, mon amant Pierre,
n’a point de soif
Elle n’a pas bu demi-verre,
s’est renversée
Elle n’en a pas bu le plein verre,
a trépassé
English translation*
“Let us go to the woods, Dame Lombarde, let us go to the woods;
We will find the green serpent, and we shall slay it.
In a pint of red wine we shall place it;
When your husband returns from hunting, such thirst he will have.
Pour some wine, Dame Lombarde, pour some wine!”
“Oh, by my faith, my friend Pierre took none.”
The cradle baby never speaks, but he spoke well:
“Do not drink of it, my father—you’ll die of it.”
“You all shall drink, Dame Lombarde, drink of it.
By my faith, my friend Pierre is not thirsty.”
She drank less than half a glass, and fell over.
She did not finish a full glass, and crossed over.

NOTE
* from here
1) in the French version we see a real triangle with lover and husband who are friends and go hunting together. The woman betrays herself because she refuses to serve the poisoned wine to her lover

Different text different melody but same subject, the ballad (Haute Savoie) is sometimes entitled “The Rossignolet” (not to be confused with the title “Rossignolet du bois”)

Mireille Ben ♪


I
Rossignolet du bois joli (1)
Mais enseignez-moi donc
Mais enseignez-moi donc
Enseignez-moi de la poison
C’est pour empoisonner
C’est pour empoisonner
II
Pour empoisonner mon mari
Qui est jaloux de moi (bis)
Allez là-haut sur ces coteaux
Là vous en trouverez (bis)
III
La tête d’un serpent maudit
Là vous le couperez
Entre deux plats d’or et d’argent
Là vous la pilerez
IV
Dans une chopine de vin blanc
Là vous la verserez
Quand votre mari r’viendra des champs
Grande soif il aura
V
Il vous dira : Belle Isabeau
Apporte-moi de l’eau
Vous lui direz : c’est pas de l’eau
C’est du vin qu’il vous faut
VI
A mesure que la belle versait
Le vin il noircissait
L’enfant qui était dans son berceau
Son père avertissait
VII
Papa, papa n’en buvez pas
Ca vous ferait mourir
Il lui a dit : Belle Isabeau
T’en boiras devant moi
VIII
Oh ! non, oh ! non mon cher mari !
Oh ! non, je n’ai point soif
La mort devrait-elle y passer
La belle vous en boirez !(2)
IX
Pour la couronne du roi de France,
Oui moi je le boira et je le finirai
Ah ! que maudite soit ma voisine
De m’avoir enseigné
English translation Cattia Salto
I
Pretty nightingale of the woods
show me then
show me then
show me about the poison
It is to poison
It is to poison
II
To poison my husband
Who is jealous of me ”
“Go up there on yon hills
And there you will find it
III
The head of a cursed snake
There, you will cut it,
And between two plates of gold and silver
There, you will crush it
IV
In a pint of white wine
There, you will pour it
When your husband returns from the fields
He will have a great thirst
V
He will tell you: Bella Isabella
Bring me some water
You will tell him: it is not water
It’s some wine you need ”
VI
As the beautiful woman poured
The wine became cloudy,
The child who was in the cradle
He warned his father
VII
“Daddy, Dad, do not drink it
This will make you die! ”
He told her: “Bella Isabella
You will drink in front of me ”
VIII
“Oh! No, oh! No my dear husband!
Oh! No, I’m not really thirsty ”
“Death must pass here
Nice to drink from you! ”
IX
“”For the crown of the king of France
Yes, I will drink it and finish it.
Ah! Cursed be my neighbor
For having instructed me”

NOTES
version reported by Flavio Poltronieri
1) the revised version thus begins
Rossignolet du bois,
rossignolet sauvage,
apprends-moi ton langage,
apprends-moi-z à parler,
apprends-moi la manière
comment il faut aimer.
2) in the Piedmontese version, the husband forces his wife to show her his sword

Here is still a version that mixes the two texts but with a different ending: it is only the husband who dies from the poison
La Part du Feu from Le Vent du Nord, 2009 


I
Rossignolet du bois joli
enseigne-moi je t’en prie
Enseigne-moi de la poison
c’est pour empoisonner
II
Pour empoisonner mon mari
qui est jaloux de moi
Allez là-bas sur ces cours d’eau
là vous en trouverez
III
La tête d’un serpent méchant
là vous la couperez
Dans un grand plat d’or et d’argent là vous la pillerez
IV
Quand votre mari arrivera du champ un grand soif il aura
Il vous dira ma bonne dame
donnez-moi donc de l’eau
V
Vous lui direz mon cher mari ce n’est pas de l’eau qu’il faut
C’est bien du vin mais pas de l’eau que vous boirerez
VI
Tout pendant qu’il en buvait le vin qui noircissait
L’enfant qui était dans le berceau
son père avertissait
VII
N’en buvez pas de ce vin-là
car ça vous ferait mourir
Pour moi la mort vraie y passait la grand soif que j’avais (1)
English translation Cattia Salto
I
“Pretty nightingale of the woods
show me then
show me about the poison
It is to poison
II
To poison my husband
Who is jealous of me ”
“Go down that stream
and there you will find
III
the head of a cursed snake
you will cut it
and in a tray of gold and silver
you will crush it
IV
When your husband comes back from the fields / he will have a lot of thirst,
he will tell you – my beautiful lady,
bring me water
V
And you will tell him – my dear husband/ you do not need water
but of wine, it is not water
what you will drink- ”
VI
While he was drinking
the wine became cloudy
and the infant who was in the cradle
he warned his father
VII
“Do not drink that wine
that will make you die! ”
But the thirst I had
he killed me

NOTES
1) it is the poisoned husband who bears the testimony of his death

LINK
http://faculty.complit.illinois.edu//rrushing/Kithara/Notes/Entries/2011/10/23_Dame_Lombarde.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=42932

Dame Lombarde

Read the post in English

Donna Lombarda (Dona Bianca) è forse la più famosa delle ballate italiane, diffusa anche in Francia e Canada francese (Quebec). La ballata tramandata fino ai giorni nostri attraverso un’infinità di varianti regionali, narra la storia di una giovane moglie istigata dall’amante ad avvelenare il marito e di un neonato che miracolosamente comincia a parlare per rivelare l’intrigo. Una tipica murder ballad di area celtica con tanto di evento soprannaturale! (prima parte)

LE VERSIONI FRANCESI

Nata in area piemontese, ben presto con il titolo di L’empoisonneuse (in italiano L’avvelenatrice) o Dame Lombarde la ballata “Dona Bianca”  attraversa le Alpi e arriva in terra francese, le  versioni riportate hanno stessa melodia (anche se gli arrangiamenti non possono essere più diversi) e testi simili.

Véronique Chalot in J’ai Vu Le Loup, 1978. Atmosfere medievali, oniriche e ipnotiche e la voce da fata incantatrice
Malicorne in Colin 1975

Audrey Le Jossec-Nicolas Quemener Quartet live


Allons au bois, charmante dame
allons au bois;
Nous trouverons le serpent verde,
nous le tuerons.
Dans une pinte de vin rouge
nous le mettrons;
Quand ton mari viendra de chasse,
grand soif aura.
Tirez du vin, charmante dame,
tirez du vin!
– Oh, par ma foi, mon amant Pierre(1),
n’y a de tiré.
L’enfant du brés jamais ne parle,
a bien parlé:
– Ne buvez pas de ça, mon père,
vous en mourrez!
– Buvez ça vous, charmante dame,
buvez ça vous.
– Ah, par ma foi, mon amant Pierre,
n’a point de soif
Elle n’a pas bu demi-verre,
s’est renversée
Elle n’en a pas bu le plein verre,
a trépassé
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
“Andiamo nel bosco, bella dama
andiamo nel bosco
e troveremo un serpente verde
e lo uccideremo.
Dentro a un litro di vino rosso
lo metteremo;
quando tuo marito tornerà dalla caccia
avrà tanta sete.”
“Mescete il vino, bella dama,
mescete il vino”
“In fede mia, al mio amato Pierre
non lo mescerò.”
Il bambino in fasce che non parla
si mette a parlare
“Non bere, padre mio
voi morrete!”
“Bevete voi, bella dama
bevete voi”
“In fede mia, amato Pierre mio
non ho sete.”
Bevve nemmeno mezzo bicchiere
che stramazzò
bevve nemmeno un bicchiere pieno
che morì

NOTE
1) nella versione francese vediamo un vero e proprio triangolo con amante e marito che sono amici e vanno a caccia insieme. La donna si tradisce perchè rifiuta di servire il vino avvelenato all’amante

Diverso testo  diversa melodia  ma stesso soggetto, la ballata (Alta Savoia) è talvolta intitolata “The Rossignolet” (da non confondersi con il titolo “Rossignolet du bois”)

Mireille Ben ♪


I
Rossignolet du bois joli (1)
Mais enseignez-moi donc
Mais enseignez-moi donc
Enseignez-moi de la poison
C’est pour empoisonner
C’est pour empoisonner
II
Pour empoisonner mon mari
Qui est jaloux de moi (bis)
Allez là-haut sur ces coteaux
Là vous en trouverez (bis)
III
La tête d’un serpent maudit
Là vous le couperez
Entre deux plats d’or et d’argent
Là vous la pilerez
IV
Dans une chopine de vin blanc
Là vous la verserez
Quand votre mari r’viendra des champs
Grande soif il aura
V
Il vous dira : Belle Isabeau
Apporte-moi de l’eau
Vous lui direz : c’est pas de l’eau
C’est du vin qu’il vous faut
VI
A mesure que la belle versait
Le vin il noircissait
L’enfant qui était dans son berceau
Son père avertissait
VII
Papa, papa n’en buvez pas
Ca vous ferait mourir
Il lui a dit : Belle Isabeau
T’en boiras devant moi
VIII
Oh ! non, oh ! non mon cher mari !
Oh ! non, je n’ai point soif
La mort devrait-elle y passer
La belle vous en boirez !(2)
IX
Pour la couronne du roi de France,
Oui moi je le boira et je le finirai
Ah ! que maudite soit ma voisine
De m’avoir enseigné
Traduzione italiana Flavio Poltronieri
I
“Usignolo del bosco grazioso
Istruitemi dunque
Istruitemi dunque
Istruitemi sul veleno
E’ per avvelenare
E’ per avvelenare
II
Per avvelenare mio marito
Che è geloso di me”
“Andate lassù su queste colline
E là ne troverete
III
La testa di un serpente maledetto
Là, la taglierete,
E tra due piatti d’oro e d’argento
Là, la pesterete
IV
In una pinta di vino bianco
Là, lo verserete
Quando vostro marito tornerà dai campi
Avrà una gran sete
V
Vi dirà: Bella Isabella
Portatemi dell’acqua
Voi gli direte: non è dell’acqua
E’ del vino che avete bisogno”
VI
Man mano che la bella versava
Il vino s’intorbidiva,
Il bambino che era nella culla
Avvertì suo padre
VII
“Papà, papà non bevetene
Questo vi farà morire!”
Lui le ha detto: “Bella Isabella
Tu ne berrai davanti di me”
VIII
“Oh! No, oh! No mio caro marito!
Oh! No, io non ho proprio sete”
“La morte dovrà passare di quà
Bella bevetene voi!”
IX
“Per la corona del re di Francia
Si, lo berrò e lo finirò.
Ah! Maledetta sia la mia vicina
Per avermi istruito “

NOTE
versione segnalata da Flavio Poltronieri
1) la versione rivisitata così inizia
Rossignolet du bois,
rossignolet sauvage,
apprends-moi ton langage,
apprends-moi-z à parler,
apprends-moi la manière
comment il faut aimer.
2) nella versione piemontese il marito costringe la moglie mostrandole la spada

Ecco ancora  una versione che mescola i due testi ma con finale diverso: è solo il marito a morire per il veleno
La Part du Feu in Le Vent du Nord, 2009 


I
Rossignolet du bois joli
enseigne-moi je t’en prie
Enseigne-moi de la poison
c’est pour empoisonner
II
Pour empoisonner mon mari
qui est jaloux de moi
Allez là-bas sur ces cours d’eau
là vous en trouverez
III
La tête d’un serpent méchant
là vous la couperez
Dans un grand plat d’or et d’argent là vous la pillerez
IV
Quand votre mari arrivera du champ un grand soif il aura
Il vous dira ma bonne dame
donnez-moi donc de l’eau
V
Vous lui direz mon cher mari ce n’est pas de l’eau qu’il faut
C’est bien du vin mais pas de l’eau que vous boirerez
VI
Tout pendant qu’il en buvait le vin qui noircissait
L’enfant qui était dans le berceau
son père avertissait
VII
N’en buvez pas de ce vin-là
car ça vous ferait mourir
Pour moi la mort vraie y passait la grand soif que j’avais (1)
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
“Usignolo del bosco gaio
mostratemi vi prego
mostratemi il veleno
per avvelenare
II
per avvelenare mio marito
che è geloso di me!”
“Scendete per quel corso d’acqua
e là troverete
III
la testa di un serpente maledetto
la teglierete
e dentro a un vassoio d’oro e d’argento la pesterete
IV
Quando vostro marito tornerà dai campi avrà tanta sete,
vi dirà – mia bella dama,
portami dell’acqua-
V
E voi gli direte – mio caro marito
non di acqua hai bisogno
ma di l vino, non è l’acqua
che berrete-”
VI
Mentre beveva
il vino diventava torbido
e l’infante che stava nella culla
avvertì suo padre
VII
“Non bere quel vino
che vi farà morire!”
Ma la tanta  sete che avevo
mi uccise

NOTE
1) è il marito avvelenato a recare la testimonianza della sua morte

FONTI
http://faculty.complit.illinois.edu//rrushing/Kithara/Notes/Entries/2011/10/23_Dame_Lombarde.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=42932

Donna Lombarda: a murder ballad from Italy

Leggi in italiano

“Donna Lombarda” (“Dame Lombarde” means “Lady from Lombardy,”) or “Dona Bianca”  (Dame White) is perhaps the most famous of the Italian ballads, also widespread in France and French Canada (Quebec). The ballad handed down to the present day through an infinity of regional variations, tells the story of a young wife instigated by her lover to poison her husband and of a newborn baby who miraculously begins to speak to reveal the intrigue. A typical murder ballad of Celtic area with a supernatural event!

Costantino Nigra considers “Donna Lombarda” originally from Piedmont and, according to the belief of the time that the ancient folk ballads reported the historical events dating back to the Middle Ages, identifies the woman in the Queen of the Lombards, Rosmunda; here is the legend, as the chronicle reported by Paul Deacon in the Historia Longobardorum: in 572 the daughter of the kings of the Gepids (ancient Pannonia) taken in marriage by the kings of the Lombards Alboin as “war trophy” organized the plot for killing her husband in favor of his lover Elmichi. However, the attempt to usurpation was unsuccessful and Rosmunda and Elmichi fled to Ravenna (together with part of the Longobard treasure). In Ravenna the two got married but Rosmunda had not lost the vice of infidelity, so soon after she tried to kill her second husband with the classic system so much advertised in the folk ballads: the poisoned food. Elmichi noticed the poison as he drank from the cup and forced Rosmunda to drink with him, thus they died killed by the same potion!

Queen Eleanor - Anthony Frederick Augustus Sandys 1858
Queen Eleanor – Anthony Frederick Augustus Sandys 1858

The Ballad: DONNA LOMBARDA

Probably the ballad “Dame Lombard” is not so ancient but it is spread in a large area from the North to the South of Italy. The textual and melodic versions change and the lyrics are adapted to the various dialects or rendered in an Italian so to speak “popular”, collected and classified here only in a small part.

NORTH-ITALY VERSIONS

The ballad with the title of “Dona Bianca”  is based on dialogues between the protagonists: the unfaithful wife, the lover, the husband and the child prodigy (because he speaks from the cradle while being newborn) . Yet an ancient noble context emerges in a few words : the husband returns from the hunt, preferred pastime by the medieval aristocracy, the garden where to find the snake is of a nobleman, the same name “Madonna” is a medieval term that is wife of a “dominus”.

La Lionetta (this song appears in several recordings, the first is in the album “Dances and Ballads of the Italian Celtic Area” Shirak, 1978) The version comes from Asti where it was collected by R. Leydi and F. Coggiola


O vòstu v’tti o dona Bianca
o vòstu v’nial ballo cun mi?
O si si si che mi a v ‘niria
ma j’o paura del me mari
Va n ‘tei giardino del mio galante(1)
la ié la testa dal serpentin
E ti t lu pie t lo piste in póer
e poi t’iu bute hit’un bicier ad vin
E so mari veti cà d’la cassa
o dona Bianca jo tanta sei
Ma va di là ‘nt’ la botejera
la jé un bicier dal vin pi bum
El cit enfant l’era ant’la cuna
papa papa beiv pò lulì
che la mamina vói fete muri
O beivlu ti o dona Bianca
se no t’lu fas beive a fil da spà
O si si si che mi lo bevria
ma jó paura d’ie mie masnà(2)
English translation  Cattia Salto
Do you want to come, Dame White ,
Do you want to come to the dance with me? “/”I’d like to come,
but I’m afraid of my husband.”
“Go to the garden of my gallant
there is the head of a serpent
and you take it and reduce it to dust
and then put it in a glass of wine ”
And the husband comes home from hunting/”O Dame White I am so thirsty”
“Go over to the cellar
there is a glass of the best wine ”
The little baby who was in the cradle/ “Daddy, daddy do not drink it
because mom wants to make you die ”
“Drink it yourself Dame White
otherwise I force you to drink with my sword “/ “Or yes, I would drink it,
but I fear for my children ”

NOTE
1) “galante” stands for a gentleman, a noble courtier; in other versions the garden is of the mother or the father of the woman
2) the woman tries to escape death by invoking her role as a mother. But the ballad is not complete, we can only imagine that the woman, forced by the sword to drink from the glass, dies poisoned!

In this other version coming from the land of “Quattro Province” the context is more direct and popular, instead of the invitation to the court ball, the man asks to have sex and the husband is back from work in the fields; but the ending is more complete both in the description of the woman’s death by poisoning that in the moralizing closing sentence.

Barabàn from Baraban 1994, text version collected in the field by the voice of Angelina Papa (1908), rice-worker of Sannazzaro de ‘Burgondi (Pavia)


Dona lombarda dona lombarda
fuma a l’amur fuma a l’amur
Mi no mi no o sciur cavaliere
che mi ‘l marito gh’i l’ò giamò
Là int’al giardino del mio bèl padre
si gh’è la testa dal serpentìn
la ciaparemo la pistaremo
fum ‘na butiglia dal noster bon vin
A vegn a cà ‘l sò marì d’in campagna
dona lombarda g’ò tanta set
O guarda lì int’la cardensola
gh’è una butiglia dal noster bon vin
L’è salta sù ‘l fantulìn de la cüna
bevalo nein bevalo nein
Cosa vuol dire dona lombarda
al noster bon vin l’è un po’ tulberì
Sarà la pulvara d’la cardensola
cà la fà ‘gnì un po’ tulberì
Dona lombarda dona lombarda
al noster bon vin t’la bévare ti
La prima guta che lu ‘l g’a dato
le la cumìncia a cambià i culur
secunda guta che la beviva
in tèra morta sì l’è cascà
Dona lombarda dona lombarda
arrivederci in paradìs
tà s’ta scardiva de fag’la ai alter
e ta t’le fada di ‘m bèla per tì
English translation  Cattia Salto
“Dame Lombarde, Dame Lombarde
let’s make love, let’s make love. ”
“Not me, not me, sir knight
that I have a husband already. ”
“There in the garden of my good father
there is the head of a pretty snake.
We’ll take it, we’ll crush it
in a bottle of our good wine. ”
Her husband comes house from fields
“Lombard woman, I am so thirsty”
“Oh, look there in the cupboard
there is a bottle of our good wine ”
the baby jumped on from the cradle:
“Do not drink it, do not drink it!”
“What does it mean, Dame Lombarde,
that our good wine is a little cloudy? ”
“It will be the dust of the cupboard
which makes it a little cloudy ”
Dame Lombarde, Dame Lombarde
our good wine, drink it! ”
After the first sip,
she begins to turn pale,.
after the second
she falled to the ground, dead.
“Dame Lombarde, Dame Lombarde
see you in Heaven!
You thought you were betraying others and you did it yourself. ”

Davide Bortolai from Ballate Lombarde 2007 (a remake very similar to the French version of the Malicorne)

The version from Venice has become a sort of “standard” supra-regional version

Giovanna Iris Daffini called “Callas of the Poor” in the text re-elaboration of Gualtiero Bertelli (founder of the Canzoniere Popolare Veneto)

 Francesco De Gregori & Giovanna Marini  from “Il fischio del vapore” – 2002 (Rome)

Fabrizio Poggi & Turututela fromCanzoni popolari 2002 (Pavia)

Le tre versioni testuali sono abbastanza simili, si riporta quella di Gualtiero Bertelli:


“Amami me che sono re”
“non posso amarti tengo marì”
“Tuo marito fallo morire, t’insegnerò come devi far:
Vai nell’orto del tuo buon padre taglia la testa di un serpentin
Prima la tagli e poi la schiacci
e poi la metti dentro nel vin”
Ritorna a casa il marì dai camp
” Donna Lombarda oh che gran sé”
“Bevilo bianco bevilo nero
bevilo pure come vuoi tu”
“Cos’è sto vino così giallino?”
“Sarà l’avanzo di ieri ser”
Ma un bambino di pochi mesi sta nella culla e vuole parlar
“O caro padre non ber quel vino
Donna Lombarda l’avvelenò”
“Bevilo tu o Donna Lombarda
tu lo berrai e poi morirai”
“E per amore del Re di Spagna
io lo berrò e poi morirò”
La prima goccia che lei beveva
lei malediva il suo bambin
Seconda goccia che lei beveva
lei malediva il suo marì
English translation  Cattia Salto
“Love me I’m a king”
“I can not love you I have a husband”
“Your husband will die, I will teach you how you must do:
Go to the garden of your good father cut the head of a snake
First cut it and then crush it and then put it in the wine ”
The husband returns from the fields
“Dame Lombarde I am so thirsty”
“Drink a withe wine, drink a red wine, drink it as you want”
“What is this wine so yellow?”
“it will be last night’s surplus”
But a child of a few months is in the cradle and wants to talk
“O dear father do not drink that wine
for Lombard Woman poisoned it”
“Drink it you Dame Lombarde
you will drink it and then you will die”
“And for love of the King of Spain
I will drink it and then I will die”
The first  sip she drank
was cursing her baby
after the second
she cursed her husband

CENTRAL-ITALY VERSIONS

Angelo Branduardi & Scintille di musica (Mantuan area) the version of Branduardi is shorter compared to the recording of Bruno Pianta collected by Andreina Fortunati of Villa Garibaldi (MN), 1975 (for the extended version here) The song is accompanied by the hurdy-gurdy, a typical popular instrument from the Middle Ages.


Donna lombarda, donna lombarda,
Ameme mì.
Cos volt che t’ama che ci ho il marito
Che lu ‘l mi vuol ben.
Vuoi vhe t’insegna a farlo morire
T’insegnerò mi.
Va co’ dell’orto del tuo buon padre
Là c’è un serpentin.
Vien cà il marito tutto assetato
Và a trar quel vin(1).
Ed un bambino di pochi anni
Lu l’ha palesà.
O caro padre non bere quel vino
Che l’è avvelenà.
Donna lombarda, bevi quel vino,
che l’è avvelenà. (2)
English translation  Cattia Salto
“Dame Lombarde, Dame Lombarde
love me ”
“How can I love you? I have a husband
who loves me”
“Do you want to teach you for killing him?/ I’ll teach you .
Go to the bottom of your good father’s garden,/ there is a little snake. ”
A thirsty husband comes home,
goes to get some wine.
But a child of a few years
he revealed it.
“O dear father, do not drink that wine
that is poisoned. ”
“Lombard woman, drink that wine,
that is poisoned. ”

NOTE
1) Branduardi skips the part where the woman crushes the head of the snake and puts it in the bottle of the best wine, as well as the fact that the husband knows how the wine is more turbid.
2) the ending


“Sol per amore del re di Francia,
sol per amore, del re di Francia io lo beverò
e poi morirò.”
Ogni goccino che lei beveva,
ogni goccino,che lei beveva: ”addio marì,
ciao marì”.
La s’intendeva da farla agli altri
la s’intendeva, da farla agli altri
la s’ l’è fata a le’
la s’ l’è fata a le’.
English translation  Cattia Salto
“I will drink it only for the love of the king of France,
I will drink it only for the love of the king of France,/and then I will die. ”
Every little drop that she drank
every little drop she drank: “farewell my husband.
Hi husband. ”
She really believed she was doing it to others
she really believed she was doing it to others
but she did it to herself
but she did it to herself

Caterina Bueno (Pistoia and Maremma area)
Franco Pacini

Riccardo Tesi & Maurizio Geri

The version was collected in 1979 by Franco Pacini (from Regina Innocenti of Pistoia) and was proposed by Caterina Bueno, who at the time continued to discover and cultivate young musicians of both popular and classical training.


– Donna lombarda, perché non m’ami?
Donna lombarda, perché non m’ami? –
– Perché ho marì.
Perché ho marì. –
– Se ciài il marito, fallo morire,
se ciài il marito, fallo morire,
t’insegnerò;
t’insegnerò:
Laggiù nell’orto del signor padre,
Laggiù nell’orto del signor padre
che c’è un serpèn
che c’è un serpèn
Piglia la testa di quel serpente,
piglia la testa di quel serpente,
pestàla ben,
pestàla ben.
Quando l’avrai bell’e pestata,
quando l’avrai bell’e pestata,
dagliela a be’,
dagliela a be’
Torna il marito tutto assetato,
torna il marito tutto assetato:
chiede da be’,
chiede da be’.
– Marito mio, di quale vuoi?
Marito mio, di quale vuoi?
Del bianco o il ne’?
Del bianco o il ne’? –
– Donna lombarda, darmelo bianco.
Donna lombarda, darmelo bianco:
ché leva la se’
ché leva la se’.
Donna lombarda, che ha questo vino?
Donna lombarda, che ha questo vino
Che l’è intorbé,
Che l’è intorbé?
– Saranno i troni dell’altra notte,
saranno i troni dell’altra notte,
che l’ha intorbé
che l’ha intorbé
S’alza un bambino di pochi mesi,
s’alza un bambino di pochi mesi:
– Babbo non lo be’
che c’è il velen
– Donna lombarda, se c’è il veleno,
Donna lombarda, se c’è il veleno,
lo devi be’ te,
lo devi ber te’.
English translation Cattia Salto
“Dame Lombarde why you dont’ love me?
“Because I have an husband.
Because I have an husband.”
“If you have an husband, we’ll make him die!
I’ll show you
I’ll show you
At the end of your father garden,
At the end of your father garden
you’ll find a snake
you’ll find a snake
cut the snake’s head,
cut the snake’s head
and crush it well
crush it well
When you’ll crush it well
When you’ll crush it well
you’ll offer (the poison) to your husband as a drink,
you’ll offer (the poison) to your husband as a drink.”
Her thirsty husband comes home,
Her thirsty husband comes home,
asking for some wine
asking for some wine.
“dear husband which you want?
dear husband which you want?
White or red?
White or red?”
“Dame Lombarde give me some white wine,
that removes my thirst
Dame Lombarde what has this wine?
It’s all torbid
It’s all torbid!”
The little baby speaks
The little baby speaks:
“Daddy don’t drink it,
that it is poisoned”
“Dame Lombarde if there is some poison
Dame Lombarden if there is some poison
you must drink it first
you must drink it first”

second part (french version)

LINK
https://homepage.univie.ac.at/helmut.satzinger/Wurzelverzeichnis/donnalomb.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=en&id=42932 http://goccedinote.blogspot.it/2012/05/donna-lombarda-testo-commento-e-video.html http://www.aess.regione.lombardia.it/percorsi/ canto_narrativo/canti/donna_lombarda/home.htm http://www.canzonierescout.it/g34.pdf http://www.umbc.edu/eol/magrini/mag-mus2.html http://www.webalice.it/macchiavelli/da_xoom/ donna_lombarda_malcapi_TTBB.pdf http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/739356?uid=3738296&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&sid=21103845500141 http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/folkways/FW04482.pdf

Paddy Lay Back: take a turn around the capstan

Leggi in italiano

Paddy Lay Back is a kilometer sea shanty, variant wedge, sung by sailors both as a recreational song and as a song to the winch to raise the anchor (capstan shanty).

Stan Hugill in his “Shanties from the Seven Seas”, testifies a long version with about twenty stanzas (see), here only those sung by himself for the album ” “Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail”, 1980: “It was both a forebitter and a capstan song and a very popular one too, especially in Liverpool ships. […] It is a fairly old song dating back to the Mobile cotton hoosiers and has two normal forms: one with an eight-line verse – this was the forebitter form; and the second with a four-line verse – the usual shanty pattern. Doerflinger gives a two-line verse pattern as the shanty – a rather unusual form, and further on in his book he gives the forebitter with both four- and eight-line verses. He gives the title of the shanty as Paddy, Get Back and both his versions of the forebitter as Mainsail Haul. Shay, Sampson and Bone all suggest that it was a fairly modern sea-song and give no indication that any form was sung as a shanty, but all my sailing-ship acquaintances always referred to it as a shanty, and it was certainly sung in the Liverpool-New York Packets as such – at least the four-line verse form. […] Verses from 11 onwards [of the 19 verses given, incl. v. 3, lines 1-4 above] are fairly modern and nothing to do with the Packet Ship seamen, but with the chorus of ‘For we’re bound for Vallaparaiser round the Horn’ are what were sung by Liverpool seamen engaged in the West Coast Guano Trade.” (Stan Hugill)
(all the strings except III)
Stan Hugill

Nils BrownAssassin’s Creed Rogue   (I, II, III, V, VI)

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord (Christ) I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
‘Bout ship’s stations, boys,
be handy (be handy)! (2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’ (5),
To stand by the comin’ of a storm.
IV
Now some of our fellers had bin drinkin’,
An’ I meself wuz heavy on the booze;
An’ I wuz on me ol’ sea-chest a-thinkin’
I’d turn into me bunk an’ have a snooze.
V
I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore,
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ (calling) at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’
VI
‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw you,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart feel sick an’ sore.
VII
There wuz Spaniards an’ Dutchmen an’ Rooshians,
An’ Johnny Crapoos jist acrosst from France;
An’ most o’ ‘em couldn’t speak a word o’ English,
But answered to the name of ‘Month’s Advance’.
VIII
I knew that in me box I had a bottle,
By the boardin’-master ‘twas put there;
An’ I wanted something for to wet me throttle,
Somethin’ for to drive away dull care.
IX
So down upon me knees I went like thunder,
Put me hand into the bottom o’ the box,
An’ what wuz me great surprise an’ wonder,
Found only a bottle o’ medicine for the pox

NOTES
1) pawl – short bar of metal at the foot of a capstan or close to the barrel of a windlass which engage a serrated base so as to prevent the capstan or windlass ‘walking back’. […] The clanking of the pawls as the anchor cable was hove in was the only musical accompaniment a shanty ever had! (Hugill, Shanties 414)
2)  it is a typical expression in maritime songs
3) limey – The origin of the Yanks calling English sailors ‘Limejuicers’ […] was the daily issuing of limejuice to British crews when they had been a certain number of days at sea, to prevent scurvy, according to the 1894 Merchant Shipping Act (Hugill, Shanties 54)
4) the sailor has spent all the advance on high-alcohol drinking
5) A storm-cone is a visual signalling device made of black-painted canvas designed to be hoisted on a mast – if apex upwards, a gale is expected from the North, if from the South, apex downward. The storm cone was devised by Rear Admiral Robert Fitzroy, former commander of HMS Beagle, head of a department of the Board of Trade known today simply as the Met Office, and inventor of weather forecasts.
“In 1860 he devised a system of issuing gale warnings by telegraph to the ports likely to be affected. The message contained of a list of places with the words:
‘North Cone’ or ‘South Cone’ – for northerly or southerly gales respectively
‘Drum’  – for when further gales were expected,
Drum and North/South Cone’ – for particularly heavy gales or storms. ” (from herei) (see more)

FOLK VERSION: Valparaiso Round the Horn

For his title the song has become a traditional Irish song, a popular drinking song, connected to equally popular jigs (eg Irish washer woman)! Also known as “The Liverpool song” and “Valparaiso Round the Horn”. Among the favorite pirate song of course!

The Wolfe Tones from “Let The People Sing” 1972 make a folk version that has become the standard of a classic irish drinking song
The Irish Rovers live
Sons Of Erin

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary (frosty) mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office I went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
About ships for England boys be handy(2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser
‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) “the Hotspur”
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
There were Frenchmen, there were Germans, there were Russians
And there was Jolly Jacques came just across from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they’d answer to the name of Bill or Dan
IV
I woke up in the morning sick and sore (5)
I wished I’d never sailed away again
Then a voice it came thundering thru’ the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name
V
I wish that I was in the Jolly Sailor (6)
With Molly or with Kitty on me knee
Now I see most any men are sailors
And with me flipper I wipe away my tears

NOTES
1) see above
2) or Bout ship’s stations, boys
3) see above
4) see above
5) a euphemism to describe the hangover
6) the name varies at the discretion of the singer

 LINK
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/paddy-lay-back/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/PaddyLayBack/hugill.html
https://maritime.org/chanteys/paddy-lay-back.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/12/36-paddy-lay-back.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddylay.html

We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!

Leggi in italiano

“We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”, the title of a popular albeit short sea shanty, it means much more than its literal translation.

IS PADDY DOYLE  A BOARDING MASTER..

According to Stan Hugill, Paddy Doyle is the prototype of the boarding masters: Joanna Colcord misidentifies him with Paddy West. (see first part)

Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, that provide ” accommodation and boarding “. Often they welcome the sailors “on credit.” On the advance received by the boarders at the time of enrollment, they refer to food and lodging, and with the rest they provide their clothing and equipment of poor quality “. (Italo Ottonello).

Sailors then usually purchased a sea bag with dungarees, oilskins, sea boots, belt, sheath, knife and a pound of tobacco from the boarding master.
So the first month (or the first months depending on the advance) the sailor works to pay the boarding master, “We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”

a typical boarding house of Liverpool

OR A COBBLER?

According to other interpretations Paddy Doyle was a good Liverpool shoemaker “known to all the “packet rats”* sailing out of that port for the excellency of his sea-boots, and beloved for his readiness to trust any of the boys for the price of a pair when they were outward bound across “the big pond.” (Fred H. Buryeson)
* slang term for sailors

SEA SHANTY

Perfect shanty for short haulers, used expressly to collect the sails on the yard or to tighten them.

The song is short because the work does not last long. Thus wrote A.L. Lloyd “This is one of the few shanties reserved for bunting the fore or mainsail. Men aloft, furling the sail, would bunch the canvas in their hands till it formed a long bundle, the ‘bunt’. To lift the bunt on to the yard, in order to lash it into position, required a strong heave. Bunt shanties differ from others in that they employed fewer voices, and were sung in chorus throughout. Paddy Doyle, the villain of this shanty, was a Liverpool boarding house keeper.” and he continues in another comment The men stand aloft on foot-ropes and, leaning over the yard, the grab the bunched-up sail and try to heave the ‘sausage’ of canvas on to the yard, preparatory to lashing it in a furled position. The big heave usually comes on the last word of the verse, sometimes being sung as ‘Pay Paddy Doyle his his hup!’ But if the canvas was wet and heavy, and several attempts were going to be needed before the sail was bunted

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag

The Clancy Brothers&Tommy Makem

Paul Clayton who adds the verse  “For the crusty old man on the poop”

To me Way-ay-ay yah!(1)
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle(2) for his boots!
We’ll all drink whiskey(3) and gin!
We’ll all shave under the chin!
We’ll all throw mud at the cook(4)!
The dirty ol’ man’s on the poop! (5)
We’ll bouse (6) her up and be done!
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots! (7)

NOTES
1) a non sense line than other versions such as “Yes (yeo), aye, and we’ll haul, aye”. The strongest accent falls on the last syllable of the verse that corresponds to the tear-off maneuver for hoisting a sail
2) In other versions are used more sea terms and inherent to the sailor work: We’ll tauten the bunt, and we’ll be furl, aye; We’ll bunt up the sail with a fling, aye ; We’ll skin the ol’ rabbit an’ haul, aye.
3) or brandy
4) figure of speech to insult or talk badly
5) poop means both stern-aft and shit
6) bouse= nautical term its meanings: 1) To haul in using block and tackle. 2) To secure something by wrapping with small stuff. 3) To haul the anchor horizontal and secure it so that it is clear of the bow wave.In the context the reference is to the sail that is collected in a ‘bunt’, it is raised to fix it to the yard
7)In the context of the shanty the sailor complains of food and discipline and also having to pay Paddy Doyle for his poor equipment!

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/paddyd.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddydoyle.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=135246
http://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html

Paddy West sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

A nineteenth-century rogue gallery of the sea inevitably includes also boarding house keeper (boarding masters) who were at the same time owners of pensions for sailors, to whom they provided lodging and boarding.
Most of them “encouraged” the sailor who had just landed with a pocket full of wages,lodging and feeding him in his propensity to drink with a lot of poor whiskey. After a couple of weeks of treatment the victim had run out of money and had to accept as soon as possible to embark again; at the time of signing the sailor received an advance equal to three months of pay in the form of promissory notes and our letch bought them at a discounted price, usually forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind: it was the sailor in fact to have to buy the necessary personal gear for the job and obviously the master of boarding was in league with the supplier and the value of the goods had doubled. The sailor was so double-plucked, upon arrival and departure!
But the most notorious names such as Rapper Brown, Shanghai Brown, Jack Ratcliff or Jackie Brown were scoundrels who hired some thieves or whores to steal from sailors just landed, taking advantage of their drunkenness, after which their gang took sailors back on board unconscious and the boarding master pocketed their advance.
This fraudulent enlistment was called shanghaiing and was mainly practiced in the north-west of the United States. The men who ran this “men’s trade” were called “crimps” and had no qualms to drug the beer of the victim with laudanum.

The authorities on the other hand were willing to turn a blind eye, because the mercantile companies needed to have sailors always available for the hardest work (like the whaling ship) and the most unfavorable routes as those of the Arctic seas.

PADDY WEST

A jesting forebitter / capstan shanty about a famous  boarding master of Liverpool, Stan Hugill says Padyy West (aka Paddy Doyle) was a “real live personage” in Great Howard Street.
Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
Our Paddy to pocket a higher advance, he had invented an imaginative training school for sailors and transformed in a few days the novices in “able seamen”, so “Paddy Wester” is for a incapable sailor.

The British sailor’s uniform, regulated by the British Admiralty, dates back only to 1875, standardizing the uniform blue jacket and white trousers; even the commercial line companies were distinguished by the uniforms worn by the whole crew

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd from  Blow Boys Blow, 1957
A.L. Lloyd commented in the notes: “Mr West is a redoubtable figure in the folklore of the sea. He was a Liverpool boarding-house keeper in the latter days of sail, who provided ship captains with crews, as a side-line. He would guarantee that every man he supplied had crossed the Line and been round the Horn several times. In order to say so with a clear conscience, he gave greenhorns a curious course in seamanship, described in this jesting ballad. It was a great favourite with “Scouse” (Liverpool) sailors.
The sea literature of the nineteenth century is larded with tales of shanghaied seamen and corrupt boarding-house masters, who sent many a green hand to sea, swearing that they were experienced sailors. The most notorious was Paddy West, a Liverpool Irishman, who hat his fake seamen step across and old rope and walk around a cow’s horn so that he could claim that they had “crossed the line and rounded the horn.”

The tune is Tramps and Hawkers


I
Oh, as I was a-walkin’ down London Road (1),
I come to Paddy West’s house,
He gave me a feed of American hash and he called it Liverpool scouse.
He said, “There’s a ship that’s wantin’ hands,
and on her you quickly sign.
her mate is a bastard, the bosun’s worse, but she will suit you fine.”
Chorus (after each verse):
Take off your dungaree jackets (2)
and give yourselves a rest,

And we’ll think on them cold nor’westers that we had at Paddy West’s.
II
Well, when I’d had a feed, my boys,
the wind began to blow;
He sent me up in the attic,
the main-royal for to stow.
But when I got up in the attic,
no main-royal could I find,
So I turned around to the window
and I furled the window blind (3).
III
Now Paddy he piped all hands on deck, their stations for to man (4).
His wife stood in the doorway
with a bucket in her hand;
And Paddy sings out, “Now let ‘er rip (5)!” and she flung the water our way,
Sayin’, “Clew up (6) your fore t’gan’sl, boys, she’s takin’ in the spray!”
IV
Now seein’ we’re off to the south’ard, boys, to Frisco we was bound,
Old Paddy he called for a length of rope and he laid it on the ground.
And we all stepped over and back again, and he says to me, “That’s fine,
Now when they ask if you’ve been to sea, you can say you’ve crossed the Line (7)”
V
“Now there’s only one thing for you to do, before you sail away,
That’s to step around the table,
where the bullock’s horn do lay.
And when they ask you, ‘Were you ever at sea?’,
you can say, ’Ten times ‘round the Horn (8).’
And Bejesus, you’re a sailor since
the day that you was born.”
Last chorus:
Put on your dungaree jacket,
and walk out lookin’ your best,

And tell ‘em you’re an old sailor man that’s come from Paddy West’s.

NOTES
1) London Road was a busy street full of shops, and an important commercial center in a densely populated neighborhood of Liverpool

London Road, 1908 (da qui)

2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) or rather the nineteenth-century equivalent of the blinds
4) man (v.) Old English mannian “to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men,” from man (n.). Meaning “to take up a designated position on a ship” is first recorded 1690s. Meaning “behave like a man, act with courage” is from c. 1400. To man (something) out is from 1660s. Related: Manned; manning. It was obviously the backyard where Paddy had a ship’s wheel rigged up
5) To let it go; to start it up. Often used as an imperative. “Her” is used in the same way that some ships and machines are referred to as female
6)  to furl a sail by gathering its clews up to the yard by means of clew lines

7) the Equator line
8) Cape Horn is the extreme point of Africa feared by sailors because of the strong winds

Dan Miller (featured Louis Killen & Mick Moloney) from Irish Ballads & Songs of the Sea 1998, a similar text version but different melody

Paddy Doyle’s boots
Go to Sea once more
Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddywest.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/paddywest.html
https://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.com/2011/07/17-paddy-west.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=151768

Paddy West

Read the post in English

Una galleria ottocentesca di brutti ceffi del mare comprende inevitabilmente anche i procuratori d’imbarco (detti in inglese boarding master) che erano contemporaneamente proprietari di  pensioni per marinai, ai quali procuravano alloggio e imbarco.
La maggior parte di loro “incoraggiava” il marinaio appena sbarcato e con le tasche gonfie nella sua propensione verso il bere, tenendolo a pensione e foraggiandolo con del whisky scadente. Dopo un paio di settimane di trattamento il malcapitato aveva finito i soldi e doveva accettare al più presto d’imbarcarsi nuovamente, senonchè al momento della firma d’ingaggio il marinaio riceveva un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga sotto forma di pagherò e il nostro marpione li comprava ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura:era il marinaio infatti a doversi comprare le attrezzature personali necessarie per il lavoro e ovviamente il maestro d’imbarco era in combutta con il fornitore e il valore della merce era raddoppiato. Il marinaio era così doppiamente spennato, all’arrivo e alla partenza!
Ma i nomi più famigerati come Rapper Brown, Shanghai Brown, Jack Ratcliff o Jackie Brown erano dei farabutti che assoldava dei prezzolati ladruncoli per derubare i marinai approfittando della loro ubriachezza o si mettevano in combutta con qualche puttana per spennare il marinaio incauto appena sbarcato, dopodichè li portavano nuovamente a bordo in stato d’incoscienza e s’intascavano il loro anticipo.
Questo arruolamento fraudolento veniva chiamato shanghaiing ed era praticato soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti. Gli uomini che gestivano questo “commercio di uomini” venivano detti “crimps” e non avevano scrupoli a drogare la birra del malcapitato con il laudano.

Le autorità d’altra parte chiudevano volentieri un occhio perchè alle compagnie mercantili faceva comodo avere manovalanza sempre a disposizione anche per i lavori più duri (come sulle baleniere) e le rotte più sfavorevoli come quelle dei mari artici.

PADDY WEST

Una divertente forebitter / capstan shanty su un maestro d’imbarco  di Liverpool, è’ Stan Hugill a riferire che l’irlandese Paddy West (ovvero Paddy Doyle) era un persona reale, che teneva una pensione e una scuola per marinai in Great Howard Street.
Le “boarding houses” sono pensioni per marinai, presenti in ogni grande porto di mare. “Sono tenute da procuratori d’imbarco (boarding masters), di dubbia reputazione, che i marinai definiscono «arruolatori», i quali forniscono «indifferentemente alloggio e imbarco». Spesso accolgono i marinai «a credito». Sull’anticipo ricevuto dai pensionanti all’atto dell’arruolamento, si rifanno del vitto e dell’alloggio, e con il resto forniscono loro abbigliamento e attrezzature di scarsa qualità“. (Italo Ottonello)
Il nostro Paddy per intascarsi una quota più alta dell’anticipo, si era inventato una fantasiosa scuola d’addestramento per marinai e  trasformava in pochi giorni dei novellini in “able seamen”, così “Paddy Wester” è finito tra i modi di dire per descrivere un marinaio incapace.

La divisa del marinaio inglese  regolamentata dall’Ammiragliato britannico risale solo al 1875 standardizzando l’uniforme giacca blu-pantaloni bianchi; anche le compagnie commerciali di linea si contraddistinguevano per le divise indossate da tutto l’equipaggio

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd in  Blow Boys Blow, 1957
A.L. Lloyd commenta nelle note: “Mr West is a redoubtable figure in the folklore of the sea. He was a Liverpool boarding-house keeper in the latter days of sail, who provided ship captains with crews, as a side-line. He would guarantee that every man he supplied had crossed the Line and been round the Horn several times. In order to say so with a clear conscience, he gave greenhorns a curious course in seamanship, described in this jesting ballad. It was a great favourite with “Scouse” (Liverpool) sailors.
The sea literature of the nineteenth century is larded with tales of shanghaied seamen and corrupt boarding-house masters, who sent many a green hand to sea, swearing that they were experienced sailors. The most notorious was Paddy West, a Liverpool Irishman, who hat his fake seamen step across and old rope and walk around a cow’s horn so that he could claim that they had “crossed the line and rounded the horn.”

La melodia è Tramps and Hawkers


I
Oh, as I was a-walkin’ down London Road (1),
I come to Paddy West’s house,
He gave me a feed of American hash and he called it Liverpool scouse.
He said, “There’s a ship that’s wantin’ hands,
and on her you quickly sign.
her mate is a bastard, the bosun’s worse, but she will suit you fine.”
Chorus (after each verse):
Take off your dungaree jackets (2)
and give yourselves a rest,

And we’ll think on them cold nor’westers that we had at Paddy West’s.
II
Well, when I’d had a feed, my boys,
the wind began to blow;
He sent me up in the attic,
the main-royal for to stow.
But when I got up in the attic,
no main-royal could I find,
So I turned around to the window
and I furled the window blind (3).
III
Now Paddy he piped all hands on deck, their stations for to man (4).
His wife stood in the doorway
with a bucket in her hand;
And Paddy sings out, “Now let ‘er rip (5)!” and she flung the water our way,
Sayin’, “Clew up (6) your fore t’gan’sl, boys, she’s takin’ in the spray!”
IV
Now seein’ we’re off to the south’ard, boys, to Frisco we was bound,
Old Paddy he called for a length of rope and he laid it on the ground.
And we all stepped over and back again, and he says to me, “That’s fine,
Now when they ask if you’ve been to sea, you can say you’ve crossed the Line (7)”
V
“Now there’s only one thing for you to do, before you sail away,
That’s to step around the table,
where the bullock’s horn do lay.
And when they ask you, ‘Were you ever at sea?’,
you can say, ’Ten times ‘round the Horn (8).’
And Bejesus, you’re a sailor since
the day that you was born.”
Last chorus:
Put on your dungaree jacket,
and walk out lookin’ your best,

And tell ‘em you’re an old sailor man that’s come from Paddy West’s.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Oh, mentre passeggiavo lungo London Road,
arrivai alla pensione di Paddy West,
mi ha dato un piatto di pasticcio americano e l’ha chiamato stufato di Liverpool .
Disse: “C’è una nave che vuole una mano, e subito ti arruolerai su di lei;
il suo primo è un bastardo, il nostromo è peggio, ma ti troverai bene. ”
Coro (dopo ogni verso):
Toglietevi le giacche blu
e concedetevi un po’ di riposo
per pensare a quei freddi venti di nordovest che c’erano da Paddy West.
II
Bene, dopo il pasto, ragazzi miei,
il vento ha cominciato a soffiare;
mi ha mandato in soffitta,
a serrare la vela maestra.
Ma quando sono salito in soffitta,
non c’era nessuna vela maestra,
così mi sono voltato verso la finestra
e ho avvolto la tapparella.
III
Ora Paddy richiamò tutti gli uomini sul ponte, nelle loro postazioni.
Sua moglie stava sulla soglia
con un secchio in mano;
e Paddy chiama, “Ora fatela filare!”
e lei gettava l’acqua sulla nostra strada,
dicendo ” Imbrogliate i velacci,
ragazzi, è presa negli spruzzi”
IV
Ora considerando che siamo diretti a sud, ragazzi, diretti a Frisco
il vecchio Paddy chiese un pezzo di corda e la posò a terra.
e la calpestammo tutti avanti e indietro, e lui mi dice: “Va bene, ora quando ti chiedono se sei stato in mare, puoi dire che hai oltrepassato la linea. ”
V
“Ora c’è solo una cosa da fare per te, prima di salpare,
che è di girare intorno al tavolo,
dove è appoggiato il corno di bue.
E quando ti chiedono: ‘Sei mai stato in mare?’,
puoi dire “Dieci volte” intorno al Corno”.
e perdio, sei un marinaio
dal giorno in cui sei nato. ”
Ultimo coro:
Indossa la giacca blu
e  vai a fare il tuo meglio

e dì loro che sei un vecchio marinaio che viene dalla pensione di Paddy West.

NOTE
1) London Road era una trafficata strada ricca di negozi, e importante centro commerciale in un quartiere densamente popolato.

London Road, 1908 (da qui)

2) dungaree (dungeon ) jumper, jacket= denim jacket
3) o meglio l’equivalente ottocentesco delle tapparelle
4) man (v.) Old English mannian “to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men,” from man (n.). Meaning “to take up a designated position on a ship” is first recorded 1690s. Meaning “behave like a man, act with courage” is from c. 1400. To man (something) out is from 1660s. Related: Manned; manning.
Si trattava ovviamente del cortile sul retro dove Paddy aveva montato la ruota del timone
5) espressione idiomatica lasciarla andare a tutta birra/a tutto gas
6)  
Stringere la tela di una vela con gli imbrogli, prima di serrarla
7) dell’equatore
8) Capo Horn la punta estrema dell’Africa temuta dai marinai a causa dei forti venti

Dan Miller (con Louis Killen & Mick Moloney) in Irish Ballads & Songs of the Sea 1998, una versione testuale simile ma diversa melodia

Paddy Doyle’s boots
Go to Sea once more
Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddywest.html
http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/paddywest.html
https://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.com/2011/07/17-paddy-west.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=151768

Row me bullies boys row (Alan Doyle)

Leggi in italiano

The most recent version of this popular sea shanty comes from the movie “Robin Hood Prince of Thieves” by Ridley Scott (2010), and was written for the occasion by Alan Doyle (front man of the Canadian band Great Big Sea), recalling the melody and the structure of the Liverpool Judies refrain, with a text that remind the typical phrases of these seafaring songs; so obviously everyone adds the verse that he likes.

russel crow crew
I’ll sing you a song, it’s a song of the sea
I’ll sing you a song if you’ll sing it with me
While the first mate is playing the captain aboard
He looks like a peacock with pistols and sword
The captain likes whiskey, the mate, he likes rum
Us sailers like both but we can’t get us none
Well farewell my love it is time for to roam
The old blue peters are calling us home

In Taberna  

Strangs and Stout

CHORUS
And it’s row me bully boys
We’re in a hurry boys
We got a long way to go
And we’ll sing and we’ll dance
And bid farewell to France
And it’s row me bully boys row.
I
I’ll sing you a song,
it’s a song of the sea
Row me bully boys row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
II
Well farewell my love
it is time for to roam
Row me bully boys row
The old blue peters
are calling us home
And it’s row me bully boys row

Barnacle Buoys

I
When we set sail for Bristol
the sun was like crystal
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
We found muddier water
when passing Bridge Water
And it’s row, me bully boys row
Chorus:
And it’s row, me bully boys,
we’re in a hurry, boys
We’ve got a long way to go
And we’ll drink as we glance
– a last look at France
row, me bully boys, row
II
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
III
So we’ve been away
for many a day now
So we’ll fill out our sails
and drink all the ale now
IV
So we’ll drink and we’ll feast
with no care in the least
And soon, as we’re craving’,
we’ll sail up to Avon
V
As we tied up in Bristol,
me heart was a-thumpin’
Then I found my girl Alice,
who took me a-scrumpin’

and so on!

ITALIAN VERSION: VOGA AMICO MIO VAI

here is the italian versione in the movie


CORO
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più (amico)

un altro po’, dove si va non lo so
Balliamo cantiamo e la Francia lasciamo
voga un altro po’ vai
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Voga un altro po’ dove si va non lo so
La Francia non la rivedremo giammai
Voga amico mio vai
E’ tardi oramai voi siete già nei guai
Voga amico mio vai
O voi non scherzate oppure rischiate
Voga voga un po’ di più
Ma non si può stare troppo via dal mare
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Partiamo di nuovo per non ritornare
Voga amico mio vai

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://thesession.org/discussions/24758
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Rambling-Sailors/Row-Me-Bully-Boys
http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/misc-soundtrack-robin-hood-row-me-bully-boys-chords-s376527
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562
https://reelsoundtrack.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/robin-hood-soundtrack/

Row bullies row.. to New York

Leggi in italiano

“Liverpool Judies” (aka”Row, bullies, row”)  is a popular sea shanty  used as reported by Stan Hugill as Capstan shanty (but also as an forebitter) it is grouped into two main versions: one in which our sailor lands in San Francisco, the other in New York.
Both versions, however, always end up with the drunken or drugged boy who wakes up again on a ship where he has been boarded by a small group of crimps
Fraudulent conscription takes the name of “shanghaiinge“, especially in the north-west of the United States.
hanghaiinge

NEW YORK VERSION

Dirty deals in the harbor docks, drunken sailors and complacent “judies”.. but also a warning song to alert the young sailors who get drunk, because they risk ending up kidnapped and forced on board. Song best known as “Row, bullies, row”.
Stan Hugill tells us that the song must be sung with an Irish rhythm. The text is taken from “Shanties and Sailors Songs”, Hugill, Stan, (1969) (see)

Ian Campbell Group from Farewell Nancy, 1964 

The Foo Foo Band from The Foo Foo Band, 2000

I
When I wuz a youngster
I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet
bound out to the West.
We anchored one day
in de harbour of Cork,
Then we put out to sea
for the port of New York.
Chorus
And it’s roll, row bullies roll (1),
Them Liverpool Judies (2)
have got us in tow (3).

II
For forty-two days
we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us,
the gales they did roar;
Off Battery Point (4)
we did anchor at last,
Wid our jib boom (5) hove in
an’ the canvas all fast.
III
De boardin’-house masters (6)
wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’
all that wuz nice;
An’ one fast ol’ crimp
he got cotton’d (7)  to me,
Sez he, “Yer a fool lad (foolish),
ter follow the sea.”
IV
Sez he, “There’s a job
is a waitin’ fer you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liqour
an’ begger-all (nothing) to do.
What d’yer say, lad,
will ye jump ‘er (8), too?”
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard,
I’m damned if I do.”
V
But de best ov intentions
dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days
at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor
an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard
‘ad drugs in me drink.
VI
Now, the next I remembers
I woke in de morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder
bound south round Cape Horn;
Wid an’ ol’ suit of oilskins
an’ three (two) pairs o’ sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head
an’ a dose of the pox.
VII
Now all ye young sailors
take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch (an eye) on yer drinks
when the liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion
to runner (9) or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick
an’ yer fid (10) ‘ll be sore.

NOTES
1)  in this context roll and row are taken as a synonym
2) The word judy is a dialectal expression of Liverpool to indicate a generic girl (not necessarily a prostitute)
3) the term has become in the seafaring jargon synonymous with favorable winds that drive home (a ship that runs fast).
In this regard Italo Ottonello argues:
the mate stood in the gangway, rubbing his hands, and talking aloud to the ship, “Hurrah, old bucket! the Boston girls have got hold of the tow-rope!” and the like (from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
At each change of the watch, those coming on deck asked those going below, “How does she go along?” and got, for answer, the rate, and the customary addition, “Aye! and the Boston girls have had hold of the tow-rope all the watch.”(from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
4) New York, the island of Manhattan
5) Jibboom: it’s a bouncer, that is, an auction (boom) that protrudes from another auction.  Bowsprit or jib-boom extends the bowsprit and is in turn extended by the flying-jibboom
6) a boarding agent who, with more or less legal means, procured sailors to ships
7) “cottoned” =”attached” ,”caught on” (british slang); or says “likin ‘to me” or even “fancying”
8) crimp is offering the boy to help him in his craft and then tells him to leave the engagement on the ship from which he has landed to be part of his team of recruiters and make shangaiing
9)  derogatory term
10) a less cleaned version uses the term “yer knob’ll be sore” which means head of .. (an other head that is a little lower)

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/136.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/judies
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=69
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LiverpoolGirls/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61483