Archivi tag: shamrock shore

Shamrock shore

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Two texts in search of an author, with the same title “Shamrock shore” we distinguish two different songs, both as text and as melody, the first reported by PW Joyce at the end of the nineteenth century is an irish emigration song, the second ever traditional is also an emigration song, but above all a protest song, the social and political denunciation of the Irish question.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Already at the end of the 1800s P. W. Joyce reported it in his  “Ancient Irish Music” to then republish it in 1909, so he writes “This air, and one verse of the song, was published for the first time by me in my Ancient Irish Music, from which it is reprinted here. It was a favourite in my young days, and I have several copies of the words printed on ballad-sheets“. Again P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) reports further text
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

The Irish emigrant arrives in London, the tune is that generally known with the title of”Erin Shore” (see)

Horslips from Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

More than a song, a political rant about the need for the independence of Ireland and the evils of landlordism.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore

NOTES
1) The song is obviously post-Union (1800), because it refers to the dissolved Irish Parliament
2) the plague of landlordism
3)  in 1846 the entire crop of potatoes (basic diet of the Irish) was all destroyed due to a fungus, the peronospera; the “great famine” occurred (1845-1849 which some historians prolonged until 1852) which lasted for several years and almost halved the population; those who did not die of hunger were lucky if the
y could leave for England or Scotland, but more massive was the migration to America
4) ‘tithes and taxes’ paid in support of the Irish Church, so the song pre-dates the Act of Disestablishment in 1869
5) the years of large-scale industrial expansion (with relative upgrading of infrastructure) began in Britain starting from 1840-50
6) John Bull is the national personification of the Kingdom of Great Britain

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

La terra del verde trifoglio

Read the post in English

Due testi in cerca di autore, con lo stesso titolo “Shamrock shore” distinguiamo due diverse canzoni, sia come testo che come melodia, la prima riportata da P. W. Joyce alla fine dell’Ottocento è una irish emigration song, la seconda sempre tradizionale è anche una emigration song ma soprattutto una party song di protesta, la denuncia sociale e politica della questione irlandese.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Già alla fine del 1800 P. W. Joyce la riporta nella sua raccolta “Ancient Irish Music” per poi ripubblicarla nel 1909, così scrive “Una delle mie ballate preferite della mia gioventù di cui ho diverse copie delle parole stampate sui fogli volanti “.
Ancora P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) riporta ul ulteriore testo
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

L’emigrante irlandese sbarca a Londra, la melodia è quella generalmente conosciuta con il titolo di “Erin Shore” (vedi)

Horslips in Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della primavera quando gli uccellini cantano e gli agnellini si divertono e giocano, presi la mia decisione di abbandonare gli amici per andare al molo di Dublino.
Mi imbarcai come passeggero e partii per l’Inghilterra, dissi addio a tutti i miei amici e lasciai la terra del trifoglio.
II
Nella bella Londra mi rifugiai,
per cercare un po’ di divertimento laggiù, trovavo che fosse un bel posticino e gradevole alla vista,
le donne del posto piacevoli da guardare con indosso delle costose pellicce, ma niente vidi che si sarebbe potuto paragonare alla fanciulle della terra del trifoglio

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

Più che una canzone una concione politica sulla necessità dell’indipendenza dell’Irlanda e sui mali del latifondismo.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters (7) stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto*
I
Voi fieri giovani figli dell’isola di Erin
spero che prestiate attenzione per un momento : sono i torti della cara vecchia Irlanda che vi andò a riferire
nero e maledetto fu il giorno in cui il nostro parlamento fu abolito e tutti i nostri guai e le sofferenze iniziarono da allora.
Perchè i nostri figli robusti e le nostre belle figlie devono recarsi in altri paesi e lasciare la loro terra natia alle spalle, con dolore condannati
a cercare un lavoro, devono viaggiare
lontano, molto lontano dalla loro casa
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio
II
L’Irlanda è benedetta con l’abbondanza, ma la gente è oppressa, a tutti quei tiranni maledetti dobbiamo obbedire, per compiacere i boriosi padroni che delle nostre case e delle nostre terre s’impadroniranno  per mettere 50 fattorie in una e portarci tutti via, senza riguardo ai pianti della vedova, alle lacrime della madre e ai lamenti dell’orfano.
In migliaia siamo stati cacciati da casa, che mi rattrista il cuore, siamo stati costretti dalla carestia e dalla malattia a emigrare attraverso i mari
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
III
Il nostro sostentamento portato via per pagare le decime e le tasse
per sostenere la chiesa protetta dalla legge a cui loro aderiscono
e la nostra gentry inglese, è risaputo,
vanno in altri paesi e i soldi della vecchia Irlanda vanno sperperando in lungo e in largo. Perchè se i nostri possidenti restassero a casa e non viaggiassero per altri paesi, costruirebbero opifici e fabbriche qui per dare lavoro alla povera gente; perchè se avessimo il commercio e l’economia, per me nessun’altra nazione si potrebbe paragonare a quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
IV
L’inglese si vanta, ride con disprezzo
e dice che l’irlandese è nato
per essere sempre scontento perchè in sull’isola non andremo mai daccordo,
eppure bandiremo i tiranni dalla nostra terra
e da buone sorelle ci alzeremo a chiedere i diritti dell’Irlanda.
Quindi uniamoci tutti
e  il nostro parlamento al College Green si riunirà per le assemblee
e giorni felici nell’isola di Erin avremo presto ancora una volta
e la cara vecchia Irldanda presto sarà
una grande e gloriosa nazione
e pace e benedizioni presto sorrideranno alla terra del trifoglio

NOTE
1) la canzone è stata scritta dopo il 1800 e l’atto di unione con il regno di Gran Bretagna ( Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda)
2) la piaga del latifondismo
3)  nel 1846 l’intero raccolto delle patate (dieta base degli irlandesi) andò tutto distrutto a causa di un fungo, la peronospera; sopravvenne “la grande carestia” (1845-1849 che alcuni storici prolungano fino al 1852) che durò per vari anni e dimezzò quasi la popolazione; chi non moriva di fame era fortunato se riusciva a partire per l’Inghilterra o la Scozia, ma più massiccia fu la migrazione in America continua
4) decime obbligatorie per il sostenamento della Chiesa Anglicana. Solo sotto il primo ministero Gladstone fu tolto (1869) alla Chiesa episcopale irlandese il riconoscimento di confessione ufficiale e fu promulgata la prima legge (Land Act) protettiva dei fittavoli.
5) gli anni dell’espansione industriale su grande scala (con relativo potenziamento delle infrastrutture)  iniziano in Gran Bretagna a partire dal 1840-50
6) John Bull è la personificazione nazionale del Regno di Gran Bretagna, il nomigliolo nasce nel 1700 a rappresentare il tipo del gentiluomo di campagna, uomo d’affari capace e onesto ma collerico e di umore variabile, amante dello scherzo e della buona tavola.(Treccani)
7) letteralmente “in armonia come sorelle”, non colgo però l’allusione

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm