Archivi tag: selkie

Aileen Duinn, Brown-haired Alan

Leggi in italiano

“Aileen Duinn” is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides: a widow/sweetheart lament for the sinking of a fishing boat, originally a waulking song in which she invokes her death to share the same seaweed bed with her lover, Alan.
According to the tradition on the island of Lewis Annie Campbell wrote the song in despair over the death of her sweetheart Alan Morrison, a ship captain who in the spring of 1788 left Stornoway to go to Scalpay where he was supposed to marry his Annie, but the ship ran into a storm and the entire crew was shipwrecked and drowned: she too will die a few months later, shocked by grief. His body was found on the beach, near the spot where the sea had returned the body of Ailein Duinn (black-haired Alan).

 The song became famous because inserted into the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy and masterfully interpreted by Karen Matheson (the singer of the Scottish group Capercaillie who appears in the role of a commoner and sings it near the fire)

Here is the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy: Ailein Duinn and Morag’s Lament, (arranged by Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in which the second track is the opening verse followed by the chorus

FIRST VERSION

The text is reduced to a minimum, more evocative than explanatory of a tragic event that it was to be known to all the inhabitants of the island. The woman who sings is marked by immense pain, because her black-haired Alain is drowned at the bottom of the sea, and she wants to share his sleep in the abyss by a macabre blood covenant.

Capercaillie from To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, the voice ‘kissed by God’ switches from the whisper to the cry, in the crashing waves blanding into bagpipes lament.

Meav, from Meav 2000 angelic voice, harp and flute

Annwn from Aeon – 2009 German group founded in 2006 of Folk Mystic; their interpretation is very intense even in the rarefaction of the arrangement, with the limpid and warm voice of Sabine Hornung, the melody carried by the harp, a few echoes of the flute and the lament of the violin: magnificent.

Trobar De Morte  the text reduced to only two verses and extrapolated from the context lends itself to be read as the love song of a mermaid in the surf of the sea (see also Mermaid’s croon)

It is the most reproduced textual version with the most different musical styles, roughly after 2000, also as sound-track in many video games (for example Medieval II Total War)

english translation
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go (1) with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(2)
I would drink(3), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
Scottish Gaelic
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\
shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,

NOTES
1) to die, to follow
2) for the inhabitants of the Hebrides Islands the seals are not simple animals, but magical creatures called selkie, which at night take the form of drowned men and women. Considered a sort of guardians of the Sea or gardeners of the sea bed every night or only on full moon nights, they would abandon their skins to reveal their human form, to sing and dance on the silver cliffs (here)
3) refers to an ancient Celtic ritual, consisting in drinking the blood of a friend as a sign of affection (the covenant of blood), a custom cited by Shakespeare (still practiced by all the friends of the heart who exchange blood with a shallow cut and joining the two cuts; it was also practiced for the handfasting in Scotland: once the handfasting was above all a pact of blood, in which the right wrist of the spouses was engraved with the tip of a dagger until the blood spurts, after which the two wrists were tied in close contact with each other with the “wedlock’s band” (see more.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECOND VERSION

Here is the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) from “Songs of the Hebrides“, see also Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) in his “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake from “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  from “Ships Ahoy !” 2011  

(english translation Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(scottish gaelic)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn,
o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat

Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart
an talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

Another translation in English with the title “Annie Campbell’s Lament”
Estrange Waters from Songs of the Water, 2016

Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..

THIRD VERSION

The most suggestive and dramatic version is that reported by Flora MacNeil who she has learned  from her mother. Born in 1928 on the Isle of Barra, she is a Scottish singer who owns hundreds of songs in Scottish Gaelic. “Traditional songs tended to run in families and I was fortunate that my mother and her family had a great love for the poetry and the music of the old songs. It was natural for them to sing, whatever they were doing at the time or whatever mood they were in. My aunt Mary, in particular, was always ready, at any time I called on her, to drop whatever she was doing, to discuss a song with me, and perhaps, in this way, long forgotten verses would be recollected. So I learned a great many songs at an early age without any conscious effort. As is to be expected on a small island, so many songs deal with the sea, but, of course, many of them may not originally be Barra songs”

A different story from Flora MacNeil’s family: the woman is married to Alain MacLeann who dies in the shipwreck with all the other men of her family: her father and brothers; the woman turns to the seagull that flies high over the sea and sees everything, as a witness of the misfortune; the last verse traces poetic images of a funeral of the sea, with the bed of seaweed, the stars like candles, the murmur of the waves for the music and the seals as guardians.

Flora MacNeil from  a historical record of 1951.


English translation
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
Scottish Gaelic
Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

NOTES
(1) Tuesday is still the day on which traditionally marriages are celebrated on the Island of Barra

FOURTH VERSION

Still a version set just like a waulking song and yet a different text, this time the ship is a whaler and Allen is shipwrecked near the Isle of Man.

Mac-Talla, from Gaol Is Ceol 1994, only the female voices and the notes of a harp, but what immediacy …

English translation
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi, I would go with thee.
I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

CHORUS
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
Scottish Gaelic
S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm

CHRISTMAS IN THE OLD MAN’S HAT

Tutta una serie di filastrocche e canti di natale vogliono ricordare ai bambini (e anche ai grandi) che il significato della Festa sta nella condivisione e nella generosità: ognuno dona quello che può, a chi ne ha più bisogno.

CHRISTMAS IN THE OLD MAN’S HAT

poor-boy
Giacomo Ceruti “Mendicante con pezzo di dolce” fine XVII secolo

Composto da  Susanne Phillips  arrangiando la melodia tradizionale sul nuovo testo, riprende nel ritornello un verso della popolare filastrocca inglese “Christmas is coming” (vedi).
Secondo la morale cattolica  San Nicola non è da biasimare per le ingiustizie sociali: alla bambina, che più grandicella inizia a porsi domande sul perchè Jenny Brown sia piena di ricchi (e inutili) regali mentre il povero Peter soffre il freddo e la fame, la madre risponde appunto che non è compito di San Nicola distribuire equamente i doni ai bambini, ma dei ricchi e privilegiati!
Mai una volta però che siano i poveri e gli sfortunati ad essere premiati ingiustamente!! Non sia mai!

ASCOLTA Celtic Tradition in “An Irish Christmas Album“, 1987: il gruppo tedesco nel 1987 registrò un album di musica tradizionale irlandese sul Natale includendo anche “Christmas in the old man’s hat” che è però una composizione contemporanea accreditata a Susanne Phillips.

ASCOLTA Selkie
ASCOLTA
Inchtabokatables in “Best of Nine Inch Years”, 2000:  non male questa teutonica versione tra il metal e folk!


