Archivi tag: The Seekers

Blow the man down sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

“Blow  the man down”, that is to knock a man down or strike with a fist, belaying pin or capstan bar, is a popular sea shanty.

There are a great variety of texts of this halyard shanty, with the same melody, and after the version for the cartoon character “Popeye” it has also become a song for children!

Billy Costello the voice of the first Popeye

According to Stan Hugill “the shanty was an old Negro song Knock A Man Down. This song, a not so musical version of the later Blow The Man Down, was taken and used by the hoosiers of Mobile Bay, and at a later date carried by white seamen of the Packet Ships.

Knock a man down

The original version probably comes from African-American workers, but ended up in the repertoire of liners along the transatlantic route. In his video Ranzo combines the melody of Stan Hugill with that of John Short: in the first text the shantyman would prefer to be on the ground, to enjoy themselves with drinks and girls.
Hulton Clint

There are three main themes.

FIRST VERSION: prime seamen onboard a Black Ball

The oldest version is the one in which the novice sailors are soon aware of the harsh and violent climate on the Black Baller.

black-ball
In addition to the flag the Black Ball of the Black Ball Line was drawn on the fore-topsail

As Hugill says ” Chief Mates in Western Ocean ships were known as “blowers”, second mates as “strikers”, and third mates as “greasers.”
Packets and Blowers
A Packet ship was one which had a contract to carry packets (formerly “paquettes”) of mail. The earliest and most famous transatlantic packet route was the Liverpool service, started in 1816 by the Black Ball Line, with regular departures from New York on the 1st and 16th of every month without fail, regardless of weather or other inconveniences. These early ships of 300 to 500 tons averaged 23 days for the eastward voyage and 40 days to return westward. Cabin passengers were usually gentlefolk of good breeding, who expected to find courtesy and politeness in the captains with whom they sailed. Packet captains were remarkable men, hearty, bluff, and jovial, but never coarse, always a gentleman.
The mates, on the other hand, had no social duties to distract their attention, and devoted their time and energies to extracting the very maximum of performance from both their vessel and its crew, so it is no surprise that it was on board the Black Ball liners that “belaying pin soup” and “handspike hash” first became familiar items of the shipboard regime. A hard breed of sailor was required to maintain the strict schedules whatever the weather, and it took an even harder breed of mate to keep this rough and ready bunch in some sort of order. If all else failed then then Rule of the Fist applied: to “blow a man down” was to knock him down with any means available – fist, belaying pin, or capstan bar being the weapons most often preferred. (from here)

“Capstan Bars” di David Bone 1932
CHORUS
oh! Blow the man down, bullies.
Blow the man down W-ay! hey?
Blow the man down!
Blow the man down bullies.
Blow him right down, give us the time and we’ll blow the man down!
Come all ye young fellers that follows the sea.
W-ay! hey? Blow the man down!
I’ll sing ye a song if ye’ll listen t’ me.
Give us the time an’ we’ll blow the man down!
‘Twas in a Black Baller I first served my time.
and in a Black Baller I wasted my prime.
‘Tis when a Black Baller’s preparin’ for sea.
Th’sights in th’ fo’ cas’le(1) is funny t’ see
Wi’ sodgers (2) an’ tailors an’ dutchmen an’ all,
As ships for prime seamen(3) aboard th’ Black Ball.
But when th’ Black Baller gets o’ th’ land
it’s then as ye’ll hear th’ sharp word o’ command.
oh! it’s muster ye sodgers an’ tailors an’ sich.
an’ hear ye’re name called by a son of a bitch.
it’s “fore-topsail halyards”(4), th’ Mate(5) he will roar.
“oh, lay along smartly you son of a whore”.
oh, lay along smartly each lousy recroot.
Wor it’s lifted ye’ll be wi’ th’ toe of a boot.

NOTES
1 )the forward part of a ship below the deck, traditionally used as the crew’s living quarters.
2) sodger vvariant of soldier is used as an insult in the sense of ambush, slacker, one who always tries to escape from work, that when there is work, goes away or retires
3) the inexperienced and the novices are good only for the easy maneuvers
4) fore-topsail halyards= In sailing, a halyard or halliard is a line (rope) that is used to hoist a ladder, sail, flag or yard; fore-topsai  the sail above the foresail set on the fore-topmast
5) Mate= first officer

The Seekers


I
Come all ye young fellows that follow the sea
To me weigh hey blow the man down
And pray pay attention and listen to me
Give me some time to blow the man down
I’m a deep water sailor just in from Hong Kong
If you’ll give me some rum I’ll sing you a song-
II
T’was on a Black Baller I first spent my time
And on that Black Baller I wasted my prime
T’is when a Black Baller’s preparing for sea
You’d split your sides laughing at the sights that you see
III
With the tinkers and tailors and soldiers and all
That ship for prime seamen onboard a Black Ball
T’is when a Black Baller is clear of the land
Our boatswain then gives us the word of command
IV
“Lay aft” is the cry “to the break of the poop
Or I’ll help you along with the toe of my boot”
T’is larboard and starboard on the deck you will sprawl
For Kicking Jack Williams commands the Black Ball
Aye first it’s a fist and then it’s a pall
When you ship as a sailor aboard the Black Ball

SECOND  VERSION: I’m a `Flying Fish’ sailor

The second version tells the story of a “flying-fish sailor” just landed in Liverpool from Hong Kong, swapped by a policeman for a “blackballer”. The sailor reacts by throwing the policeman on the ground with a sting and obviously ends up in jail for a few months.

Stan Hugill& Pusser’s Rum from Sailing Songs  (1990)


I’ll sing you a song if you give some gin
To me wey-hey, blow the man down
?? down to the pin
Gimme some time to blow the man down
As I was rolling down Paradise street(1)
a big irish scuffer boy (2) I chanced for to meet,
Says he, “You’re a Blackballer from the cut of your hair(3);
you’re a Blackballer by the clothes that you wear.
“You’ve sailed in a packet that flies the Black Ball,
You’ve robbed some poor Dutchman of boots, clothes and all.”
“O policeman, policeman, you do me great wrong;
I’m a `Flying Fish’ sailor(4) just home from Hongkong!”
So I stove in his face and I smashed in his jaw.
Says he, “Oh young feller, you’re breaking the law!”
They gave me six months in Liverpool town
For bootin’ and a-kickin’ and a-blowing him down.
We’re a Liverpool ship with a Liverpool crew
A Liverpool mate(5) and a Scouse(6) skipper too
We’re Liverpool born and we’re Liverpool bred
Thick in the arm, boys, and thick in the head
Blow the man down, bullies, blow the man down
With a crew of hard cases(7) from Liverpool town

NOTES
1) once the fun way for sailors, the 19th century Paradise street left today the place for Liverpool One,
2 sassy policeman or big Irish copper: scuffer is a typical nineteenth-century term for policeman
3) all the Black Baller line sailors wore their hair cut short
4) According to Hugill a flying-fish sailor is a sailor ” who preferred the lands of the East and the warmth of the Trade Winds to the cold and misery of the Western Ocean
5) first mate
6) scouse is a term used by the people of Liverpool which is also the name given to the local dialect. Originally born from the habits of the sailors of Liverpool to eat the stew of lamb and vegetables probably derived from the Norwegian “skause”. It refers to the English spoken language typical of Irish immigrants
7) hard cases: a tough or intractable person, a person who is hard to get along with.

JOHN SHORT VERSION: Knock a man down

The shantyman John Short sings a very personal version compared to the “Blow the man down” reported in the shanties archives, in the arrangement for the Short Sharp Shanties the authors write ” ” Fox-Smith, Colcord and Doeflinger all comment on the number of different texts which the shanty carried.  Hugill gives six different sets of words and Short’s words are not really related to any of them – so we have added ‘general’ verses from other versions.  Specifically, we’ve added the ‘Market Street’, ‘spat in his face’ and ‘rags are all gone’ verses – the rest are Short’s.”
Sam Lee from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 


As I was a-walking down Market street
way ay knock a man down, 
a bully old watchman I chanced for to meet
O give me some time to knock a man down.
Chorus

Knock a man down, kick a man down ;
way ay knock a man down,
knock a man down
right down to the ground,
O give me some time to knock a man down.

The watchman’s dog stood ten feet high (1),
The watchman’s dog stood ten feet high.
So I spat in his face by gave him good jaw
and says he “me young  you’re breaking the law!”
[chorus]
I wish I was in London Town.
It’s there we’d make them girls fly round.
She is a lively ship and a lively crew.
O we are the boys to put her through
[chorus]
The rags are all gone and (?the chains they are jam?)
and the skipper he says  (? “If the weather be high”?)
[chorus]

NOTES
A transcription still incomplete because I can not understand the pronunciation of the final verses
1) it was not unusual that the watchmen since the Middle Ages were accompanied with a dog, as can be seen from many vintage illustrations

THIRD VERSION: Beware of the drink whenever it’s free

000brgcf
The most widespread version is about an unfortunate meeting in Paradise street with a young “damself” sometimes compared to a ship in which, metaphorically, the sailor would want to embark.
The awakening is bitter, because he was shanghaiing on a Yankee ship. (see more)

the Haunted Saloon

I’ll sing you a song, a good song of the sea
Way – hey, blow the man down.
I trust that you’ll join in the chorus with me; Give me some time to blow the man down.
Chorus
Blow the man down, bully, blow the man down; Way – hey, blow the man down.
Blow the man down, boys, from Liverpool town; 
Give me some time to blow the man down.

As I was a-walking down Paradise street
A handsome young damsel I happened to meet
At the pub down on Lime street I then went astray
I drank enough stout for to fill Galway Bay
The next I remember I woke in the dawn
On a tall Yankee clipper that was bound round Cape Horn.
Come all ye young fellows who follow the sea
Beware of the drink whenever it’s free

Woody Guthrie from Songs of American Sailormen, 1988 version collected by Joanna Colcord


As I was out walkin’ down Paradise street(1),
To me way, hey, blow the man down!
A pretty young damsel I chanced for to meet,
Give me some time to blow the man down!

