Archivi tag: sea chanty

Sailor’s farewell: on the sailor’s side!

Leggi in italiano

A further variant of “Sailor’s Farewell” is titled “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy” (aka “Swansea Town,” and “The Holy Ground”) found in England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the United States. It’s developed on twice directions, on the one hand it’s the typical and cheerful sea shanty, sometimes rough and with a lot of drink, and on the other it becomes a more intimate and fragile vein, which reflects on the solitude and danger of the sea. In these versions the sailor is enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Copper Family: Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy

Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy is one of the best-known songs from the repertoire of the Copper Family. It was published in the first issue of the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 1, in 1899, a version also released in Australia and entitled “Lovely Nancy”, in which it is only the handsome sailor who speaks during the separation on the shore.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 from Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger from a free session in front of the pub for “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”

ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) In the part of dialogue ometted Nancy wants to dress up as a sailor to go with him.
3) the reference is always to broadside ballad version in which our johnny (slang term for sailor) has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants Nancy to stay home waiting for him.

AMERICAN/ IRISH VERSION: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan from American Stranger 1997 “I learned this version from the Max Hunter Collection. Hunter was a traveling salesman and amateur folksong collector from Springfield, Missouri, who amassed an impressive number of field recordings from the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. When I was a teenager I learned many songs from the cassette tapes of his collection that were housed in the Springfield Public Library.
Hunter recorded this song in 1959 from Bertha Lauderdale, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She had learned the song from her grandfather, who, in turn, had learned it from his grandmother, when “he was a young child in Ireland.” Since I recorded the song on American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, and Pete Coe have all added it to their repertoires.”

Altan from Local Ground, 2005

ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) hearts of oak rerefers to the wood from which British warships were generally made during the age of sail. The “Heart of oak” is the strongest central wood of the tree.

000brgcf
Sailor’s farewell

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

Dan Dan, sea shanty

Dan Dan è un sea shanty riportato da Stan Hugill che dice di averlo appreso dall’amico marinaio Barbados Harding, un canto utilizzato come hauling shanty o per lo scarico delle merci, diffuso nelle isole caraibiche e più in generale nelle Indie Occidentali.
Dalle ricerche di Hulton Clint apprendiamo che lo chanty “Dan Dan Oh” riportato da Roger D. Abrahams nel suo “Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore” (1974) ha un testo correlato. Il canto era tipico dei balenieri quando trascinavano la carcassa della balena sulla spiaggia.

ASCOLTA David Thomas in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Stan Hugill

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Roger D. Abrahams


My name, it is Dan Dan
My name, it is Dan Dan
Somebody stole my rum
He didn’t leave me none
That no good son of a gun
My name, it is Dan Dan
A sailor man I am
Somebody took my wife
Somebody took my knife
My name, it is Dan Dan
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
qualcuno mi ha fregato il rum
e non mi ha lasciato niente
quel figlio di buona donna!
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
e sono un marinaio
qualcuno mi ha preso la moglie
qualcuno mi ha preso il coltello
Il mio nome è Dan Dan

PADDY LAY BACK

Una sea shanty kilometrica con una ventina di strofe e zeppa di varianti, era cantata sia come canzone ricreativa che come canzone all’argano per sollevare l’ancora. Stan Hugill la dice molto conosciuta sulle navi a vela della tratta Liverpool-New York e la fa risalire agli anni 1830.
Giocoforza per quel Paddy del titolo la canzone è diventata un traditional irlandese!

ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones in “Let The People Sing” 1972 ne fanno una versione folk

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed Rogue questa è invece la versione più shanty

E questa come doveva essere la canzone cantata nei momenti di ricreazione sulla nave, introdotta dalla “Irish washer woman” e mixata melodicamente con  la jig

I
‘Twas a cold an’ dreary mornin’ in December,
An’ all of me money it was spent
Where it went to Lord I can’t remember
So down to the shippin’ office went,
CHORUS
Paddy, lay back (Paddy, lay back)!
Take in yer slack (take in yer slack)!
Take a turn around the capstan – heave a pawl (1) – (heave a pawl)
‘Bout ship, stations, boys, be handy (be handy)! (2)
For we’re bound for Valaparaiser ‘round the Horn! 

