Archivi tag: The Wicker Man

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

LA MUSICA DEI CELTI INTORNO AI FUOCHI DI BELTANE

LA MUSICA DEGLI DEI

I festeggiamenti intorno al fuoco di Beltane avevano caratteristiche rituali comunitarie a sfondo orgiastico e il parallelo corre ai riti dionisiaci cadenzati da aulos doppi e tamburi. vedigreci

ASCOLTA Synaulia

ASCOLTA Wardruna  (per il versante germano-scandinavo)

8cac350d21a4583719eeb3b62bdd244b

FIRE LEAP

Dal film-cult The Wicker man (1973): il canto-danza è una sorta di lezione-studio di partenogenesi in cui delle giovani fanciulle per essere rese fertili dal Fuoco, saltano sulla fiamma .

dal film The Wicker Man Lezione di partenogenesi

Lord Summerisle: Well I’m confident your suspicions are wrong, Sergeant. We don’t commit murder here. We’re a deeply religious people.
Sergeant Howie: Religious? With ruined churches, no ministers, no priests… and children dancing naked!
Lord Summerisle: They do love their divinity lessons.
Sergeant Howie: [outraged] But they are… are *naked*!
Lord Summerisle: Naturally! It’s much too dangerous to jump through the fire with your clothes on!
Sergeant Howie: What religion can they possibly be learning jumping over bonfires?
Lord Summerisle: Parthenogenesis.
Sergeant Howie: What?
Lord Summerisle: Literally, as Miss Rose would doubtless say in her assiduous way, reproduction without sexual union.
Sergeant Howie: Oh, what is all this? I mean, you’ve got fake biology, fake religion… Sir, have these children never heard of Jesus?
Lord Summerisle: Himself the son of a virgin, impregnated, I believe, by a ghost…
Sergeant Howie: And what of the TRUE God? Whose glory, churches and monasteries have been built on these islands for generations past? Now sir, what of him?
Lord Summerisle: He’s dead. Can’t complain, had his chance and in modern parlance, blew it.

ASCOLTA Per “Fire Leap” ovvero “Take the flame within you” Paul Giovanni ha composto una melodia medioevale, di flauti e zufoli, cadenzata ma non frenetica, non proprio una musica dionisiaca.
Secondo la versione ufficiale la maggior parte dei testi scritti per l’occasione provengono dalle raccolte di musica tradizionale di Cecil Sharpe, e riscritti dallo sceneggiatore Anthony Shaffer (ma al momento per questo canto in particolare non ho ancora trovato riscontro)


I
Take the flame inside you
Burn and burn below
Fire seed and fire feed
To make the baby grow
II
Take the flame inside you
Burn and burn belay(1)
Fire seed and fire feed
To make the baby stay
III
Take the flame inside you
Burn and burn belong
Fire seed and fire feed
And make the baby strong
IV
Take the flame inside you
Burn and burn belie(2)
Fire seed and fire feed
To make the baby cry(3)
V
Take the flame inside you
Burn and burn begin
Fire seed and fire feed
To make the baby King
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Prendi la fiamma dentro di te
brucia e brucia da sotto
il fuoco è seme e nutrimento
per far nascere il bambino
II
Prendi la fiamma dentro di te
brucia e brucia il legame
il fuoco è seme e nutrimento
per accogliere il bambino
III
Prendi la fiamma dentro di te
brucia e brucia da tanto
il fuoco è seme e nutrimento
per far diventare il bambino forte
IV
Prendi la fiamma dentro di te
brucia e brucia le impurità
il fuoco è seme e nutrimento
per far piangere il bambino
V
Prendi la fiamma dentro di te
brucia e brucia dall’inizio
il fuoco è seme e nutrimento
per fare il bambino Re

NOTE
1) nelle strofe si ripetono parole assonanti composte con il verdo be: below, belay, belong, belie, begin che creano un’allitterazione
2) belie è una contrazione di belied, belying, io l’ho tradotto un po’ liberamente
3) credo si riferisca al vagito del bambino al momento della nascita

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/strumenti-antichi-celti.html
http://www.simonescuola.it/lebaccanti/strumenti_dionisiaci.html
http://powderroom.kinja.com/our-more-dreadful-sacrifice-an-appointment-with-the-w-1672309330

RIGS O’BARLEY

Questa canzone è stata scritta interamente da Robert Burns nel 1782 adattandola ad una vecchia aria scozzese da danza dal titolo “Corn Rigs are bonnie“. Pare fosse particolarmente cara al poeta: si racconta della notte d’amore con una bella fanciulla tra i covoni di grano, una magica notte di luna piena…

L’Annie della canzone è stata identificata in Anne Rankie, la più giovane figlia di un fittavolo, John Rankine di Adamhill, della fattoria che si trovava a poca distanza da quella dei Burns a Lochlea. Nel 1782, nel mese di settembre, la donna sposò un oste, John Merry di Cumnock, per cui alcuni dubitano che ad agosto si trovasse tra i covoni d’orzo con il bel Robert; altri però fanno notare che dopo 4 anni (e ancora una volta ad agosto) il poeta, trovatosi nei paraggi, alloggiasse proprio presso la locanda dei due! Possiamo quindi essere certi che Annie e Robert si fossero frequentati, tant’è  che Burns le regalò una ciocca di capelli e un suo ritratto, che lei conservò insieme alla canzone.
Molto cavallerescamente Burns tace però sull’identità della bella Annie.

William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865
William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865

LA NOTTE DI LAMMAS

rigsL’analisi del testo dipana la dinamica della relazione tra i due amanti (secondo il mio punto di vista): la notte di Lammas, come consuetudine della tradizione celtica, è la notte della vigilia del 1 agosto, giorno di festa per i contadini della Scozia, giorno di riposo e festa prima dell’inizio del raccolto.
Tra i giovani era consuetudine passare la notte nei campi di grano (o di orzo) ma il nostro Robert in un primo momento si tiene alla larga da tale usanza, la bella Annie è promessa ad un altro…
Tuttavia l’ardore giovanile alla fine vince e anche la fanciulla (senza neanche farsi pregare troppo, ci rivela il bardo) acconsente: i due si incontrano tra i campi d’orzo, al crepuscolo, in una calda sera d’estate con la luna piena a rischiarare la notte, e che “happy night”!
La strofa finale riprende un concetto caro al poeta: il tempo migliore è quello speso ad amare! E in quella magica notte sembra che il giovane Robert lo abbia fatto per tre volte!

Ossian in Seal Song 1981 con la melodia tradizionale Corn Rigs Are Bonnie, il video è molto ben fatto con il testo che scorre, filmati e foto d’epoca nonchè “ritratti” del bardo, tutto ben strutturato nell’evocazione per immagini del testo

ASCOLTA Paul Giovanni per il film The Wicker Man (in italiano Il prescelto) con un’altra melodia


I
It was upon a Lammas(1) night,
When the corn rigs(2) were bonnie,
Beneath the moon’s unclouded light,
I held awa’ to Annie;
The time flew by wi’ tentless heed,
‘Til ‘tween the late and early,
Wi’ small persuasion she agreed
To see me thro’ the barley.
chorus
Corn Rigs and barley rigs,
Corn rigs are bonny:
I’ll ne’eer forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
II
The sky was blue (3), the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly;
I set her down wi’ right good will,
Amang the rigs o’ barley:
I ken’t(4) her heart, was a’ my ain(5);
I loved her most sincerely;
I kissed her o’er and o’er again,
Amang the rigs o’ barley.
III
I locked her in my fond embrace;
Her heart was beatin’ rarely:
My blessing on that happy place,
Amang the rigs o’ barley!
But by the moon and stars so bright,
That shone that hour so clearly!
She aye shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs of barley.
IV
I hae been blythe(6) wi’ comrades dear;
I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyful gath’rin’ gear(7);
I hae been happy thinking:
But a’ the pleasures e’er I saw,
Tho’ three times doubled fairly,
That happy night was worth them a’,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Era la notte di Lammas(1)
quando le porche(2) del grano erano belle, sotto la piena luce della luna,
me ne andai da Annie;
il tempo scorreva senza pensieri
finchè da un momento all’altro,
senza farsi pregare troppo, acconsentì
a vedermi in mezzo all’orzo
RITORNELLO
Porche di grano e d’orzo,
le porche di grano sono belle:
mai dimenticherò quella notte felice
tra le porche con Annie
II
Il cielo era azzurro(3), il vento tranquillo,
chiara la luna splendeva;
la stesi di buona voglia
tra le porche dell’orzo:
sapevo che il suo cuore era tutto mio,
l’amai nel modo più sincero;
la baciai ancora e ancora di nuovo,
tra le porche dell’orzo
III
La imprigionai nel mio appassionato abbraccio, il cuore le batteva appena:
benedetto quel luogo propizio
in mezzo alle porche dell’orzo!
E anche la luna e le stelle così luminose
che in quell’ora brillavano così chiaramente!
Si, lei benedirà quella notte felice
in mezzo alle porche dell’orzo
IV
Sono stato bene con i miei cari amici,
sono stato a bere in allegria
e con gioia i soldi ho guadagnato
e sono stato felice a pensare:
ma tutti i piaceri che abbia mai provato,
sebbene raddoppiati tre volte,
quella notte allegra tutti li valeva
in mezzo alle porche con Annie

NOTE
1) Lammas è la festa del raccolto che si celebra il primo agosto le cui origini risalgono alla festa celtica di Lugnasad, una festa che segna l’inizio del primo raccolto (grano e orzo). Nella tradizione contadina scozzese è come il nostro giorno di San Martino, quando vengono pagati i terreni in affitto e si rinnovano i contratti. (vedi scheda)
2) Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche” una tecnica colturale che prevedeva la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate, ed era il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale del tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare, il mugellese, che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto dimensione opportuna.
3) l’ora indicata è quella del crepuscolo
4) knew
5) own
6) joyous
7) earning money= guadagnare soldi

LA SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE

Il brano è più conosciuto con il titolo di Corn Rigs o Corn Rigs Are Bonnie ed è anche una danza, una scottish country dance (vedi scheda danza) presa dalle vecchie tradizioni o dalla vita quotidiana della società di una volta dedita alla pastorizia e all’agricoltura. Durante il raccolto era consuetudine danzare tra i covoni di grano, come mostrato in questo filmato d’epoca dalla Royal Scottish Country Dance Society.
VIDEO

e qui la melodia Mandosounds

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://giulsass.wordpress.com/istruzione/esperienza-antica/gest_terra_p_s/