She was round in the counter and bluff in the bow,
So I took in all sail and cried “way enough now”(2)
I hailed her in English, she answered me clear
“I’m from the Black Arrow bound to the Shakespeare”
So I tailed her my flipper(3) and took her in tow
And yard-arm to yard-arm(4), away we did go
But as we were a-going she said unto me
“There’s a spankin’ full rigger(5) just ready for sea”
That spankin’ full rigger to New York was bound
She was very well mannered and very well found
But as soon as that packet was clear of the bar(6)
The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar
As soon as that packet was out on the sea
‘Twas devilish hard treatment of every degree
So I give you fair warning before we belay
Don’t never take heed of what pretty girls say.

NOTES
1) once the fun way for sailors, the 19th century Paradise street left today the place for Liverpool One,
2) way enough now from Weigh enough – Take the stroke, put the blades on the water and relax. “Weigh enough” (or “Wain…’nuff”, or “Way enough”) (USA) The command to stop what ever the rower is doing, whether it be walking with the boat overhead or rowing.
3) flipper= hand
4) yard-arm to yard-arm= Very close to each other.
5) rigger=packet
6) The bar of Mersey river.

Allen Robertson for the cartoon version of Jack Sparrow from Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean: Swashbuckling Sea Songs 2007

I
Oh, blow the man down, bullies, blow the man down
Way aye blow the man down
Oh, blow the man down, bullies, blow him away
Give me some time to blow the man down!
II
As I was a walking down Paradise Street
A pretty young damsel I chanced for to meet.
III
So I tailed her my flipper and took her in tow
And yardarm to yardarm away we did go.
IV
But as we were going she said unto me
There’s a spanking full-rigger just ready for sea.
V
So just as that lass I reached not to far
The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar.
VI
It’s starboard and larboard on deck you will sprawl
For Captain Jack Sparrow commands the Black Pearl
VII
So I was shangaiing aboard this old ship
she took off me money and gave me to sleep
VIII
So I give you fair warning before we belay,
Don’t ever take head of what pretty girls say.

CARRIBEAN VERSIONS

Two variants from the Nevis and Carriacou islands so Ranzo writes in the notes: “The variation from Nevis, with its repeated phrase “in the hold below”, suggests the song was once associated with stevedores loading cargo. This is fascinating, because it is consistent with (my reading of the) evidence that “Blow the Man Down” was initially a stevedore song, in which the act of blowing “the man down” was perhaps a metaphor for stowing each piece of cargo. Also, the many variations, “hit,” “knock,” “kick,” “blow” are consistent with other historical data that “knock a man down” was an/the early form. The variation was sung by Roy Gumbs and party of Nevis in 1962. Lomax recorded it, and Abrahams transcribed it in his 1974 book. The second variation is from Carriacou. It refers to a vessel named _Cariso_. It was sung by Daniel Aikens and chorus in 1962.”

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/blowdown.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/btmd/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/blowdown
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/blow-the-man-down.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/flying-fish-sailor.html http://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/blow-the-man-down-chords-lyrics
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/blowthemandown.htm
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm

ERISKAY LOVE LILT

Leggi in italiano

Bheir mi ò” (aka “Gradh Geal Mo Chridhe”)  a scottish slow air, rearranged  by Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser as “Eriskay Love Lilt”  because she listened the gaelic song onEriskay isle: she modified the tune a little and she added this English lyric.

Judith Durham & The Seekers  ‘The Seekers At Home’ TV special (1967)

Siobhan Owen

  Alfred Deller

Which woman would not want to hear so sweet verses?

Chorus
Vair me o, ro van o(1)
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
Sad I am without thee.
I
When I’m lonely, dear white heart(2),
Black the night and wild the sea;
by love’s light my foot finds
The old pathway to thee.
II
Thou’rt the music of my heart,
Harp of joy, o cruit mo chridh'(3),
Moon of guidance by night,
Strength and light thou’rt to me
III
In the morning, when I go
To the white and shining sea,
In the calling of the seals
Thy soft calling to me.

NOTE
1) no meanings only sounds
2)  a good, honest and generous person.
3) from scottish gaelic “harp of my heart”

ERISKAY

Eriskay  from the Old Norse for “Eric’s Isle”, is a small island of the Outer Hebrides. It is a rocky island connected to the largest South Uist island by a causeway: white beaches, crystal clear waters, seals and dolphins, hawks, buzzards, breathtaking views!

eriskay

A poem of remote lives:  Werner Kissling 1934 http://ssa.nls.uk/film.cfm?fid=1701
So you understand how music is an integral part of the harsh rural life of the past: a collective work acquired from a centuries-old experience and in balance with the earth, underlined by the traditional songs!!

http://www.visit-uist.co.uk/default.asp?page=39
http://www.eriskayselfcatering.co.uk/html/exploring.html

 

ERISKAY LOVE LILT

Read the post in English

Bheir mi ò (anche con il titolo di  “Gradh Geal Mo Chridhe”) è una slow di origini scozzesi; è stata fatta propria dalla tradizione irlandese e  tradotta in inglese con il titolo di Eriskay Love Lilt ( in italiano”Nenia d’amore di Eriskay” ).
E’ stata Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser a rendere popolare tra il gande pubblico questa dolce melodia

MARJORIE KENNEDY-FRASER

Questa è la versione anglicizzata dal gaelico scozzese di  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930 e il titolo si traduce con (e )
ASCOLTA Judith Durham & The Seekers per ‘The Seekers At Home’ TV special (1967)

ASCOLTA Siobhan Owen voce da uccello del paradiso, una giovanissima cantane e arpista gallese (il suo sito qui)

 ASCOLTA Alfred Deller (nel video immagini dell’isola, un incanto)

Quale donna non vorrebbe sentirsi sussurrare così dolci versi?


Chorus
Vair me o, ro van o(1)
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
Sad I am without thee.
I
When I’m lonely, dear white heart(2),
Black the night and wild the sea;
by love’s light my foot finds
The old pathway to thee.
II
Thou’rt the music of my heart,
Harp of joy, o cruit mo chridh'(3),
Moon of guidance by night,
Strength and light thou’rt to me
III
In the morning, when I go
To the white and shining sea,
In the calling of the seals
Thy soft calling to me.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ritornello (1)
Vair me o, ro van o
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
sono triste senza di te
I
Quando sono solo, caro cuore puro(2)
oscura la notte e scatenato il mare,
i passi trovano, illuminati dall’amore, il vecchio sentiero verso te.
II
Tu sei la musica del mio cuore
Arpa di gioia ” o cruit mo chridh‘”
luna che guidi nella notte
forza e luce tu sei per me
III
Al mattino quando vado
verso il mare spumoso e rilucente,
nel richiamo delle foche
(trovo) il tuo dolce richiamo per me.

NOTE
1) le parole non hanno significato in quanto sono solo suoni ossia la pronuncia delle corrispondenti frasi nella versione in gaelico scozzese
2) letteralmente “cuore bianco” ovvero una persona buona, onesta e generosa.
3) in gaelico scozzese letteralmente “arpa del mio cuore”

PER SAPERE TUTTO SULL’ISOLA

Eriskay è una piccola isola che fa parte delle Ebridi (le Ebridi Esterne) qui vi sbarcò il Bel Carletto nel 1745 alla volta della conquista del trono di Scozia. E’ un isola rocciosa collegata da una strada rialzata alla più grande isola South Uist: spiagge bianche, acque cristalline, foche e delfini, falchi, poiane, panorami mozzafiato!

eriskay

A poem of remote lives: i filmati di Werner Kissling nel 1934 http://ssa.nls.uk/film.cfm?fid=1701
Nel vedere il filmato si comprende come la musica sia parte integrante della dura vita contadina di un tempo: un lavoro collettivo acquisito da una secolare esperienza e in equilibrio con la terra, scandito dai canti della tradizione!

http://www.visit-uist.co.uk/default.asp?page=39
http://www.eriskayselfcatering.co.uk/html/exploring.html

FONTI
http://www.raretunes.org/performers/patuffa-kennedy-fraser/

Blow (knock) the man down

Read the post in English

“Blow (knock) the man down” nel gergo marinaro significa picchiare sodo fino a far cadere a terra il malcapitato, in genere bastavano i pugni ma all’occorrenza i marinai maneggiavano una caviglia o un’aspa d’argano.

Esistono una grande varietà di testi di questa halyard shanty, sulla stessa melodia, che dopo la versione per il personaggio cartoon “Braccio di ferro” è diventata anche una canzone per bambini!

Billy Costello la voce del primo Braccio di Ferro

Secondo Stan Hugill “la shanty era una vecchia canzone dei neri “Knock A Man Down”. Questa canzone, una versione non così musicale della successiva “Blow The Man Down”, è stata presa e usata dagli scaricatori portuali di Mobile Bay, e in un secondo momento dai marinai bianchi delle navi postali”

Knock a man down

La versione che ha influenzato la shany proviene canti di lavoro afro-americani, ma è finita nel repertorio delle navi di linea lungo la rotta transatlantica. Nel suo video Ranzo accosta la melodia di Stan Hugill con quella di John Short: nel primo testo lo shantyman preferirebbe essere a terra, a sollazzarsi con drink e ragazze.

Si distinguono tre temi principali.

PRIMA VERSIONE: prime seamen onboard a Black Ball

La versione più antica è quella in cui gli i marinai novellini si accorgono presto del clima duro e violento sulle Black Baller.

black-ball
Oltre che sulla bandiera la Palla nera della Black Ball Line era disegnata sulla vela di parrochetto

Come dice Hugill “I Primi Ufficiali nelle navi transatlantiche erano conosciuti come “blowers”, i secondo come “strikers”, e i terzi come”greasers.”
Una Packet ship era una nave che trasportava i pacchi di posta (“paquettes”). La tratta transatlantica più antica e più famosa era il servizio di Liverpool, iniziato nel 1816 dalla Black Ball Line, con partenze regolari da New York il 1 e il 16 di ogni mese senza cancellazioni, a prescindere dalle condizioni meteorologiche o da altri inconvenienti. Queste prime navi da 300 a 500 tonnellate avevano una media di 23 giorni per il viaggio verso est e di 40 giorni per ritornare a ovest. I passeggeri delle cabine erano solitamente gentiluomini di buona educazione, che si aspettavano di trovare cortesia e buone maniere nei capitani con cui navigavano. I Capitani dei postali erano uomini notevoli, generosi, sinceri e gioviali, ma mai volgari, sempre gentiluomini.
Gli ufficiali, d’altra parte, non avevano doveri sociali che distraevano la loro attenzione e dedicavano il loro tempo e le loro energie a spremere il massimo delle prestazioni sia dalla loro nave che dal suo equipaggio, quindi non sorprende che bordo delle  Black Ball “belaying pin soup” e “handspike hash” siano diventate per la prima volta elementi familiari del regime di bordo. Era necessaria una dura razza di marinai per mantenere gli orari rigidi a prescindere dalle condizioni meteorologiche, e ci voleva una razza di ufficiali ancora più dura per mantenere la disciplina in questo branco di duri e allenati uomini. Se tutto il resto falliva, allora si applicava la Regola del Pugno (Rule of the Fist): “blow a man down” significava buttarlo a terra in qualunque modo: il pugno, una caviglia o un’aspa d’argano, erano le armi più spesso preferite.“(tratto da qui)

“Capstan Bars” di David Bone 1932
CHORUS
oh! Blow the man down, bullies.
Blow the man down W-ay! hey?
Blow the man down!
Blow the man down bullies.
Blow him right down, give us the time and we’ll blow the man down!
Come all ye young fellers that follows the sea.
W-ay! hey? Blow the man down!
I’ll sing ye a song if ye’ll listen t’ me.
Give us the time an’ we’ll blow the man down!
‘Twas in a Black Baller I first served my time.
and in a Black Baller I wasted my prime.
‘Tis when a Black Baller’s preparin’ for sea.
Th’sights in th’ fo’ cas’le(1) is funny t’ see
Wi’ sodgers (2) an’ tailors an’ dutchmen an’ all,
As ships for prime seamen(3) aboard th’ Black Ball.
But when th’ Black Baller gets o’ th’ land
it’s then as ye’ll hear th’ sharp word o’ command.
oh! it’s muster ye sodgers an’ tailors an’ sich.
an’ hear ye’re name called by a son of a bitch.
it’s “fore-topsail halyards”(4), th’ Mate(5) he will roar.
“oh, lay along smartly you son of a whore”.
oh, lay along smartly each lousy recroot.
Wor it’s lifted ye’ll be wi’ th’ toe of a boot.
Traduzione italiano di Italo Ottonello
CORO
Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi. abbattetelo
Buttate giù l’uomo! W-ay! hey?
Buttate giù l’uomo!
Abbattete l’uomo, ragazzi.
Buttatelo giù
all’occasione abbatteremo l’uomo!

Venite tutti, voi giovani che andate per mare
W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
Se mi ascolterete vi canterò una canzone/ all’occasione abbatteremo l’uomo!
Fu su un Black Baller il mio primo imbarco
e su un Black Baller sprecai la mia gioventù
Quando il Black Baller si appresta a salpare
è divertente dare uno sguardo all’equipaggio nel castello
con soldataglia, sarti, olandesi e tutto il resto,
imbarcati da novellini
sul Black Ball
Ma quando il Black Baller lascia la terra
allora udrete l’aspra parola
di comando
voi soldati, sarti e simili,
sarete riuniti per udire
il vostro nome chiamato da figli di buona donna
“la drizza di parrocchetto”, griderà il “primo”
“Su arriva sparato,
figli di p……a
vada arriva sparato ogni pidocchioso novizio.
o ci sarà fatto arrivare dalla punta di uno stivale”

NOTE
1) Sui velieri il cassero si estende dalla poppa fino all’albero di mezzana. La sua parte prodiera, dotata di ringhiera, costituisce il ponte di comando della nave a vela. Lo spazio coperto dal cassero è solitamente destinato agli alloggi. Il castello (forecastle) è il “locale equipaggio”, che ha conservato tale denominazione anche quando l’equipaggio dormiva in tuga. Quindi prora>castello>equipaggio mentre poppa>cassero>ufficiali. In merito Italo Ottonello cita Ishmael, il protagonista di Moby Dick, secondo il quale ” il commodoro sul cassero riceve di seconda mano l’aria dai marinai del castello
2) sodger variante di soldier è usato come insulto nel senso di imboscato, scansafatiche, uno che cerca sempre di sfuggire al lavoro, che quando c’è da lavorare, si allontana o si ritira
3) gli inesperti e i novellini sono buoni solo per le facili manovre
4) fore-topsail halyards= Drizza: cavo con funzione di sollevamento (di pennone, di fiocco, di picco). Parrocchetto: secondo pennone a partire dal basso dell’albero di trinchetto e nome della vela relativa. Trinchetto: l’albero prodiero di un veliero a più alberi
5) Mate= il primo ufficiale

The Seekers


I
Come all ye young fellows that follow the sea
To me weigh hey blow the man down
And pray pay attention and listen to me
Give me some time to blow the man down
I’m a deep water sailor just in from Hong Kong
If you’ll give me some rum I’ll sing you a song-
II
T’was on a Black Baller I first spent my time
And on that Black Baller I wasted my prime
T’is when a Black Baller’s preparing for sea
You’d split your sides laughing at the sights that you see
III
With the tinkers and tailors and soldiers and all
That ship for prime seamen onboard a Black Ball
T’is when a Black Baller is clear of the land
Our boatswain then gives us the word of command
IV
“Lay aft” is the cry “to the break of the poop
Or I’ll help you along with the toe of my boot”
T’is larboard and starboard on the deck you will sprawl
For Kicking Jack Williams commands the Black Ball
Aye first it’s a fist and then it’s a pall
When you ship as a sailor aboard the Black Ball
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite tutti, giovani compagni che andate per mare,
con me, W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
State attenti
e ascoltatemi
all’occasione abbatterò l’uomo!
Sono un marinaio d’alto mare appena arrivato da Hong Kong
e se mi darai del rum ti canterò una canzone
II
Fu su un Black Baller il mio primo imbarco
e su un Black Baller  sprecai la mia gioventù.
Quando il Black Baller si appresta a salpare
ci si sbellica dalle risate
nel godere il panorama
III
Con calderai e  sarti e soldati e tutto il resto
imbarcati da novellini sul
Black Ball
Ma quando il Black Baller lascia la terra
allora il nostro comandante ci darà gli ordini
IV
“Andate a poppa”
è il grido
“o vi farò arrivare a poppa dalla punta del mio stivale”
A babordo e a tribordo sul ponte si ammucchieranno
perchè  Jack Williams lo Spaccone, comanda il Black Ball
si prima sono pugni e poi funerali
quando navighi come marinaio a bordo del Black Ball

SECONDA VERSIONE: I’m a `Flying Fish’ sailor

La seconda versione racconta la storia di un “flying-fish sailor” appena sbarcato a Liverpool da Hong Kong, scambiato da un poliziotto per un “blackballer” e insultato o quantomeno apostrofato in malo modo. Il marinaio reagisce gettando il poliziotto a terra con un pungo e ovviamente finisce in prigione per qualche mese.

Stan Hugill & Pusser’s Rum in Sailing Songs  (1990)


I’ll sing you a song if you give some gin
To me wey-hey, blow the man down
?? down to the pin
Gimme some time to blow the man down
As I was rolling down Paradise street(1)
a big irish scuffer boy (2) I chanced for to meet,
Says he, “You’re a Blackballer from the cut of your hair(3);
you’re a Blackballer by the clothes that you wear.
“You’ve sailed in a packet that flies the Black Ball,
You’ve robbed some poor Dutchman of boots, clothes and all.”
“O policeman, policeman, you do me great wrong;
I’m a `Flying Fish’ sailor(4) just home from Hongkong!”
So I stove in his face and I smashed in his jaw.
Says he, “Oh young feller, you’re breaking the law!”
They gave me six months in Liverpool town
For bootin’ and a-kickin’ and a-blowing him down.
We’re a Liverpool ship with a Liverpool crew
A Liverpool mate(5) and a Scouse(6) skipper too
We’re Liverpool born and we’re Liverpool bred
Thick in the arm, boys, and thick in the head
Blow the man down, bullies, blow the man down
With a crew of hard cases(7) from Liverpool town
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vi canterò una canzone se mi date del gin con me, W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo! (incomprensibile)
all’occasione abbatterò l’uomo!
Mentre veleggiavo per Paradise street
ebbi la ventura di incontrare un poliziotto irlandese
Dice “Sei un Blackballer per il taglio dei capelli
Sei un Blackballer per i vestiti che porti.
Hai navigato su un postale della Balck Ball,
e hai derubato qualche povero olandese di stivali vestito e altro.”
“Poliziotto, poliziotto ti sbagli di grosso:
sono un “pesce volante” appena arrivato da Hong Kong”.
Così lo colpisco in faccia e gli fracasso la mascella
dice “giovanotto stai infrangendo la legge”.
Mi diedero sei mesi nella città di Liverpool
per averlo pestato, preso a calci e steso!
Siamo una nave di Liverpool con una ciurma di Liverpool,
un primo di Liverpool e un comandante mangia-stufato.
Siamo nati a Liverpool e cresciuti a Liverpool,
forti di braccia, ragazzi
e forti di testa.
Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi, abbattetelo
con una ciurma di casi difficili dalla città di Liverpool

NOTE
1) la Paradise street ottocentesca ha lasciato oggi posto alla Liverpool One, un tempo la via  del divertimento per i marinai
2) anche sassy policeman oppure big Irish copper: scuffer è un termine tipicamente ottocentesco per poliziotto
3) tutti i marinai della Black Baller line portavano i capelli tagliati corti
4) Secondo Hugill un flying-fish sailor è un marinaio “che preferiva le terre dell’est e il calore degli alisei al freddo e alla miseria dell’Oceano Occidentale
5) primo ufficiale
6)scouse è un termine usato dalla gente di Liverpool che è anche il nome dato al dialetto locale. In origine nasce proprio dalle abitudini dei marinai di Liverpool di mangiare lo stufato di agnello e verdure derivata probabilmente dal norvegese “skause”. Si riferisce alla parlata inglese tipica degli irlandesi immigrati
7) hard cases: una persona dura, poco accomodante, difficile da tenere sotto controllo e arrogante

LA VARIANTE DI JOHN SHORT: Knock a man down

Lo shantyman John Short canta una versione molto personale rispetto alla “Blow the man down” riportata negli archivi delle shanties, nell’arrangiamento per lo Short Sharp Shanties gli autori scrivono ” Fox-Smith, Colcord e Doeflinger commentano sul gran numero di testi della shanty. Hugill fornisce sei diversi gruppi di parole e le parole di Short non sono effettivamente correlate a nessuno di essi, quindi abbiamo aggiunto versetti “generali” di altre versioni. In particolare, abbiamo aggiunto rispetto a Short, i versi ‘Market Street’, ‘spat in his face’ e ‘rags are all gone’
Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 


As I was a-walking down Market street
way ay knock a man down, 
a bully old watchman I chanced for to meet
O give me some time to knock a man down.
Chorus

Knock a man down, kick a man down ;
way ay knock a man down,
knock a man down
right down to the ground,
O give me some time to knock a man down.
The watchman’s dog stood ten feet high (1),
The watchman’s dog stood ten feet high.
So I spat in his face by gave him good jaw
and says he “me young  you’re breaking the law!”
[chorus]
I wish I was in London Town.
It’s there we’d make them girls fly round.
She is a lively ship and a lively crew.
O we are the boys to put her through
[chorus]
The rags are all gone and (?the chains they are jam?)
and the skipper he says  (? “If the weather be high”?)
[chorus]
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Mentre passeggiavo per Market street
W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
ebbi la ventura di incontrare una vecchia guardia prepotente
datemi un po’ di tempo per abbattere l’uomo
Coro

Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi. abbattetelo
W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
Abbattete l’uomo,
proprio dritto a terra
datemi un po’ di tempo per abbattere l’uomo
Il cane della guardia era alto
dieci piedi
Il cane della guardia era alto
dieci piedi
così gli assestai un bel colpo sulla mascella
dice lui “Giovanotto, state infrangendo la legge!”
Coro
Vorrei essera e Londra
è là dove portiamo a spasso
le ragazze
E’ una nave vivace e un equipaggio vivace
siamo i ragazzi che la faranno passare
Coro
(versi incomprensibili)

NOTE
Una trascrizione ancora incompleta perchè non riesco a capire la pronuncia dei versi finali
1) non era inconsueto che le guardie notturne  fin dal medioevo si accompagnassero con un cane, così come si evince da molte illustrazioni d’epoca

TERZA VERSIONE: Beware of the drink whenever it’s free

000brgcfLa versione più diffusa è quella in cui il protagonista incontra invece in Paradise street una giovane “damigella”  a volte paragonata a una nave nella quale, sempre metaforicamente, egli si vorrebbe imbarcare, e finisce immancabilmente lungo disteso a terra (dal bere o dal colpo ben assestato dal “compare” di lei) continua.
Il risveglio è amaro, perchè il malcapitato si trova imbarcato a forza su una nave (a volte più genericamente un Yankee clipper o un packet, ma anche un Black Ball)

the Haunted Saloon


I’ll sing you a song, a good song of the sea
Way – hey, blow the man down.
I trust that you’ll join in the chorus with me; Give me some time to blow the man down.
Chorus
Blow the man down, bully, blow the man down; Way – hey, blow the man down.
Blow the man down, boys, from Liverpool town; 
Give me some time to blow the man down.
As I was a-walking down Paradise street(1)
A handsome young damsel I happened to meet
At the pub down on Lime street I then went astray
I drank enough stout(2) for to fill Galway Bay
The next I remember I woke in the dawn
On a tall Yankee clipper that was bound round Cape Horn.
Come all ye young fellows who follow the sea
Beware of the drink whenever it’s free
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vi canterò una canzone una bella canzone del mare
con me, W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
e confido che vi unirete con me nel coro
all’occasione abbatterò l’uomo!
CORO
Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi. abbattetelo
W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
Abbattete l’uomo, ragazzi di Liverpool
datemi un po’ di tempo per abbattere l’uomo!
Mentre passeggiavo per Paradise street
ebbi la ventura di incontrare una bella damigella
allora mi fiondai dritto nel pub di Lime Street
e bevvi abbastanza stout
da riempire la Baia di Galway.
Il mio secondo ricordo al mio risveglio all’alba,
fu che ero imbarcato su un clipper americano diretto a Capo Horn.
Venite tutti voi, giovani compagni che andate per mare
attenti alle bevande soprattutto quando sono gratis

NOTE
1) Paradise street, una mitica strada di Liverpool il cui nome è tutto un programma, molto frequentata dai marinai
2) birra scura

Woody Guthrie Songs of American Sailormen, 1988 la versione collezionata da Joanna Colcord


As I was out walkin’ down Paradise street(1),
To me way, hey, blow the man down!
A pretty young damsel I chanced for to meet,
Give me some time to blow the man down!
She was round in the counter and bluff in the bow,
So I took in all sail and cried “way enough now”(2)
I hailed her in English, she answered me clear
“I’m from the Black Arrow bound to the Shakespeare”
So I tailed her my flipper(3) and took her in tow
And yard-arm to yard-arm(4), away we did go
But as we were a-going she said unto me
“There’s a spankin’ full rigger(5) just ready for sea”
That spankin’ full rigger to New York was bound
She was very well mannered and very well found
But as soon as that packet was clear of the bar(6)
The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar(7)
As soon as that packet was out on the sea
‘Twas devilish hard treatment of every degree
So I give you fair warning before we belay
Don’t never take heed of what pretty girls say.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Mentre passeggiavo per Paradise street
con me, W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
ebbi la ventura di incontrare
una bella e giovane damigella
datemi un po’ di tempo per abbattere l’uomo!
Era tonda a poppa
e dritta a prua
così ammainai tutte le vele e gridai “Tira i remi in barca”
La salutai in inglese e lei mi rispose in modo comprensibile
“Sono della Black Arrow imbarcato sulla Shakespeare”
Così la legai alla mia mano
e la presi a rimorchio
e vicini-vicini siamo
andati al largo
ma mentre stavamo andando lei mi disse
” C’è una rigger nuova di zecca pronta per il mare”
Quella rigger nuova di zecca era in partenza per New York
si dava un contegno
ed era ben messa
ma non appena quel postale ebbe superato il banco di sabbia
il primo ufficiale mi stese con una legnata
non appena il postale
fu al largo
iniziarono i dannati maltrattamenti di ogni tipo!
Così vi do un buon avvertimento, prima di arruolarvi
non date mai retta a quello che dicono le belle ragazze

NOTE
1) Paradise street, una mitica strada di Liverpool il cui nome è tutto un programma, molto frequentata dai marinai
2) way enough now deriva da un’espressione marinaresca Weigh enough – Take the stroke, put the blades on the water and relax. “Weigh enough” (or “Wain…’nuff”, or “Way enough”) (USA) The command to stop what ever the rower is doing, whether it be walking with the boat overhead or rowing. Mi viene da tradurre con un’espressione idiomatica italiana  “Tira i remi in barca”: il marinaio alla vista di cotale bellezza subito si ferma per parlarle, ovvero l’abborda!!
3) flipper  è uno slang marinaresco per mano
4) yard-arm to yard-arm letteralmente da pennone a pennone in italiano potrebbe essere equivalente all’espressione vicini-vicini
5) rigger? come termine nautico significa attrezzature, ma qui è chiaramente riferito alla nave: più sotto la nave viene chiamata packet
6) La barra del fiume (la Mersey dato che si parla di Liverpool) così uscendo in mare aperto.
7)  Italo Ottonello traduce “il primo ufficiale mi stese con una legnata” e precisa: dorma o droma, l’insieme delle parti di rispetto per alberi, pennoni ed aste varie. In questo caso (end of a spar), un pezzo asta della dorma.

Allen Robertson per la versione cartoon di Jack Sparrow in Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean: Swashbuckling Sea Songs 2007


I
Oh, blow the man down, bullies,
blow the man down
Way aye blow the man down
Oh, blow the man down, bullies, blow him away
Give me some time to blow the man down!
II
As I was a walking down Paradise Street
A pretty young damsel I chanced for to meet.
III
So I tailed her my flipper and took her in tow
And yardarm to yardarm away we did go.
IV
But as we were going she said unto me
There’s a spanking full-rigger just ready for sea.
V
So just as that lass I reached not to far
The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar.
VI
It’s starboard and larboard on deck you will sprawl
For Captain Jack Sparrow commands the Black Pearl
VII
So I was shangaiing aboard this old ship
she took off me money and gave me to sleep
VIII
So I give you fair warning before we belay,
Don’t ever take head of what pretty girls say.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi,
Buttate giù l’uomo!
W-ay! hey? Buttate giù l’uomo!
Buttate giù l’uomo, ragazzi,
fatelo fuori,
datemi un po’ di tempo per abbattere l’uomo!
II
Mentre passeggiavo per Paradise street
ebbi la ventura di incontrare
una bella e giovane damigella
III
Così la legai alla mia manoe la presi a rimorchio
e vicini-vicini siamo
andati al largo
IV
ma mentre stavamo andando lei mi disse ” C’è una rigger nuova di zecca pronta per il mare”
V
Così non mi accostai a quella ragazza
il primo ufficiale mi stese con una legnata
VI
A babordo e a tribordo sul ponte si ammucchieranno
perchè  capitano Jack Sparrow comanda la Perla Nera
VII
Così fui coscritto a forza a bordo di quella vecchia nave
lei mi prese i soldi e mi mandò a dormire
VIII
Così vi do un buon avvertimento, prima di lasciarci
non date mai retta a quello che dicono le belle ragazze

BLOW THE MAN DOWN: VARIANTE CARAIBICA

Due varianti dalle isole Nevis e Carriacou così Ranzo scrive nelle note: “la variazione dall’isola di Nevis, con la sua frase ripetuta “nella stiva sottostante” (“in the hold below”), suggerisce che la canzone fosse una volta associata agli stivatori che caricavano la stiva. Questo è affascinante, perché è coerente con la prova che “Blow the Man Down” fosse inizialmente una canzone degli scaricatori portuali, in cui l’atto di “buttare  giù l’uomo” era forse una metafora per riporre ogni pezzo di carico . Inoltre, le molte varianti, “hit”, “knock”, “kick”, “blow” sono coerenti con altri dati storici che “knock a man down” era una / la prima forma. La variante fu cantata da Roy Gumbs di Nevis nel 1962. Lomax la registrò e Abrahams la trascrisse nel suo libro del 1974. La seconda variante è di Carriacou. Si riferisce a una nave chiamata “Cariso”. E ‘stato cantato da Daniel Aikens e coro nel 1962.”

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/blowdown.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/btmd/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/blowdown
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/blow-the-man-down.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/flying-fish-sailor.html http://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/blow-the-man-down-chords-lyrics
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/blowthemandown.htm

http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm