Archivi tag: The High Kings

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

Leggi in italiano

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore ” is a traditional Irish song originally from Donegal, of which several textual versions have been written for a single melody.

TUNE: Erin Shore

A typically Irish tune spread among travellers already at the end of 1700, today it is known with different titles: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (LISTEN instrumental version of the Irish group The Corrs from Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (LISTEN to the version always instrumental of the Corrs from Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair or The Green Glens Of Gweedor (with text written by Francie Mooney)

Standard version: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

The common Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore was first sung on an EFDSS LP(1969) by Packie Manus Byrne, now over 80 and living in Ardara Co Donegal*. He was born at Corkermore between there and Killybegs. It was taken up by Paul Brady and subsequently. However, there are longer and more local (to north Derry, Donegal) versions in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People and in Jimmy McBride’s The Flower of Dunaff Hill.” (in Mudcats ) and Sam Henry writes “Another version has been received from the Articlave district, where the song was first sung in 1827 by an Inishowen ploughman.”
The recording made by Sean Davies at Cecil Sharp House dates back to 1969 and again in the sound archives of the ITMA we find the recording sung by Corney McDaid at McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal in 1987 (see) and also Paul Brady recorded it many times.
Kevin Conneff recorded it with the Chieftains in 1992, “Another Country” (I, II, IV, V, II)

Amelia Hogan from “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.”

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny ( I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (I, II, IV, V)

intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

NOTES
*additional first verse by Garrison White
1) It refers to the reception of immigrants who were inspected and held for bureaucratic formalities, but the sentence is not very clear. Ellis Island was used as an entry point for immigrants only in 1892. Prior to that, for approximately 35 years, New York State had 8 million immigrants transit through the Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Lower Manhattan.

OTHER VERSIONS

This text was written by Patrick Brian Warfield, singer and multi-instrumentalist of the Irish group The Wolfe Tones. In his version the point of landing is not New York but Baltimore.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones from Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 

Lyrics: Patrick Brian Warfield 
I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore

This version takes up the 3rd stanza of the previous version as a chorus
The High Kings

I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
III
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór (2)
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore

NOTES
1) Banna Strand , Banna Beach, is situated in Tralee Bay County Kerry
2) my love

Shamrock shore

LINK
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

La terra del verde trifoglio di Paddy

Read the post in English

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore” è una  canzone irlandese tradizionale originaria del Donegal, di cui per una sola melodia sono state scritte diverse versioni testuali,

LA MELODIA

Una melodia tipicamente irish diffusa tra i traveller già alla fine del 1700, oggi si conosce con diversi titoli: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (ASCOLTA versione strumentale del gruppo irlandese The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (ASCOLTA la versione strumentale sempre dei Corrs in Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair ovvero The Green Glens Of Gweedor (con testo scritto da Francie Mooney)

LA VERSIONE STANDARD: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

” Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore è stata cantata per la prima volta su un EFDSS LP (1969) di Packie Manus Byrne, ora ultraottantenne [Packie è morto il 12 maggio 2015] e residente ad Ardara -Contea del Donegal. Era nato a Corkermore tra lì e Killybegs ed è stata ripresa da Paul Brady. Tuttavia, ci sono versioni più lunghe e locali (a North Derry, Donegal) in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry e in “The Flower of Dunaff Hill” di Jimmy McBride” (tratto da qui) Sam Henry scrive in merito “Un’altra versione proviene dal distretto di Articlave, dove la canzone è stata cantata per la prima volta nel 1827 da un aratore di Inishowen.
La registrazione effettuata da Sean Davies al Cecil Sharp House risale al 1969 e ancora negli archivi sonori  dell’ITMA troviamo la registrazione cantata da Corney McDaid al McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal nel 1987 (vedi) e anche Paul Brady l’ha registrata più volte.
Kevin Conneff la registra con i Chieftains nel 1992 per l’album “Another Country” 

Amelia Hogan in “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.” con un bellissimo video -racconto

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny (strofe I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (strofe I, II, IV, V)

VERSIONE STANDARD
intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
introduzione
Venite irlandesi che ascoltate la mia canzone, il vostro destino è una storia triste, quando siete indietro con gli affitti e siete tartassati e i raccolti sono andati a male
abbandonerete le vostre terre
e vi laverete le mani di tutto quello che è avvenuto e prenderete il mare per una nuova occasione, lontano dalla terra del verde trifoglio.
I
Dal molo di Derry partimmo
il 23 di Maggio
eravamo imbarcati in una simpatica ciurma che salpava per l’America,
abbiamo preso cinque mila e più litri di acqua fresca
per il breve viaggio
fino a New York,
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
II
Così addio cara e dolce Liza,
e addio alla città di Derry
e due volte addio ai miei bravi compagni
che restano su quella terra santa,
se fama e fortuna mi arrideranno
e farò dei soldi a palate,
ritornerò indietro e sposerò la fidanzatina che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
III
Alle dodici in punto abbiamo avvistato
il famoso Mullin Head
e Innistrochlin a destra spiccava sul letto dell’oceano,
una vistra migliore mai prima videro i miei occhi
del sole che tramonta tra il mare e il cielo
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
IV
Navigammo per tre giorni (settimane) e abbiamo sofferto tutti il mal di mare, non c’era un uomo a piede libero a bordo, eravamo tutti confinati nelle nostre cuccette, senza nessuno a confortarmi, né la cara madre, né il buon padre a sorreggermi la testa che era dolorante, il che mi ha fatto pensare ancora di più alla ragazza che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
V
Raggiungemmo infine l’altra sponda in salvo in 23 gioni, siamo stati presi come passeggeri da un uomo che ci ha portato in giro in sei strade diverse
così bevemmo tutti il bicchiere dell’addio nel caso non ci fossimo più incontrati e bevemmo alla salute della vecchia Irlanda e alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

NOTE
* strofa introduttiva scritta da Garrison White
1) si riferisce dell’accoglienza degli immigrati che erano ispezionati e trattenuti per le formalità burocratiche, ma la frase non è molto chiara. Ellis Island fu usata come punto d’ingresso agli immigrati solo nel 1892. Prima di allora, per circa 35 anni, lo Stato di New York ha fatto transitare 8 milioni di immigrati per il Castle Garden Immigration Depot situato in Lower Manhattan

Rispetto alla versione “standard” si trovano un paio di testi, i quali riprendono sempre il tema dell’emigrazione

ALTRE VERSIONI

Questo testo è stato scritto da Patrick Brian Warfield, cantante e polistrumentista del gruppo irlandese The Wolfe Tones (autore di molte canzoni per il gruppo). Nella sua versione il punto di sbarco non è New York ma Baltimora.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones in Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 


I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio all’Irlanda
la mia cara terra natia,
mi si spezza il cuore a separarmi dagli amici
perchè è allora che le lacrime scorrono, devo andare in America.
Rivedrò ancora una volta la mia casa, per ora lascio la mia innamorata e la terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
II
La nostra nave si trova in rada
e lei è in piedi sul molo;
che la buona sorte ci accompagni ogni notte
mentre solchiamo mare,
molte navi sono andate perdute (nel naufragio) costato molte vite,
in questo viaggio che abbiamo davanti, con le lacrime agli occhi, dirò addio alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
III
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai ,
anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
IV
Ora la nostra nave è in viaggio
che il cielo ci protegga tutti
con i venti e  le vele di certo non falliremo
in questo viaggio verso Baltimora,
ma che genitori e amici restino a salutare
fino a quando non riuscirò più a vederli e allora darò l’ultimo sguardo
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

Questa versione riprende  la III strofa della versione precedente con un coro
The High Kings


I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio il mio solo vero amore
ti penserò notte e giorno
addio alla vecchia Irlanda
e addio a te Bannastrant
non c’è tempo per guardarsi indietro, ma fronteggiare il vento e combattere le onde, che il cielo ci protegga
dal freddo, dalla fame e dalle raffiche rabbiose, ti prego non voglio perdermi,
vento nelle vele portami al sicuro
Coro
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai , anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

II
Fuori ora sull’oceano profondo
il rumore della nave rende difficile il sonno, gli occhi si riempiono di lacrime
la tua immagine non se ne vuole andare via. (coro)
New York alla fine è in vista
il mio cuore batte forte
cerco di essere coraggioso
ma desidero averti vicino
accanto a me, cuore mio
(coro)
Finchè potrò fare ritorno un giorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi

NOTE
1) Banna Strand , ovvero Banna Beach, si trova nella Tralee Bay contea di Kerry

Shamrock shore

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

PHIL THE FLUTER’S BALL

La canzone è stata scritta da Percy French (1854-1920) sulla popolarissima melodia Delaney’s Donkey di William Hargreaves. Si tratta molto probabilmente di un aneddoto su un evento realmente accaduto a Carrigallen nella contea di Leitrim o Cavan dove Percy si trovava a causa dei suoi viaggi di lavoro.
“One evening the Rev. James Godley came in after one of his long walks and told me how he had met the local flute player and how he had paid his rent. ‘I’ve paid up all me arrears, yer reverence,’ said Phil the Fluter. ‘And how did you manage that?’ said his reverence. ‘I give a ball.’ said Phil. .. “I clean out me cabin and lock up any food or drink in the cupboard. “Then I put me hat behind the door. The neighbours come in bringin’ their suppers with them, and each puttin’ a shillin’ or two in the hat. “Then I cock me leg over the dresser, throw me top lip over the flute and toother away like a hatful o’ larks, and there they stay leppin’ like hares till two in the morning.” (tratto da qui)

Il resto della storia diventa una canzone piena di personaggi caratteristici che si trovavano comunemente nei villaggi d’Irlanda a fine Ottocento.

ASCOLTA Brian Dunphy
ASCOLTA The High Kings live

I
Have you heard of Phil the fluter from the town of Ballymuck?
The times were going hard with him, in fact the man was broke.
So, he just sent out some notices to his neighbours one and all.
As to how he’d like their company that evening at a ball.
When writin’ out he was careful to suggest to them,
That if they found a hat of his convenient to the door,
The more they put in whenever he requested them,
The better would the music be for batterin’ the floor.
CHORUS
With a toot on the flute and a twiddle on the fiddle-o!
Hopping in the middle like a herrin’ on the griddle-o!
Up! Down! Hands around! Crossing to the wall!(1)
Oh, hadn’t we the gaiety at Phil the fluter’s ball.
II
There was Mister Denis Doherty who kept the Running Dog(2);
There was little Crooked Paddy, from the Tiraloughett Bog;
Boys from every barony, and girls from ev’ry art,
And the beautiful Miss Brady’s, in their private ass an’ cart.
Along with them came bouncing Missus Cafferty,
Little Micky Mulligan was also to the fore,
Rose, Suzanne, and Margaret O’Rafferty,
The flower of Ard Na Gullion(3) and the pride of Pethravore(4).
III
First, little Micky Mulligan got up to show them how,
And then the widow Cafferty gets out and takes a bow,
I could dance you off your feet, says she, as sure as you were born,
If you’ll only make the piper play, The Hare Was In The Corn.
Phil plays up to the best of his ability,
The ladies and the gentlemen begin to do their share;
Faith, then “Mick, it’s you that has agility”,
“Begorrha Missus Cafferty, you’re leppin’ like a hare!”
IV
Then Phil the fluter tipped a wink to little Crooked Pat,
“I think it’s nearly time,” says he, “for passing ‘round the hat.”
So Paddy passed the caubeen ‘round and, looking mighty cute,
Said, “You have to pay the piper when he tootles on the flute.”
All joined in with the greatest joviality,
Covering the buckle, and the shuffle, and the cut(5);
Jigs were danced of the very finest quality,
The widow bate(6) the company at handling the foot.
NOTE
1) sono i comandi delle danze
2) running dog può voler dire i combattimenti tra cani ma è anche un’espressione idiomatica per indicare colui che segue ciecamente gli ordini altrui, così come il cieco segue il suo cane guida; un seguace fedele specialmente in politica. IN questo contesto è chiaramente il nome di una locanda o pub
3) scritto anche come Ardmagullion forse la località di Altachullion che si trova nei pressi di Petravore
4) Eileen Og – The Pride of Petravore nella contea di Cavan
5) sono passi e movimenti dell’irish dancing
6) bet o bate

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Hai saputo di Phil il flautista della città di Ballymuck? Gli stava andando male e in effetti l’uomo era al verde, così sparse la notizia tra tutto il vicinato che avrebbe gradito la loro compagnia quella sera al ballo. Mentre li invitava fece attenzione a suggerire che se avessero trovato un cappello per le offerte alla porta, più ne avessero messe su richiesta, migliore sarebbe stata la musica per saltellare sul pavimento.
Con uno strombazzo sul flauto e un titillo al violino si salta in mezzo come un’aringa alla griglia “Up! Down! Hands around! Crossing to the wall!” Non siamo mai stati così allegri come al ballo di Phil il flautista!
C’era il signor Denis Doherty che teneva “Il cane che corre”, c’era Paddy un po’ sorto dalla palude di Tiraloughett; ragazzi da ogni contea e ragazze di ogni sorta e la bellissima Signorina Brady con asino personale e carretto.
Insieme a loro venne la pimpante signora Cafferty, Little Micky Mulligan era anche lui della partita, Rose, Suzanne, e Margaret O’Rafferty, il fiore di Ard Na Gullion e l’orgoglio di Pethravore.
Prima il piccolo Micky Mulligan si alzò per mostrare loro il come e poi la vedova Cafferty si alzò e prese un archetto “Potrei farti ballare fino a sfinirti, com’è vero che sei nato se solo farai suonare al pifferaio “The Hare Was In The Corn”. Phil suona al meglio delle sue capacità le signore e i signori iniziano a fare la loro parte Faith allora “Mike è tua l’agilità”, “per dio signora Cafferty saltate come una lepre”. Poi Phil il flautista fa l’occhiolino a Pat lo storto “Credo sia arrivato il tempo di passare in giro con il cappello” Così Paddy passò con il berretto in giro e con l’aria carina, dice ” Dovete pagare il pifferaio quando suona il suo flauto” Tutti si unirono con grande giovialità “Covering the buckle, and the shuffle, and the cut”, le gighe furono danzate delle migliore qualità e la vedova scommise sulla compagnia a battere il tempo.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19103
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/phil-the-fluthers-ball http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/26/phil.htm https://thesession.org/tunes/9057

RED IS THE ROSE

Di rose rosse sono piene le canzoni celtiche più sentimentali e molte sono già state inserite in questo database.

Red is the Rose” è la variante irlandese della ballata scozzese Loch Lomond. Non è insolito che le belle melodie si somiglino al di là e al di qua del North Channel (e tra gli appassionati fiocca la querelle su quale sia l’originale e chi ha copiato da chi), di questa non si conosce bene la provenienza, è stato Tommy Makem insieme ai Clancy Brothers a farla conoscere al grande pubblico a partire dagli anni ’60: Tommy, ricordato affettuosamente con il nome di Bardo di Armagh (vedi) aveva imparato la canzone dalla madre Sarah, cantante e grande collezionista di Armagh, Irlanda del Nord. Sempre tra le canzoni di Sarah Makem e per restare in tema floreale, vi rimando a “I wish my love was a red, red rose” .

La prima registrazione della canzone tuttavia  risale al 1934 con il titolo di My Bonnie Irish Lass; solo più recentemente è ritornata in auge dopo la versione dei The High Kings ..

RED IS THE ROSE: VERSIONE IRLANDESE

ASCOLTA Josephine Beirne & George Sweetman 1934
ASCOLTA Tommy Makem & Liam Clancy live
The Ennis Sisters (Terranova) + The Chieftains in “Fire in the kitchen” 1997

Nanci Griffin & The Chieftains in An Irish Evening, 1992 (che rendono sempre omaggio alla versione dei Clancy Brothers)

The High Kings in Memory Lane 2010

I versi sono molto semplici: due innamorati si dichiarano amore eterno, e si scambiano le promesse di matrimonio, ma la canzone è permeata dall’amarezza dell’abbandono, lui partirà (probabilmente per l’America) in cerca di lavoro.

I
Come over the hills, my bonny Irish lass(1)
Comer over the hills to your darling;
You choose the rose, love, and I’ll make the vow(2)
And I’ll be your true love forever.
Refrain:
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
And fair is the lily of the valley(3);
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne(4)
But my love is fairer than any.
II
Down by Killarney’s green woods(5) that we strayed
And the moon and the stars they were shining;
The moon shone its rays on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she’d be my love forever.
III
It’s not for the parting that my sister pains
It’s not for the grief of my mother,
“Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever(6).
I
Vieni sulle colline mia bella
irlandese
vieni sulle colline dal tuo amore;
tu scegli la rosa, amore, e io farò le promesse
e sarò il tuo amore per sempre.
Ritornello:
Rossa è la rosa che cresce in quel giardino laggiù,
e bello è il mughetto;
chiara è l’acqua che scorre
dal Boyne
ma il mio amore è il più bello di tutti.
II
Giù dai boschi di Killarney che ci siamo allontanati
e la luna e le stelle brillavano;
la luna risplendeva con i raggi sulle ciocche dei suoi capelli d’oro,
e lei mi ha giurato
che sarà il mio amore per sempre.
III
Non soffro per la separazione da mia sorella
non è per la perdita di mia madre,
è per la perdita della mia bella irlandese
che il mio cuore è spezzato per sempre

NOTE
1) oppure a secondo di chi canta “my handsome Irish lad”
2) a leggere tra le righe il protagonista sta chiedendo una notte d’amore alla sua fidanzata e vuole convincerla a cedere la sua virtù (la rosa) con una promessa di matrimonio. Secondo la tradizione il matrimonio tra due persone che, anche senza testimoni, si fossero scambiati le promesse e avessero consumato il rapporto era socialmente valido.
3) il mughetto è un fiore delicato e profumatissimo che fiorisce in tutto maggio-giugno; nelle notti di luna piena il suo profumo diventa particolarmente intenso e inebriante
4) il fiume Boyne che scorre nel Leinster (Irlanda Orientale) è spesso richiamato nella mitologia irlandese: Brú na Bóinne (in italiano “la dimora del Boyne”) è uno dei più importanti siti archeologici del mondo con i grandi tumuli di Newgrange, Knowth e Dowth. La citazione allude a una specie di cuore dell’Irlanda, il santuario degli Antenati dell’Irlanda tribale.
5) Killarney si trova nel Kerry, all’estremità sud dell’isola e mi piace pensare che il bosco della canzone sia stato preservato nel Parco Nazionale (Killarney National Park) ricco di odorosi alberi secolari. In questa strofa veniamo a sapere che l’incontro d’amore notturno c’è effettivamente stato!!
6) nella versione americana diventa “That is leaving old Ireland forever” in cui si rende più esplicito l’abbandono degli affetti a causa dell’emigrazione. Come possibile “trait d’union” con le versioni scozzesi la somiglianza con la ballata Flora’s Lament For Her Charlie 1841 (qui)
It’s not for the hardships that I must endure,
Nor the leaving of Benlomond;
But it’s for the leaving of my comrades all,
And the bonny lad that I love so dearly.

RED IS THE ROSE: VERSIONE AMERICANA

Questa versione iniziò a circolare negli anni 70 e Joe Heaney ci dice di averla imparata dal nonno. Originario di Carna (Connemara, Irlanda) egli fu un moderno bardo, un cantore del popolo custode dei canti tradizionali (la maggior parte in gaelico); negli anni 50 e 60 è in viaggio tra Dublino e Londra per concerti, registrazioni e competizioni canore.
The folk music revival proved both a blessing and a curse to Joe.  He began to be féted by the ‘stars’ of this revival.  Some, like MacColl and Seeger, Lloyd and Hamish Henderson were earnestly trying to gain a knowledge and appreciation of his art.  And at a more popular level, groups like the Clancy Brothers and the Dubliners were genuinely attracted to him and respected him for what he stood for.  However, well-meant attempts by such groups to introduce him to popular audiences often came to grief.  It has to be remembered that such audiences were there only because the current fad was ‘the ballads’.  Their comprehension of sean-nós, or any other form of traditional singing, was zilch“.(tratto da qui)
Poco dopo Joe decide di trasferirsi definitivamente in America dove accanto al lavoro “per vivere” partecipò a festival diede concerti nei folk club e così via, fino a diventare insegnante (nel dipartimento di Etnomucologia) in alcune università..

ASCOLTA Joe Heaney 1996 nel sean nós di Connamara

51IzeFlH0lL__SL500_AA500_Questa versione è pressochè identica a quella irlandese privata però da più precise connotazioni geografiche, qui però manca la strofa in cui l’uomo chiede alla propria innamorata di trascorrere una notte d’amore nel bosco (l’ultima prima della partenza); alcuni perciò cantano una versione “sincretica” aggiungendo le strofe I e II della versione irlandese come strofe finali a questa. (vedi)

CHORUS
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
Fair is the lily of the valley(3);
Clear are the waters that flow in yonder stream(4),
But my love is fairer than any
I
Over the mountains and down in the glen,
To a little thatched cot(7) in the valley;
Where the thrush and the linnet sing their ditty and their song,
And my love’s leaning over the half-door(8).
II
Down by the seashore on a cool summer’s eve(5),
With the moon rising over the heather;
The moon it shown fair on her head of golden hair,
And she vowed she’d be my love forever.
III
It is not for the loss of my own sister Kate,
It is not for the loss of my mother;
It is all for the loss of my bonnie blue-eyed lass,
That I’m leaving my homeland forever.

NOTE
4) il Boyne che scorre nel Leinster (Irlanda Orientale) della versione irlandese è diventato un generico “yonder stream
5) anche in questo verso il riferimento geografico “Down by Killarney’s green Woods that we strayed” diventa una “riva del mare” in una notte d’estate
7) il “thatched cottage” è la tipica “casetta di campagna” delle fiabe in pietra intonacata di bianco e con il tetto spiovente in paglia
8) “the half-door” in genere il cottage aveva un’unica porta d’accesso a sud una caratteristica “mezza-porta” divisa cioè in due pannelli, che si aprivano in modo indipendente: quello superiore poteva essere anche a vetro e veniva lasciato quasi sempre aperto per fare entrare la luce e far circolare l’aria; quello inferiore era in un unico battente di legno che rimaneva sempre chiuso, in modo che bambini e animali non potessero entrare (o uscire!). Al mezzo battente della porta si stava appoggiati restando in casa per spettegolare con i vicini o per fumare un po’ di tabacco!

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO PRIMA STROFA
Su per le montagne e giù per la valletta alla casina nella valle, dove il merlo e tordo cantano le loro canzoncine e il mio amore sta accanto alla porta.

FONTI
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/red-is-the-rose
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/06/rose.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/20/red.htm http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1009
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7171 http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/j_heaney.htm
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/sud/contea-di-kerry/killarney-national-park/ http://cottageology.com/information/irishcottagehistory/

 

MCALPINE’S FUSILIERS

Navvies“McALPINE’s FUSILIERS” è una canzone di denuncia sociale condita da molto irish humor, scritta dal dublinese Dominic Behan (anche se negli anni escono sempre fuori nuovi nominativi tra la gente del popolo, primo nella lista tale Martin Henry di Rooskey, nella contea irlandese di Roscommon, ma anche Darkie McClafferty, John Henry di Silgo, etc).
Il curioso titolo non si riferisce a qualche reparto speciale di Fucilieri dell’esercito inglese ma ai navvies di Mcalpine cioè ai manovali che imbracciano pala e piccone (invece dei moschetti o dei fucili) per andare a lavorare per una grossa ditta di costruzioni, la Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd, azienda leader nella progettazione e costruzione di grandi opere specialmente nel settore industriale, energetico e della difesa. Sir Robert McAlpine, detto “Concrete Bob”, fondò la sua azienda nel 1869 e questa, proprio negli anni della dittatura hitleriana, iniziò la sua ascesa a colosso economico fondato sul sudore e sul sangue degli immigrati inglesi e irlandesi sfruttati e mal pagati.

NAVIGATORS

canale-piccolaCon il termine gergale Navvies si indicarono dapprima gli ‘Excavators‘ i manovali sterratori che lavorarono alla realizzazione di un vasto sistema di vie navigabili interne a fini commerciali ovvero per l’irrigazione e il trasporto. Il primo canale della serie fu il Newry Canal (Irlanda del Nord completato nel 1745) e ovviamente i lavoratori erano tutti Irlandesi, man mano durante tutto l’ultimo quarto del 1700 e per buona parte del 1800 si realizzò in tutto il Regno Unito un complesso sistema di canali “Inland Navigation System” per il trasporto delle materie prime e dei manufatti a livello nazionale funzionale alle esigenze della rivoluzione industriale.
La rete dei canali però perse la sua competitività con lo svilupparsi del sistema ferroviario (e del resto la maggior parte dei canali finì per diventare di proprietà delle imprese ferroviarie) e solo più recentemente i canali caduti nell’abbandono sono stati ripristinati e rivalutati per il tempo libero. Così come i canali navigabili vennero sostituiti dai binari della ferrovia i manovali addetti alla costruzione delle “strade ferrate” vennero sempre chiamati Navvies.
Il lavoro di questi manovali era molto faticoso, avendo come unici strumenti picconi, pale e una carriola o un cesto. Il lavoro era anche rischioso a causa dei molti incidenti che potevano portare a gravi mutilazioni e alla morte (le procedure di sicurezza erano praticamente inesistenti). Sempre navvies erano chiamati gli irlandesi immigrati in Gran Bretagna in cerca di lavoro presso i cantieri ferroviari: migliaia di operai irlandesi furono gli artefici della rete ferroviaria della Gran Bretagna e dell’America. (continua “Poor Paddy on the Railway” qui)

McALPINE’S FUSILIERS

Il brano in questa particolare versione è stato scritto dal dublinese Dominic Behan ed è stato diffuso al grande pubblica dai nascenti Dubliners a partire dagli anni 60. Su Mudcat c’è un lungo dibattito se fosse esistita prima di Behan una versione popolare scritta per l’appunto da uno dei primi navvies..

La canzone è spesso introdotta dai Dubliners da questa parte parlata:


‘Twas in the year of ’39
when the sky was full of lead
When Hitler was headin’ for Poland
and Paddy for Holyhead(1)
Come all you pincher laddies and you long-distance men(2)
Don’t ever work for MacAlpine,
for Wimpey or John Laing(3)
For you’ll stand behind a mixer
still your skin has turned to tan
And they’ll say “Good on you, Paddy”
with your boat fare in your hand .
The craic(4) was good
in Cricklewood(5)
but they wouldn’t leave the crown(6) There was glasses flyin’
and Biddy(7)’s cryin’
sure Paddy was goin’ to town!
Oh mother dear I’m over here
and I never will come back
What keeps me here is the rake of beer, the ladies and the craic
For I come from the County Kerry
the land of eggs and bacon
And if you think I’ll eat your fish and chips(8) by Jaysus you’re mistakin’
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto 
Era il ’39
quando il cielo era pieno di piombo, mentre Hitler si dirigeva in Polonia, Paddy andava a Holyhead(1);
venite tutti voi ragazzi che lavorate per Pincher e voi navigators(2),
non lavorate mai per MacAlpine,
Wimpey o John Laing(3),
perchè starete dietro a una betoniera finchè la pelle vi diventerà di cuoio e vi diranno “Buon (lavoro) per te Paddy” con il vostro biglietto del traghetto in mano.
L’atmosfera(4) era buona a Cricklewood(5)
e non si vorrebbe lasciare il pub(6), c’erano bicchieri che volavano
e le urla di Biddy, (7)
figuratevi Paddy che andava in città!
O cara mamma sono finito qui e
non ritornerò mai indietro,
quello che mi trattiene qui è un sacco di birra, le ragazze e l’atmosfera
perchè venivo dalla contea di Kerry
la terra delle uova con pancetta
e se credi che mangerò il tuo “pesce e patatine” (8) per dio ti stai sbagliando
NOTE
1) Holyhead si trova nel Galles ed è una grande cittadina portuale con una linea diretta di traghetti per l’Irlanda
2) Pincher laddies (pincher kiddies) = il vecchio nome dato ai navvies, un soprannome comune tra i manovali edili e carpentieri; “men who worked for ‘The Pincher Mac’, whose name was MacNicholas, per Paul O’Brien of Dublin, Ireland, as published in the glossary errata of The Essential Ewan McColl Songbook, Sixty Years Of Songmaking by Peggy Seeger 2001. Pincher is given as a whinger, a petty, ‘crabbid’ individual”. I Pinchers erano detti anche `long distant kiddies.
Navvie è il nome abbrevviato di navigator, quelli che scavavano i canali le prime vie di navigazione o ‘navigations.’
3) tutte aziende britanniche con grosse commesse nel settore pubblico e nelle infrastrutture
4) Craic – (pronuncia: crack) quando di sta in buona compagnia con una piacevole conversazione, si ascolta musica e si danza e c’è da bere e da fumare
5) Cricklewood: zona di Londra con una considerevole popolazione irlandese e importante nodo ferroviario
6) Crown: una “English public house” ma anche il nome di un pub di Cricklewood
7) Biddy = gallinella dal gaelico “bideach”, con il significato di molto piccola o servetta; è anche il diminutivo di Bridget
8) fish and chips è il tipico cibo inglese da mangiare per strada

MELODIA: The Jackets Green

ASCOLTA Dominic Behan (1960)

ASCOLTA Geoff Brady
ASCOLTA The High Kings in “Friends for Life” 2013

ASCOLTA The Rumjacks (la band di Sidney) 2010

E per qualcosa di più energetico: ASCOLTA Young Dubliners 2007


McALPINE’s FUSILIERS
I
As down the glen came
McAlpine’s men
with their shovels slung behind them
It was in the pub
they drank the sub(9)
and up in the spike(10) you’ll find them
They sweated blood
and they washed down mud
with pints and quarts of beer
And now we’re on the road again
with McAlpine’s Fusiliers
II
I  stripped to the skin
with the Darky Flynn
way down upon the Isle of Grain(11)
With the Horseface Toole
I knew the rule,
no money if you stop for rain
When McAlpine’s god
was a well filled hod with your shoulders cut to bits and seared
And woe to he who looks for tea
with McAlpine’s Fusiliers
III
I remember the day
that the Bear O’Shea(12)
fell into a concrete stairs
What the Horseface said,
when he saw him dead,
well it wasn’t what
the rich call prayers
“I’m a navvy short ”
was the one retort
that reached unto my ears
When the going is rough,
well you must be tough
with McAlpine’s Fusiliers
IV
I’ve worked till the sweat
near had me bet (13)
with Russian, Czech and Pole
On shuddering(14) jams
up in the hydro dams
or underneath the Thames in a hole
I grafted hard
and I’ve got me cards(15)
and many a gangers(16) fist
across me ears
If you pride your life,
don’t join, by Christ,
with McAlpine’s Fusiliers
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
LA TRUPPA DI MCALPINE
I
Come dalla valle arrivavano
gli uomini di McAlpine
con le pale appese dietro la schiena,
andavano al pub
a bere l’anticipo
e li troverai su nell’ostello,
sudavano sangue
e si lavavano il fango
con pinte e quartini di birra.
E ora siamo di nuovo per strada
con la truppa di McAlpine
II
Mi sono spellato
con Flynn lo scuro,
laggiu’ sull’isola di Grain,
con Toole Faccia-di-cavallo
ho imparato la regola:
niente paga se ti fermi per la pioggia, infatti il dio di McAlpine
era un secchio bello pieno,
con le spalle a pezzi e scottate,
e tanto peggio a chi va in cerca di tè
con la truppa di McAlpine
III
Mi ricordo il giorno
in cui O’Shea l’orso
cadde in una scala di cemento
quello che disse Faccia-di-cavallo, quando lo vide morto,
be’ non era quello
che i ricchi chiamano preghiere!
“Ho un immigrato di meno”
fu l’unica risposta
che giunse alle mie orecchie.
Quando il gioco si fa duro,
be’ devi essere tosto
nella truppa di McAlpine
IV
Ho lavorato finchè
ho dovuto vedermela
con Russi, Cechi e Polacchi
al getto di cemento nel cassero
lassù alla diga idroelettrica
o nei tunnel sotto il Tamigi,
ho sgobbato sodo
ed mi sono beccato il licenziamento
e più di un cazzotto in faccia
dal caposquadra
se ci tieni alla vita,
perdio, non ti unire,
alla truppa di McAlpine


NOTE
9) sub= piccolo prestito sul salario della prossima settimana
10) spike: un ostello o ‘centro di accoglienza’ (originariamente un ricovero occasionale in una Workhouse) per gli uomini senza fissa dimora o senza tetto, spesso usato dai manovali irlandesi che non riuscivano a trovare un alloggio permanente.
11) L’Isola di Grain è una zona desolata nel Kent dove il fiume Medway si unisce al Tamigi è stato un grande cantiere per alcuni anni
12) in alcune interpretazioni si legge come Bere O’Shea
13) letteralmente “finchè il problemia mi fece scommettere”
14) shuddering: è la cassaforma o armatura in cui si getta il cemento per farlo stare in forma
15) Cards – to get cards= essere licenziato. Quando si è licenziati o il lavoro è finito si ottiene dal datore del lavoro la propria “national insurance card” con le marche pagate per ogni settimana di lavoro e un modulo con lo stipendio percepito e le tasse versate
16) capetto o caposquadra

FONTI
http://livingonanarrowboat.co.uk/canals-the-waterways-network-in-england-and-wales/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=38452&lang=it http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=12665 http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16925
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=112889
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/22/mcalpine.htm

THE BEGGARMAN’S SONG

13600Un mendicante girovago ritiene che il suo mestiere sia il migliore del mondo, perché così è libero (da ogni convenzione sociale, obblighi e consuetudini); quando ha fame chiede da mangiare, quando è stanco si siede a riposare e quando ha sonno dorme dove capita, magari in un fienile se piove. Incontrata una ragazza che gli fa notare il suo misero abbigliamento, le risponde che preferisce il suo genere di vita e che tutto il resto è superfluo.

LA MELODIA: RED HAIRED BOY

Il brano è conosciuto sotto vari titoli anche come sola versione strumentale e su thesession.org sono elencati come: An Carrowath, An Giolla Ruadh, The Auld Rigadoo, The Beggar Man, The Beggarman, Danny Pearl’s Favorite, Danny Pearl’s Favourite, Gilderoy, Guilderoy, Injun Ate A Woodchuck, The Jolly Beggar, The Jolly Beggarman, The Jolly Beggerman, The Journeyman, The Little Beggar Man, The Little Beggarman, The Little Beggerman, The Old Rigadoo, The Old Soldier With The Wooden Leg, The Red Haired Boy, The Red Haired Lad, The Red Headed Irishman, The Red-Haired Boy, The Redhaired Boy, The Rigadoo, Thy Redhaired Lad.

The Fiddler’s Companion riporta: “‘Red Haired Boy’ is the English translation of the Gaelic title “Giolla Rua” (or, Englished, “Gilderoy”), and is generally thought to commemorate a real-life rogue and bandit, however, Baring-Gould remarks that in Scotland the “Beggar” of the title is also identified with King James V. The song was quite common under the Gaelic and the alternate title “The Little Beggarman” (or “The Beggarman,” “The Beggar”) throughout the British Isles. For example, it appears in Baring-Gould’s 1895 London publication Garland of Country Song and in The Forsaken Lover’s Garland, and in the original Scots in The Scots Musical Museum. A similarly titled song, “Beggar’s Meal Poke’s,” was composed by James VI of Scotland (who in course became James the I of England), an ascription confused often with his ancestor James I, who was the reputed author of the verses of a song called “The Jolly Beggar.” The tune is printed in Bunting’s 1840 A Collection of the Ancient Music of Ireland as “An Maidrin Ruadh” (The Little Red Fox).  The melody is one of the relatively few common to fiddlers throughout Scotland and Ireland, and was transferred nearly intact to the American fiddle tradition (both North and South) where it has been a favorite of bluegrass fiddlers in recent times.”

La melodia, un’allegra hornpipe, a volte è suonata come un reel

ASCOLTA Vi Wickam (due violini)

ASCOLTA Norman Blake and Ed “Doc” Cullis: banjo e chitarra, ottimo bluegrass!!

JOHN DHU

Pur nella spensieratezza delle melodia,  c’è da riflettere che il nome del vecchio, John Dhu suona come il tipico nome riservato ai corpi non identificati negli ospedali e nelle camere mortuarie, John Doe.

La versione testuale è stata riportata da Sarah Makem (Irlanda del Nord) e resa famosa dal fratello Tommy
ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers &Tommy Makem
ASCOLTA The High Kings

ASCOLTA Buddy Greene con l’armonica
ASCOLTA Great Big Sea in Play 1997: “Rigadoon”  (Alan Doyle, Séan McCann, Bob Hallett, Darrell Power). Un’arrangiamento in stile rap! (anche il testo in questa rilettura diventa modernissimo)

ASCOLTA
Gaelic Storm in Three2001: la canzone diventa quasi uno scioglilingua rappato tanto è veloce con l’inizio delle voci che ripetono come un mantra “I am a little beggarman” a imitare il suono del digeridoo

CHORUS
Diddly-i-diddle-i-doodle-i-do-die-dum
Diddly-doo-dah-diddly-i-diddly-i-dum
Diddly-i-diddly-i-diddly-i-dee-dum
Diddly-doo-dah-diddly-i-doo-dah-dum


I
I am a little beggarman,
a-begging I have been
For three score(1) or more
in this little isle of green
I’m known from the Liffey
down to Segue(2)
And I’m known by the name
of old Johnny Dhu.
II
Of all the trades that’s going,
I’m sure begging is the best
For when a man is tired,
he can sit down and rest,
He can beg for his dinner,
he has nothing else to do
Only cut around the corner
with his old rig-a-doo (3)
III
I slept in the barn
right down at Caurabawn(4),
A wet night came on
and I slept until the dawn,
With holes in the roof
and the rain coming through,
And the rats and the cats,
they were playing peek-a-boo.
IV
When who did I waken
but the woman of the house
With her white spotty apron
and her calico blouse
She began to frighten,
I said, “Boo Ara, don’t be afraid,
ma’am, it’s only Johnny Dhu (5)”
V
I met a little flaxy-haired girl one day
“Good morning,
little flaxy-haired girl,” I did say
“Good morning, little beggarman,
and how do you do,
With your rags and your tags
and your old rig-a-doo(3)?”
VI
I’ll buy a pair of leggings
and a collar and a tie
And a nice young lady
I’ll fetch by and by
I’ll buy a pair of goggles,
I’ll color them blue (6),
And an old-fashioned lady
I will make her, too (7)
VII
Over the road with
me pack on me back
Over the fields with
me great, heavy sack
With holes in me shoes
and me toes peeping through
Singing, “Skinny-me-rink-a-doodle-o and old Johnny Dhu”
VIII
I must be going to bed
for it’s getting late at night
The fire’s all raked
and out goes the light
So now you’ve heard the story
of me old rig-a-doo
“It’s good-bye and God be with you,” says old Johnny Dhu
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un piccolo mendicante
e lo sono sempre stato,
ho passato più di sessanta anni
in questa isola verde,
mi conoscono dal Liffey
e fino a Seagew  (2)
con il nome di
il vecchio Johnny Dew.
II
Di tutti i mestieri da farsi,
mendicare è il migliore:
quando uno è stanco
si siede a riposare,
chiede la carità per mangiare,
non ha altro da fare
che sedersi nel suo angolo
con la sua vecchia filosofia.(3)
III
Ho dormito in un fienile
proprio a Caurabawn (4),
(quando) venne una nottata bagnata
e ho dormito fino all’alba
con i buchi nel tetto
e la pioggia che veniva giù,
con i topi e i gatti che
giocavano a nascondino.
IV
Ma chi si sveglia
se non la donna di casa,
con un grembiule bianco macchiato
e una camicia di cotone stampata?
Si prese uno spavento
e allora le ho detto :”Non aver paura donna sono solo Johnny Dew (5)”.
V
Ho incontrato una giovanetta bionda un giorno “Buon giorno
biondina” le ho detto
“Buon giorno mendicante,
come stai,
con i tuoi stracci, i rattoppi
con la sua vecchia filosofia (3)?”
VI
Mi comprerò un paio di calze,
un colletto e una cravatta,
e una signora elegante
incontrerò tra poco,
mi comprerò un paio di occhiali
e li colorerò di blu(6)
e farò di lei
una signora onesta (7).
VII
Via per la strada con
la borsa sulle spalle!
Via per i campi col
mio grosso sacco,
coi buchi nelle scarpe
e le dita che spuntano fuori
cantando “Skinny-me-rink-a-doodle-o e il vecchio Johnny Dew”
VIII
Devo andare a dormire
perchè si è fatta notte
il fuoco è spento,
smorzato il lume,
così avete sentito la storia
della mia vecchia filosofia
“Arrivederci e Dio sia con voi”
dice il vecchio Johnny Dew

NOTE
1) score vuole anche dire un gruppo o una serie di 20 quindi l’età del mendicante è di oltre 60 anni
2) probabilmente Seagoe in Armagh
3) rigadoo = carretta che i senza tetto si portano appresso (oggi il carrello della spesa dei super-market) oppure bastone da passeggio ma anche zaino;  il bastone da passeggio diventa il bastone da trasporto con dei sacchi o pacchetti legati sulla cima e portato a tracolla sulle spalle; altri propendono per il nome di una danza, dal francese Rigaudon – storpiato in inglese come rigadoon (rigadig), una danza di corte francese diventata popolare nell’ottocento (più precisamente un passo di danza.). Dallo Yorkshire osservano che con “Reet Good Do” si indica un session di musica con canti e racconti. Alcuni arrivano a unire i due significati osservano che nel portare un sacco appeso ad un bastone questo sembra che balli.
Ma potrebbe anche trattarsi di un cappotto o un vestiario.
Altri ancora osservano che il gaelico “riocht go dubh” che foneticamente si avvicina al nostro termine significa “a black/dirty/dismal shape/state/condition” traducibile come “disordinato” o confusionario con tutte le sfumature che la parola inglese “mess” comporta,
In senso lato a mio avviso  vuole indicare la summa della sua  filosodia di vita, un comportamento che segue alla lettera  l’insegnamento del filosofo greco Epicuro (vedi)
4) anche scritto come Currabawn
5) anche con il nome l’uomo ha voluto cancellare i legami con la sua stirpe (con tutto l’insieme di conseguenze che porta:  senso di appartenenza, obblighi morali, affetti)
6) una frase che può contenere molti significati:  colorare gli occhiali di azzurro ha un senso opposto al colorarli di rosa, il rosa è la visione positiva ed edulcorata della realtà, mentre l’azzurro prende una sfumatura negativa (in inglese blue vuol dire anche triste) più disincantata; una seconda interpretazione trovata in mudcats è che  l’uomo ha intenzioni oneste con la donna che corteggia e intende sposarla: per tradizione infatti la sposa deve portare qualcosa di blu al suo matrimonio.
7) la strofa prosegue  nei Gaelic Storm:
I’ve got the sky, I’ve got the road.
I’ve got the sky…The world is my home.

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/566
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=3505&c=68 http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/REA_RED.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/beggar.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=126076
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6002

THE IRISH ROVER: A COMIC DRINKING SONG

aa8fa4c8ef9c450aa42f1559cf008760“The Irish Rovers” è il titolo di una comica narrazione di un disastro in mare: un magnifico quanto improbabile vascello in viaggio da Cork (Irlanda) alle Americhe è distrutto da una serie di sfortunati accidenti che riducono l’equipaggio a un solo superstite (in verità gli  ultimi rimasti erano due: il marinaio che racconta la storia e il cane del capitano che resiste tenacemente a tutte le sventure, per poi perire in ultimo, alla vista della costa, in un naufragio). Il marinaio essendo rimasto l’unico testimone ne spara delle grosse visto che nessuno lo può smentire: a cominciare dalle gigantesche dimensioni della nave con la bellezza di 27 alberi! Il carico poi è del tutto assurdo e la quantità di animali caricati ancora più folle! L’unica descrizione realistica probabilmente è quella dell’equipaggio.

Il testo è stato attribuito a Joseph Crofts (JM Crofts) un compositore / arrangiatore americano, tuttavia il brano è considerato un tradizionale ottocentesco: ha il sapore di una music hall song (vedi) presumibilmente un tradizionale di genere marinaresco che è stato rielaborato in canzone comica.
Dalle prime registrazioni degli anni 60 di Dominic Behan, Clancy Brothers (i quali hanno rivendicato il copyright) e i Dubliners la canzone è famosa in Irlanda e America immancabile drinking song negli irish pubs: del brano esistono diverse verioni testuali
ASCOLTA The Irish Rovers
alcune anche con il ritornello
So fare thee well, my own true love,
I’m going far from you,
And I will swear by the stars above
Forever I’ll be true to you,
Tho’ as I part, it breaks my heart,
Yet when the trip is over
I’ll come back again in true Irish style
Aboard the Irish Rover.
(The Irish Rover A Selection of Irish Songs and Ballads
Dublino: Walton’s Musical Instrument Galleries, 1966)

ASCOLTAThe Dubliners

ASCOLTA The High Kings (strofe I, IV, II, V)


I
On the fourth of July
eighteen hundred and six(1)
We set sail from
the sweet cove of Cork(2)
We were sailing away
with a cargo of bricks
For the grand city hall in New York
‘Twas a wonderful craft(3),
she was rigged fore-and-aft
And oh, how the wild winds drove her.
She’d got several blasts,
she’d twenty-seven masts (4)
And we called her the Irish Rover.
II (5)
We had one million bales
of the best Sligo rags
We had two million barrels of stones
We had three million sides of old blind horses hides (6),
We had four million barrels of bones.
We had five million hogs,
we had six million dogs,
Seven million barrels of porter,
We had eight million
bails of old nanny goats’ tails,
In the hold of the Irish Rover.
III
There was awl Mickey Coote
who played hard on his flute
When the ladies lined up for his set
He was tootin’ with skill for each sparkling quadrille
Though the dancers were fluther’d (6) and bet (7)
With his sparse witty talk
he was cock of the walk
As he rolled the dames under and over
They all knew at a glance
when he took up his stance
And he sailed in the Irish Rover
IV
There was Barney McGee
from the banks of the Lee,
There was Hogan from County Tyrone
There was Jimmy McGurk
who was scar(r)ed stiff of work
And a man(8) from Westmeath
called Malone
There was Slugger O’Toole who was drunk as a rule
And fighting Bill Tracey from Dover
And your man Mick McCann
from the banks of the Bann
Was the skipper of the Irish Rover
V
We had sailed seven years
when the measles(9) broke out
And the ship lost it’s way in a fog.
And that whole of the crew
was reduced down to two,
Just meself and the captain’s old dog.
Then the ship struck a rock,
oh Lord what a shock
The bulkhead (10)
was turned right over
Turned nine times around, and the poor dog was drowned
I’m the last of the Irish Rover
VI (11)
For a sailor it’s always a bother in life
It’s so lonesome by night and day
That he longs for the shore
And a charming young whore
Who will melt all his troubles away
Oh, the noise and the rout (12)
Swillin’ poitin (13) and stout (14)
For him soon the torment’s over
Of the love of a maid
He is never afraid
An old salt from the Irish Rover
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
Il quattro luglio
del 1806
salpammo dalla
bella baia di Cork
facendo rotta
con un carico di mattoni
per il grande municipio di New York.
Era una bellissima nave
equipaggiata a prua e a poppa
e oh come prendeva il vento!
Aveva resistito a diverse tempeste
aveva 27 alberi
e si chiamava Irish Rover
II
Caricammo un milione di balle
dei migliori stracci di Sligo
e due milioni di barili di pietre,
tre milioni di vecchi paraocchi da cavallo
e quattro milioni di barili di ossa,
cinque milioni di porci,
sei milioni di cani
e sette milioni di barili di porter,
avevamo otto milioni
di balle di code di capra
nella stiva della Irish Rover
III
C’era il vecchio Mickey Coote
che suonava il flauto alla grande
quando le dame si mettevano in fila per la danza, suonava con bravura
ogni vivace quadriglia,
sebbene i danzatori fossero tutti follemente accoppiati
con la sua parlantina spiritosa
era il gallo del pollaio
e si rigirava le signore come voleva.
Tutte sapevano alla prima occhiata,
quando cominciava a darsi delle arie,
che aveva navigato sulla Irish Rover
IV
C’era Barney McGee
dalle rive del Lee
c’era Hogan dalla contea di Tyrone
c’era Jimmy McGurk,
paralizzato dal terrore di lavorare,
ed un uomo da Westmeath chiamato Malone,
c’era Slugger O’Toole che di norma era ubriaco
e si menava con Bill Tracy di Dover,
ed il vostro uomo, Mick McCann,
dalle rive del Bann,
era il comandante della Irish Rover
V
Navigammo sette anni
quando scoppiò il morbillo
e la nave perse la rotta nella nebbia,
e tutto quell’equipaggio
fu ridotto a due , soltanto
io e il vecchio cane del capitano.
poi la nave urtò uno scoglio,
oddio! che paura!
La fiancata si ribaltò,
girò nove volte in tondo
e il povero cane affogò
io sono l’ultimo della Irish Rover
VI
La vita del marinaio e’ una bella seccatura
sempre così solo giorno e notte,
che uno ha nostalgia della terra
e di una bella puttana giovane
per  dissolvere tutte le preoccupazioni.
Ah, il rumore e il frastuono,
ubriaco di distillato e birra scura,
ma presto il tormento dovra’ finire;
dell’amore di una donna
non ha mai paura
il vecchio lupo di mare della Irish Rover

NOTE
* dalla traduzione di Marco Zampetti qui
1) Tommy Makem “In the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and six
2) High Kins dicono “coal quay of Cork
3) High Kins dicono “We had an elegant craft
4) High Kins invertono l’orgine delle frasi
5) High Kins le sparano ancora più grosse
“We had five million bags of the best Sligo rags
We had six million barrels of stones
We had seven million bales of old nanny goats tails
We had eight million barrels of bones
We had nine million hogs
ten million dogs
eleven million barrels of porter
We had twelve million sides of old blind horses hides’
In the hold of the Irish Rover”
6) fluthered è un termine irlandese che definisce uno stato di ubriachezza
7) bet il significato si evince dal contesto: le coppie vanno d’amore e daccordo ma Mickey Coote attirava le donne come l’unico gallo del pollaio!
8) High Kins dicono “chap”
9) Il morbillo è in realtà una corruzione di “mizzens” cioè mezzane, che si riferisce al terzo e più piccolo albero sulle navi a vela. Entrambe le parole morbillo e mezzane sono ormai comunemente utilizzati
10) High Kins dicono “The boat she turned right over” letteralmente bulkhead è la paratia dello scafo; in inglese scafo si traduce come hull. Se si separa la parola bulk head diventa una parolaccia
11) una strofa spesso censurata
12) letteralmente rout è la diserzione delle truppe in una sconfitta, una ritirata disordinata e rumorosa
13) poitin è il whisky illegale continua
14) stout è la birra scura che in Irlanda è sinonimo di Guinness. Per molti la Guinness non è una birra, è Dublino (anche se ormai la proprietà della fabbrica è in mano alla Diageo il colosso britannico nella produzione di liquori, birra e vino). Si parla di Stout per indicare le birre dal colore quasi nero e dal sapore tipicamente amaro (la tipica colorazione scura viene dall’orzo bruciacchiato, ovvero molto tostato). La parola significa anche “robusto” continua

LA DANZA: IRISH ROVER

La melodia è una scottish country dance molto popolare
VIDEO

FONTI
http://thesession.org/discussions/11798
http://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/video/irish-rover.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14865

THE RISING OF THE MOON

La ballata per antonomasia della ribellione irlandese del 1798 fu scritta da John Keegan Casey (1846-1870) per il “The Nation” nel 1865 con lo pseudonimo di Leo Casey e poi pubblicata in una sua raccolta di poesie dal titolo A wreath of shamrocks: ballads, songs, and legends (1867).
Pur restando sul generico l’autore ha voluto comunque descrivere una battaglia realmente accaduta, quella che ha avuto luogo nei pressi di Granard (contea di Langford) – e così vicina alla sua città natale Mullingar, : un gruppo di ribelli irlandesi armati solo di picche, si sono scontrati con i soldati inglesi molto meglio armati e addestrati e sono stati sconfitti; nelle successive stesure della canzone però l’autore ha epurato ogni riferimento geografico, così il fiume Inny diventa un generico “river”. L’intento del poeta, all’epoca adolescente, è manifesto: nel celebrare le glorie del passato vuole infondere lo stesso fervore nazionalistico nei ribelli del suo tempo, i Feniani.

I FENIANI

Ai mitici Fianna s’ispirò James Stephens nel fondare proprio nel giorno di San Patrizio 17 marzo 1858 il movimento feniano detto Irish Republican Brotherhood (parallelamente alla gemella americana “Fenian Brotherhood”con l’obiettivo di proclamare l’Irlanda una repubblica democratica indipendente. Era il tempo delle società segrete e dei moti d’insurrezione, ma anche delle idee eroiche basate su uno scarso senso pratico. La segretezza poi un’utopia essendo la delazione il grimaldello con cui gli inglesi riuscirono a sbaragliare ogni tentativo di insurrezione.
Dopo l’insuccesso  del 1865 Stephens fu deposto e il comando passò al Colonnello Kelly, ma anche la rivolta del 1867 finì con arresti preventivi e disastrose ritirate.

Dopo la rivolta Casey, poco più che ventenne, venne imprigionato senza processo nel carcere di Mountjoy, ma rilasciato alla condizione che emigrasse in Australia; egli però preferì vivere in clandestinità a Dublino, apprezzato per le sue doti oratorie ai raduni degli affiliati. Purtroppo la sua vita si è spenta prematuramente qualche hanno più tardi, minata dal duro trattamento ricevuto in carcere (la causa diretta però fu una brutta caduta accidentale).

Il sorgere della luna è un simbolo paragonabile come potenza iconografica al sole dell’avvenire che raggia il mondo socialista del futuro, il presagio della venuta di un tempo di libertà, ma è anche e soprattutto l’incitazione a prendere le armi per ribellarsi al dominio inglese.


La poesia è diventata subito popolare dopo la sua pubblicazione, ripresa nelle ballad sheets come canzone abbinata a diverse melodie, tra queste una melodia lenta e triste così in “More Irish Street Ballads” di Colm O’Lochlainn, che si è diffusa in America attraverso l’emigrazione irlandese.

VERSIONE AMERICANA: RISING OF THE MOON

ASCOLTA Peter Paul and Mary (melodia originaria) in  “See What Tomorrow Brings”.

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: WEARING OF THE GREEN

La melodia che ha però preso piede in Irlanda è quella di “The Wearing of the Green

ASCOLTA Na Casaidigh

ASCOLTA The High Kings

ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones che cantano anche l’ultimo verso


I
And come tell me Sean O’Farrell
tell me why you hurry so
Hush a buachaill hush and listen
and his cheeks were all a glow
I bare orders from the captain
get you ready quick and soon
For the pikes must be together
at the rising of the moon
At the rising of the moon,
at the rising of the moon,
for the pikes must be together
at the rising of the moon

II
And come tell me Sean O’Farrell where the gath’rin is to be
At the old spot by the river (1)
quite well known to you and me
One more word (2) for signal token whistle out the marchin’ tune
With your pike upon your shoulder
at the rising of the moon
III
Out from many a mud wall cabin
eyes were watching through the night
Many a manly heart was beating
for the blessed warning (3)  light
Murmurs rang along the valleys
to the banshees(4) lonely croon
And a thousand pikes were flashing
by the rising of the moon
IV
All along that singing river
that black mass of men was seen
High above their shining weapons
flew their own beloved green(5)
Death to every foe and traitor! Whistle out the marching tune
And hurrah, me boys, for freedom, ‘tis the rising of the moon
V
Well they fought for poor old Ireland, And full bitter was their fate
(Oh! what glorious pride and sorrow Fill the name of Ninety-Eight(6)).
Yet, thank God, e’en still are beating Hearts in manhood’s burning noon,
Who would follow in their footsteps, (5) At the risin’ of the moon!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E dimmi Sean O’Farrell,
dimmi perche’ hai tanta fretta?
“Zitto compagno, zitto e ascolta
– e le sue guance erano in fiamme-
porto ordini dal capitano,
sbrigatevi in fretta e subito
perche’ le picche dovranno riunirsi
al sorgere della luna”
Al sorgere della luna,
al sorgere della luna

perche’ le picche dovranno riunirsi
al sorgere della luna

II
E dimmi Sean O’Farrell,
dove sarà l’appuntamento?
“Al vecchio posto vicino al fiume
che conosciamo bene tu ed io,
un’ultima parola sul segnale convenuto
fischietta il motivetto della marcia
con la picca in spalla
al sorgere della luna”
III
Dalle capanne dai muri di fango
molti occhi scrutavano la notte
più di un cuore virile batteva
per la luce benedetta
mormorii risuonavano per le valli
al lamento solitario delle banshees
e mille picche brillarono
al sorgere della luna
IV
Lungo il fiume cantanterino
si vide quella nera massa d’uomini
alto sopra le armi lucenti
sventolava l’amato colore verde
“Morte ai nemici ed ai traditori! Fischietta la marcia
e urrà compagni per la libertà!
è sorta la luna”
V
Hanno combattuto bene per la povera vecchia Irlanda e il loro fato fu di fiele
(quale orgoglio di gloria e tristezza richiama il nome del 98)
eppure, grazie a Dio, ancora battono
i cuori degli uomini nel caldo mezzodì,
di coloro che seguiranno le loro orme(5) al sorgere della luna

NOTE
* dalla versione di Marco Zampetti
1) nelle successive stesure della canzone l’autore ha epurato ogni riferimento geografico, così il fiume Inny diventa un generico “river”.
2) oppure ” by way ”
3) scritto anche come morning, con “warning light” ci si riferisce a qualche generico segnale luminoso di avvertimento, con “morning light” è invece il chiarore del mattino
4) scritto anche “like”.  Nel folklore irlandese la banshee è la fata della morte che piange, con un lugubre lamento, la morte imminente del guerriero del clan. In genere solo le migliori famiglie hanno una loro banshee ovvero le famiglie con lignaggi antichi ed eroici.
5) Già nel Seicento i patrioti irlandesi indossavano nastri verdi o il
trifoglio nel cappello per il giorno di San patrizio, ma erano considerati dei ribelli dagli Inglesi continua
6) La rivolta durò una breve stagione dal maggio al settembre del 1798 e venne chiamata con il nome di “United Irishmen Rebellion” perché condotta da un gruppo politico denominato Society of United Irishmen. continua
7) i Feniani

FONTI
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/rising-of-the-moon
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2313
http://homepage.tinet.ie/~tipperaryfame/rebel798.htm
http://homepage.eircom.net/~johnkeegancasey/

La terra santa dei marinai

Read the post in English  

No, non stiamo parlando di Gerusalemme e la sea song “Holy ground” è ancor meno vicina ai salmi di quanto il titolo lasci intendere! Si tratta di una sea shanty dalle origini incerte diffusa in molte varianti un po’ per tutta la Gran Bretagna e l’Irlanda nonché l’America sulle rotte delle baleniere che un tempo solcavano i mari partendo dall’Irlanda e dalla Gran Bretagna; per un marinaio infatti “la terra promessa” non è altro che una zona del porto o una strada piena di locande, pubs o taverne dove divertirsi con bevute, donne e canzoni!
L’argomento con titoli diversi e la stessa melodia, si ripropone con versi molto simili dalla Scozia all’Irlanda, e tuttavia si delinea un duplice registro, da una parte è la tipica e allegra canzone marinaresca, a volte sguaiata e inneggiante alle colossali bevute, e dall’altra assume una vena più intimista e fragile, che riflette sulla solitudine e il pericolo del vita in mare. 

Cove Harbour: The scenery and antiquities of Ireland (Volume I)  N.P. Willis, J.S. Coyne e W.H. Bartlett. Londra: George Virtue, ca. 1841.

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: HOLY GROUND

The Holy Ground” anche come “Fine Girl You Are” o “The Cobh Sea Shanty” è la versione diffusa in Irlanda, e prende il nome da un quartiere di Cobh cittadina portuale un tempo conosciuta come Queenstown, noto porto dell’emigrazione irlandese nella contea di Cork: un marinaio di Cobh sta per prendere il mare lasciando a casa la sua innamorata, parte però con la speranza di ritornare presto da lei. L’arrangiamento di questa versione “made Clancy Brothers” negli anni 60 è decisamente scanzonato e molti dei gruppi più recenti nella scena irlandese li omaggiano riproponendo il brano pari pari e indossando anche gli stessi maglioni che li resero caratteristici in tutto il mondo!
Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem

The High Kings

The Kilkennys


I
Fare thee well my lovely Dinah,
a thousand times adieu
For we’re going away
from the Holy Ground(1)
and the girls we all loved true
And we’ll sail the salt sea over,
but we’ll return for sure
To greet(2) again the girls we loved,
on the Holy Ground once more
(fine girl you are)
Chorus:
You’re the girl I do adore
and still I live in hopes to see
The Holy Ground once more
(fine girl you are)
II
And now the storm is raging
and we are far from shore
And the good old ship is tossing about and the rigging is all tore
And the secret of my mind,
I think you’re the girl I do adore
For soon we live in hopes(3)
to see the Holy Ground once more
(fine girl you are)
III
And now the storm is over
and we are safe and well
We’ll go into a public house
and we’ll sit and drink like hell
We’ll drink strong ale and porter(4) and we’ll make the rafters roar(5)
And when our money is all spent,
we’ll go to sea once more
(fine girl you are)
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio a te mia amata Dina,
mille volte addio,
perchè stiamo andando via
dalla Terra Santa (1) e dalle donne che tutti noi amiamo davvero,
e salperemo per il mare salato
ma di certo ritorneremo,
per vedere (2) di nuovo le donne che amiamo e la Terra Santa ancora una volta (che bella ragazza sei)
CORO
Sei la ragazza che adoro
e ancora vivo nella speranza di vederti Terra Santa ancora una volta
(che bella ragazza sei)

II
E ora la tempesta infuria
e siamo lontani dalla terra
e la vecchia cara nave è sballottata
e il sartiame è tutto strappato
e nel profondo del mio cuore
credo che tu sai la ragazza che amo, perchè viviamo con la speranza (3) di vedere la Terra Santa ancora una volta (che bella ragazza sei)
III
E ora la tempesta è passata
e siamo sani e salvi
andremo in una taverna
per sederci e bere come dannati
berremo birra forte e porter (4)
e faremo tremare il tetto (5).
E quando il denaro sarà tutto speso, andremo per mare ancora una volta (che bella ragazza sei)

NOTE
1) forse un quartiere a luci rosse della città ossia la zona del porto piena di locali per far divertire i marinai, nei dizionari è riportato come slang proprio del XVIII secolo, nel contesto della canzone è però più idelamente la propria città
2) nella versione dei The High King è scritto to see
3) nella versione dei The High King è scritto And still I live in hopes
4) porter è il termine settecentesco con cui gli irlandesi identificavano la birra scura; oggi si dice stout
5) l’espressione “scuotere il tetto” si riferisce al far traballare le travi del soffitto con cui erano puntellati i solai delle locande di una volta; è un po’ equivalente all’espressione idiomatica italiana “scuotere le fondamenta” nel senso di fare molto rumore

E tuttavia la versione originaria della melodia era più meditativa e malinconica, si veda la versione gallese “Old Swansea Town Once More”
Mary Black in The Holy Ground 1993 ad esempio la riporta da punto di vista femminile


I
Farewell my lovely Johnny,
a thousand times adieu
You are going away
from the holy ground
And the ones that love you true
You will sail the salt seas over
And then return for sure
To see again the ones you love
And the holy ground once more
II
You’re on the salt sea sailing
And I am safe behind
Fond letters I will write to you
The secrets of my mind
And the secrets of my mind, my love
You’re the one that I adore
Still I live in hopes you’ll see
The holy ground once more
III
I see the storm a risin’
And it’s coming quick and soon
And the night’s so dark and cloudy
You can scarcely see the moon
And the secrets of my mind, my love
You’re the one that I adore
And still I live in hopes you’ll see
The holy ground once more
IV
But now the storms are over
And you are safe and well
We will go into a public house
And we’ll sit and drink our fill
We will drink strong ale and porter
And we’ll make the rafters roar
And when our money it is all spent
You’ll go to sea once more
You’re the one that I adore
And still I live in hopes that you’ll see
The holy ground once more
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mio amato Johnny
diecimila volte addio;
stai per lasciare
la Terra santa
sei tu il ragazzo che amo.
Navigherai per il mare salato
e poi ritornerai di certo
per rivedere di nuovo colei che ami
e la Terra santa  ancora una volta
II
Sei a navigare per mare
e  io sonoi rimasta indietro al sicuro
dolci lettere ti scriverò
sui miei pensieri più segreti
sui miei pensieri più segreti, mio caro
sei tu colui che amo
così vivo con la speranza che tu rivedrai la Terra santa ancora una volta
III
Vedo  la tempesta che si sta alzando
ed è in arrivo rapidamente
la notte così buia e nuvolosa
che si riesce a mala pena a vedere la luna, e i miei pensieri più segreti,
sei tu colui che amo
così vivo con la speranza che tu rivedrai la Terra santa ancora una volta
IV
E ora la tempesta è passata
e sei sano e salvo
andremo in una taverna
per sederci e bere come dannati
berremo birra forte e porter
e faremo tremare il tetto.
E quando il denaro sarà tutto speso,
andrai per mare ancora una volta
sei tu colui che amo
così vivo con la speranza che tu rivedrai la Terra santa ancora una volta
Vista del porto di Swansea

VERSIONE GALLESE: OLD SWANSEA TOWN ONCE MORE

“Old Swansea Town Once More” o più brevemente “Swansea Town” è la versione diffusa nel Galles della sea shanty “Fine Girl You Are” , ed è stata raccolta nell’Hampshire nel 1905 da George Gardiner (cantata da William Randall di Hursley); anche se del testo esistono molte varianti, ecco la versione simile a quella irlandese: il protagonista s’imbarca probabilmente su una baleniera e pensa con nostalgia alla ragazza lasciata a casa. Una dura vita quella dei pescatori di balene che stavano mesi in mare aperto in balia dei capricci del tempo.

Storm Weather Shanty Choir in Cheer Up Me Lads! 2002, che la restituiscono più lenta e accorata, venata dalla nostalgia.


I(1)
Oh farewell to you sweet Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu;
I’m bound to cross the ocean, girl,
once more to part from you.
Once more to part from you,
fine girl
(Chorus)
You’re the girl that I do adore.
But still I live in hopes to see
old Swansea(2) town once more.

II
Oh it’s now that I am out at sea,
and you are far behind;
Kind letters I will write to you
of the secrets of my mind.
III
Oh now the storm is rising,
I can see it coming on;
The night so dark as anything,
we cannot see the moon.
IV
Oh, it’s now the storm is over
and we are safe on shore,
We’ll drink strong drinks
and brandies too
to the girls that we adore;
V (chorus)
To the girls that we adore, fine girls,
we’ll make this tavern roae,
And when our money is all gone,
we’ll go to sea for more.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia bella Nancy
diecimila volte addio;
parto per attraversare l’oceano,
e ancora una volta mi separo da te, ragazza e ancora una volta mi separo da te, bella ragazza
CORO
Tu sei la ragazza che amo
ma sempre vivo nella speranza di vederti vecchia Swansea ancora una volta
II
Adesso che sono per mare
e tu sei rimasta indietro e lontana,
dolci lettere ti scriverò
sui miei pensieri più segreti
III
Oh ora la tempesta si sta alzando
e la vedo in arrivo;
la notte così buia come nient’altro,
non si riesce a vedere la luna.
IV
Oh ora che la tempesta è passata
e siamo sani e salvi a terra,
berremo roba forte
e anche brandy
alla salute delle ragazze che amiamo;
V
alla salute delle ragazze che amiamo, belle ragazze, faremo tremare questa taverna,  e quando il denaro  sarà tutto speso, andremo per mare ancora una volta

NOTE
1) strofa alternativa
Oh the Lord, made the bees,
An’ the bees did make the honey,
But the Devil sent the woman for to rob us of our money.
An around Cape Horn we’ll go!
An when me money’s all spent ol’ gal,
We’ll round Cape Horn for more ol’ gal, ol’ gal!
(gal è un termine marinaresco al posto di girl)
2) Swansea è una città costiera del Galles meridionale

APPROFONDIMENTO
HOLY GROUND ONCE MORE
ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

FONTI
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/1137.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=116846
http://brethrencoast.com/shanty/Old_Swansea_Town.html

http://www.swanseadocks.co.uk/Old%20Dock%20Images%202.htm

FOR IRELAND I’D NOT TELL HER NAME: AN AISLING SONG

Ar Eireann Ni Neosainn Ce hi è una canzone d’amore dolcissima, la cui  melodia richiama un’antica aria anglo-scozzese “Tweedside” o “The Banks of the Tweed” (vedi)

La fonte data dalle pubblicazioni testuali (in gaelico irlandese) si rifanno a E. Walsh “Irish Popular Song” 1847: “Walsh says the name of the author is unknown, but he was likely a native of Kerry, as the song was very popular there. Tradition attributes it to a young man who fell in love with his brother’s affianced bride. Dr. Joyce quotes O’Curry’s authority for the statement that the song was written about 1810 by Finneen, or Florence, Scannell, a Kerry schoolmaster.”

angelabetta3
Dipinto della pittrice torinese Angela Betta Casale http://www.angelabettacasale.com/

Scritta in gaelico forse nel 1800 su di una melodia del secolo precedente, la canzone è stata più recentemente tradotta metricamente in inglese in varie versioni. In origine probabilmente una aisling song un genere letterario della poesia irlandese proprio del 1600-1700 in cui il protagonista ha la visione in sogno di una bella fanciulla che rappresenta l’Irlanda. Incidentalmente anche il poeta inglese William Cowper nel 1788 scrisse una poesia dal titolo “The Morning Dream” sulla stessa melodia con il tema del sogno, in cui una bellissima ragazza ordina al poeta di andare a liberare gli schiavi africani dalle catene (vedi).

VERSIONE ORIGINALE IN GAELICO IRLANDESE

Un giovane si è innamorato di una ragazza ma è troppo povero per poterla mantenere decorosamente e troppo timido per farsi comunque avanti, si reca all’estero per cercare la fortuna e quando ritorna trova la donna sposata con suo fratello.
O almeno è questa la storia raccontata tradizionalmente con la canzone, anche se versioni testuali tramandate continuano a rimanere molto enigmatiche!
In questa versione il senso dell’incontro o del sogno notturno resta piuttosto indefinito: il protagonista incontra una bella fanciulla che gli ruba il cuore, ma lui non ha il coraggio di parlarle! In verità il poeta si avvicina alla fanciulla per conoscerla e lei  non vuole ascoltarlo. Una situazione piuttosto angosciante che lascia l’uomo esausto..

ASCOLTA De Dannan in “A Celtic Tapestry” vol II 1997

ASCOLTA Ciara Considine in “Beyond The Waves” 2010

Il video creato da Alessandro Tosi ha come interprete Maria McCool


I
Aréir is mé téarnamh um’ neoin
Ar an dtaobh thall den teóra ‘na mbím,
Do théarnaig an spéir-bhean im’ chómhair
D’fhág taomanach breóite lag sinn.
Do ghéilleas dá méin is dá cló,
Dá béal tanaí beó mhilis binn,
Do léimeas fé dhéin dul ‘na cómhair,
Is ar éirinn ní n-eósainn cé h-í.
II
Dá ngéilleadh an spéir-bhean dom’ ghlór,
Siad ráidhte mo bheól a bheadh fíor;
Go deimhin duit go ndéanfainn a gnó
Do léirchur i gcóir is i gcrich.
Dó léighfinn go léir stair dom’ stór,
‘S ba mhéinn liom í thógaint dom chroí,
‘S do bhearfainn an chraobh dhi ina dóid,
Is ar éirinn ní n-eósainn cé h-í.
III
Tá spéir-bhruinneal mhaordha dheas óg
Ar an taobh thall de’n teóra ‘na mbím.
Tá féile ‘gus daonnacht is   meóin
Is deise ró mhór ins an mhnaoi,
Tá folt lei a’ tuitim go feóir,
Go cocánach ómarach buí.
Tá lasadh ‘na leacain mar rós,
Is ar éirinn ní n-eósainn cé h-í.
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
Last night as I strolled abroad(1)
On the far side of my farm
I was approached by a comely maiden
Who left me distraught and weak.
I was captivated by her demeanour and shapeliness
By her sensitive and delicate mouth,
I hastened to approach her
But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.
II
If only this maiden heeded my words,
What I’d tell her would be true.
Indeed I’d devote myself to her
And see to her welfare.
I would regale her with my story
And I longed to take her to my heart
Where I’d grant her pride of place
But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.
III
There is a beautiful young maiden
On the far side of my farm
Generosity and kindness shine in her face (2)
With the exceeding beauty of her countenance
Her hair reaches to the ground
Sparkling like yellow gold;
Her cheeks blush like the rose
But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Ieri notte mentre passeggiavo sul lato opposto della fattoria, mi si avvicinò una bella fanciulla che mi lasciò turbato e fiacco.
Fui catturato dal suo contegno e delle sue forme,
dalla sua bocca sensuale e delicata;
e mi affrettai per conoscerla,
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome
II
Se solo questa fanciulla badasse alle mie parole, le racconterei la verità.
Anzi mi dedicherei tutto a lei
e penserei al suo benessere
L’avrei deliziata con la mia storia
e che desideravo tenerla nel mio cuore
dove avrebbe preso il posto d’onore,
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome
III
C’è una bella giovane fanciulla
sul lato opposto della mia fattoria, generosità e gentilezza spiccano sul suo viso, (2)
superate solo dalla bellezza del suo volto,
i capelli toccano terra
e luccicano come oro giallo;
le guance avvampano come rose,
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome

NOTE
1) il termine abroad ha un duplice significato: significa sia fuori che all’estero
2) l’apparizione è descritta come una creatura fatata, che simboleggia la natura rigogliosa e l’amore

ASCOLTA The High Kings in “The High Kings” 2008

In questa versione viene mantenuta la I strofa in gaelico mentre la seconda è stata riscritta in inglese: sembrerebbe che l’uomo si trovi in una terra straniera e che la nostalgia della sua Irlanda sia tale da apparirgli in sogno come una bellissima fanciulla! Egli purtroppo si rende conto che la visione è fugace forse perchè in cuor suo sa che non rivedrà mai più il suo amato paese!
Questa versione di sole due strofe richiama l’aisling song, un genere letterario della poesia irlandese proprio del 1600-1700 in cui il protagonista (spesso un poeta) ha la visione in sogno di una bella fanciulla che rappresenta l’Irlanda. In genere lei si lamenta delle condizioni di vita del popolo irlandese e prevede un futuro radioso, in cui sarà libera dagli oppressori. La chiave politica è una lettura tipicamente irlandese di un genere sviluppato in Francia con il termine Reverdie, in cui il poeta incontra una dama soprannaturale, che simboleggia la natura rigogliosa e l’amore.
A volte il poeta è esortato a compiere grandi gesta o a unirsi alla causa, ma il tutto è scritto in codice, perchè per chi aveva scritto e per chi cantava la canzone, c’era l’accusa di tradimento, ed era passibile perciò di condanna a morte. (continua)
Le aisling song sono in genere delle slow air di una dolcezza mista a tristezza infinita e per lo più sono composte in gaelico irlandese per rivendicare l’indipendenza culturale dall’inglese e le proprie radici celtiche!


I
Aréir is mé téarnamh ar neoin
Ar ar dtaobh eile ‘en teóra seo thiós
Do thaobhnaigh an spéirbhean im’ chomhair
D’fhág taomanac breoite lag tinn
Le haon ghean dá méin is dá cló
Dá bréithre ‘s dá beol tanaí binn
Do léimeas fá dhéin dul ‘na treo
Is ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
II
Last night in strange fields as I roved
Such a vision I passed on my way
A young woman so fair to behold
That in seconds my heart was astray
Oh she reached out a welcoming hand
But I knew that it never could be
And before I could kiss her sweet lips
She had vanished forever from me
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Ieri sera mentre all’aperto passeggiavo sul lato opposto della fattoria, si avvicinò una bella fanciulla che mi ha lasciato sconvolto e esausto.
Fui affascinato dal suo contegno e delle sue forme,
dalla sua bocca sensuale e delicata;
mi sono affrettato per conoscerla,
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome
II
Ieri sera mentre passeggiavo in campi stranieri, una visione incrociai nel cammino! Una giovane donna così bella a vedersi, che  il mio cuore in un attimo si era smarrito. Oh lei allungò una mano invitante, ma io sapevo che non avrei mai potuto prenderla e prima che potessi baciare le sue dolci labbra lei era scomparsa per sempre.

VERSIONI IN INGLESE

Questa traduzione in inglese è quella circolata durante il folk revival degli anni settanta, ma non ha avuto molto seguito
ASCOLTA Wolfe Tones in “Let the People Sing” 1972


I
Last eve as I wandered quiet near,
To the border’s of my little farm,
A beautifull maiden appeared,
Whoes lovelyness caused my heart’s harm,
By her daring and love smitten sour,
And the words from her sweet lips that came,
To meet her I raced the field o’re,
But for Ireland i’d not tell her name.
II
If this beauty but my words would heed
The words that I speak would be true,
I’d help her in every need,
And indeed all her work I would do,
To win one fond kiss from my love,
I’d read her romances of fame,
Her champion I daily would prove,
But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.
III
There’s a beautiful stately young maid,
At the nearing of my little farm,
She’s welcoming kind unafraid,
Her smile is both childlike and warm,
Her gold hair in masses that grows
Like amber and sheen is that same,
And the bloom in her cheeks like the rose,
But for Ireland I’d not tell her name.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
L’altra sera passeggiavo tranquillo
vicino al confine della mia piccola fattoria, una bella fanciulla mi   apparve, la cui amabilità mi ha infiammato il cuore
verso di lei ardito e d’amore infatuato
-per le parole che dalle sue dolci labbra venivano-
a incontrarla corsi oltre il campo,
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome
II
Se questa beltà avesse solo badato alle mie parole, le parole che le avrei detto sarebbero state sincere, l’avrei aiutata per ogni bisogno, e inoltre tutto il suo lavoro avrei fatto; per vincere un bacio appassionato dal mio amore, leggerei i suoi romanzi preferiti e la proteggerei ogni giorno
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome
III
C’è una bella giovane fanciulla maestosa che si avvicina alla mia piccola fattoria è la benvenuta senza tema, il suo sorriso è sia fanciullesco che sensuale, i suoi capelli d’oro voluminosi sono lucenti come ambra
e le sue guance sbocciano come rose
ma per l’Irlanda non dirò il suo nome

ASCOLTA Dervish in “The End of the Day” 1996

Questa versione meno letterale nella traduzione è però più armoniosa come metrica e decisamente più bella della precedente: qui l’uomo per sfogare il suo struggimento d’amore per la bella fanciulla che lo aspetta, canta per lei una canzone, ma non vuole farci sapere il nome di lei finchè non l’avrà sposata!


I
There’s a home by the wide Avonmore
That will sweep o’er the broad open sea/And wide rivers their waves wash ashore
Whilst bulrushes wave to the breeze
Where the green ivy clings ‘round the door
And the birds sweetly sing on each tree
Oh me darling, they’re tuning their notes/It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
II
Like the sick man that longs for the dawn/I do long for the light of her smile/And I pray for my own cailín bán Whilst I’m waiting for her by the stile/Oh I’d climb all the hills of the land/And I’d swim all the depths of the sea/To get one kiss from her lily-white hand
It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
III
I have toiled sore those years of me life
Through storm, through sunshine and rain
And I surely would venture my life
For to shield her one moment from pain
For she being my comfort in life
Oh my comfort and joy she may be
She’s my own, she’s my promised wife
It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
IV
Oh but when I will call her my own
And ‘tis married we both then will be
Like the king and the queen on the throne
We’d be living in sweet purity
Oh ‘tis then I’ll have a home of my own
And I’ll rear up a nice family
Oh ‘tis then that her name will be known
But for Ireland I won’t tell her name
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
C’è una casa accanto all’ampio Avonmore (1)
che sfocerà verso il mare aperto
e ampi fiumi le onde bagnano la riva
i giunchi ondeggiano nella brezza, mentre la verde edera si aggrappa  alla porta,
e gli uccelli dolcemente cantano su ogni ramo
o mia cara, cantano la melodia
“It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí”
II
Come l’uomo malato che brama l’alba io bramo la luce del suo sorriso, e prego la mia cailín bán (2)
mentre lì aspetto accanto alla scaletta;
oh vorrei arrampicarmi su tutte le colline della terra, e vorrei nuotare in tutti  gli abissi del mare, per ottenere il bacio della sua bianca mano (3)
It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
III
Ho faticato molto in questi anni della mia vita, sia con la tempesta, con  il sole e la pioggia,
e di certo rischierei la mia vita
per proteggere lei dai dispiaceri
perchè lei è il mio conforto nella vita
Oh il mio conforto e gioia lei potrebbe essere,
lei è mia, la mia promessa sposa
It’s ar Éirinn ní neosfainn cé hí
IV
Oh ma fino a quando la chiamerò mia cara e saremo sposati insieme
come il re e la regina sul trono,
dobbiamo vivere in castità
Oh allora avrò una casa tutta mia
e crescerò una bella famiglia
solo allora il suo nome sarà conosciuto
ma per l’Irlanda, non voglio dire il suo nome

NOTE
1) il fiume l’Avonmore scorre nelle Wicklow Mountains e confluisce nel fiume Avoca cantato anche da Thomas Moore nel “The Meeting of the Waters
2) cailín bán: ragazza bella
3) un giro di parole per dire: “vorrei essere accarezzato”

Come si vede in nessuna versione si fa menzione che la donna abbia sposato il fratello del protagonista, la vox populi deve essere stata aggiunta come tentativo di spiegazione al refrain “But for Ireland I won’t tell her name“, ovvero la segretezza del nome della fanciulla per non turbare i rapporti parentali.

Eppure la bellezza della canzone sta proprio nell’enigmaticità del verso.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10531
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=111051
http://martindardis.com/id70.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/1039
http://thesession.org/tunes/11612
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&textsid=38883
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/areireann.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/dervish/areirinn.htm

ILLUSTRAZIONE
Dipinto di Angela Betta Casale sito web

(Cattia Salto febbraio 2014)