Archivi tag: Yorkshire wassailing

Lancashire, Yorkshire & Oxfordshire may day carols

Leggi in italiano

GREATER MANCHESTER – Lancashire

Manchester May Day.
“One tradition was for girls to don mainly white dresses, made from curtains or whatever, and carry around a broomstick representing a maypole. Another tradition was for boys to dress up in women’s clothing and to colour their faces – they were called molly dancers, ‘molly’ being an old expression for an effeminate man. Dr Cass[Dr Eddie Cass, the Folklore Society] says they went round quoting a verse. One such, from the Salford area, was: I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew. Itch Koo Pushing little wagons up a brew I earn thirty bob a week I’ve a wife and kids to keep I’m a collier from Pendlebury brew Dr Cass himself remembers both traditions. The girls would dance round the maypole and sing other songs, such as: Buttercups and daisies Oh what pretty flowers Coming in spring time To tell of sunny hours We come to greet you on the first of May We hope you will not send us away For we dance and sing our merry song On a maypole day (from here)

SWINTON MAY SONG

The version reproduced by Watersons in 1975 is taken from W & R Chamber “Book of Days” – 1869 – with words and music collected by Mr. Job Knight (1861) –  A.L. Lloyd comments
The critical seasons of the year—midwinter, coming of spring, onset of autumn—were times for groups of carollers to go through the villages singing charms for good luck, in hope of a reward of food, drink, money. This one was sung on May Eve or thereabouts in Yorkshire and Lancashire, but it’s much like similar songs from any other county.”

This song is  titled “Drawing Near the Merry Month of May” and the text is also reported in Edwin Waugh’s book “Lancashire Sketches” (1869)
The area of reference is Yorkshire and Lancashire and “Swinton” was a small borough, then Salford city now become a part of Manchester (England)

The Watersons from For Pence and Spicy Ale -1975

Brass Monkey from Flame of Fire – 2005

The two melodies are different, the version of the Brass Monkey recalls the Padstow May Song, another song of springtime still popular ritual in the town of Padstow, Cornwall.
As reported in Chambers’ Book of Day (1869), Swinton’s two songs were the Old May song and the New May song. The Old May Song was a so-called Night song that was sung during the night by groups of mayers accompanied with various musical instruments.

OLD MAY SONG

I
All in this pleasant evening together
come has we
for the summer springs so fresh and green and gay.
We’ll tell you of a blossom and a bud on every tree
Drawing near to the merry month of May
II
Rise up, the master of this house all in your chain of gold
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope you’re not offended with your house we make so bold
Drawing near to the merry month of May
III
Rise up, the mistress of this house with gold all on your breast
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
And if your body is asleep we hope your soul’s at rest
Drawing near to the merry month of May
IV
Rise up, the children of this house, all in your rich attire
For the summer springs so gresh and green and gay.
And every hair all on your head shines like a silver wire
Drawing near to the merry month of May
V
God bless this house and arbor, your riches and your store
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We hope that the Lord will prosper you both now and evermore
Drawing near to the merry month of May
VI
So now we’re going to leave you in peace and plenty here
For the summer springs so fresh and green and gay
We will not sing you May again until another year
For to drive you these cold winter nights away

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

We heve a direct testimony in the book”Memoirs of Seventy Years of an Eventful Life  from Charles Hulbert (Providence Grove, Near Shrewsbury:1852), pg 107
With feelings of indescribable pleasure, I still call to my remembrance various customs and scenes familiar to my early years. Still present is the delight with which I hailed the approach of May-day morning, when a select company of the musical Rustics of Worsley, Swinton and Eccles, would assemble at midnight to commence the grateful task of saluting their neighbours with the sound of the Clarionet, Hautboy, German Flute, Violin, and the melody of twenty voices. On this occasion the leader of the band would commence his song under the window or before the outer door of the family “he delighted to honour” with
O rise up Master of this House, all in your chain of gold,
For the summer springs so fresh, green and gay;
I hope you’ll not be angry at us for being so bold,
Drawing near to the merry month of May.
In this strain, including some encomiums or happy allusion to the various qualifications of all the other branches of the family the whole were saluted: after which a purse of silver or a few mugs of good ale were distributed among the company; thus they proceeded from house to house, tilling the air with their music and happy voices, till six o’clock in the morning.
Among the drinks with which the singers were refreshing their throat in addition to the inevitable beer there was also the Syllabub prepared with milk cream. see more

OXFORDSHIRE

THE SWALCLIFFE MAY DAY CAROL

CMB-009Here is the transcription of a 19th-century May song sung by Swalcliffe’s children, clearly a Day Song
Swalcliffe (pronounced sway-cliff) is a village near Banbury in North Oxfordshire. The words of this carol were noted by Miss Annie Norris around 1840 from the singing of a group of children in the village. The words were passed onto the collector – and Adderbury resident – Janet Blunt in 1908, and she finally collected a tune for the song from Mrs Woolgrove of Swalcliffe, and Mrs Lynes of Sibford, at Sibford fete, July 1921.” (from here)

Magpie Lane from The Oxford Ramble 1993

I
Awake! awake! lift up your eyes
And pray to God for grace
Repent! repent! of your former sins
While ye have time and space
II
I have been wandering all this night
And part of the last day
So now I’ve come for to sing you a song
And to show you a branch of May
III
A branch of may I have brought you
And at your door it stands
It does spread out, and it spreads all about
By the work of our Lord’s hands
IV
Man is but a man, his life’s but a span
He is much like a flower
He’s here today and he’s gone tomorrow
So he’s all gone down in an hour
V
So now I have sung you my little short song
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And I wish you a happy May

LINK

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129987 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30126 http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/april/24.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/ making_history/makhist10_prog5d.shtml https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/ swintonmaysong.html http://www.magpielane.co.uk/sleevenotes/ oxford_ramble/may_day_carol.htm https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2013/04/29/ week-88-swalcliffe-may-day-carol/

God Bless the Master of This House

Here We Come A-Wassailing è forse il canto di questua natalizio più popolare, tramandato e raccolto in varie versioni. Tra queste “God bless the master of this house” con un versetto estrapolato che è diventato canto a se stante, spesso utilizzato come Mummers’ Salutation nel Hampshire, Sussex, Surrey e Berkshire . Il testo è anche “Christmas Rhyme” nel  “The Nursery Rhyme Book” di Andrew Lang  (1897)


I
God bless the master of this house,
The mistress bless also,
And all the little children
That round the table go;
II
And all your kin and kinsmen,
That dwell both far and near;
I wish you a merry Christmas,
And a happy New Year
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dio benedica il padrone di questa casa
e anche la padrona
e tutti i bambini piccoli
seduti attorno al tavolo.
II
E tutti i parenti
vicini e lontani
vi auguro un Buon Natale
e un Felice Anno Nuovo
illustrazione di L. Leslie Brooke

ASCOLTA Frank Bond di North Waltham (Hampshire) fondatore del gruppo mummers “North Waltham Jolly Jacks” attivo fino agli anni 50 (vari spezzoni, senza audio, qui)

ASCOLTA The Watersons che riprendono la versione di Preston Candover (archivio)


I
God bless the master of this house
And send him long to reign;
Wherever he walks wherever he rides, Lord Jesus be his guide.
II
God bless the mistress of this house
With a gold chain round her breast;
Amongst her friends and kindred
God send her soul to rest.
III
From morn till morn remember thou
When first our Christ was born,
He was crucified between two thieves
And crowned with a thorn.
IV
From morn till morn remember thou
When Christ lay on the rood,
‘Twas for our sins and wickedness
Christ shed his precious blood
V
From morn till morn remember thou
When Christ was wrapped in clay;
He was put into some sepulchre
Where never no man lay.
VI
God bless the ruler of this house
And send him long to reign,
And many a merry Christmas
We may live to see again.
VII
Now I have said my carol
Which I intend to do;
God bless us all both great and small
And send us a happy New Year
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dio benedica il padrone di questa casa e lo preservi nel comando, ovunque andrà a piedi o a cavallo
il Signore Gesù sarà la sua guida
II
Dio benedica la padrona di questa casa
con la collana d’oro sul petto
tra amici e parenti
Dio manderà la sua anima a riposare
III
Di giorno in giorno ricordatevi
quando il nostro Cristo è nato
e fu crocefisso tra due ladroni
e incoronato di spine
IV
Di giorno in giorno ricordatevi
quando  Cristo fu sulla croce, fu per i nostri peccati e la nostra malvagità che Cristo versò il suo prezioso sangue
V
Di giorno in giorno ricordatevi
quando  Cristo  fu avvolto nel sudario
fu messo nel sepolcro
dove mai nessun uomo giacque.
VI
Dio benedica il padrone di questa casa
e lo preservi nel comando,
e che tanti felici Natali
possiamo vivere per vederli ancora
VII
Ora ho cantato il mio inno
come avevo intenzione di fare
che Dio benedica noi tutti grandi e piccini e ci mandi un felice Anno Nuovo

Vedi indice wassail song

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/godblessthemaster.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/week-226-god-bless-the-master/
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/god_bless_the_master_of_this_hou.htm
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1858

HERE WE COME A-WASSAILING

Wassail_BowlLe wassail songs sono canti di questua di natura non religiosa che risalgono sia al solstizio d’inverno che ai riti di primavera dalla remota origine. Gruppi di giovani questuanti cantavano e suonavano per le strade dietro il compenso di libagioni o di denaro  per augurare una buona festa di Natale e un felice Anno Nuovo.
(introduzione  e indice wassail songs qui)

GOODING CAROLS: la versione tradizionale dello Yorkshire

children-wasselingDa mump= mendicare il Mumping Day (oppure ‘Doleing Day’) cadeva il 21 dicembre e un tempo era il giorno in cui i poveri andavano a chiedere l’elemosina in vista del Natale per potersi procurare tante cose buone (good things).

Nello Staffordshire il termine utilizzato era semplicemente “a-gooding.” “In some parts of the country the day is marked by a custom, among poor persons, of going a gooding, as it is termed—that is to say, making the round of the parish in calling at the houses of their richer neighbours, and begging a supply either of money or provisions to procure good things, or the means of enjoying themselves at the approaching festival of Christmas. …By a correspondent of Notes and Queries, in 1857, we are informed that the custom of ‘Gooding’ exists in full force in Staffordshire, where not only the old women and widows, but representatives from every poor family in the parish, make their rounds in quest of alms. The clergyman is expected to give a shilling to each person, and at all houses a subsidy is looked for either in money or kind. In some parts of the same county a sum of money is collected from the wealthier inhabitants of the parish, and placed in the hands of the clergyman and churchwardens, who on the Sunday nearest to St. Thomas’s Day, distribute it in the vestry under the name of ‘ St. Thomas’s Dole.’ We learn also from an-other communication of the writer just quoted, that at Harrington, in Worcestershire, it is customary for children on St. Thomas’s Day to go round the village begging for apples” (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA registrazione sul campo nel 1973


I
Oh, here we come a wassailing (1)
among the leaves so green (2),
Oh, here we come a wassailing
so fairer to be seen
Chorus
God send a happy,
God send a happy,
Pray God send you all
a happy New Year.
II
We are not daily beggars
that beg from door to door,
But we are neighbours’ children
who you have seen before (3).
III
God bless the master of this house,
God bless the mistress too,
God bless its dwellers one and all
with peace and plenty too
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Qui veniam per la questua, (1)
tra le foglie dei sempreverdi (2)
Qui veniam per la questua,
così belli a vedersi
CORO
Che Dio mandi,
Dio mandi un felice
che Dio vi mandi
un felice Nuovo Anno
II
Non siamo mendicanti abituali
che girano di porta in porta,
ma siamo i figli dei vicini di casa
che già conoscete.(3)
III
Dio benedica il padrone di questa casa e anche la padrona
Dio benedica i suoi abitanti uno ad uno, con pace e prosperità

NOTE
1) wassailing si traduce con brindisi benaugurale, ma qui ha significato di questua
2) non solo rametti di agrifoglio, i questuanti potavano dei bastoni decorati in cima con rametti e fronde di sempreverde decorati con nastri
3) chi canta specifica la propria appartenenza alla comunità del villaggio, non sono dei vagabondi (tinkers o minstrels)

YORKSHIRE WASSAIL: HERE WE COME A-WASSAILING

Yorkshire - carolingAnche se ogni villaggio dello Yorkshire  aveva una sua versione per il canto di questua invernale, c’è una sorta di modello standard testuale (mentre le melodie erano più diversificate tra di loro), che deve la sua notorietà al fatto di essere andato in stampa nella più popolare raccolta ottocentesca di canti natalizi “Christmas Carols New and Old” di Henry Ramsden Bramley e John Stainer (1871): i bambini chiedono qualche soldino, un po’ di pane e formaggio e potersi sedere un momento accanto al fuoco.
In genere mentre le strofe sono abbastanza simili e ricorrenti è il ritornello a presentare una certa varietà nella scelta delle frasi.
Nelle illustrazioni allegate a questo canto riportato nelle principali raccolte ottocentesche e d’inizi Novecento, sono raffigurati come questuanti dei gruppo di bambini senza la presenza di un adulto. Così nell’immagine in “Carols Old and Carols New” (1916) che accompagna “The Wassail Song” altro nome di “Here we come a-wassailing” vediamo un gruppetto di fanciulli che portano un bastone decorato con dei rametti di sempreverde, uno di loro tiene in mano una piccola borsa per le offerte e sulla soglia della casa vediamo arrivare il maggiordomo con il vassoio delle libagioni. Non sono più i bambini a portare la bevanda del brindisi gower-wassail

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser in versione strumentale

ASCOLTA Kate Rusty in Sweet Bells- 2008 (strofe I, II,III, VI)


I
Here we come a-wassailing
among the leaves so green,
Here we come a-wassailing
so fairly to be seen.
CHORUS
Love and joy come to you,
and to you our wassail too,
And God bless you and send you,
a Happy New Year,
God send you a Happy New Year.
II
We’re not daily beggars,
that beg from door to door,
But we are neighbor’s children,
that you’ve seen before.
III
We have a little purse,
it’s made of leather skin,
we need a silver sixpence,
to line it well within.
IV
Good master and good mistress,
As you sit beside the fire,
Pray think of us poor children
Who wander in the mire
V
Bring us out a table
And spread it with a cloth;
Bring us out a cheese,
And of your Christmas loaf
VI
God bless the master of this house,
and then the mistress too,
And all the little children,
that ‘round the table grew.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Qui veniam per la questua (1)
tra le foglie dei sempreverdi (2),
qui veniam per la questua
così belli a vedersi.
RITORNELLO
Perchè amore e gioia siano vostri
e a voi i nostri auguri
che Dio vi benedica e vi porti
un felice anno Nuovo
che Dio vi porti un felice anno Nuovo.
II
Non siamo mendicanti abituali
che girano di porta in porta,
ma siamo i figli dei vicini di casa.
che già conoscete.(3)
III
Abbiamo un borsellino
fatto di cuoio e vi chiediamo di darci qualche monetina d’argento (4),
per riempirlo bene.
IV
Buon padrone e padrona,
seduti accanto al fuoco del camino, pregate pensando a noi poveri bambini, che camminiamo nel fango
V
Portateci fuori un tavolo
e copritelo con una tovaglia,
portateci del formaggio
e la vostra pagnotta di Natale (5)
VI
Dio benedica il padrone di questa casa
e anche la padrona
e tutti i bambini piccoli
seduti intorno al tavolo.

NOTE
4) sei penny, moneta pre-decimale coniata fin dal 1551. IN epoca elisabettiana il sixpence equivaleva ad un giorno di paga per il bracciante agricolo
5) Una specie di pane dolce dalla forma allungata  fatto nello stampo del pane a cassetta, pieno di uva passa e canditi: per preparare il Pane di Natale secondo la ricetta irlandese continua)

Una variante inizia con “We’ve been a-while a-wandering”


I
We’ve been a-while a-wandering
Amongst the leaves so green.
But now we come a wassailing
So plainly to be seen,
CHORUS
For it’s Christmas time,
when we travel far and near;

May God bless you and send you
a happy New Year.
II
We are not daily beggars
That beg from door to door;
We are your neighbors children,
For we’ve been here before;
III
We’ve got a little purse;
Made of leathern ratchin skin;
We want a little of your money
To line it well within;
IV
Call up the butler of this house,
Likewise the mistress too,
And all the little children
That round the table go;
V
Bring us out a table
And spread it with a cloth,
Bring us out a mouldy cheese
And some of your Christmas loaf;
VI
Good master and good mistress,
While you’re sitting by the fire,
Pray think of us poor children
That’s wandered in the mire
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Siamo stati per un po’ in giro
tra le foglie dei sempreverdi (2),
ma ora veniamo per una questua (1),
così belli a vedersi.
CORO
Perchè è il periodo di Natale
quando viaggiamo in lungo e in largo

che Dio vi benedica e vi porti un felice Anno Nuovo
II
Non siamo mendicanti abituali
che girano di porta in porta,
ma siamo i figli dei vicini di casa.
che (ben) conoscete.(3)
III
Abbiamo un borsellino
fatto di cuoio
vogliamo qualche spicciolo (4),
per riempirlo bene.
IV
Che venga il maggiordomo (5) della casa e anche la signora
e tutti i bambini piccoli
seduti intorno al tavolo
V
Portateci fuori un tavolo (6)
e metteteci una tovaglia
portateci fuori del formaggio erborinato (7) e delle pagnotte di Natale
VI
Buon Signore e Buona Signora
mentre viete seduti accanto al caminetto, vi preghiamo di pensare a noi poveri bambini che stiamo in giro nel fango

NOTE
4) le richieste sono per modeste elemosine
5) il maggiordomo della casa è un tratto distintivo della signorilità e del benessere dei padroni di casa (della gentry) in contrasto con la povertà dei questuanti
6) mentre in alcune versioni i bambini chiedono di poter entrare per riscaldarsi accanto al fuoco è più probabile che venissero accolti all’esterno
7) ovvero un formaggio con la muffa; l’equivalente al nostro gorgonzola è in Inghilterra detto Stilton (blue cheese)

WESSEL CUP CAROL

E’ una variante di “Here we come a-wassailing”
ASCOLTA The Children’s Wait in  A Victorian Christmas Revels 2000, che uniscono Gooding Carol/Wessel Cup Carol (su Spotify)


GOODING CAROL
Well-a-day! Well-a-day!
Christmas too soon goes away!
Then your gooding (1) we will pray
For the good-time (2) will not stay.
We are not beggars that beg from door to door,
But neighbors’ children (3) you have known before.
So gooding pray, we cannot stay,
we cannot stay, but must away.
For the Christmas will not stay,
Well-a-day! Well-a-day!

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un buon giorno, un buon giorno!
Il Natale passa troppo in fretta!
Allora l’elemosina(1) chiederemo,
che il buon delle feste (2) non durerà!
Non siamo mendicanti che chiedono l’elemosina porta a porta,
ma i figli dei vicini (3) che già
conoscete.
Così vi preghiamo di darci delle cose buone, che non possiamo restare, e dobbiamo andare via.
Perchè il Natale non durerà,
un buon giorno, un buon giorno!

NOTE
1) gooding è l’elemosina deriva da: tante cose buone (good things).
2)  good-time: letteralmente il buon tempo anche nel senso di tempo della bontà, generosità ovvero il tempo delle cose buone (da mangiare)
3) chi canta specifica la propria appartenenza alla comunità del villaggio

WESSEL CUP CAROL
I
Here we come a-wassailing
Among the leaves so green,
Here we come a-wand’ring
So fair to be seen.
CHORUS
Cheer cheer wessel and the jolly wassel
Bring cheer wealth and joy
Cheer cheer wessel
II
Call up the butler of this house
to put on his golden ring
let him bring us a glass of beer
and the better we shall sing
III
We have a little purse
Made of stretching leather skin;
We want some little money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Qui veniamo per un brindisi,
tra le foglie dei sempreverdi
qui veniamo facendo il giro
così belli da vedere
CORO
Un prospero e felice wassail
portiamo auguri, salute e gioia
un prospero wassail
II
Che venga il maggiordomo  della casa con addosso il suo anello d’oro (4)
che ci porti un bicchiere di birra (5)
e meglio canteremo
III
Abbiamo un borsellino
fatto di cuoio
vogliamo qualche spicciolo,
per riempirlo bene.

NOTE
4) nelle case signorili era il maggiordomo a servire i questuanti
5) la birra era la bevanda del popolo e consumata anche dai bambini

ulteriori varianti continua

FONTI
http://www.yorkshirefolksong.net/song.cfm?songID=22
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/yorkshire_wassail.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54221 http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/herewecomeawassailing.html http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/ Hymns_and_Carols/wassail_song-1.htm