II
That day there wuz a great demand for sailors
For the Colonies and for ‘Frisco and for France
So I shipped aboard a Limey barque (3) the Hotspur
An’ got paralytic drunk on my advance (4)
III
Now I joined her on a cold December mornin’,
A-frappin’ o’ me flippers to keep me warm.
With the south cone a-hoisted as a warnin’ (5),
To stand by the comin’ of a storm.
III strofa Wolf Tones
There were Frenchmen, there were Germans, there were Russians
And there was Jolly Jacques came just across from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they’d answer to the name of Bill or Dan
IV (6)
I woke up in the mornin’ sick an’ sore (7),
An’ knew I wuz outward bound again;
When I heard a voice a-bawlin’ at the door,
‘Lay aft, men, an’ answer to yer names!’
V
‘Twas on the quarterdeck where first I saw you,
Such an ugly bunch I’d niver seen afore;
For there wuz a bum an’ stiff from every quarter,
An’ it made me poor ol’ heart feel sick an’ sore.
V strofa Wolf Tones
I wish that I was in the Jolly Sailor
With Molly or with Kitty on me knee
Now I see most any men are sailors
And with me flipper I wipe away my tears
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era una fredda e triste mattina di Dicembre
e avevo speso tutti i soldi
dove andai per Dio non mi riesce di ricordare, ma alla fine mi sono trovato davanti all’ufficio per l’arruolamento
CORO
Paddy rilassati
finisci il lavoro
fai un giro intorno all’argano-
passa la castagna 
sulla nave, ai posti,
ragazzi datevi da fare
perchè siamo in partenza per Valparaiso a doppiare Capo Horn
II
Quel giorno c’era una grande richiesta di marinai
per le Colonie e Frisco e per
la Francia
così mi sono imbarcato su una barca di limoncini la “Hotspur”
ed ero ubriaco fradicio con il mio anticipo
III
L’ho raggiunta in una fredda mattina di Dicembre
sfregandomi le pinne per tenermi al caldo
con un cono verso sud innalzato come avvertimento
che stava per l’arrivo di una tempesta
III (Wolf Tones)
C’erano Francesi e Tedeschi, c’erano Russi
e c’era un Jolly Jacques appena arrivato dalla Francia
e nessuno di loro sapeva parlare una parola d’Inglese
ma rispondevano al nome di
Bill o Dan
IV
Mi svegliai al mattino con
un malanno
e sapevo di essere di nuovo
in partenza
quando sentìì una voce abbaiare alla porta
“Alzatevi, uomini, e rispondete al vostro nome”
V
Fu sul ponte dove vi vidi la prima
volta
dei così brutti ceffi non li avevo mai visti prima
perchè c’era un barbone e un cadavere per ogni direzione
da far venire un infarto
V (Wolf Tones)
Vorrei essere il Marinaio Allegro
con Molly o con  Killy sulle mie ginocchia
adesso vedo solo marinai attorno
e con le mie pinne mi asciugo le lacrime

NOTE
1) pawl – short bar of metal at the foot of a capstan or close to the barrel of a windlass which engage a serrated base so as to prevent the capstan or windlass ‘walking back’. […] The clanking of the pawls as the anchor cable was hove in was the only musical accompaniment a shanty ever had! (Hugill, Shanties 414)
Pawl ( castagna): specie di arpione mobile che impediva all’argano di girare in senso inverso inserendosi in una serie di fori alla sua base. Per consentire la rotazione in senso contrario c’era una seconda castagna con forma diversa.
2) I Wolf Tones dicono “About ships for England boys be handy”
“Be handy” è un espressione tipica nelle canzoni marinaresche : letteralmente si traduce in italiano come “essere a portata di mano” C’è anche una lieve di allusione sessuale. Possibili significati: rendersi utile ma anche trovarsi a portata di mano (come in handy),
3) limey – The origin of the Yanks calling English sailors ‘Limejuicers’ […] was the daily issuing of limejuice to British crews when they had been a certain number of days at sea, to prevent scurvy, according to the 1894 Merchant Shipping Act (Hugill, Shanties 54)
4) cioè ha speso tutti i soldi dell’anticipo sulla paga in bevute ad alto grado alcolico
5) “Storm cones”  (coni tempesta) erano delle segnalazioni approntate lungo le coste irlandesi e britanniche per segnalare l’arrivo di una tempesta alle navi . Il sistema era stato messo a punto dal capitano Robert FitzRoy nel 1860 e consisteva in un collegamento telegrafico tra le stazioni meteo di terra e tutti i porti delle isole britanniche, di modo che venissero esibiti degli appositi segnali (coni neri o luci) lungo le coste non appena era segnalata una tempesta. I segnali di avvertimento  indicavano la direzione in cui infuriava il maltempo in modo che le navi di passaggio potessero prendere gli opportuni provvedimenti.
“In 1860 he devised a system of of issuing gale warnings by telegraph to the ports likely to be affected. The message contained of a list of places with the words:
‘North Cone’ or ‘South Cone’ – for northerly or southerly gales respectively
‘Drum’  – for when further gales were expected,
Drum and North/South Cone’ – for particularly heavy gales or storms. ” (tratto da qui) (continua)
6) I Wolf Tones dicono
I woke up in the morning sick and sore
I wished I’d never sailed away again
Then a voice it came thundering thru’ the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name
7) un eufemismo per descrivere i postumi della sbornia

ASCOLTA Sons Of Erin

FONTI
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/paddy-lay-back/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/paddy-lay-back.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/PaddyLayBack/hugill.html
https://maritime.org/chanteys/paddy-lay-back.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/12/36-paddy-lay-back.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/p/paddylay.html

WHERE AM I TO GO M’JOHNNIES

Referente della sea shanty  “Where am I to go, M’Johnnies” è Stan Hugill (1961) c he la sentì cantare da Harding (the Barbarian from Barbadoes) mentre Gordon Bok nel suo Time and the Flying Snow (1977) riporta una variante della melodia e del testo
ASCOLTA Clayton Kennedy per Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)

Oh, where am I to go, M’Johnnies, oh where am I to go?
Timme way hey hey, high roll and go.
Oh, where am I to go, M’Johnnies, oh where am I to go,
For I’m a young sailor boy, and where am I to go?
Way up on that t’gallant (1) yard, that’s where you’re bound to go.
Way up on that t’gallant yard and take the gans’l(2) in.
You’re bound away to Kingston town (3), that’s where you’re bound to go.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
Dove devo andare miei marinai,
oh dove devo andare?
A me su via, salpa e vai
Dove devo andare miei marinai,
oh dove devo andare?
Perchè sono un giovane marinaio e dove devo andare?
Sali sul pennone di trinchetto, ecco dove devi andare
Sali sul pennone e serra i velacci
Sei in partenza per Kingston town ecco dove devi andare

NOTE
1) top gallant si pronuncia “t’gallant” VELACCINO (PENNONE): Il pennone di trinchetto del 3° ordine. Fore top-gallant yard.
2) topgallant sail (velaccio) è abbreviato in “t’garns’l” si dice anche gallant or garrant sail: Vela della maestra del 3° ordine. Main top-gallant sail
3) oppure Cape Horn
FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5807
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Hugi169.html
https://www.8notes.com/scores/6878.asp?ftype=gif

SAILBOAT MALARKAY

Una sea shanty originaria delle Bahamas, entrata nel circuito folk attraverso la registrazione di A.L. Lloyd del 1974, che ha ripreso la versione di Frederick McQueen nella compilation The Real Bahamas in Music and Song (1966).
Così scrive Lloyd “The tune and most of the words come from the Bahamas, from the singer Frederick McQueen. In the Bahamas it’s mostly used for boat-launching, but it serves equally well for capstan work. ‘Malarkey’ here is a mispronunciation of ‘Malachi’.

ASCOLTA AL Lloyd

Please tell me, what is this sailboat’s name?
It’s the sailboat Malarkey
Tell me now, what is this good boat’s name?
It’s the sailboat Malarkey
(Vi prego di grazia qual’è il nome di questo veliero?
E’ il veliero Malarkey
Ditemi allora qual’è il nome di questa bella nave?
E’ il veliero Malarkey)


Who is the man then who built this fine boat?
Richardson, Richardson built this fine boat
Well now, me boys, we are bound out to sea
Windward (1) Caroline come down to me
She’s lovely aloft and she’s lovely below
But she’s best on her back as you very well know
The blackbirds sang and the crow did caw
For to set this sail be up half past four
Away, away in St George’s town (2)
The rats (3) come batting the houses 4) down
I’d give the world, boys, and all that I know
To turn and roll with me Lucy-oh
You pick her up, boys, and lay her down
And hang on tight as she bounces around
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Chi è stato a costruire questa bella nave?
Richardson, Richardson costruì questa bella nave
Beh ragazzi, stiamo per prendere il largo
Oh quando (1) rivedrò Carolina?
E’ bella sopra e sotto
ma è meglio da dietro come sapete bene
Il merlo canta e il corvo gracchia
per salpare ci svegliamo alle quattro e mezza
Via, via a St George’s Town (2)
i marinai (3) vanno a chiudere le finestre della tuga(4)
Darei il mondo ragazzi e tutto quello che so
per ritornare a rotolarmi con la mia Lucy- oh
vi appenderete, ragazzi, e la tirerete giù
e la legherete stretta quando lei sbatacchia (5)

NOTE
1) probabile storpiatura di “When would Caroline”
2) la città di Saint George sull’isola omonima (http://www.bermuda-online.org/seetown.htm) fondata dagli Inglesi nel 1612 considerata dall’UNESCO Patrimonio dell’Umanità
3) appellativo tipico dei marinai in gergo piratesco, sotto inteso “ratto di sentina”.
4) “batten down the hatches” è un termine nautico per dire chiudere (serrare) i boccaporti; qui si dice (deck)house che è più propriamente la tuga. (Soprastruttura sulla coperta di una nave, la cui larghezza non raggiunge la murata)
5) I versi finali sono pieni di sottintesi: si parla di “manovre alle vele” ma anche di ben altre più carnali “grandi manovre”

ASCOLTA AC4 Black Flag In-Game Soundtrack: una sea shanty che non poteva mancare nel repertorio “piratesco” del gioco

Please tell me, what is this sailboat’s name?
Please tell me, what is this sailboat’s name?
The sailboat Malarkey.
Tell me now what is this good boat’s name?
It’s the sailboat Malarkey.
Well now, me boys, we are bound out to sea!
O when will Caroline come down to me?
She’s lovely aloft and she’s lovely below.
But she’s best on her back as you very well know!
Away, away in St George’s Town,
The rats come batting the houses down,
I’d give the world boys and all that I know
To turn and to roll with my Lucy-oh!
You pick her up, boys, and lay her down,
And hang on tight as she bounces around!
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Vi prego di grazia qual’è il nome di questo veliero?
E’ il veliero Malarkey
Ditemi allora qual’è il nome di questa bella nave?
E’ il veliero Malarkey
Beh ora ragazzi stiamo per prendere il largo
Oh quando rivedrò Carolina?
E’ bella sopra e sotto
Ma è meglio da dietro come sapete bene
Via, via a St George’s Town
I marinai vanno a chiudere i boccaporti Darei il mondo ragazzi e tutto quello che so
Per ritornare a rotolarmi con la mia Lucy- oh
Vi appenderete, ragazzi, e la tirerete giù
e la legherete stretta quando lei sbatacchia

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thesailboatmalarkey.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/louis-killen-stan-hugill-and-the-x-seamens-institute/sailboat-malarkey/american-folk-celtic/music/track/smithsonian
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129624

WORST OLD SHIP

Una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) per il lavoro alle pompe, anche conosciuta con il nome di The Collier Brig

La Versione Black Flag è più corta

The worst old ship that ever did sail,
Sailed out of Harwich on a windy day.
And we’re waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day
That we get our pay.
She was built in Roman time,
Held together with bits of twine
Nothing in the galley—nothing in the hold,
But the skipper’s turned in with a bag of gold.
Off Orford Ness she sprang a leak,
Hear her poor old timbers creak.
We pumped our way round scalby Ness,
When the wind backed round to the west-nor’-west.
Into the Humber and up the town,
Pump you blighters—pump or drown
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Il peggior brigantino che mai navigò
salpò da Harwich (1) in un giorno di vento
CORO
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
aspettiamo il giorno
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
in cui saremo pagati
Fu costruita ai tempi dei Romani
tenuta insieme con un pezzo di spago
Niente in cambusa, niente nella stiva
ma il capitano ritornò con una borsa piena d’oro
Nei pressi di Orford Ness (4) nella nave si aprì una falla, ascoltate le sue povere vecchie travi scricchiolare,
abbiamo azionato le pompe nei pressi di Lowestoft Ness (5) e allora il vento spingeva da ovest, nord-ovest
nell’Humber (7) e verso la città
“Pompate, bastardi, pompate o affogate”

ASCOLTA  Bob Roberts in “Sea Songs & Shanties”


The worst old brig that ever did weigh,
Sailed out of Harwich on a windy day;
Chorus:
And we’re waiting for the day,
Waiting for the day,
We’re waiting for the day
When we get our pay!
She (2) was built in Roman times,
Held together with bits of twine…
The skipper’s half drunk and the mate is too,
And the crew is fourteen men too few…
As we shoved off from the Surrey Dock,
The skipper caught his knickers in the main sheet block…
By Orford Ness she sprang a leak,
Hear her poor old timbers creak…
We pumped our way ‘round Lowestoft Ness,
When the wind backed round to the west-sou’-west…
Through the Cockles to Cromer Cliff,
She’s steering like a wagon with a wheel adrift…
Into the Humber and up to town,
“Pump, you bastards, pump or drown”…
Her coal was shot by a Keadby crew,
But her bottom was rotten and it all fell through…
So after all our fears and alarms,
We’re all ended up in “The Druid’s Arms.”
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Il peggior brigantino che mai navigò
salpò da Harwich (1) in un giorno di vento
CORO
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
aspettiamo il giorno
Non aspettiamo che il giorno
in cui saremo pagati
Fu costruita ai tempi dei Romani
tenuta insieme con un pezzo di spago
il comandante è mezzo ubriaco e il primo ufficiale pure
e la ciurma è di soli quattordici uomini
appena siamo smammati dal Surrey Dock (3)
il comandante stese le mutande..
sulla randa
nei pressi di Orford Ness (4) nella nave si aprì una falla, ascoltate le sue povere vecchie travi scricchiolare,
abbiamo azionato le pompe nei pressi di Lowestoft Ness (5) e allora il vento spingeva da ovest, sud-ovest
per il Cockles a Cromer Cliff (6)
sterzava come un carro senza una ruota
nell’Humber (7) e verso la città
“Pompate, bastardi, pompate o affogate”
Il suo carbone è stato pescato da un equipaggio di Keadby
perchè il suo fondo era marcio e tutto si è riversato
così dopo tutte le nostra paure e gli allarmi
siamo finiti sul The Druid’s Arms.”

NOTE
1) Harwich è una cittadina portuale della contea dell’Essex, in Inghilterra
2) brigantino è al maschile, nave è al femminile così viene usato she per riferirsi alla nave
3) molo di Londra
4) Orford Nesso vero il Suffolk : un tratto di costa paranoica che ha difeso se stessa da invasioni che per secoli non sono mai arrivate. scrive Robert Macfarlane: “Linee umane e linee alluvionali si scontrano, si collegano e si intersecano, creando un’unica gigantesca impronta digitale di ghiaia, che si allunga a perdita d’occhio.” E dove Winfried Sebald ebbe “la sensazione di ritrovarsi fra i relitti della nostra civiltà, andata a picco nel corso di una catastrofe a venire”.
“Quando scendemmo dalla nave sul pontile, lo stato selvaggio di quella lingua di terra ci apparve evidente. Guardando il cordone litorale dall’imbarcadero, era impossibile capire dove il marrone del deserto lasciasse spazio al marrone del mare. L’orizzonte era svanito, dissolto in un unico beige ondulato di sassi, di mare e di cielo. Una coppia di Harrier sfrecciò sopra di noi in direzione sud, scartavetrando l’aria con il suo frastuono. Calcammo i primi passi sulla ghiaia.”
(in Luoghi Selvaggi Robert Macfarlane)
5) Ness Point, anche conosciuto come Lowestoft Ness, rappresenta il punto più orientale dell’Inghilterra, (contea del Suffolk.)
6) Norfolk
7) L’Humber è un ampio estuario che forma parte del confine tra nord e sud dell’Inghilterra. Vi si trovano i porti di Hull, Grimsby, Immingham e New Holland.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=42400
http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=615806
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Worst_Old_Ship.html

CONGO RIVER

Blow Bullies Blow, conosciuta anche con il titolo di “Blow boys blow”, “The Yankee Clipper” e “Congo River” è un canto marinaresco (sea shanty) classificabile sostanzialmente in due principali filoni testuali.
(Versione Yankee Clipper)

CLIPPER: nave a vela, con spiccate attitudini per la velocità (arrivavano anche a 18 nodi), usata tra gli anni venti e la fine del XIX secolo, per lunghi percorsi con carichi pregiati (tè con la Cina, lana con l’Australia, passeggeri come postali) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico —in particolare i Black Baller , i postali della American Black Ball line, che derivava il nome dalla sua bandiera rossa con un disco nero al centro. Erano navi molto veloci e il percorso dall’Inghilterra all’America (tratta Liverpool – New York), per lo più contro vento, durava quattro settimane, mentre il ritorno, con il vento a favore, poteva durare meno di tre settimane. Il nome “packet” deriva dal fatto che i clipper svolgevano la funzione di “postini” ovvero trasportavano la corrispondenza tra le due sponde dell’Atlantico o anche tra Inghilterra-Australia (altro continente pieno di coloni inglesi, scozzesi e irlandesi)
“Nasceva così, intorno al 1820, un nuovo tipo di veliero che tradizionalmente si pone nelle coste nordorientali degli Stati Uniti d’America, nazione giovane e dinami­ca ben diversa dal mondo conservatore e consuetudinario inglese. Trattavasi di una nave ancora piccola, a due alberi, detta BALTIMORE CLIPPER perché nata a Baltimora, caratterizzata da forme di scafo molto stellate e molta vela, agile, manovriera e sopra tutto veloce. Buona pertanto al contrabbando e al trasporto di schiavi, perfino pirata.” (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE CONGO RIVER

Tra le merci pregiate imbarcate nei clipper c’erano anche gli schiavi africani, la tratta degli schiavi infatti perdurò ancora per buona parte dell’Ottocento (grosso modo un margine temporale tra il 1500 e il 1850), nonostante l’embargo inglese, e cessò con la spartizione dell’Africa in colonie. La prima nazione ad abolire lo schiavismo e a contrastare la tratta degli schiavi fu l’Inghilterra (per la verità la Francia rivoluzionaria rese liberi anche i neri, ma Napoleone ristabilì la schiavitù nelle colonie francesi).

slave-tradeLa tratta degli schiavi coinvolse tutta la costa atlantica  dell’Africa ma in particolare si concentrò nel territorio intorno alle foci del fiume Congo (si stima che da qui partirono quattro milioni di persone, circa un terzo del totale).  Portoghesi, inglesi, francesi e olandesi erano i mercanti principali, ma a dare una mano per le razzie nell’entroterra erano le stesse tribù africane in perenne lotta tra di loro. E il fiume Congo era un ottimo tracciato che attraversava la foresta vergine fino al mercato di Kinshasa, a trecento kilometri dalla costa.

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brotheres & Tommy Makem in Sing of the Sea 1968 (testo più esteso qui)

ASCOLTA The 97th Regimental String Band

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint variante proveniente da una fonte caraibica (in Folklore and the Sea di Horace Beck)
ASCOLTA Ivan Houston (una interpretazione decisamente caraibica)


I
Oh was you ever on the Congo River Blow, boys, blow!
Black fever makes the white man shiver
Blow, me bully boys, blow!
A Yankee ship came down the river
Her masts and yards they shone like silver
Chorus:
And blow me boys and blow forever
Blow, boys, blow!
Aye, blow me down the Congo River
Blow, me bullyboys, blow!
II
What do think she had for cargo
Why, black sheep that had run the embargo
And what do you think they had for dinner?
Why a monkey’s heart and a donkey´s liver.
III
Yonder comes the Arrow packet
She fires her guns can´t you hear the racket?
Who do you think was the skipper of her?
Why, Bully Hayes, the sailor lover
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Siete mai stati sul fiume Congo?
forza, ragazzi, forza!
Le febbre nera fa tremare gli uomini bianchi.
forza, miei bravacci, forza
Una nave yankee (1) discende il fiume,
albero e pennoni brillano come l’argento.
CORO
E forza (2), miei ragazzi, forza per sempre, forza, ragazzi, colpite!
Si, buttatemi giù nel fiume Congo
forza, miei bravacci, colpite!
II
Quale pensate che sia il suo carico?
Beh, sono pecore nere (3), sfuggite all’embargo.
E cosa pensate che abbiano mangiato a pranzo?
Beh, code di scimmia e fegato di manzo (4).
III
Da lontano arriva il postale Arrow (5),
spara i suoi cannoni non senti il baccano?
Chi pensate che sia il suo capitano?
Beh, Bully Hayes (6)  il beniamino dei marinai(7)!

NOTE
1) la Terra Yankee corrisponde alla Nuova Inghilterra, e yankees sono detti i suoi abitanti. Sembra che il termine sia la corruzione indiana del francese anglais.
2) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma trattandosi di velature potrebbe essere un incitazione perchè si alzi il vento. Ma anche nel significato di colpire, come monito della dura disciplina che vigeva sulle navi. Del resto in termino colloquiali anche in italiano “suonargliele” a qualcuno significa picchiarlo per bene!
3) il carico di “pecore nere” sta per gli schiavi africani deportati verso le Americhe.
4) il menù varia elencando cibo altrettanto insolito: “monkey’s arse and a sandfly’s liver”
5) clipper packets — i postali che con regolarità attraversavano l’oceano atlantico
6) il soprannome di Bully dato al capitano è da intendersi qui nel significato negativo di bullo, persona prepotente e crudele, non per niente era conosciuto come “Bully Hayes, the Down East bucko.” 
7) appellativo da intendersi in senso ironico “colui che è amato dai marinai” è ovviamente il più detestato

FONTI
Congo di David van Reybrouck
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17461
http://research.culturalequity.org/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=27276
http://anitra.net/chanteys/blow.html

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO

Una grande varietà di testi per questo sea shanty classificato come pulling chanty che era perciò eseguito dallo shantyman nella manovra per issare le vele.
“A Long Time Ago is one of the shanties with the greatest number of variations. Old sailors can remember such different versions as There were two Ships in Callao Bay, Noah built this Wonderful Ark and A Hundred Years is a Very Long Time, but they were all the same song originally.” (tratto da qui)

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO

Tra queste si esamina la versione “A hundred years ago“, ancora controversa la sua origine, era molto popolare sui clipper che facevano la spola New York – San Francisco via Capo Horn.

ames Buttersworth Clipper Ship at Cape Horn
James Buttersworth “Clipper Ship at Cape Horn” 1850-90

 VERSIONE CLIPPER

Scrive A.L. Lloyd nelle note all’album Blow Boys Blow registrato con Ewan MacColl nel 1967: “English and American folklorists fail to agree whether this shanty was first made under the Stars and Stripes or the Red Ensign. It has close associations with the Baltimore clippers, yet John Masefield heard it on British ships in his seafaring days, and the singer who gave it to Cecil Sharp knew it as an English sailors’ song. It may be a seaman’s remake of the mid-nineteenth century minstrel song called A Long Time Ago. Whatever it is, it made a good nostalgic-sounding shanty for the long pulls on the halyard.” (tratto da qui)
I clipper (i primi modelli provengono da Baltimora e risalgono al 1812) per andare sempre più veloce avevano una superficie velica di molto superiore ai vascelli precedenti e quindi il lavoro dei marinai era più impegnativo. Nella canzone lo shantyman impartisce l’ordine di issare le vele tirando la cima (drizza) per alzare il pennone ovvero l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge la rispettiva vela.

ASCOLTA A.L. Lloyd in Blow Boys Blow 1967


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore(1),
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
Oh, when I sailed across the sea,
My girl said she’d be true to me.
I promised her a golden ring,
She promised me that little thing.
Oh, up aloft this yard(2) must go,
For mister mate has told us so.
I thought I heard the old man say,
That we was homeward bound today(3).
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale(1)
oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
un centinaio d’anni fa
Quando navigavo per i mari, la mia ragazza diceva che mi sarebbe stata fedele, le promisi un anello d’oro
e lei mi promise quella cosina.
Oh su, questo pennone(2) deve andare perchè il primo  ci ha detto così. Credo di aver sentito il capitano dire che leveremo l’ancora diretti a casa oggi!

NOTE
1) la costa orientale dell’America
2) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela.
3) oppure “Just one more pull and then belay” (in italiano= Ancora un tiro e poi lasciate, ragazzi.) nell’album “The Black Ball Line” 1957

A Hundred Years on the Eastern Shore

ASCOLTA Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1 (su spotify)


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
A handred years have passed an’ gone,
a hundred years will come once more
Oh, Bully John from Baltimore,
Oh, Bully John on the Eastern Shore.
Oh, Bully John, I knew him well,
But now he’s dead and gone to hell.
A hundred years is a very long time
A hundred years will come again
A long time was a very long time
it’s a very long time I made this rhyme
I thought I heard the old man say,
Just one more pull and then belay.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale/oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale/ un centinaio d’anni fa
un centinaio d’anni sono andati e sepolti, un centinaio d’anni
Oh Bully John sulla Costa Orientale
Oh Bully John lo conoscevo bene
ma ora è morto e andato all’inferno.
Un centinaio d’anni è un tempo molto lungo, un centinaio d’anni ritorneranno ancora. Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei, ed è da tanto tempo che sto componendo questi versi.
Credo di aver sentito dire dal vecchio,
ancora un tiro e poi lasciate.

VERSIONE BALENIERE

L’altra versione è quella cantata sulle baleniere e si divide idealmente in tre parti: nella prima lo shantyman accenna alla fedeltà della fidanzata, nella parte centrale descrive i ruggenti venti di Capo Horn e le insidie di quel tratto di mare. Nella parte finale commemora la figura del marinaio Bully John di Baltimora.
ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in “Whaler out of New Bedford, and other songs of the Whaling Era” 1962


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore(1),
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
Oh, when I sailed across the sea,
My girl said she’d be true to me.
I promised her a golden ring,
She promised me that little thing.
I wish to God I’d never been born,
To go rambling round and round Cape Horn(4)
Around Cape Stiff(4) where the wild winds blow(5),
Around Cape Stiff through sleet and snow.
Around Cape Horn with frozen sails,
Around Cape Horn to fish for whales.
Oh, Bully John from Baltimore,
I knew him well on the Eastern Shore.
Oh, Bully John, I knew him well,
But now he’s dead and gone to hell.
Oh, Bully John was the boy for me,
A bucko on land and a bully(6) at sea.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
un centinaio d’anni fa
Quando navigavo in mare
la mia ragazza mi diceva che mi sarebbe stata fedele
le promisi un anello d’oro
e lei mi promise quella cosina
vorrei per Dio non essere mai nato,
piuttosto che andare su e giù per Capo Horn
a doppiare Capo Stiff(4) dove soffiano i venti forti,
a doppiare Capo Stiff con gelo e neve
per Capo Horn con le vele ghiacciate,
attorno a Capo Horn per pescare le balene,
Oh Bully John da Baltimora
lo conoscevo bene sulla costa orientale
Oh Bully John lo conoscevo bene,
ma ora è morto ed è andato all’inferno
Oh Bully John era il ragazzo per me
un macellaio a terra e un duro(6) per mare

NOTE
4) Capo Horn, detto dai marinai “Cape Stiff”, la nera scogliera all’estremità dell’America Meridionale dove si scontrano le masse d’acqua e d’aria dell’Atlantico e del Pacifico, provocando venti che vanno dai 160 ai 220 Km/h e una risalita verso Ovest quasi proibitiva. Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, per i forti venti, le grani onde e gli iceberg vaganti, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
 “Grandi Naufragi” impossibile stabilire il numero delle navi che sono andate perdute in queste estreme acque tra le onde alte anche 20 metri. Tempeste di neve, violenti uragani, nebbie e pericolosi iceberg alla deriva, fanno capire quanto sia stato difficile passare indenni per la via di Capo Horn. I pochi naufraghi dovevano affrontare oltre all’inospitalità di quelle terre anche l’avversità degli indigeni che aggredivano i superstiti per depredarli di alcool ed armi. (tratto da qui)
5) “Quaranta ruggenti” termine coniato dagli inglesi all’epoca dei grandi velieri con rotta per Cape Horn. Venti, considerati i più temibili al mondo, prendono slancio da migliaia di miglia nel Pacifico senza che il minimo ostacolo possa smorzare la forza, riuscendo nelle acque di Capo Horn addirittura ad esaltarsi con l’incontro di aria fredda proveniente dall’Antartide. “Ruggenti” dal sibilo intenso che il vento produce tra gli alberi, il sartiame e la velature delle imbarcazioni. (tratto da qui)
6) bully è un termine da marinai con molti significati: in senso positivo per dire che il marinaio è un tipo “very good”, o “first rate”, ma bully è anche l’attaccabrighe sempre pronto a fare a pugni. Anche il termine bucko era spesso utilizzato in modo gergale per indicare un primo ufficiale manesco e violento che trattava in modo brutale la ciurma.

Una variante con il titolo Around Cape Horn (vedi) estrapola la parte centrale del testo precedente  trasformandosi in un canto nostalgico.

ASCOLTA White Magic in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.


A long time was a very good time
Long time ago
A long was a very long time
Long time ago
Around Cape Horn(4) we got to go
Around Cape Horn to Calleao(7)
You give me the girl and you take me away(8)
A long long time in the hull below
Around Cape Horn with frozen sails
Around Cape Horn to fish for whales
I wish to God I’d never been born
A long long time in the hull below
Around Cape Horn where wild winds blow(5)
Around Cape Horn through sleet and snow
A long long time in the hull below
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei tempi, tanto tempo fa
Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei tempi, tanto tempo fa

per Capo Horn dovevamo andare
a doppiare Capo Horn verso Callao(7),
mi dai la ragazza e mi porti via(8),
tanto tempo sotto nello scafo,
per Capo Horn con le vele ghiacciate,
attorno a Capo Horn per pescare le balene,
vorrei per Dio non essere mai nato,
tanto, tanto tempo sotto nello scafo,
per Capo Horn dove i venti di bufera soffiano,
a doppiare Capo Horn con neve e nevischio, tanto, tanto tempo sotto nello scafo

NOTE
7) Callao si trova vicino a Lima nel Perù, le navi commerciali che facevano scalo a Callao caricavano il prezioso guano per portarlo in Inghilterra. Alcuni traducono Call-e-a-o come California, che però dovrebbe essere scritto Califor-ni-o
8) ?!non capisco il significato della frase

continua “Noah’s Ark Shanty

FONTI
http://www.capehorn.it/400-anos/
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/panama-canal-horn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ahundredyearsago.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/noahsarkshanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/hundred.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/noahsarkshanty.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/index.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/mystic.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/holdstock.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10638
https://musescore.com/sangerforum/scores/2232266
http://memory.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.award.rpbaasm.0463/default.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cc2gQAi1OKY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBMBW_G_uJE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK_Sj8GbLa8
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/shay.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/100years.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/aroundca.html