I.
“Oh mother dear, one Christmas day
again I must complain
I wonder it is Santa Claus (1)
for Christmas sake again
you see there’s little Jenny Brown
she’s kept so many things
dolls and sweet and teddy bears
clothes and golden rings”
CHORUS
Christmas is coming 
and the goose is getting fat
Hey put a penny in the old man’s hat (2)
light up the fire, 
the wind’s blowing cold
Santa Claus is getting old
II.
“Oh mother, Jenny has so much
but still it’s not enough
but little Peter (3) down the road
got none of all the stuff
he’s cold and hungry can’t you see?
There’s holes in both his shoes
no toys for him, no clothes and sweets
and no Christmas goods”
III.
“Oh child, I understand you now
it seems it is not right
some children live all in the dark
while others’ homes are light
but Santa Claus is not to blame
a-pouring of his load
but Jenny Brown should simply share
with Peter down the road”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“O mamma cara, il giorno di Natale  devo lamentarmi ancora;
mi chiedo se Babbo Natale
si sia sbagliato di nuovo,
vedi c’è la piccola Jenny Brown,
lei ha così tanti regali,
bambole e dolci e orsacchiotti,
vestiti e anelli d’oro”.
CORO:
Natale è in arrivo
e l’oca è all’ingrasso,
metti un penny nel cappello del vecchio, accendi il fuoco,
il vento soffia freddo,
Babbo Natale sta diventando vecchio.
II
“Oh mamma Jenny ha troppo
e non è sempre mai abbastanza,
ma il piccolo Peter in fondo alla strada non ha proprio niente,
è al freddo ed è affamato, non lo vedi?
Ha entrame le scarpe bucate, nessun giocattolo per lui, né abiti e dolci e nessun regalo di Natale.”
III
“Oh bambina, capisco che adesso
non ti sembri giusto
che dei bambini vivano al buio, mentre le case degli altri sono illuminate! Però Babbo Natale non è da biasimare nello scaricare il suo sacco, invece è Jenny Brown che dovrebbe semplicemente condividere i suoi con Peter”

NOTE
1) L’Old Nick della carola “Christmas is coming” americanizzato in Santa Claus, aveva il suo giorno nel calendario dell’Avvento al 6 dicembre. Una figura sincretica che unisce antichissime tradizioni con quelle “moderne” improntate al consumismo, da vescovo è diventato un buffo e grasso vecchietto dalla barba bianca vestito di un bel rosso pomodoro. Come tutti sanno il Babbo Natale inglese (Santa Klaus) è la storpiatura dall’olandese ‘Sinter klaas’, per San Nicola, sbarcato nel XVII secolo negli Stati Uniti con gli immigrati dai Paesi Bassi (quando New York si chiamava Nieuw Amsterdam). E però nell’Ottocento con la poesiola A Visit from St. Nicholas pubblicata in forma anonima nel 1823, ma attribuita nel 1838 a Clement Clarke Moore, che Nick si rifà il look e porta i doni ai bambini alla vigilia di Natale e non più il 6 dicembre. continua
2) Già i Celti mangiavano l’oca a Samain e i cristiani medievali la servivano sulla tavola per San Michele (29 settembre), in epoca Regency finisce sulla tavola di Natale come piatto principale della cena natalizia inglese (oltre al roast beef e alla cacciagione), finchè in epoca vittoriana l’oca riebbe il posto d’onore nel menù spodestata poco dopo dall’americano (e più economico) tacchino. L’oca arrosto resta comunque la preferita sulle tavole natalizie dei Piemontesi e Lombarde prestandosi a preparazioni agro-dolci con ripieni saporiti di mele e nocciole, o prugne e castagne !
3) Peter è così povero da non avere nemmeno un cognome!

SEA LONGING (AN IONNDRAINN MHARA)

Una melodia tradizionale dalle Isole Ebridi sempre della collezione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser. Il titolo si traduce in italiano come “Desiderio del mare”: si tratta di una particolare nostalgia del mare, un inappagabile struggimento, tipica delle creature fatate provenienti dal mare. Questo sentimento è un topico della letteratura fantasy richiamata anche dal “padre” del genere: “It is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Iluvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen. “(The Silmarillion, Tolkien) Nell’oceano risuona ancora la voce primigenia che ha creato il mondo, la quale attira le creature fatate e in particolare gli Elfi molto sensibili verso la musica, essendo ottimi musicisti. Oltre il Mare ci sono le Terre Imperiture, il Reame Beato (ovvero l’altromondo celtico.)
Nel cuore di tutti gli (elfi) Esuli la nostalgia del Mare era un inguaribile tormento; nell’animo dei Grigi Elfi un’inquietudine latente, che una volta destata non poteva essere più placata.” (Appendice F, A proposito degli Elfi) Così scrive Tolkien descrivendo lo stato d’animo degli Elfi lontani dalla loro Terra Madre; questo “richiamo del mare” è ben presente nella musica celtica delle Isole dalla Scozia.

Il brano preso in esame oggi non è molto conosciuto, in pratica l’unica versione che si trova in rete è quella raccolta da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser ma molto rielaborata. Possiamo presumere si tratti del canto di una selkie,  che canta la sua insopprimibile nostalgia per il mare..  mentre è costretta a vivere in forma umana. Secondo la leggenda bastava rubare e nascondere la pelle della foca mentre era mutata in fanciulla danzante sugli scogli, la creatura del mare si sarebbe trasformata in una docile e servizievole moglie…

selkie_by_annie_stegg600_450

Una bella versione strumentale quella di Susan Craig Winsberg nel Cd La Belle Dame (1999)
ASCOLTA Susan Craig Winsberg

E per chi piace la musica classica la rielaborazione sinfonica di Sir Granville Bantock

ASCOLTA Lisa Milne (soprano), Sioned Williams (arpa) in Land of Heart’s Desire. Nelle note si legge: “The air was collected by Mrs Kennedy-Fraser and her daughter Patuffa from Anne Monk of Benbecula but the accompaniment is by Sir Granville Bantock. The words are described as ‘an old fragment’ adapted and translated by Kenneth Macleod”

ASCOLTA Kenneth McKellar su Spotify


Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart
Glides the sun, but ah! how slowly,
Far away to luring seas!
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Hear’st, O Sun, the roll of waters,
Breaking, calling by yon Isle?
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart.
Sun on high, ere falls the gloamin’,
Heart to heart, thou’lt greet yon waves.
Mary Mother(1), how I yearn,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Mary Mother, how I yearn.
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
Nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare
le onde oltremare di Barra mi chiamano,
nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare,
sfugge il sole ma oh si piano,
per adescare il mare!
Nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare
le onde oltremare di Barra mi chiamano,
nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare,
Ascolta oh Sole le onde del mare,
che si frangono per chiamare la lontana Isle?
Nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare
le onde oltremare di Barra mi chiamano,
nel cuore struggente nostalgia del mare,
Sole supremo ecco scende il crepuscolo,
cuore contro cuore, andrai a salutare le onde,
madre Maria(1), che struggimento,
le onde oltremare di Barra mi chiamano,
madre Maria, che struggimento!

NOTE
1) probabilmente Bride la dea che veniva chiamata Maria in una sorta di sincretizzazione con la religione cristiana


APPROFONDIMENTO DEL MITO: SCHEDA continua

FONTI
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/sea-longing-0
http://inkpot.com/classical/bantocksyms.html

GRUAGACH-MHARA: A GRUAGACH OR A SELKIE?

Sebbene il termine gaelico Gruagach si traduca con “fanciulla“, il Gruagach del folklore scozzese è diventato più simile ad un folletto tipo Brownie che una fanciulla del Mare.

SPIRITO TUTELARE

Khatarine Briggs nel suo “Dizionario di fate, gnomi e folletti” parla dei Gruagach maschi delle Highlands scozzesi paragonandoli ai Brownie, belli e slanciati, elegantemente vestiti di rosso e dotati di capelli biondi, dediti alla sorveglianza del bestiame. La maggior parte però sono brutti e trasandati e come i Brownie aiutano gli uomini nei lavori domestici e agricoli.

Sorta di spirito tutelare della casa e del bestiame la gruagach è considerata un folletto da rabbonire con offerte di latte lasciate nelle coppelle dei massi erratici. Stuart McHardy ritiene tuttavia che la gruagach sia stata una divinità più potente e antica decaduta nel tempo al rango di guardiano. J.A. McCulloch (The religion of the ancient Celts, 1911) had this to say: “Until recently milk was poured on ‘Gruagach stones’ in the Hebrides, as an offering to the Gruagach, a brownie who watched over herds, and who had taken the place of a god”. Evans-Wentz in The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries (1911) also describes the Gruagach, again stressing the link with cattle: “The fairy queen who watches over cows is called Gruagach in the islands, and she is often seen. In pouring libations to her and her fairies, various kinds of stones, usually with hollows in them, are used. In many parts of the Highlands, where the same deity is known, the stone into which women poured the libation is called Leac na Gruagaich, ‘Flag-stone of the Gruagach’. If the libation was omitted in the evening, the best cow in the fold would be found dead in the morning”. (tratto da qui)

LA FANCIULLA DEL MARE

John Gregorson Campbell nel suo “Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland”, 1900 descrive il Gruagach come una fanciulla del mare dai capelli biondi: “A Gruagach haunted the ‘Island House’ (Tigh an Eilein, so called from being at first surrounded with water), the principal residence in the island, from time immemorial till within the present century. She was never called Glaistig, but Gruagach and Gruagach mhara (sea-maid) by the islanders. Tradition represents her as a little woman with long yellow hair, but a sight of her was rarely obtained. She staid in the attics, and the doors of the rooms in which she was heard working were locked at the time. She was heard putting the house in order when strangers were to come, however unexpected otherwise their arrival might be. She pounded the servants when they neglected their work.”

LA DEA DEL MARE

Così nella tradizione la gruagach è associata ad una vacca sacra giunta dal mare e ad una pietra coppellata per le offerte di libagioni (ovvero latte), una creatura soprannaturale in origine sicuramente di genere femminile  guardiana del bestiame di un determinato territorio. Potrebbe essere il ricordo di antichissimi rituali celebrati da sacerdotesse della Dea Madre e in seguito trasformate in creature fatate.

Stuart McHardy prosegue nel suo saggio: ‘Gruagach’ may mean “the long-haired one” and be derived from gruag = a wig, and is a common Gaelic name for a maiden, or a young woman. In A Midsummer Eve’s Dream (1971) Alexander Hope analyses16thC Scots poems by Dunbar. In the poem the Golden Targe Dunbar’s goddesses wear green kirtles under their green mantles and with their long hair hanging loose they are also presented as fairies in their appearance. The belief in a “fairy-cult” which Hope discerns in these and other works is quite clearly a remnant of an earlier pagan religion. .. Gruagach may be related to the Breton words Groac’h or Grac’h, a name given to the Druidesses or Priestesses, who had colleges on the Isle de Sein, off the NW coast of Brittany. These Groac’h were known for being involved in divination, healing and shape-shifting, and P.F.Anson (Fisher Folk Lore, 1965) says of them: “On the intensely Catholic Isle de Sein there used to be the conviction that certain women had what was known as ‘le don de vouer’, i.e. the power of communicating with the Devil or his emissaries, in other words that they were witches. Fishermen alleged that they had seen these women on dark nights launching mysterious boats (bag-sorcérs) to enable them to take part in a witches’ Sabbath or coven known as groach’hed”. (sempre tratto da qui)

Quindi la Gruagach è un altro nome della Cailleach, la dea primigenia della creazione come viene chiamata in Scozia, il cui ricordo ha lasciato una traccia nel folklore celtico e ci parla di un culto primordiale conservatosi pressoché immutato anche durante l’affermarsi del Cristianesimo e praticato soprattutto dalle donne con poteri sciamanici, ben presto demonizzate e declassate al rango di streghe.

La Giumenta Bianca era una delle sembianze di Cailleach, la velata, così come si manifestava la Dea durante l’Inverno la “Vecchia Donna”, lei colpiva con il suo martello la terra e la rendeva dura fino a Imbolc, la festa del risveglio della Primavera.
Questa antichissima Dea Anziana che controlla le forze della natura e plasma la terra con il suo potere ha forse origini lontane dalle Isole Britanniche. Lo storico greco Erodoto nel V° secolo A.C. ci parla di una tribù celtica in Spagna che chiama “Kallaikoi”. L’autore romano Plinio parla del popolo dei Callaeci, tribù da cui deriva il nome Gallaecia (Galizia) e Portus Cale (Portogallo). Il nome Callaeci viene fatto risalire ad “adoratori della Cailleach”. …Numerose sono le leggende [scozzesi] che ci parlano di questa Dea e analizzandole possiamo evidenziare delle caratteristiche ricorrenti: – La Cailleach dà forma alla terra sia in modo volontario che involontario (il suo grembiule carico di pietre ritorna in moltissime leggende celtiche) creando laghi, colline, isole e costruzioni megalitiche. – Una costante associazione con l’acqua attraverso pozzi, laghi e fiumi di cui è spesso guardiana. – L’associazione con la stagione invernale. – La sua mole gigantesca. – La sua antichissima età, essendo fatta risalire a uno dei primi esseri presenti sulla terra. – La sua funzione di guardiana di particolari animali come il cervo e l’airone. – La sua capacità di trasformarsi ed assumere diverse forme come quella di fanciulla, airone e pietra… In Irlanda l’animale sacro alla dea è la mucca. La dea stessa si occupava del suo bestiame e mungeva le sue mucche fatate ricavandone del latte magico che usava per ridare la vita ai morti. La Dea appare quindi sia come signora della morte che della vita. (Claudia Falcone tratto da: ilcerchiodellaluna.it)

Una creatura che si può associare alla Gruagach è il folletto-capra presente sia nel folklore irlandese con il nome di bocánach sia in quello delle Highlands scozzesi con il nome di Glaistig (metà donna e metà capra):  dai lunghi capelli biondi e bellissima nasconde la sua parte inferiore animale sotto una lunga veste verde. Nella sua versione  maligna la fanciulla è una sorta di sirena che attira l’uomo con un canto o una danza e poi si nutre del suo sangue. Al contrario nella sua versione benigna è considerata una protettrici del bestiame e dei pastori, oltre che dei bambini lasciati soli dalle madri per sorvegliare gli animali al pascolo.

La fanciulla del Mare continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/poor-horse.htm
https://listserv.heanet.ie/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9311&L=celtic-l&D=0&P=13250
http://www.goddessalive.co.uk/index.php/issues-21-25/issue-21/gruagach

THE SONG OF THE SEAL

grey sealLe foche sono mammiferi semiacquatici classificati come pinnipedi perchè hanno le pinne al posto dei piedi (piè d’ala per usare un temine poetico). Imparentate con il tricheco e le otarie le foche si nutrono in mare, ma hanno bisogno della terraferma per l’amore e la prole.
Esistono circa 30 specie di foche, che in genere vivono sulle coste delle regioni polari e sub-polari del pianeta o, in certi casi, in alcune aree temperate. Di queste specie, ne vengono cacciate una quindicina, per un totale di 15-16 milioni di esemplari. La caccia alle foche viene praticata tutto l’anno, ma la stagione venatoria varia in base alla regione e alle specie. Il Canada, la Groenlandia e la Namibia rappresentano circa il 60% delle 900.000 foche cacciate ogni anno. Tra gli altri paesi interessati figurano l’Islanda, la Norvegia, la Russia e gli Stati Uniti e, all’interno dell’Unione europea, la Svezia, la Finlandia e il Regno Unito.” Fonte UE

Il Parlamento europeo ha approvato il regolamento che vieta la vendita nell’Ue di prodotti derivati dalle foche (2009). “l’introduzione sul mercato comunitario di prodotti derivati dalle foche sarà autorizzate solo quando «provengono dalla caccia tradizionalmente praticata dagli Inuit e da altre comunità indigene e contribuiscono alla loro sussistenza». Inoltre, l’importazione di prodotti derivati dalle foche è autorizzata quando «è di natura occasionale ed è costituita esclusivamente da merci destinate all’uso personale dei viaggiatori o dei loro familiari». La vendita sul mercato Ue sarà anche autorizzata «unicamente su basi non lucrative» per gli articoli provenienti da sottoprodotti della caccia regolamentata dalla legislazione nazionale e »praticata al solo scopo di garantire una gestione sostenibile delle risorse marine». In entrambi i casi, il tipo e la quantità di questi prodotti non dovranno essere tali da far ritenere che l’importazione e la vendita possa avere finalità commerciali.” (tratto da qui)

grey-seal-profiloSi sa che le foche (soprattutto quelle grigie che si distinguono da quelle comune per il “naso” aquilino), come le balene, cantano anche quando sono sott’acqua (da ascoltare qui da “Encounters at the End of the World.”).

Così scrive John blogger di “The Natural Contemplative”: ” Most books about seals say nothing about their singing abilities. And I think scientists have been a little slow to accept the fact that seals sing beautiful tunes in the air. That is because the seals seem to be a little choosy about whom they sing to. But scientists do now realize that seals also sing under water. These songs are not like the tunes in the story. They are more like the songs of whales. They seem to be a way of communicating with each other over long distances. They are sung by both male and female seals, and each song is unique to the seal who sings it. That means seals can use these songs to identify each other and to find each other in the dark water.”

I suoni che emettono le foche in superficie sono numerosi: sembrano ruggiti, starnuti, fischi, soffi, ma anche lamenti qui.

IL CANTO DELLE SELKIE

selkie-Lindsay-ArcherMa per gli Scozzesi delle Isole Ebridi le foche sono selkie, creature metà foca e metà uomo, guardiani del mare, il popolo delle fate del regno sottomarino.

SCHEDA continua

Ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, le selkie abbandonerebbero le loro pelli sulle scogliere per cantare e danzare sulla terra ferma, evidentemente desiderose di muoversi con agilità e bellezza senza l’impaccio della forma animale (perfetta per nuotare negli abissi).
Ovviamente non poteva mancare nella tradizione popolare la testimonianza di questi canti, che si dice i pescatori abbiano imparato assistendo di nascosto a questi incontri o ascoltandone l’eco lontana..

THE SONG OF THE SEAL

selkie-songLa melodia è tradizionale mentre le parole sono scritte da Granville Bantock (1868-1946); la canzone fu pubblicata nel 1930.

Chi canta è una selkie ma chi scrive è un po’ impreciso: è noto che le selkies cantano di notte quando assumono la loro forma umana lontana da occhi indiscreti, preferibilmente quando c’è la luna piena, allora si liberano del loro mantello e danzano sugli scogli e sulle rive; possiamo in qualche modo “sorvolare” sull’errore immaginandoci di essere nell’ora del crepuscolo

ASCOLTA Grace Griffith in Siren Song 2015 (vedi) segue lo strumentale The Song of the Water Kelpie 


I
A sea maid sings on yonder reef
The spell-bound seals draw near
A lilt that lures beyond belief
Mortals enchanted hear
Chorus
Coir an oir an oir an eer o
Coir an oir an oir an eer o
Coir an oir an oir an ee lalyuran
Coir an oir an eer o
II
The wandering plowman halts his plow
The maid her milking stays
Sheep on hillside, bird on bough
Pause and listen in amaze
III
Was it a dream? Were all asleep?
Or did she cease her lay?
The seals with a splash dive into the deep
The world goes on, yet lingers the refrain
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Una fanciulla del mare canta sugli scogli, le foche prese dall’incantesimo le si avvicinano, una nenia che seduce oltre ogni immaginazione
CORO
Coir an oir an eer o
Coir an oir an eer o
Coir an oir an oir an ee lalyuran
Coir an oir an eer o
II
Il bracciante stagionale arresta l’aratro
la fanciulla interrompe la mungitura
le pecore sulla collina, l’uccello sul ramo, si fermano e ascoltano rapiti
III
Era un sogno? Erano tutti addormentati? Oppure finì il suo canto? Le foche con un tuffo si gettano negli abissi,
il mondo riprende il suo corso e ancora indugia il ritornello

Un’altra canzone della Seal Woman arriva da S. Uist
SEAL WOMAN’S SEA-JOY/ YUNDAH continua

FONTI
http://www.elicriso.it/it/stragi_compiute_uomo/foca/ http://saturdaychorale.com/2013/06/13/granville-bantock-1868-1946-song-to-the-seals/ http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/songof.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41145
IMMAGINI
http://www.pinterest.com/hwilliamson1981/mystery/
http://www.wildlife-photography.uk.com/blog/?p=7033

SEAL WOMAN’S SEA-JOY/ YUNDAH

Una canzone tradizionale delle Isole Ebridi (proveniente da S. Uist da Catriona Campbell) collezionata da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser.

grey seal

Le foche (soprattutto quelle grigie) come le balene cantano anche quando sono sott’acqua (da ascoltare qui da “Encounters at the End of the World.”).
I suoni che emettono le foche in superficie sono numerosi: sembrano ruggiti, starnuti, fischi, soffi, ma anche lamenti (da ascoltare qui).

LA VOCE DELLE FOCHE

Così scrive John blogger di “The Natural Contemplative”: ” Most books about seals say nothing about their singing abilities. And I think scientists have been a little slow to accept the fact that seals sing beautiful tunes in the air. That is because the seals seem to be a little choosy about whom they sing to. But scientists do now realize that seals also sing under water. These songs are not like the tunes in the story. They are more like the songs of whales. They seem to be a way of communicating with each other over long distances. They are sung by both male and female seals, and each song is unique to the seal who sings it. That means seals can use these songs to identify each other and to find each other in the dark water.All of the music in the story comes from the seals themselves, and from the people who live on islands and coasts where there are many seals, people who know the seals very well. The song the old man sings to the seals is called “The Seal Woman’s Sea Joy,” and there are some who say that song came from the seals themselves long ago. The seals’ response to the old man, which has no name I know, is a real seal tune. And the tune I begin with, that is a real seal tune too, and was recorded about 50 years ago on the island of Skomer, part of Wales. My story is only one of many about the seal people, sometimes called Silkies, or Selkies. There are many stories told by the islanders about seals who live on the land as people; and often they help those who are kind to them. And sometimes they come to teach a lesson to those who are cruel to them. But often they are just going about their own business.” (per leggere tutta la storia qui)

Marjory Kennedy-Fraser in “From the Hebrides” (1925) così scrive: We were some little distance from the water’s edge, parallel with which out in the sea ran a long line of skerries, reefs that are covered at high tide. On the skerries were stretched, also basking in the sunlight, innumerable great grey seals, seals that visit these isles only at long intervals. My friends, great enthusiasts for Hebridean songs, who use their own string instrument arrangements of them for their students, said to me: ‘Try singing “The Sealwoman’s Sea-joy” to the seals themselves.’ I raised myself on my elbow — I was too lazily happy at the moment to stand erect — and, with the most carrying tone I could summon, sang the first phrase of the song. Instantly the response began at the southern end of the reef, and a perfect fusillade of single answering tones came from seal after seal, travelling rapidly northward, until at the further end of the reef it ceased. Then, after a moment of intense silence, a beautiful solo voice sang…The voice was quite human in character but much greater in volume than any mezzo-soprano I have ever heard. Is the song I sang really a seal song, and did the Isles folk learn it from the seals? I noted it many years ago from an old Uist woman. Did the seals mistake me for one of themselves, and had the phrase I sang a meaning for them, and did they instantly grasp it and answer it?

IL CANTO DELLE SELKIE

selkie-Lindsay-ArcherPer gli Scozzesi delle Isole Ebridi le foche sono selkie, creature metà foca e metà uomo, guardiani del mare, il popolo delle fate del regno sottomarino. continua

Ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, le selkie abbandonerebbero le loro pelli sulle scogliere per cantare e danzare sulla terra ferma, evidentemente desiderose di muoversi con agilità e bellezza senza l’impaccio della forma animale (perfetta però per nuotare negli abissi).

Ovviamente non poteva mancare nella tradizione popolare la testimonianza di questi canti, che si dice i pescatori abbiano imparato assistendo di nascosto a questi incontri o ascoltandone l’eco lontana.. come questa canzone tradizionale delle Isole Ebridi (proveniente da S. Uist da Catriona Campbell) collezionata da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser: l’arrangiamento per piano o arpa è pubblicato in “Sea Tangle some more Songs of The Hebrides” (1913) e poi in “Songs of the Hebrides for voice and Celtic Harp or Piano” (1922) di Paruffa Kennedy-Fraser a pag 12 (qui); nello spartito è riportato solo un fraseggio non-sense che dovrebbero essere i vocalizzi della selkie.

ASCOLTA Peter Govan in Devotion 2001

ASCOLTA Ananda in Cosmic Chants 2010

ASCOLTA Mary Mclaughlin in Celtic Voices, Women of Song (1995)
con il titolo Sealwoman/Yundah che sovrappone un testo ai vocalizzi

I
Ionn da, ionn do
Ionn da, odar da
Ionn da, ionn do
Ionn da, odar da
II
Hi-o-dan dao
Hi-o-dan dao
Hi-o-dan dao
odar da.

LYRICS by Mary Mclaughlin
I
Over the waves you call to me
Shadow of dream, ancient mystery
Oh how I long for
your sweet caress
Oh how I long
for your gentleness.
II
Torn between sea mists
and solid land
Nights when I’ve ached
for a human hand
III
I’ll come to you
when the moon shines bright
But I must go free
with the first streak of light
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dalle onde mi chiami
ombra del sogno, antico mistero
come mi mancano
le tue dolci carezze,
quanto desidero
la tua dolcezza.
II
Lacerata tra le brume del mare
e la terra ferma,
nelle notti in cui avevo desiderato una mano umana
III
verrò da te
quando la luna splenderà luminosa,
ma devo andare via libera
al primo raggio di luce.

I vocalizzi riportati da Marjory ricordano molto i richiami rivolti agli animali tipici dei paesi nordici (i croon scozzesi) e scandinavi (Kulning)
Continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.musicweb-international.com/bantock/budd.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13136 http://homepages.sover.net/~chughes/jlc/essays/seals.html https://archive.org/stream/songsofhebridesf00kenn#page/n1/mode/2up http://homepages.sover.net/~chughes/jlc/essays/seals.html https://urresearch.rochester.edu/institutionalPublicationPublicView.action;jsessionid= D4880D32953DCE531C0B60F225B615F6?institutionalItemId=24996 http://blog.naturalcontemplative.com/2009/01/singing-of-seals.html http://theroseandchestnut.com/2014/04/15/seven-tears-into-the-sea-the-male-roots-of-selkie-legends/

(Cattia Salto novembre 2014)

THE GREAT SELKIE OF SULE SKERRY

5494853578_b8a653b169Selkie / silkie / Selchie sono i termini dialettali con cui in Scozia e Irlanda sono chiamate le creature del mare mutaforma; derivano da selich, vocabolo arcaico scozzese per la foca grigia degli oceani e i mari atlantici: sono i guardiani del mare, foca nel mare e uomo sulla terra.

LA SCHEDA continua

Di sesso sia maschile che femminile sono descritti nella loro forma umana come creature bellissime (capelli e occhi scuri, agili membra), docili ma al contempo dotate di potere seduttivo. La leggenda dice che per riprodursi il selkie-maschio deve essere in forma umana e trasmetterà alla sua discendenza il suo potere: solo dopo che il bambino sarà svezzato sulla terra ferma, il selkie tornerà dal mare per portarlo con sé. Un tempo quando la mortalità infantile era molto alta, solo i bambini che superavano il settimo anno di età potevano essere considerati fuori pericolo ed è proprio allo scadere del settimo anno che il selkie ritorna a prendere il figlio.
Selkie maschi erano invocati dalle fanciulle in cerca di amanti versando sette lacrime nella marea e i marinai erano attratti dalle selkie femmina che cercavano di prendere come spose.

Selkie by Maryanne Gobble

THE GREAT SELKIE OF SULE SKERRY

La più nota delle ballate delle isole Orcadi, anche come The Grey Silkie of Sule Skerry, narra di un selkie che vive sulla scogliera rocciosa di Sule. Skerry deriva dal norreno sker che significa roccia nel mare e in italiano si traduce con scoglio.
La ballata è stata collezionata anche dal professor Child nella sua opera ( # 113).

tumblr_loialeB04U1r04h5zo1_500Una giovane fanciulla ha un figlio da un uomo sconosciuto che si rivela essere un selkie: uomo sulla terra, foca nel mare la cui dimora sono gli scogli di Sule. Dopo sette anni la creatura del mare ritorna per reclamare a sè il figlio, donandogli una catena d’oro, e la madre lo lascia andare.
La donna dopo qualche tempo si sposa con un cacciatore che commercia con le pelli di foca. Un giorno ritorna a casa con le pelli di due foche che aveva ucciso per donarle alla moglie: una era di una foca vecchia e grigia, l’altra di una giovane foca con al collo una catena d’oro! La donna sopraffatta dal dolore di tale visione muore: le si spezza il cuore oppure decide di gettarsi in mare con il bambino per vivere come silkie.

LA PROFEZIA DEL SELKIE

L’incanto della vicenda però risiede nella scelta narrativa: la storia è spesso descritta come in un sogno notturno in cui un uomo che si dichiara essere silkie e padre del bambino, appare quasi magicamente e, accanto alla culla del neonato come nelle fate madrine delle fiabe, ne traccia il destino.

LE MELODIE

La melodia abbinata e che è stata ripresa nel folk revival degli anni 70 è stata scritta da James Waters nel 1954 (la versione di Joan Baez per intenderci); un’altra melodia è invece tradizionale ed è stata raccolta nel 1938 da Otto Anderson dalla voce di John Sinclair dell’isola di Flotta e trascritta in notazione (vedi)

LA VERSIONE DI JOAN BAEZ

La melodia è stata composta da James Waters negli anni 1950 e resa popolare da Joan Baez, quasi un lamento funebre in forma di ninnananna.

ASCOLTA Castelbar che hanno realizzato anche un mini-filmato,   molto evocativo. La sequenza delle strofe è: I, II, IV, V, III, VI, VII, I

oppure la versione più pop di Cécile Corbel (strofe I, II, IV usata come ritornello, III, V, VI)

ed ecco la versione live dei Seriouskitchen (Nick Hennessey, Vicki Swan and Jonny Dyer )  magia degli strumenti, belle voci, intensità espressiva


I
An earthly nurse sits and sings,
And aye, she sings by lily wean,
“And little ken I my bairn’s father,
Far less the land where he dwells in.
II
For he came one night to her bed feet,/And a grumbly guest, I’m sure was he,/Saying, “Here am I, thy bairn’s father,/Although I be not comely.”
III
He had ta’en a purse of gold/And he had placed it upon her knee/ Saying, “Give to me my little young son,/And take thee up thy nurse’s fee.”
IV
“I am a man upon the land,
I am a silkie on the sea,
And when I’m far and far frae land,
My home it is in Sule Skerrie.”
V
“And it shall come to pass on a summer’s day,/When the sun shines bright on every stane,/I’ll come and fetch my little young son,/And teach him how to swim the faem.”
VI
“ye shall marry a gunner good/And a right fine gunner I’m sure he’ll be,/And the very first shot that e’er he shoots/Will kill both my young son and me.”
VII
“Alas! Alas! this woeful fate!
This weary fate that’s been laid for me!”/And once or twice she sobbed and sighed/and she joint to a sun and grey silkie
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Una madre (1) mortale seduta, canta
e si, canta vicino al bambino pallido
E ben poco so (2) del padre di mio figlio (3) 
tanto meno della terra dove vive
II
che venne una notte ai piedi del letto (4) ed era un ospite ben strano (5)  e disse “eccomi qua, il padre di tuo figlio
anche se non sono bello da vedersi“.
III
Aveva preso una borsa d’oro
e gliela aveva posata sulle ginocchia
dicendo “Dà a me il mio figlioletto,
e prendi la ricompensa per averlo allevato
IV
Io sono un uomo sulla terra,
e un silkie in mare
e quando sono lontano dalla terra
la mia dimora è lo scoglio di Sule.
V
Ed avverrà in un giorno
d’estate, quando il sole splenderà lucente su ogni pietra, che verrò a prendere il mio
figlioletto e gli insegnerò a nuotare
nelle onde.
VI
E tu sposerai un buon cacciatore,
e sarà di certo un cacciatore dalla buona mira e al primo colpo che mai sparerà
ucciderà sia mio figlio che me”
VII
Ahime! Ahime! Che destino doloroso
che tristo destino è stato predisposto per me!
Una o due volte si lamenta
e piange poi si unisce al figlio e alla foca grigia (6).

NOTE
1) nourris = nurse qui tradotto nel senso della maternità
2) ken = know
3) bairn = child termine scozzese per bambino
4) bed fit = foot of the bed
5) grumly = strange significa strano, spaventoso ma anche triste
6) il verso più comunemente adottatto è invece: And her tender heart did break in three

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sule-skerry.htm
http://www.orkneyjar.com/folklore/selkiefolk/sulesk.htm
http://thawinedarksea.blogspot.it/2010/04/selkie-pallawah-skin.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31375
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch113.htm
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/recordings–info-113-great-silkie-of-sule-skerry.aspx
http://bestoflegends.org/fairy/selchies.html
http://fiabesca.blogspot.it/2013/06/acque-settentrionali-le-storie-della.html

MERMAID OR SELKIE SONG?

selkie-focheLa Scozia conserva ancora tantissimi canti sulle creature del mare, in particolare la tradizione è ancora viva nelle Isole Ebridi: qui le foche non sono dei semplici animali, bensì creature magiche chiamate selkie, che di notte prendono la forma di uomini e donne annegati. Ritenuti una sorta di guardiani del Mare (qui) o giardinieri del fondale marino ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, abbandonerebbero le loro pelli per rivelare sembianze umane, per cantare e danzare sulle scogliere d’argento.

LA SCHEDA continua

ORAN NA MAIGHDINN-MHARA

Melodia tradizionale scozzese, eseguita spesso con la sola cornamusa

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers

LA LEGGENDA DELLA SELKIE, LA FATA-FOCA

Alcuni interpretano questo canto alla luce di una leggenda scozzese che narra la storia di una selkie costretta a vivere con l’uomo che le aveva rubato la pelle. Dopo molti anni il figlio nato dal rapporto trova la pelle e la mostra alla madre, così lei è finalmente libera di riprendere il mare.

Si racconta che una notte, sulla piccola isola di Inis Oirr, Séan O’Shea incontrò una ragazza dai lunghi capelli rossi che sedeva nuda sugli scogli, cantando una canzone che parlava del Grande Padre Mare.foca-saluta
Séan, osservando la ragazza da lontano, vide la pelle di foca poco distante da lei e invaghitosi della giovane decise di prenderla con sé.
Da quel momento, la ragazza divenne la moglie di Séan, incapace per incanto di separarsi da lui.
Passarono molti anni e Séan e la selkie ebbero una bambina che entrambi amavano e coccolavano. La selkie era docile, affettuosa, una madre perfetta ed una moglie gentile, ma non perse mai il suo sguardo malinconico.
Ogni notte, alla fine dei lavori domestici, sedeva sugli scogli a guardare il mare cantando tristi melodie a suo padre, il Mare, dal quale non riusciva a separarsi.

Il tempo passò, la bambina crebbe e la selkie si innamorò veramente del suo uomo; ma una notte, nascosta in un vecchio canestro in fondo alla cantina della casa, trovò il mantello di foca che suo marito aveva nascosto per tanto tempo.
Il mattino dopo, Séan trovò soltanto una scritta fatta con un dito in un pugno di farina sparsa sul tavolo: “Vi amo”. Ma di sua moglie non c’era traccia, e Séan e la bambina non la videro mai più.

OPPURE E’ UNA SIRENA?

Ma c’è anche un altro racconto leggendario che ben si adatta a questo canto.
Una sirena si innamorò di un pastore delle Isole Ebridi e i due si incontravano sulla riva rocciosa dove consumavano il loro amore. Poi l’uomo stanco del rapporto non andò più alla riva. La bella sirena attese invano il ritorno del suo amore e alla fine scelse la morte gettandosi contro gli scogli. Sembra che l’ingresso di una grotta conservi ancora la forma della sirena impressa con un colore rosso scuro.
Con questa chiave di lettura il canto sarebbe quinti il canto di disperazione della sirena che attende invano il suo amante che l’ha tradita.

ASCOLTA Rich Hill, la canzone illustrata da The Crankie Factory

ASCOLTA Glasgow Islay Choir
ASCOLTA Ishbel MacAskill in Sioda

GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist:
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hì
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
‘S ann le foill a mheall thu mì
I
A mach air bharr nan stuadh ri gaillionn
Fuachd is feannadh fad ‘o thìr
Tha mo ghaol dhuit daònan fallainn
Ged is Maighdinn mhara mì
II
Chaneil mo chadal-sa ach luaineach
‘Nuair bhios buaireas air an tìd’
Bha mi ‘n raoir an Coirre Bhreacainn(2)
‘S bi mi nochd an Eilean I
III
Seall is faic an grunnd na fairge
Uamhan airgiod ‘s òr gun dìth
Lainnearachd chan fhaca sùil e
Ann an cuirt no lùchairt righ

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hì
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
It was with guile that you cheated me
I
Out on top of the tempest’s crest
Cold so bitter to skin alive
My love for you is constant and healthy
Though ‘tis a mermaid that I am
II
My sleep is sporadic
When the ocean’s in turmoil
Last night I spent in Corry Vreckan
And tonight it’s in Iona that I’ll be
III
Look and see on the   ocean’s floor
Endless caves of silver and gold
Such glittering beheld by no one
Even in the courts or palace of kings
TRADUZIONE  di Cattia Salto
Ritonello
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hì
Hùbha i ‘s na horaibh hùbhaidh
con la menzogna mi hai ingannato
I
Fuori sulla cresta delle onde in tempesta, freddo e ancora freddo sulla viva pelle, il mio amore per te è costante e vero, anche se sono una fanciulla del mare (1)
II
Il mio sonno è agitato
quando la tempesta infuria
Ieri sera ero a Corryvreckan (2)
stasera sarò nell’Isola di Iona.
III (3)
Guarda e osserva il fondo dell’oceano
grotte senza fine d’oro e d’argento
bellezza che nessun occhio ha mai visto
nella corte o nel palazzo di un Re

NOTE
1) se il verso fosse pronunciato dall’uomo sarebbe “Though ‘tis a mermaid that you are”: il mio amore per te è costante e vero anche se sei una sirena
2) Corry Vreckan è un mulinello nel mare tra Jura e Scarba
3) è la sirena-selkie che è finalmente libera di vagare per il mare (non solo nei suoi sogni inquieti) e di ritornare alla bellezza celata negli abissi.

lo stesso racconto nella tradizione irlandese continua

Alan dai capelli neri

Read the post in English

Aileen Duinn, un canto, in gaelico scozzese, originario delle Isole Ebridi : un lament per il naufragio di una barca di pescatori, in origine una waulking song  in cui la donna invoca la morte per condividere lo stesso letto d’alghe del suo amore, Alan dai capelli neri. Secondo la tradizione sull’isola di Lewis è stata Annie Campbell ad aver scritto la canzone nella disperazione per la morte del suo fidanzato Alan Morrison, il capitano della nave che nella primavera del 1788 lasciò Stornoway per andare a Scalpay dove avrebbe dovuto sposarsi con la sua Annie, ma la nave incappò in una tempesta ed fece naufragio e l’intero equipaggio affogò: anche lei morirà qualche mese più tardi, sconvolta dal dolore. Il suo corpo è stato trovato sulla spiaggia, nei pressi del punto in cui il mare aveva riconsegnato il corpo di Ailein Duinn (Alan dai capelli neri).

La canzone è diventata famosa perché inserita nella colonna sonora del film Rob Roy e interpretata magistralmente da Karen Matheson (la cantante del gruppo scozzese i Capercaillie che compare nei panni di una popolana e la canta vicino al fuoco accompagnata da leggeri tocchi sull’arpa)

Ecco  la sound track del film Rob Roy : per la verità le tracce sono due Ailein Duinn  e Morag’s Lament, (arrangiate dai Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in cui la seconda è il verso d’apertura seguito dal coro

PRIMA VERSIONE
Il testo è ridotto al minimo, più evocativo che esplicativo di un tragico evento che doveva essere noto a tutti gli abitanti dell’Isola. La donna che canta è segnata da un dolore immenso, il suo Alain dai capelli neri è annegato in fondo al mare, e lei vaneggia di voler condividerne il sonno negli abissi stipulando un macabro patto di sangue.

Capercaillie nel Cd To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, la voce ‘kissed by God’ passa dal sussurro al grido, ripreso dalla cornamusa in un frangersi di onde del mare.

Meav, in Meav 2000 voce angelica, arpa e flauto

Annwn nel Cd Aeon – 2009 gruppo tedesco fondato nel 2006 che si definisce Folk Mystic; molto intensa anche questa interpretazione pur nella rarefazione dell’arrangiamento, con la voce limpida e calda di Sabine Hornung, la melodia portata dall’arpa, pochi echi del flauto e il lamento del violino, magnifico.


Trobar De Morte
il testo ridotto a sole due strofe ed estrapolato dal contesto si presta ad essere letto come il canto d’amore di una sirena nella risacca del mare (vedi anche Mermaid’s croon)

E’ la versione testuale più riprodotta con gli stili musicali più disparati grossomodo dopo il 2000  anche come sound-track in molti video giochi vedasi per tutti  Medieval II Total War

Gaelico scozzese
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,
traduzione inglese
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(1)
I would drink(2), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Che dolore senza fine,
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino.
CORO
Oh hi vorrei morire con te,
Alan dai capelli neri,
salve, vorrei morire con te.
Se ti è cuscino la sabbia,
sul letto d’alghe,
se i pesci ti sono luce di candela ,
e le foche sentinelle(1),
io vorrei bere(2), sebbene ciò mi faccia orrore,
il sangue del tuo cuore dopo il tuo annegamento

NOTE
1) per gli abitanti delle Isole Ebridi le foche non sono dei semplici animali, bensì creature magiche chiamate selkie, che di notte prendono la forma di uomini e donne annegati. Ritenuti una sorta di guardiani del Mare o giardinieri del fondale marino (la leggenda più diffusa è quella che le foche siano le anime degli annegati in mare) ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, abbandonerebbero le loro pelli per rivelare sembianze umane, per cantare e danzare sulle scogliere d’argento  (qui)
2) allude ad un antico rituale celtico, consistente nel bere il sangue di un amico in segno di affetto (il patto di sangue), usanza citata da Shakespeare (ancora praticata da tutti gli amici del cuore che si scambiano il sangue con un taglietto superficiale unendo i due tagli, così era anche praticato l’handfasting in Scozia: un tempo l’handfasting era soprattutto un patto di sangue, in cui si incideva con la punta di un pugnale il polso destro degli sposi fino a far sgorgare il sangue, dopodiché i due polsi erano legati a stretto contatto tra di loro con la “wedlock’s band” ovvero una lunga striscia di stoffa continua.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECONDA VERSIONE

Ecco l’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) da “Songs of the Hebrides“, brano citato anche da Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) lo scrittore dei “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake in “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  in “Ships Ahoy ! 2011”  

(Gaelico scozzese)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat
Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart.
An talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

(traduzione inglese Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan,

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto)
Sono colei che soffre
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino
Coro
Alan dai capelli neri

Vorrei morire con te
Alan dai capelli neri
vorrei morire con te
Non è per la morte del bestiame nel mese di maggio
ma per il tuo sudario bagnato,
sebbene le bestie fossero di certo mie, oggi poco mi importa di esse.
Ailein duinn vitello del mio cuore
sei tu alla deriva sulla costa d’Erin?
Che non vorrei fossi in una terra straniera,
ma in un posto dove il mio lamento ti possa raggiungere.
Ailein duinn, mio incanto e riso
vorrei per Dio essere vicina a te
su quella riva o  fiume su cui sei abbandonato,
su quella spiaggia su cui la marea ti ha lasciato.
Vorrei bere una bevanda, chi potrebbe negarlo,
ma non lo scarlatto vino di Spagna,
il sangue del tuo corpo, amore
vorrei piuttosto bere, il sangue che viene dall’incavo della tua gola.
Possa Dio irrorare la tua anima
con quello che ho delle tue dolci carezze,
con quello che ho del tuo parlare
con quello che ho dei tuoi dolci baci.
La mia preghiera a te, o Re del Trono
che io non vada nè in terra nè in cielo
che io non vada nè in paradiso nè all’inferno
ma nel letto d’alghe dove giace il mio Alan

Un’altra traduzione in inglese con il titolo  “Annie Campbell’s Lament” è quella degli Estrange Waters in Songs of the Water, 2016


Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Alan il nero, amore mio
vorrei seguirti
lontano sotto all’oceano
nei profondi abissi 
Alan il nero, vorrei seguirti
I
Oggi il mio cuore è pieno di dolore
la nave del mio amore è affondata nell’oceano
vorrei seguirti..
II
Soffro nel pensare alla tua figura
le tue bianche membra
e la camicia strappata e fatta a pezzi
vorrei seguirti..
III
Vorrei poter esserti accanto
su qualche scoglio o spiaggia dove stai dormendo
vorrei seguirti..
IV
Le alghe saranno la nostra coperta
e appoggeremo le nostre teste su soffici letti di sabbia
vorrei seguirti..

TERZA VERSIONE

Ma la versione più suggestiva e drammatica è quella riportata da Flora MacNeil che l’ha imparata dalla madre. Nata nel 1928 sull’Isola di Barra è una cantante scozzese depositaria di centinaia di canzoni in gaelico scozzese. “Le canzoni tradizionali erano trasmesse in famiglia e io sono stata molto fortunata ad avere mia madre e la sua famiglia come cultori dei testi e delle melodie delle vecchie canzoni. Era molto spontaneo per loro cantarle qualunque cosa facessero o di qualunque umore fossero. Mia zia Mary in particolare era sempre pronta ogni volta che glielo chiedevo, di interrompere qualunqua cosa facesse per discutere una canzone con me, e forse così facendo si ricordava di lunghe strofe dimenticate. Così ho imparato fin dalla tenera età moltissime canzoni senza sforzo. Come ci si può aspettare da una piccola isola, tante canzoni trattano del mare, ma, naturalmente, molte di esse potrebbero non essere  originarie di Barra”

La storia è diversa da quella maggiormente citata, qui la donna è sposata ad Alain MacLeann  che nel naufragio muore con tutti gli altri uomini della famiglia di lei: il padre e i fratelli; la donna si rivolge al gabbiano che vola in alto sul mare e tutto vede, per chiedere conferma della disgrazia; l’ultima strofa traccia immagini poetiche di un funerale del mare, con il letto di alghe, le stelle come candele, il mormorio delle onde per la musica e le foche come guardiani. Funerale e lamento ricorrono spesso nei canti delle donne rimaste sole con il dolore.

Flora MacNeil in una storica registrazione del 1951

Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

Traduzione inglese
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Un dolore senza fine mi è costato quel naufragio, non erano pecore, né  mucche, ma il carico che la nave ha portato via con se erano mio padre, i miei tre fratelli, e come se non fosse abbastanza, colui a cui diedi la mia mano: il mio MacLean, con la pelle candida, che mi prese in chiesa di martedì.(1)
“Gabbiano, gabbiano dell’oceano
dove hai lasciato i miei cari?”
“Lasciati soli, circondati dal mare schiena contro schiena, senza più respirare. “

NOTE
(1) il martedì è ancora il giorno in cui si celebrano tradizionalmente i matrimoni nell’Isola di Barra

QUARTA VERSIONE

Ancora una versione impostata proprio come una waulking song e ancora un testo diverso, questa volta la nave è una baleniera e Allen è naufragato nei pressi dell’Isola di Man.

Mac-Talla, in Gaol Is Ceol 1994 (fortunatamente nel video pubblicato su you tube c’è anche il testo con traduzione) solo le voci femminili e le note di un’arpa, ma che immediatezza…

S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

Traduzione inglese
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sono tormentata
e non penso al matrimonio stanotte
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei  
morire con te
non penso al matrimonio stanotte,
ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza
delle tempeste
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei
morire con te
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi vorrei morire con te

Ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza delle tempeste
che dovrebbero guidare gli uomini nel porto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ho saputo che hai attraversato il mare
su un’esile barca di scura quercia
e che sei sbarcato sull’Isola
di Man
che non è il porto che avrei
scelto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ero giovane quando mi sono innamorata di te
stasera il mio racconto è triste
non ti parlo di una mandria morta nella palude
ma della tua camicia bagnata
e di come sei circondato
dalle balene.
Allen dai neri capelli, mio caro amore
ho sentito che sei annegato
ma ahimè Dio, non ero accanto
a te
ovunque la marea ti abbia
rilasciato
vorrei bere, a dispetto
di tutti,
il sangue del tuo cuore
dopo che sei annegato

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm