Archivi categoria: TURISMO IN SCOZIA/ Scotland travelling

Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie

Leggi in italiano

“Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie” (or “Bonnie Glenshee”) is a scottis traditional song great favourite with Scots Travellers, from an old Perthshire tune, with little concrete information about it . The lyrics inserts in the common theme of the girls who would like to follow their love enlisted as a soldier (or sailor) disguised as a man to stay beside him, but they are dissuaded to remain at home. MacColl and Seeger included  “Busk,Busk, Bonnie Lassie” (“Bonnie Glen Shee”) in Travellers Songs from England and Scotland, 1977, as sung by Charlotte Higgins. They say: “This piece does not appear in any of the major Scots collections. It is a kind of mirror-image of ‘O No, No’, a song of the ‘Lisbon / banks of the Nile’ genre, in which a girl’s plea that she should be allowed to accompany her lover to war is rejected on the grounds that her beauty would fade and her colour stain when exposed to the frost and rain of the highlands.” (from Charlotte Higgins see more)

Here the boy invites his girlfriend to a last romantic walk (probably a love meeting with exchange of votes) for Glen Isla before leaving the war.

Shona Anderson & Terry Dey

The Corries — Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie


I
Do you see yon high hills (1)
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Chorus
Busk, busk, bonny lassie
And come alang wi me
And I’ll tak ye tae Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon (bonny) shepherds,
As they walk alang
Wi their plaidies pulled aboot them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon  (bonny) sodjers
As they all march alang
Wi their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging doon
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
English translation Cattia Salto
I
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They have parted many’s a true love
And they’ll soon part us two
Chorus
Get ready get ready bonny lassie
And come along with me
And I’ll take you to Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon shepherds,
As they walk along
With their plaidies pulled about them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon sodjers
As they all march along
With their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging down
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They have parted many’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us two

NOTES
1) or bonny highland

The Bloody Fields of Flanders

The pipe march version comes from the World War I arranged by John MacLellan (Pipe Major of the 8th Argylls), Hamish Henderson had the chance to hear it during the Second World War at Anzio and in 1960 he added a text entitled “The Freedom Come-All-Ye” by tranforming it into an anti-war song.


A Trip

https://outnaboutinscotland.com/2014/11/24/glen-isla-monamenach/

LINK
http://sangstories.webs.com/bonnyglenshee.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/81881/16
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/10596/1
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/65221/1
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/871.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4991
http://www.schoolofpiping.com/articles/flanders.pdf

Bonnie Glenshee

Read the post in English

“Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie” (anche “Bonnie Glenshee”) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese diffusa tra gli Scots Travellers, su di una vecchia melodia del Perthsire, una canzone di cui non si sa praticamente nulla. S’inserisce nel filone delle fanciulle che vorrebbero seguire il loro amore arruolato come soldato (o marinaio) travestendosi da uomo per restargli accanto, ma sono dissuase a restare a casa. Nelle note di copertina de Travellers Songs from England and Scotland, 1977 MacColl and Seeger  scrivono: “This piece does not appear in any of the major Scots collections. It is a kind of mirror-image of ‘O No, No’, a song of the ‘Lisbon / banks of the Nile’ genre, in which a girl’s plea that she should be allowed to accompany her lover to war is rejected on the grounds that her beauty would fade and her colour stain when exposed to the frost and rain of the highlands.” (dalla testimoniana di Charlotte Higgins vedi)

Qui il ragazzo invita la fidanzata a ad un ultima romantica passeggiata (probabilmente un incontro amoroso con scambio di voti ) per la Glen Isla prima di partire in guerra.

Shona Anderson & Terry Dey

The Corries — Busk Busk Bonnie Lassie


I
Do you see yon high hills (1)
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Chorus
Busk, busk, bonny lassie
And come alang wi me
And I’ll tak ye tae Glen Isla
Near bonny Glen Shee
II
Do you see yon (bonny) shepherds,
As they walk alang
Wi their plaidies pulled aboot them
And their sheep they graze on
III
Do you see yon  (bonny) sodjers
As they all march alang
Wi their muskets on their shouders
And their broadswords hinging doon
IV
Do you see yon high hills
All covered with snow
They hae pairted mony’s a true love
And they’ll soon pairt us twa
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Vedi le alte colline
ricoperte di neve
Hanno separato più di un vero amore
e presto ci divideranno
Coro
Preparati, preparati bella fanciulla
e vieni con me
e ti porterò a Glen Isla
vicino alle bella Glen Shee.
II
Vedi quei pastori
che camminano
con i loro mantelli stretti addosso
e le loro pecore che pascolano
III
Vedi quei soldati
mentre camminano tutti insieme
con i moschetti sulle spalle
e i loro spadoni che penzolano al fianco
IV
Vedi le alte colline
ricoperte di neve
Hanno separato più di un vero amore
e presto ci divideranno

NOTE
1) oppure bonny highland

LA MELODIA:The Bloody Fields of Flanders

La versione pipe march viene dalla I Guerra Mondiale arrangiata da John MacLellan (Pipe Major dell’8° Argylls), Hamish Henderson ebbe l’occasione di sentirla durante la II Guerra Mondiale ad Anzio e nel 1960 ci aggiunge un testo dal titolo ‘The Freedom Come-All-Ye’ trasformandola in una anti-war song.


L’escursione
https://outnaboutinscotland.com/2014/11/24/glen-isla-monamenach/

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/bonnyglenshee.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/81881/16
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/10596/1
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/65221/1
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/871.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4991
http://www.schoolofpiping.com/articles/flanders.pdf

Arran Boat Song

Leggi in Italiano
“Arran Boat Song” ia a slow air from the Scottish Highlands, the title is often misanderstood as the “Aran Boat song” and is therefore widely considered as trad irish, but is more often known as The Highland Boat Song. It is a very popular melody and although it was published in the collections of nineteenth-century music it was already known in 1700 and combined for example with Robert Allan’s poetry “Queen Mary’s Escape From Lochleven Castle”. It is a melody that one learns to play on the tin whistle due to its relative simplicity of execution (see), but it is also a tune much loved by the harpists.
The arrangements of this sweet melody are endless, I propose only a small part, among those that I consider to be the most beautiful.

Musika Magika with the magic harp from Tabita Dulcamara

Patrick Ball  and the harp with metal strings

John&Phil Cunningham  from “Against the Storm”

Arran is the largest island of the Firth of Clyde, the fjord of the river Clyde, nicknamed the Sleeping Warrior because its conformation seen from the sea is that of a sleeping giant. “While wandering around the island, whatever the chosen vehicle, one also realizes why the isle has been called “a Scotland in miniature”, thanks to its geological conformation, because the landscape is divided into Highlands and Lowlands exactly as it is, the larger the entire Scottish nation.
And it is definitely impressive how much the landscape changes between the south and the north of the island: the north is bristly, rocky and sharp; while the southern part is flat, covered with heath and green.” (translated from here)

LINK
https://thesession.org/tunes/986
https://thesession.org/tunes/6478
http://www.folkrag.org/tunes/2013.html
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-arran-boat-song-tin-whistle-notes.html
http://www.visitdunkeld.com/tour-arran-scotland.html
http://it-blackcatsouvenirs.blogspot.it/2014/09/lisola-di-arran-la-scozia-in-miniatura.html

Beltane Fire Festival of Edinburgh

Leggi in italiano

In the small park of Calton Hill in the middle of Edinburgh is held the most spectacular Beltane festival in Europe, the Beltane Fire Festival organized by the Beltane Fire Society, a community of artists founded in 1988.
On the night of 30 April the Beltane fire feast is re-acting according to ancient customs, but with a hint of theatricality and modern spectacularization that make it unique: obviously the fire is the dominant element and yet it is the contour of a ritual narration, the awakening of the Green Man, with a succession of acrobatic dance performances and choreographies full of costumed characters: hundreds of figures embody divinities and spirits of Nature that inhabit Gaelic mythology.

The particularity of this festival is that you can attend the feast as spectator but also participate as performer, after registration and attendance of some open meetings that are held a few months before the event; you can choose from a series of groups predefined by the organization (see)
The event is an happening in progress, the starting point is the National Monument of Scotland, built in the first half of the nineteenth century, known as Acropolis because inspired by the Parthenon of Athens.
Over the centuries on the hill overlooking Edinburgh, Greek-themed monuments have been erected, with the will to create a sort of a timeless space that emphasizes the sense of distance from the city. Entire Calton Hill is a succession of folly architecture buildings that are an exercise in style, such as a fake ruin or a classical temple.

From the Acropolis the parade proceeds along a pre-established path to the rhythm of the drums. At the head, the May Queen and the Green Man with their court; in parallel to the main procession there are a series of counter-performances and traveling groups that have evolved to balance the strong turnout of visitors and revive even the most dark corners of the park. As the procession approaches, the groups come to life and continue to play a part throughout the evening; the hill comes alive, reflecting the awakening of the earth at the passage of spring.

Dancers and acrobats, fires, sounds of horns and drums, men (and women) painted by blue, green, red and white, to represent the 4 natural elements (air, water, earth and fire): the heart of the spark are the White Bride and the Green Man, the feminine and male principle that with their sacred union light the Beltane fire.
And then…. dances, songs, and dances will follow throughout the night.

LINK
https://beltane.org/

Beltane Fire Festival di Edimburgo

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Nel piccolo parco di Calton Hill al centro di Edimburgo si tiene la festa di Beltane più spettacolare d’Europa, il  Beltane Fire Festival organizzato dalla  Beltane Fire Society, una comunità di artisti fondata nel 1988.
Nella notte del 30 aprile viene rievocata la festa del fuoco di Beltane secondo le antiche consuetudini, ma con un pizzico di teatralità e di moderna spettacolarizzazione che la rendono unica: ovviamente il fuoco è l’elemento dominante eppure è di contorno alla narrazione di un rito,  il risveglio dell’Uomo Verde,  con un susseguirsi danze tavolta acrobatiche e coreografie ricche di personaggi in costume : centinaia di figuranti incarnano divinità e spiriti della Natura che popolano la mitologia gaelica.

Il bello di questo festival è che si può assistere alla festa come spettatori ma anche parteciparvi come performers, previa iscrizione e frequentazione di serie di open meeting che si tengono qualche mese prima dell’evento; si possono scegliere tra una serie di gruppi predefiniti dall’organizzazione (vedi)
L’evento è un happening in progress, il luogo di partenza è il National Monument of Scotland, costruito nella prima metà dell’Ottocento, noto come Acropoli  perchè ispirato al Partenone di Atene.
Nel corso dei secoli  sulla collinetta che domina Edimburgo sono stati eretti monumenti a tema greco, con la volontà di creare una sorta di sorta di spazio atemporale che enfatizzasse il senso di lontananza rispetto alla città. Tutta Calton Hill è un susseguirsi di folly architecture  edifici che sono un esercizio di stile, come una finta rovina o un tempio classico.

Dall’Acropoli il corteo procede in senso antiorario lungo un percorso prestabilito a ritmo di tamburo. Alla testa, la Regina di Maggio (May Queen) e l’Uomo Verde (Green Man) e la loro corte, parallelamente al corteo principale si svolgono tutta una serie di  contro-esibizioni e gruppi itineranti che si sono evoluti per bilanciare la forte affluenza dei visitatori e ravvivare anche gli angoli più in ombra del parco. Man mano che la processione si avvicina  i gruppi prendono vita e continuando a recitare una parte per tutta la sera; la collina si anima, rispecchiando il risveglio della terra al passaggio della primavera.

Ballerini e acrobati, fuochi, suoni di corni e di tamburi, uomini dipinti di blu, verde, rosso e bianco, per rappresentare i 4 elementi naturali (aria, acqua, terra e fuoco), e il cuore della scintilla sono la bianca dea della Primavera e l’Uomo Verde, il principio femminile e quello maschile che con la loro unione sacra accendono il fuoco di Beltane.
E poi…. danze, canti, e balli seguiranno per tutta la notte.

FONTI
https://beltane.org/

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

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The Gaelic name Srath Bhàthain translates to English as “the valley of the Blane”, with reference to the Blane Water is ‘The Braes of Strathblane’ ballad, also sung in Scottish Gaelic, may have originated in Stirlingshire; it is however widespread in the Hebrides and in Ireland like “The Banks of Strathdon”
‘The Braes of Strathblane’ is a song which is firmly based in the oral tradition. As a result it is difficult to pinpoint its origins and author. It is, however, one of many folksongs which feature the braes of a village and young love. This song, indeed, an identical match to the lyrics of ‘The Braes of Strathdon’, which lies in Aberdeenshire. On other broadsides the suggested to tune to these lyrics is often ‘As I stood at my cottage door’.see)

SCOTTISH GAELIC VERSION

lavandaiaWidespread in the Hebrides and sung in Scottish Gaelic ballad’s history is a bit unusual compared to the “courting songs”: a young washerwoman refuses the proposal of marriage of her suitor (apparently a idle lad and not liked by her parents) and he instead to wander desperately and disconsolate for some distant valley (as would happen in an Irish song) goes to woo some other more available girl. In the last verses the girl complains about having let slip the opportunity to get married (with the fear of being a spinster forever)!

Capercaillie in “Delirium”, 1991.

Aodann Srath Bhain  (The Slopes of Strath Ban)

English translation *
I
Walking out early alone
on a morning in May
Among green fields,
an outcast and purposeless,
I saw a maiden
who lived some way above me
As she washed her clothes
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.
II
I then climbed upwards
to the maiden I loved was
And courteously and mildly
I spoke to her
“It’s over a year
since our love began,
And if you are willing
we shall marry at once.”
III
“Marry? To Marry
I’m too young
Your sort has tongue
that could cause trouble anywhere;
My father and mother
would scold me forever more
If I were to marry the likes of you,
you feckless young man.’
IV
But you young girls everywhere
who are still unmarried,
Don’t go turning young men down through pride or contempt.
How sad for me
to be unmarried forever more-
I’ll have to live alone,
out on the slopes of Strath Ban.

I
‘S mi ri imeachd nam aonar
Anns an òg-mhadain Mhàigh
Feadh lèantaichean uaine
Mar fhear-fuadain gun stàth
Nuair a chunnaic mi a’ ghruagach
An taobh shuas dhiom a’ tàmh
‘S i ri nigh’a cuid aodaich
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin
II
An sin dhìrich mi suas
Far ‘n robh gruagach mo ghràidh
Is labhair mi rithe
Gu sìobhalta tlàth
“Tha bliadhn’agus còrr
Bhon a thòisich an gràdh
Is ma bhitheas tu deònach
Nì sinn pòsadh gun dàil”
III
“Gu pòsadh, gu pòsadh
Ro òg tha mi ‘n dràsd’
Gu bheil teang’aig do sheòrsa
Dhèanadh fògradh ‘s gach àit
Gum biodh m’athair ‘s mo mhàthair
Gam chàineadh gu bràth
Nam pòsainn do leithid
O fhleasgaich gun stàth”
IV
Ach a nìonagan òga
Tha gun phòsadh ‘s gach àit’
Na diùltaibh fir òga
Le mòrchuis no tàir
Nach muladach dhòmhsa
Bhith gun phòsadh gu bràth
‘S fheudar fuireach nam aonar
Mach air aodann Srath Bhàin

NOTES
(1) The Blane Water has also been referred to as Beul-abhainn  meaning “mouth-river” after the numerous burns merging.One of its tributaries, the Ballagan Burn passes over the waterfall the Spout of Ballagan which shows 192 alternate strata of coloured shales and limestone (including pure alabaster) (from Wiki)

Gary Ellis “Balloch”

SCOTTISH AND IRISH VERSIONS

LINK
http://glasgowpictures.blogspot.it/2010/02/high-ballagan-waterfall.html
https://www.visitscotland.com/info/towns-villages/strathblane-p240461
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/20794
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/aodann.htm

Il tordo del Clan Donald

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Smeòrach Chlann Dòmhnaill (Il tordo del Clan Donald) è una canzone in gaelico scozzese in cui il poeta elogia il Clan Donald e l’isola North Uist (Ebridi).
Fu composta da John MacCodrum (Iain Mac Fhearchair 1693-1779) uno dei primi “poeti del villaggio”, che la scrisse sulla scia del gusto antiquario sollevato dal “ritrovamento” delle poesie del bardo Ossian

Il poeta dice di essere un tordo sulla cima della collina, che guarda il sole e il cielo sereno. Descrive la sua terra, la terra degli eroi e dei poeti. Il Clan Donald (o MacDonalds di Sleat) è elogiato per la bravura e il coraggio in battaglia, non si escludono riferimenti giacobiti nel testo.

Sinn Fhèin(Folk Group) 1983 
Rachel Walker in Bràighe Loch Iall 2004  (I, II, III, VI, VII, VIII)
Julie Fowlis in Gach Sgeul – Every Story 2014 live (I, II, III, IV, V, VI)

Hoilibheag hilibheag hó ail il ó
Hoilibheag hilibheag hó ró i
Hoilibheag hilibheag hó ail il ó
Smeòrach le Clann Dòmhnaill mi
I
Smeòrach mis’ air ùrlar Phaibil
Crùbadh ann an dùsal cadail
Gun deòrachd a théid nas fhaide
Truimid mo bhròin, thòirleum m’ aigne
II
Smeòrach mis’ air mullach beinne
‘G amharc gréin is speuran soillear
Théid mi stòlda chòir na coille
Bidh mi beò air treòtas eile
III
Ma mholas gach eun a thìr féin
Cuim’ thar éis nach moladh mise?
Tìr nan curaidh, tìr nan cliar
An tìr bhiadhchar fhialaidh mhiosail
IV
‘N tìr nach caol ri cois na mara,
An tìr ghaolach, chaomhnach, channach,
An tìr laoghach, uanach, mheannach:
Tìr an arain, bhainneach, mhealach.
V
An Cladh Chomhghain mise rugadh,
’N Àird an Rùnair fhuair mi togail,
Fradharc a’ chuain uaibhrich chuislich,
Nan stuagh guanach cluaineach cluiceach.
VI
Measg Chlann Dòmhnaill fhuair mi m’ altrum
Buidheann nan seòl ‘s nan sròl daithte
Nan long luath air chuantan farsaing
Aiteam nach ciùin rùsgadh ghlas lann
VII
Na fir eòlach stòlda stàideil
Bha ‘s a’ chòmhstri stròiceach scaiteach
Fir gun bhròn gun leòn gun airtneul
Leanadh tòir, is tòir a chaisgeadh
VIII
Buidheann mo ghaoil nach caoin caitean
Buidheann nach gann greann san aisith
Buidheann shanntach ‘n àm bhith aca
Rùsgadh lann fo shranntraich bhratach
Traduzione Inglese *
Hoilibheag hilibheag hó ail il ó
A mavis of Clan Donald 
I
A mavis I on Paible’s flatland
Huddled in a drowse of sleep
unwilling to go any further
in the depths of my sorrow
my spirit made a mighty leap
II
A mavis I on a mountaintop
Watching the sun and cloudless skies
I will approach the forest quietly
and I’ll be living on other sustenance
III
If every other bird praises its own land/ Why then should not I?
Land of heroes, land of poets/The abundant, hospitable, estimable land.
IV
The land not narrow near the sea,
The delectable, mild, comely land,
The land of calves and lambs and kids,
The land of bread and milk and honey.
V
ln Comgan’s Churchyard I was born,
In Àird an Runnair I was reared,
In sight of the proud throbbing sea,
Of the sportive, fickle, playful waves.
VI
Among Clan Donald I was nursed
Of sails and colored banners
Of swift ships on wide oceans
A people not mild when baring grey blades.
VII
Men experienced, steady, stately
Haughty and keen in battle
Men without sorrow, without wounds, without weariness
Who would follow in the rout and who could also stop one
VIII
My beloved company, not smooth of temper
A company resolute in war
A company ambitious when it was necessary
To bare their blades beneath fluttering banners
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Hoilibheag hilibheag hó ail il ó
sono il tordo (1) del Clan Donald
I
Sono un tordo sulla piana di Paible
accovacciato nel sonno,
riluttante a migrare
dal profondo del dolore
il cuore sobbalzava
II
Sono un tordo in cima alla montagna
A guardare il sole e il cielo limpido
Mi avvicinerò alla foresta in silenzio
Vivrò con altri mezzi.
III
Se ogni altro uccello elogia la propria terra, perché allora non dovrei io?
Terra di eroi, terra di poeti, ospitale e generosa terra dell’abbondanza
IV
Un’ampia distesa accanto al mare
deliziosa, mite, terra gentile
la terra dei vitelli,  agnelli e capretti, terra del pane, del latte e del miele
V
Nella parrocchia di Comgan sono nato, sono cresciuto a  Àird an Runnair in vista del fiero, pulsante mare, delle sue onde giocose e mutevoli
VI
Tra il Clan Donald sono cresciuto
quelli delle vele e bandiere colorate
Di navi veloci sui mari
Un popolo inclemente quando sfodera le spade
VII
Uomini esperti, saldi, maestosi
fieri e forti in battaglia
Uomini senza dolore, senza ferite, senza stanchezza
che seguono la folla
o che possono anche fermarla
VIII
I miei amati compagni, dal carattere non adultatore
compagni risoluti in guerra
compagni arditamente pronti alla bisogna
a denudare le lame sotto gli stendardi svolazzanti

NOTE
* in parte dalla traduzione inglese di Tom Thomson
1) Mavis è il tordo, un piccolo passerotto che si differenzia però in almeno due principali specie: il tordo bottello e la tordella, il termine in gaelico per il primo è smeòrach (song thrush, mavis -turdus philomelos) mentre per il secondo è smeòrach-mhòr or smeòrach-ghlas (mistle thrush -turdus viscivorus) Il nome mavis viene dal medioevo probabilmente dal francese antico “mauvis”

FONTI
‘The Uist Collection – The poems and songs of John MacCodrum, Archibald MacDonald, and some of the minor Uist bards’ (Rev. A. MacDonald ed., 1894
https://archive.org/details/uistcollectionpo00macd

http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/keng/kenhtml/scottour(b)/TheUists(Page3).htm
https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/juliefowlis/smeorachchlanndomhnaillthemavisofclandonald.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/25571/10
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/walker/smeorach.htm
http://www.countrylife.co.uk/country-life/folklore-mistle-thrush-66404

FAREWELL TO THE BANKS OF AYR

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Lyrics: The Banks Of Ayr by Robert Burns 1786
Tune:  Roslin Castle (aka House of Glamis) old Scottish Slow Air

The   gloomy night is gath’ring fast” or “The bonie banks of Ayr” was written by Robert Burns on the autumn of 1786 when he was 27 years old; crucial year for Burns in which he decides to embark for Jamaica in search of fortune; to pay for the trip, on July 31 he published “Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect” (also known as “The Kilmarnock Edition“), but … the unexpected success achieved with his first publication and the persuasion of his friends, it brought him to Edinburgh at the end of November.

burns 1787
Robert Burns in Edinburgh 1787, the living room of Jane Duchess of Gordon

Welcomed with benevolence in the most fashionable houses of Edinburgh, the handsome Robbie has become famous throughout Scotland, even if he was always nagged by economic problems.

FAREWELL TO COILA (SCOTLAND)

The song reflects the dark thoughts of the poet, the worries of today, the fears of facing a long journey by sea and his heartfelt farewell to his beloved Scotland. “I composed this song as I conveyed my chest so far on my road to Greenock, where I was to embark in a few days for Jamaica. I meant it as my  farewell dirge to my native land.”

Le rive dell'Ayr
The banks of Ayr

ARYSHIRE

Ayr is a capital harbor town of Ayrshire (south-west Scotland) located at the mouth of the river Ayr, center of the “Burns an ‘a’ that” the May festival to pay homage to the Bard of Scotland: the feast lasts a whole week and it is a succession of concerts, literary and artistic events. Several other places associated with the poet and his youthful years can be found in the Burnay National Heritage Park in Alloway. These include the Burns Cottage, the museum and the Tam o ‘Shanter Experience, as well as the Auld Alloway Kirk, the Burns monument and the Brig o’ Doon.
Around the city lies the sparsely populated Scottish countryside and beautiful landscapes: in the Aryshire region there are forty castles, many of which can be visited.

ROSLIN CASTLE

The tune is an example of the Italian influence on eighteenth century Scottish music. The tune has been attributed to James Oswald (or composed by William McGibbon and printed by James Oswald)
Charles Nicholson in his Preceptive Lessons for the Flute of 1821
(http://www.oldflutes.com/articles/roslincastle.htm)

Old Blind Dogs  in The World’s Room 1999 (violino e flauto) Jonny Hardie (violino) e Rory Campbell (whistle), sotto il delicato arpeggio della chitarra di Jim Malcolm

The Albanach Guitar Duo
Kate Steinbeck, (flute) · Alicia Chapman, (oboe)· Jacquelyn Bartlett, (harp)

THE BANKS OF AYR

However, there are not many versions of the song, listen to Jim Malcom (Farewell To the Banks of Ayr)
New Celeste in “It’s a new day” – 1997: the group of Glasgow made a very characteristic arrangement (the music is composed by Iain Fergus), with the moaning of the bagpipe, vibrato and melancholic, which defines the “mood” of the whole piece. On a slow battery base, delicate arrangements and touches of guitar, violin arquings, flute riffs

I
The gloomy night is gath’ring fast,
Loud roars the wild,  inconstant blast,
Yon murky cloud  is foul with rain,
I see it driving  o’er the plain;
The hunter now has  left the moor,
The scatt’red coveys meet secure;
While here I wander,   prest with care,
Along the lonely  banks of Ayr.
II
The Autumn mourns her rip’ning corn
By early Winter’s  ravage torn;
Across her placid,  azure sky,
She sees the  scowling tempest fly:
Chill runs my blood  to hear it rave;
I think upon the  stormy wave,
Where many a danger  I must dare,
Far from the bonie banks of Ayr.
III
‘Tis not the surging billow’s roar,
‘Tis not that fatal, deadly shore;
Tho’ death in ev’ry  shape appear,
The wretched have no  more to fear:
But round my heart  the ties are bound,
That heart transpierc’d with many a wound;
These bleed afresh,  those ties I tear,
To leave the bonie banks of Ayr.
IV
Farewell, old Coila’s(1) hills and dales,
Her healthy moors  and winding vales;
The scenes where  wretched Fancy roves,
Pursuing past, unhappy loves!
Farewell, my  friends! farewell, my foes!
My peace with these,  my love with those:
The bursting tears  my heart declare-
Farewell, the bonie banks of Ayr!

NOTES:
1) Coyla is the name of Burns’ muse, identified with Scotland

http://www.burnsmuseum.org.uk/collections/object_detail/3.6275.b
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18500/18500-h/18500-h.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/4150

ROBERT BURNS: RANTIN’, ROVIN’ ROBIN

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

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“Rantin ‘, rovin’, Robin” is an autobiographical song written by Robert Burns as a celebration of his 28th birthday (25 January 1787), also known under the title “There was a lad“.
Burns describes in joking terms his own birth in the presence of a midwife who predicts his destiny. A sort of fairy-tale in which the old woman next to the cradle is a kind of fairy-godmother who dispenses the gift of Poetry to the future Bard.
The cottage that saw his birth is located in Alloway in the district of Kyle, Ayr county and was built by his father William Burness (the name of the family at the origins), a cottage of straw and clay for a family of small sharecroppers (now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum)

Burns' s Cottage - Samuel Bough 1876
Burns’ s Cottage – Samuel Bough 1876

Shortly after his death (aged only 37), a group of friends dined together to commemorate him. It was 1802 and the dinners have become part of the Scottish tradition, and the song is among the favorites in the Burns’ Supper.

Jim Malcolm


The Corries
Sylvia Barnes & The Battlefield Band con immagini dell’ambiente quotidiano di Robbie
Andy M. Stewart

RANTIN’, ROVIN’, ROBIN *
I
There was a lad was born in Kyle (1),
But whatna day o’ whatna style,
I doubt it’s hardly worth the while
To be sae nice wi’ Robin.
Chorus.
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, rantin’, rovin’,
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, Robin!
II
Our monarch’s hindmost year but ane(2)
Was five-and-twenty days begun,
‘Twas then a blast o’ Janwar’ win’
Blew hansel(3) in on Robin.
III
The gossip keekit(4) in his loof(5),
Quo’ scho(6), “Wha lives will see the proof,
This waly(7) boy will be nae coof(8):
I think we’ll ca’ him Robin.
IV
He’ll hae misfortunes great an’ sma’,
But aye(9) a heart aboon(10) them a’,
He’ll be a credit till us a’-
We’ll a’ be proud o’ Robin.”
V
“But sure as three times three mak nine,
I see by ilka(11) score and line,
This chap will dearly like our kin’,
So leeze(12) me on thee! Robin.”
VI
“Guid(13) faith,” quo’, scho, “I doubt you gar(14)
The bonie lasses lie aspar(15);
But twenty fauts (16) ye may hae waur(17)
So blessins on thee! Robin.” 
NOTES

* english translation 
1) The cottage is in the village of Alloway in Ayrshire, now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum Burns’ start in life was a humble one. He was born the son of poor tenant farmers and was the eldest of seven children
2) hindmost year but one=January 25, 1759.The strong wind that blew in those days destroyed part of the house, so his mother with the little one in her arms preferred to challenge the storm to take refuge from the neighbor.
3) hansel=birth-gift
4) keekit=peered – glanced. Allan Connochie  notes “The “gossip” was the midwife, family friend or godparent telling the baby’s future”
5) loof=the palm, the hand outspread and upturned
6) said she: It is said that his father met the woman while he was crossing the river at the ford, but the river was in flood and the woman was in trouble, so Robert’s father helped her and took her home; the woman in exchange made a prophecy about the child.
7) waly=sturdy
8) coof=fool – dolt
9) aye= always
10) aboon=above
11) ilka=every
12) leeze=commend; blessings on thee; I am fond of you
13) guid= good
14) gar= make
15) asprar= wide apart
16) fauts=faults
17) waur=worse

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/therewasalad.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/6927
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/ThereWasALad.html

WILD MOUNTAINSIDE

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WILD  MOUNTAINSIDE
in “Eddi Reader sings the song of Robert Burn” 2003

Le canzoni di Robert BurnsWild Mountainside is not a traditional scottish song, it was written by John Douglas, guitarist of “The Trashcan Sinatras “, a pop group of Scottish school.
Eddi writes  in the booklet: “This song was written  by John Richard Douglas of Irvine, Ayrshire. John  plays and writes in the band The Trashcan Sinatras.  I wanted to include this song because I wanted to show how poetry is alive  and well in Burns country. Through the centuries it still breaths its way out  of the sons and daughters of the west coast of Scotland. Also its a  homecoming song. I found an appreciation of Burns along with my way home to  Scotland.” (here)

It is the journey that takes you back to a land (Scotland) described in its wild and uncontaminated beauty.

VIDEO Trashcan sinatras

Eddi Reader amazing voice class 59- live with arrangement for guitar and accordion

Eddi Reader : from cd – Sing the songs of Robert Burns– 2003 (the background voice declaims the verses of “My love is a red, red rose” by Robert Burns )

I
Beauty is within grasp
Hear the island’s call
The last mile is upon us
I’ll carry you if you fall
I know the armour’s heavy now
I know the heart inside
It’s beautiful just over
The wild mountainside
II
Snow is falling all around
Out of clear blue sky
Crow is flying high over
You and I are going to wander
High up where the air is rare
Wild horses ride
It’s beautiful, just over
The wild mountainside.
III
Wild and free we roam
Only a mile to go
Beauty is within grasp
Hear the highland’s call
The last mile is upon us
I’ll carry you if you fall
I know the armour’s heavy now
I know the heart inside
It’s beautiful just over
The wild mountainside
It’s beautiful just roaming
The wild mountainside