Archivi tag: Sam Lee

Concealed death: Clerk Colvill & Georges Collins

Leggi in Italiano

Concealed death

LORD OLAF AND THE ELVES 
SCANDINAVIAN VARIANTS
BRITISH AND AMERICAN VERSIONS
FRENCH VERSIONS
ITALIAN VERSION

In The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, in Child ballad # 42 Clerck Colven (other titles Clerck Colvill or Earl Colvin) we find the same medieval ballad focused on the meeting between a knight about to marry and a fairy creature (or a jealous lover)

SCOTTISH VERSION:CLERK COLVILL CHILD # 42

The ballad begins with a quarrel between boyfriends: the future bride beseeches him not to visit his lover, a washerwoman, just on the eve of their wedding!
The knight denies any sexual involvement (normal administration!) but he is anxious to meet his lover again.
For a comparison between the versions A, B, C see the analysis by Christian Souchon (here)

Clerk-Colvill-ArthurRackhamThey have an obvious sexual relationship (in the coded language of the time), but then the man complains about his headache, she gives him a strip of fabric (poisoned) and announces his imminent death (or poisoning him by giving him one last kiss). The woman is clearly a water nymph and in fact as soon as the young man draws his sword to take revenge, she turns into a fish and dives into the water.

Frankie Armstrong from Till the Grass o’ergrew the corn 2006, ♪
The melody is an arrangement by Frankie from the one heard by Mrs. Brown from Falkirk, Stirling County.
Kate Fletcher & Corwen Broch from  Fishe or Fowle 2017, ♪
“One of many ballads from across Europe in which a man is doomed to death by his Other-Worldly lover.
We have used the words of Child 42 version B and the only existing melody for them from Mrs Brown (Anna Gordon) of Falkland. The transcribed melody has given rise to endless debate about how the words should fit to the refrain line of the music. We have chosen to sidestep the argument and sing the verses as given omitting the problematic line of melody.”

VERSION A
I
Clerk Colven (1) and his gay (2) lady
Were walking in yon garden green,
A belt (3) around her middle so small
Which cost Clerk Colven crowns fifteen.
II
“O harken to me, my lord,” she says
“O, harken well to what I do say:
If you go to the walls of Stream (4),
Be sure you touch no well fair’d maid.”
III
“O, hold your tongue,” Clerk Colven said,
“And do not vex me with your din.
I never saw a fair woman
But with her body I could sin.” (5)
IV
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed
And merrily merrily rode he on,
Until he came to the walls of Stream,
And there he spied the mermaiden (6).
V
“You wash, you wash you mermaiden”,
“O, I will wash your sark of the silk (7).
It’s all for you, my gentle knight,
My skin is whiter than the milk(8).”
VI
He’s taken her by the milk white hand
And likewise by the grass-green sleeve,
he’s laid her down all on the grass,
Nor of his lady need he ask leave (9).
VII
“Alas! Alas!” says Clerk Colven,
“For oh so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“Aye, even on, till you be dead.”
VIII
“But you pull out your little pen-knife,
And from my sark you shear a gore,
And bind it round your lovely head,
And you shall feel the pain no more.”
IX
So he’s took out his little pen-knife,
And from her sark he sheared a gore,
He’s bound it round his lovely head;
But the pain it grew ten-times more.
X
“Alas! Alas!” cries Clerk Colven,
“For now so sore is grown my head.”
Merrily laughed the mermaiden,
“’twill I be away and you’ll be dead.”
XI
So he’s pulled out his trusty sword,
And thought with it to spill her blood;
But she’s turned to a fish again
And merrily sprang into the flood.
XII
He’s mounted on his berry-brown steed,
And drear and dowie rode he home,
Until he’s come to his lady’s bower
And heavily he’s lighted down.
XIII
“O, mother, mother, make my bed,
O, gentle lady, lay me down(10);
O brother, brother, unbend my bow(11),
It’ll ne’er be bent by me again.”
XIV
His mother she has made his bed,
His gentle lady laid him down,
His brother he unbent his bow,
It ne’er was bent by him again.

NOTES
1) according to the Danish folklorist Svend Grundtvig the name Colven is a corruption of Olafur in “Olvill” from the Faroese language (the Norse has long been spoken in the islands of Scotland). Also Clerck is a mispronunciation of Herr for Lord, in the stanza V the siren calls him “gentle knight”
2) as Giordano Dall’Armellina observes, the lady in other versions is defined lusty, that is greedy and ultimately possessive.
3) the belt is clearly a love token, it was customary, in fact, to exchange the promise of engagement, giving a “trinket” to the lady, not necessarily a diamond ring as we use today, but a hair clip or belt (obviously not less expensive)
4) in version B it is “Wells of Slane” misunderstood as “Wall of Stream” in version A; it could refer to the “Loch o ‘Strom” on the Mainland the largest of the Shetland Islands. The sacred well is generally a cleft in the earth in which the magical and healing water flows from the mother goddess’s womb, but if the spirit of the place is not placated it becomes deadly water. But here it represents the erotic energy that attracts the knight
5) translated into simple words: “do you think I’m the kind of man who goes to bed with every woman he meets?”
6) mermaiden is the siren, but he could be a nymph or an undine, the term with which the magical creatures of the inner waters are classified (see more). In Scotland and especially in the islands it is identified with a selkie
7) the beautiful girl is depicted as a washerwoman washing clothes by beating them on a marble stone (variant C and D). The image recalls the girl of the ford of the Irish tradition that is a harbinger of imminent death (banshee)
8) it is known that a snow skin was a fundamental requirement for the sexual excitement of the medieval knight
9) the whole stanza is a coded language to say that they have had a sexual intercourse
10) death in this case is not concealed and even the girlfriend immediately learns the news
11) in other versions says “O brother, take my sword and spear” to indicate that he will be buried with the warrior’s set as it was the custom in burials for people of rank in ancient European civilizations.

AMERICAN VERSION: GEORGE COLLINS 

Published in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs it is the D version collected by George Gardiner in 1906 from the voice of Henry Stansbridge of Lyndhurst, Hampshire. The version, however, is very corrupt and diversified compared to the ballad of Norse origins.
It is the version on which American variants are modeled, almost transformed into a murder ballad.

Sam Lee The Ballad of George Collins from ‘Ground of its own’ 2012 (winner of the Barclaycard Mercury Prize 2012 see more) : amazing video clip

Shirley Collins from The Sweet Primroses 1967Alan Moores in a folk-country arrangement by Spud Gravely  version (in Ballads and Song of the Blue Ridge Mountains) also known as George Allen

 Sam Lee Version ( da qui)
I
George Collins walked out one may
morning, when may was all in bloom
and who  should he see but a fair pretty maid, washing her white marble stone (1)
II
She whooped she hollered she called so loud,
she waved her lilly white hand
“Come hither to me George Collins -cried she- for your life it won’t last you long”
III
He put his foot on the broad water side,
across the river sprung he,
he gripped his hands round her middle (2) so small and he kissed her red ruby lips (3)
IV
Then he road home to his father’s old house, loudly knocked with the ring
“arise, arise my father- he cried-
rise and please let me in”
V
“Oh arise, arise dear mother -he cried-
rise and make up my bed”
“arise, arise dear sister -he cried-
get a napkin (4) to tie round my head.
VI
For if I should die tonight
As I suppose I shall
Please bury me under that marble stone
That lies in fair Ellender’s hall(5)”
VII
Fair Ellender sat in her hall
weaving her silk so fine
who should she see but the finest corpse(6) that ever her eyes shone on
VIII
Fair Ellender called unto her head maid
‘Whose corpse is this so fine?’
she made her reply “George Collins is corpse an old true lover of mine”
IX
“Oh put him down my brave little boys
and open his coffin so wide
but I may kiss his red ruby lips
ten thousand times he has kissed mine”
X
This news been carried to fair London town
And wrote on London gate(7),
“six pretty maids died all in one night
‘twas all for George Collins’ sake”

NOTES
1) It is the stone on which the washerwoman beats and rubs her clothes. Another “marble stone” returns cited in the VI stanza, the marble slab in the hall or hill of Ellender
2) in the modest language of ballads it indicates a sexual relationship. Despite the jealous lover threatened him with death, George kisses her and embraces her: he probably does not consider her a danger
3) it is the deadly kiss of the nymph, (or the kiss of the plague) the woman is never described as a supernatural creature
4) the poisoned cloth that we saw in version A and B of Clerck Colven still comes back to wrap the sufferer’s head, but this time it’s a normal bandage
5) elsewhere written as hill. George is in his father’s house announcing his imminent death and asking to be buried in Ellender’s property. Shirley Collins sings
Bury me by the marble stone
That’s against Lady Eleanor’s hall.”
6) 6) the coffin was brought into the house of the lady who asked to remove the lid so that she could still kiss the lips of her lover. The sentence is a bit to be interpreted, it is the lady-in-waiting (or the housekeeper) to ask who is the corpse in the coffin. And it is Ellender who answers that he was her lover.
7) The final stanza seems to be a nineteenth-century addition in an ironic key, the six women died because of the venereal disease of George

french and breton versions 

LINK
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch042.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch085.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/colvill.htm
http://www.nspeak.com/allende/comenius/bamepec/multimedia/saggio1.htm
http://www.gestsongs.com/16/collins.htm

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18313
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/georgecollins.html
http://www.promonews.tv/videos/2012/11/01/sam-lee-ballad-george-collins-andrew-steggall
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2210
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41600
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140832
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64646

Sweet Nightingale from Cornwall

Leggi in italiano

In Italy, the nightingale returns in mid-March and leaves in September. His song, melodious and powerful, presents a remarkable variety of modulations and phrasings, by able songwriter, so that one can speak of a personal repertoire different from bird to bird.
In the folk tradition the nightingale is the symbol of lovers and their love meeting, immortalized by Shakespeare in “Romeo and Juliet” he sings at the pomegranate and the only choice is between life and death: to stay in the nuptial thalamus and die or to leave for exile (and perhaps salvation)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

JULIET
Wilt thou be gone?
It is not yet near day.

It was the nightingale,
and not the lark,

That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love,
it was the nightingale.

ROMEO
It was the lark,
the herald of the morn,

No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

Thus the song of the nightingale has assumed a negative characteristic, he is not the singer of joy as the lark but of melancholy and death.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Fresco detail Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompeii

The fresco in the House of the Golden Bracelet, in Pompeii, dated between 30 and 35 AD. depicting scenes taken from a wooded garden, portrays a lonely nightingale among the rose branches.
And it is precisely for his nocturnal hiding in the thick of the wood that in the traditional songs he has approached to trivial kind with double meanings alluding to the erotic sphere and his sweet song is an invitation to abandon oneself to the pleasures of sex.
The folk song was probably born in Cornwall with the titles of”Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” or “Down in those valleys below”.

“The words of Sweet Nightingale were first published in Robert Bell’s Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England, 1857, with the note:“This curious ditty—said to be a translation from the ancient Cornish tongue… we first heard in Germany… The singers were four Cornish miners, who were at that time, 1854, employed at some lead mines near the town of Zell. The leader, or captain, John Stocker, said that the song was an established favourite with the lead miners of Cornwall and Devonshire, and was always sung on the pay-days and at the wakes; and that his grandfather, who died 30 years before at the age of a hundred years, used to sing the song, and say that it was very old.” Unfortunately Bell failed to get a copy either of words or music from these miners, and relied in the end on a gentleman of Plymouth who “was obliged to supply a little here or there, but only when a bad rhyme, or rather none at all, made it evident what the real rhyme was. I have read it over to a mining gentleman at Truro, and he says it is pretty near the way we sing it.”The tune most people sing was collected by Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould from E.G. Stevens of St. Ives, Cornwall.” (from here)

The song also includes a version in cornish gaelic titled “An Eos Hweg“, but it is a more recent translation from the folk revival of the Celtic traditions.  It is a popular song often sung in pubs today in repertoire of the choral groups.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968

THE NIGHTINGALE
I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.

NOTES
1) Pretty Bets or Betty or Sweet maiden
2) the girl was a milkmaid and the young man offers to take home the bucket with fresh milk
3) certainly the girl had become pregnant

third part

LINK
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

The Wild Wild Berry

Una variazione sul tema della Ballata dell’Avvelenato, dalle antiche origini italiane, conosciuta nelle Isole Britanniche con il titolo di Lord Randal
E’ la  storia di un figlio morente, perchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per coricarsi a letto e fare testamento. Il retroscena (conosciuto dal pubblico del tempo e perciò taciuto) è quello dell’incontro con l’amante gelosa o una fata che lo avvelena perchè respinta dal giovane in procinto di sposarsi con un’altra. (vedasi gli sviluppi in Lord Olaf).

La variante intitolata “The Wild Wild Berry” è stata riportata da Ray Driscoll che l’aveva raccolta nel Shropshire da un bracciante agricolo itinerante che la canta nel Cd “A century of Song”  della English Folk Dance and Song Society. Così commenta Gwilym Davies nelle note “The gem of Ray’s repertoire and unique to him. Ray learnt this song, from the itinerant farm labourer Harry Civil in Shropshire. The story is clearly the same as Lord Randal but reworked. It is not clear whether the song is a old revival or is the product of 19th Century re-working. Whatever the truth, the song has struck a chord with many revival folk singers on both sides of the Atlantic who are now performing it.” (tratto da qui)

L’arma del delitto in questa versione sono le bacche velenose della Dulcamara denominata così per il suo sapore prima amaro e poi dolce (I rametti della dulcamara possono essere masticati proprio come avviene con la liquirizia); è una pianta che viene usata a scopi medicinali e con parsimonia anche in cucina (come insaporente e aromatizzante per piatti di verdura e carne).  Detta anche Morella Rampicante cresce nei boschi, fiorisce da maggio a luglio mentre le bacce nascono in autunno.

ASCOLTA Hladowski & Joyne

ASCOLTA Sam Lee (che canta solo la I e l’ultima strofa)


I
Young man came from hunting
faint and weary
What does ail my love, my dearie?
“O mother dear,
let my bed be made,
For I feel the gripe
of the woody nightshade (1)”
“Lie low, sweet Randall”
II
Come all you young men
that do eat full well
And them that sups right merry
‘Tis far better, I entreat,
to eat toads for your meat
Than to eat of the wild, wild berry
III
This young man, well, he died fair soon
By the light of the hunters’ moon
‘Twas not by bolt, nor yet by blade
But the leaves and the berries (2)
of the woody nightshade
“Lie low, sweet Randall”
IV
This lord’s false love (3), well,
they hanged her high
For ‘twas by her deeds
that her lord should die (4)
Within her locks they entwined a braid
Of the leaves and the berries (5)
of the woody nightshade
“Lie low, sweet Randall”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il giovane venne dalla caccia
sfinito e stanco
“Cosa affligge il mio caro amore?”
“Oh cara madre
fammi preparare il letto
perchè sento la morsa
della Dulcamara”
“Sdraiati caro Randall”
II
“Venite tutti voi giovani
che mangiate molto bene
e coloro che cenano proprio contenti
è meglio assai, vi prego,
mangiare rospi come cibo, piuttosto che mangiare la bacca velenosa
III
Questo giovane è morto piuttosto presto, sotto la luce della luna dei cacciatori. Non è stato il dardo, e nemmeno la lama, ma le foglie
e le bacche della Dulcamara.
“Sdraiati caro Randall”
IV
Il falso amore di questo Sire, beh, l’hanno impiccata
perché era a causa delle sue azioni
che il suo Sire doveva morire.
Con le ciocche intrecciarono una treccia
di foglie e bacche della Dulcamara
“Sdraiati caro Randall”

NOTE
1) Woody Nightshade è la morella rampicante detta anche Dulcamara (nome scientifico Solanum dulcamara)
2) Stephanie Hladowski dice “deathly gripe”
3) Stephanie Hladowski dice “His lord’s ships winch”
4) Stephanie Hladowski dice “For she was the(a) cause of her love(lord) to die”
5) Stephanie Hladowski dice “deathly”

Sam Lee ha ulteriormente rielaborato la ballata (insieme a Daniel Pemberton) trasformandola nella canzone “The devil and the huntsman” per il film King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017)


Young man came from hunting
faint and weary
«What does ail my lord, my dearie?»
«Oh brother dear,
let my bed be made
For I feel the gripe
of the woody nightshade»


Many a man would die as soon
Out of the light of a mage’s moon


‘Twas not by bolt, but yet by blade
Can break the magic that the devil made
‘Twas not by fire, but was forged in flame
That can drown the sorrows of a huntsman’s pain


This young man he died fair soon
By the light of the hunters’ moon
‘Twas not by bolt, nor yet by blade
[But] of the berries of the woody nightshade


«Oh father dear lie here be safe
From the path that the devil made»
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il giovane cavaliere venne dalla caccia sfinito e stanco
“Cosa affligge il mio amato Sire?”
“Oh amato fratello
fammi preparare il letto
perchè sento la morsa
della Dulcamara”


Più di un uomo morirà presto, lontano dalla luce della luna di un mago


Non è stato il dardo e neppure la lama
a spezzare la magia che il diavolo ha fatto
non è stato il fuoco, ma fu forgiato nella fiamma
ciò che può affogare le sofferenze della pena di un cacciatore
Questo giovane è morto piuttosto presto, sotto la luce della luna dei cacciatori. Non è stato il dardo, e nemmeno la lama, ma le bacche della Dulcamara “Oh amato padre resta qui in salvo
dal sentiero che il diavolo ha fatto”

FONTI
http://www.loscrivodame.com/dulcamara/
https://www.ideegreen.it/dulcamara-proprieta-85863.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/lordrandall.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/105.html

Johnny the Brine

Una ‘Border Ballad’ trascritta dal professor Child al numero 114 in ben 13 versioni:  Johnny the Brine, Johnnie Cock, Johnnie (Jock)  o’ Breadislee, Jock O’Braidosly, Johnnie o’ Graidie sono i vari nomi con cui è identificato questo bracconiere/bandito del Border scozzese.

LA GUERRA AL BRACCONAGGIO

“La foresta ha occupato un posto importantissimo nella vita inglese fino dai tempi antichi; ancora durante il regno della regina Elisabetta, fitte boscaglie ricoprivano le aree di intere contee, ed il mondo della foresta aveva guardie, leggi e tribunali propri ai quali neanche i nobili ed il clero potevano sottrarsi completamente. Dall’invasione normanna fino a Giorgio III è stata una continua lotta, per lungo tempo assai sanguinosa, tra il popolo da una parte e, dall’altra, le inique leggi che trattavano l’uccisione d’un cervo alla stregua di un assassinio e sottoponevano i cacciatori di frodo, quando non alla morte, all’abbacinamento o alla mutilazione degli arti. La foresta veniva “monopolizzata” dalla nobiltà per l’esclusivo “sport” della caccia, mentre per la gente essa rappresentava uno dei pochi mezzi di sostentamento. Il bracconaggio era dunque un’attività rischiosissima e poteva davvero costare la vita, anche perché i guardacaccia avevano la facoltà di abbattere sul posto chiunque fosse stato scoperto a cacciare di frodo. Da qui la denominazione di “guerra del bracconaggio“, che rende esattamente l’idea di che cosa davvero si trattasse (anche perché le foreste, ideale rifugio di banditi e Outlaws, venivano spesso soggette a vere e proprie spedizioni militari.” (Riccardo Venturi tratto da qui)

Nell’Alto Medioevo i bracconieri  erano considerati alla stregua di fuorilegge e uccisi sul posto dai guardacaccia. Successivamente le pene si mitigarono prevedendo l’incarcerazione e/o l’amputazione della mano (o l’abbacinamento) fino alla pena capitale quando gli animali erano della riserva di caccia del Re. In Inghilterra con la Magna Charta libertatum (1215) vennero abolite le pene per la caccia di frodo, ma nella prassi quotidiana i giudici della contea (ovvero gli stessi nobili “derubati”) raramente erano ben disposti verso i bracconieri. Le condanne  nei secoli successivi furono progressivamente più miti e nel settecento il bracconiere rischiava solo la detenzione in carcere per qualche mese e/o le frustate. Era inoltre possibile pagare una multa (anche se salata) per riavere la libertà.

La ballata è ancora popolare in Scozia (dal Fife all’Aberdeenshire fino al Border) e le sue prime versioni in stampa risalgono alla fine del Settecento: si narra di un giovane che va a caccia di cervi, ma in sprezzo del pericolo, dopo il buon esito della caccia, se ne resta nel bosco appisolandosi dopo un lauto banchetto. Sorpreso da un servitore della zona viene denunciato ai guardacaccia del Re i quali gli tendono un’imboscata per ucciderlo: sono sette contro uno ma Johnny riesce a ucciderne sei. Il finale varia a seconda delle versioni: il settimo guardacaccia riesce a mettersi in salvo fuggendo sul cavallo, o viene lasciato in vita per poter riferire l’accaduto; in altre è un uccellino che viene inviato a casa con la richiesta di soccorso, ma la fine è sempre tragica e il bracconiere muore a causa delle ferite.

Johnny of Braidislee-Samuel Edmund Waller

LA VERSIONE ESTESA: Jock O’Braidosly

ASCOLTA The Corries, live

ASCOLTA Top Floor Taivers live in un arrangiamento molto personale


I
Johnny got up on a May mornin’
Called for water to wash his hands
Says “Gie loose tae me my twa grey dugs
That lie in iron bands – bands
That lie in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s mother she heard o’ this
Her hands for dool she wrang
Sayin’ “Johnny for your venison
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang – gang
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang”
III
But Johnny has ta’en his guid bend bow
His arrows one by one
And he’s awa’ tae the greenwood gane
Tae ding the dun deer doon – doon
Tae ding the dun deer doon
IV
Noo Johnny shot and the dun deer leapt
And he wounded her in the side
And there between the water and the woods
The grey hounds laid her pride – her pride/The grey hounds laid her pride
V
They ate so much o’ the venison
They drank so much o’ the blood
That Johnny and his twa grey dugs
Fell asleep as though were deid – were deid
Fell asleep as though were deid
VI
Then by there cam’ a silly auld man
An ill death may he dee
For he’s awa’ tae Esslemont (1)
The seven foresters for tae see – tae see
The foresters for tae see
VII
“As I cam’ in by Monymusk (2)
Doon among yon scruggs
Well there I spied the bonniest youth
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs – twa dugs
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs”
VIII (3)
The buttons that were upon his sleeve
Were o’ the gowd sae guid
And the twa grey hounds that he lay between
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood – wi’ blood
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood
IX
Then up and jumps the first forester
He was captain o’ them a’
Sayin “If that be Jock o’ Braidislee
Unto him we’ll draw – we’ll draw
Unto him we’ll draw”
X
The first shot that the foresters fired
It hit Johnny on the knee
And the second shot that the foresters fired
His heart’s blood blint his e’e – his e’e
His heart’s blood blint his e’e
XI (4)
Then up jumps Johnny fae oot o’ his sleep
And an angry man was he
Sayin “Ye micht have woken me fae my sleep
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e – my e’e
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e”
XII
But he’s rested his back against an oak
His fit upon a stane
And he has fired at the seven o’ them
He’s killed them a’ but ane – but ane
He’s killed them a’ but ane
XIII
He’s broken four o’ that one’s ribs
His airm and his collar bane (5)
And he has set him upon his horse
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame – hame
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame
XIV
But Johnny’s guid bend bow is broke
His twa grey dugs are slain
And his body lies in Monymusk
His huntin’ days are dane – are dane
His huntin’ days are dane
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani
“Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri
sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La madre di Johnny che seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
” Johnny per la tua caccia
al bosco non andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo, le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù – per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna spiccò un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda,
la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Molto mangiarono della carne
e bevvero tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono di colpo –
di colpo
si addormentarono di colpo
VI
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio,
che peste lo colga,
che andava a Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia, –
vedere
per vedere i sette guardacaccia.
VII
“Mentre venivo qui da Monymusk
per quella boscaglia
vidi il ragazzo più bello
che giaceva addormentato tra due cani- due cani
giaceva addormentato tra due cani
VIII
I bottoni che portava alla maniche
erano d’oro zecchino
e i due levrieri tra cui era
disteso
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue- di sangue
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue
IX
Saltò su il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Se quello è il giovane Jock o’ Braidislee andremo da lui –
andremo da lui”
X
Il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, colpì Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio- occhio il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
XI
Saltò su Johnny risvegliandosi dal sonno
ed era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Mi avete risvegliato dal sonno
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio”
XII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno – uno
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
XIII
Aveva quattro delle costole rotte
il braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa
XIV
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti – sono finiti, i giorni della caccia sono finiti

NOTE
1) nell’Aberdeenshire si trovano ancora i resti del Castello di Esslemont
2) Monymusk è un ameno paesello, oggi la tenuta Monymusk gestisce una vasta area boschiava lungo le rive del fiume Don (vedi)
3) un classico espediente dei narratori che aggiungevano dettagli sfarzosi alla storia per destare meraviglia tra il pubblico
4) è una strofa riempitiva secondo lo schema della ripetizione tipico delle ballate popolari (vedi)
5) un passaggio un po’ brusco inerente il settimo guardacaccia lasciato in vita, anche se malconcio issato sul cavallo e liberato perchè fosse un testimone di quanto accaduto

SECONDA VERSIONE: Johnny the Brine

La versione è quella della traveller Jeannie Robertson un po’ più rielaborata nelle strofe finali.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee

ed ecco l’intervista filmanta dallo stesso Sam Lee in merito alla trasmissione orale della ballata all’interno della famiglia Robertson


I
Johnny arose one May morning
Called water to wash his hands
“so bring to me my twa greyhounds
They are bound in iron bands, bands
They are bound in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s wife she wrang her hands –
“To the greenwoods dinnae gang
for the sake o’ the venison
To the greenwoods dinnae gang, gang
To the greenwoods dinnae gang”
III
Johnny’s gane up through Monymusk
And doon some scroggs
And there he spied a young deer leap
She was lying in a field of scrub, scrub
She was lying in a field of scrub
IV
The first arrow he fired
It wounded her on the side
And between the water and the wood
His greyhounds laid her pride, pride
His greyhounds laid her pride
V
Johnny and his two greyhounds
Drank so much blood
That Johnny an his two greyhounds
They fell sleeping in the wood, wood
They fell sleeping in the wood
VI
By them came a fool old man
And an ill death may he dee
he went up and telt the forester
And he telt what he did lie, lie
And he telt what he did lie
VII
“If that be young Johnny of the Brine
then let him sleep on (1)”
but the seventh forester denied (2)
he was Johnny’s sister’s son, son
“To the greenwood we will gang”
VIII
The first arrow that they fired
wounded him upon the thigh,
And the second arrow that they fired
his heart’s blood blinded his eye, eye
his heart’s blood blinded his eye
IX
Johnny rose up wi’ a angry growl
For an angry man was he –
“I‘ll kill a’ you six foresters
And brak the seventh one’s back in three, three, three
And brak the seventh one’s back in three”
X
He put his foot all against a stane
And his back against a tree
An he’s kilt a’ the six foresters
And broke the seventh one’s back in three,
and he broke his collar-bone
An he put him on his grey mare’s back
For to carry the tidings home, home
For to carry the tidings home
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani “Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri, sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La moglie di Johnny si torse le mani
“Al bosco non andare
per amor della caggiagione
al bosco non andare, andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Johnny è andato per il Monymusk,
in mezzo alla boscaglia
e lì vide una giovane cerva
distesa nella macchia, macchia
distesa nella macchia
IV
La prima freccia scoccata
la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda, la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
bevvero così tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono nel bosco, bosco
si addormentarono nel bosco
VI
Presso di loro venne un vecchio pazzo,
che peste lo colga,
e andò a chiamare i guardacaccia
per dire dove (John) dormiva, dormiva
per dire dove lui dormiva.
VII
“Se quello è il giovane Johnny of the Brine allora che riposi in pace” eccetto il settimo dei guardacaccia  che li rimproverò, era il figlio della sorella di Johnny, il figlio “e al bosco andremo”
VIII
La prima freccia che tirarono
lo ferì alla coscia, e la seconda freccia che tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
IX
Johnny si alzò con un urlo straziante
perchè era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Ucciderò tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre, tre, tre
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre”
X
Mise un piede contro la pietra
e la schiena contro l’albero
e uccise tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzò la schiena del settimo in tre,
e gli ruppe la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso della sua cavalla grigia
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa

NOTE
1) l’intendo dei guardiaboschi è di cogliere Johnny nel sonno perchè non si risvegli mai più
2) sono tutti daccordo a tendere l’imboscata mentre il bracconiere dorme indifeso, tranne il settimo guardacaccia, il quale li rimprovera, in alcune versioni si dice che nemmeno un lupo avrebbe attaccato un uomo inerme 

TERZA VERSIONE: Johnny O’Breadislee

ASCOLTA Hamish Imlach
ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in “Five” 1997


I
Johnny arose on a May mornin’
Gone for water tae wash his hands
He hae loused tae me his twa gray dogs
That lie bound in iron bands
II
When Johnny’s mother, she heard o’ this
Her hands for dule she wrang
Cryin’, “Johnny, for yer venison
Tae the green woods dinna ye gang”
III
Aye, but Johnny hae taen his good benbow
His arrows one by one
Aye, and he’s awa tae green wood gaen
Tae dae the dun deer doon
IV
Oh Johnny, he shot, and the dun deer lapp’t
He wounded her in the side
Aye, between the water and the wood
The gray dogs laid their pride
V
It’s by there cam’ a silly auld man
Wi’ an ill that John he might dee
And he’s awa’ doon tae Esslemont
Well, the King’s seven foresters tae see
VI
It’s up and spake the first forester
He was heid ane amang them a’
“Can this be Johnny O’ Braidislee?
Untae him we will draw”
VII
An’ the first shot that the foresters, they fired
They wounded John in the knee
An’ the second shot that the foresters, they fired
Well, his hairt’s blood blint his e’e
VIII
But he’s leaned his back against an oak
An’ his foot against a stane
Oh and he hae fired on the seven foresters
An’ he’s killed them a’ but ane
IX
Aye, he hae broke fower o’ this man’s ribs
His airm and his collar bain
Oh and he has sent him on a horse
For tae carry the tidings hame
X
Johnny’s good benbow, it lies broke
His twa gray dogs, they lie deid
And his body, it lies doon in Monymusk
And his huntin’ days are daen
His huntin’ days are daen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e andò al fiume per lavarsi le mani
aveva liberato per me i suoi due levrieri  legati con catene di ferro.
II
Quando la madre di Johnny seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
gridando “Johnny per la tua cacciagione al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo,
le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna diede un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i levrieri presero la preda
V
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio
in animo che John dovesse morire,
ed è uscito da Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia
del Re
VI
Saltò su a parlare il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Potrebbe essere Johnny O’ Braidislee? Andremo da lui!”
VII
E il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono
colpirono Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo che i guardacaccia tirarono il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
VIII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro
la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette i guardacaccia
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
IX
Aveva rotto quattro delle costole di quell’uomo
il suo braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa
X
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti
i giorni della caccia sono finiti


FONTI
http://www.mostly-medieval.com/explore/johnie.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch114.htm
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=9398
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/johnnyobredislee.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/johnny.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/johnobre.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/johnnie-o-breadisley/

Tommy’s Gone

Sea shanty variante della famiglia “To Hilo” nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor sono riportate ben due versioni.
Il marinaio di queste sea shanty è Tom e al suo nome si abbinano un buon numero di porti, la lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dalla durata del lavoro (‘Stringing out’) e quindi la lista dei porti visitati dal nostro Tom è molto vasta.

Tommy’s Gone (Tommy’s Gone Away)

ASCOLTA Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that noted school.
Tommy’s gone to Baltimore
To dance upon that sandy floor
Tommy’s gone to Mobile Bay,
To screw the cotton all the day..
Tommy’s gone to Singapore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone to Buenos Aires,
Where the girls have long black hair,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool quella scuola rinomata
Tommy è andato a Baltimora
a ballare sulla sabbia gialla
Tommy è andato a Mobile Bay
a raccogliere il cotone tutto il giorno
Tommy è andato a Singapore
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre
Tommy è andato a Buenos Aires
dove le ragazze portano i capelli neri e lunghi
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre

Tommy’s Gone to Ilo

La variante diffusa nel Canada.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
Away you Ilo (1).
My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
My Tom’s gone to Ilo.
Tom’s gone to Liverpool
To Liverpool that packet school
Tom’s gone to Merasheen (2)
where they tied up
to tree (3)
Tom’s gone to Vallipo (4)
When he’ll come back I do not know
Tom’s gone to Rio
Where the girls put on show
Hilo town is in Peru
It’s just the place for me an’ you.
I wish I was in London town
then to see no more Ilo
A bully ship and a bully crew
Tom’s gone and I’ll gone too
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
via a Hilo
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito per Hilo
Tom è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool a quella scuola navale
Tom è andato a Merasheen
dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta
Tom è andato a Vallipo
quando ritornerà non lo so
Tom è andato a Rio
dove le ragazze si mettono in mostra
Hilo è una città del Perù
ed è il posto perfetto per me e te
Vorrei essere a Londra
e non andare più a Hilo
Una nave tosta e una ciurma di bulli
Tom è partito e partirò anch’io

NOTE
1) Hilo è il nome di un porto che si trova sia in Perù che  nelle Hawai (vedi)
2) anche scritto come Merrimashee c’è un isola di Merasheen a Terranova (Canada), ma più probabilmente è Miramichi, una cittadina del Canada, situata nella provincia del Nuovo Brunswick, ma anche un grande fiume che da il nome alla baia in cui sfocia, nel Golfo di San Lorenzo. Spesso i marinai ripetevano le canzoni ad orecchio ed era più probabile che venissero storpiati i nomi delle località che non si conoscevano.
3) vedi commento in Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie) 
4) Valparaiso in Cile

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/hilo-in-the-sea-shanties/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/514.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/tomsgonetohilo.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=147564

The Irish Girl of Mr Tapscott

Una sea shanty conosciuta con vari nomi “The Irish Girl”, “The Irish Emigrant”, ” Yellow Meal” o “Mr Tapscott” è una via di mezzo tra una sea shanty e una emigration ballad.
In alcune versioni il testo è stato riscritto per il music-hall, per ridicolarizzare l’irlandese di turno.

PRIMA VERSIONE: MR TAPSCOTT (John Short)

Testo e melodia sono una variante di “The New York gals” (“Can’t You Dance the Polka?”)
Si racconta di una ragazza irlandese che dal molo di Liverpool s’imbarca su una nave della Linea Marittima gestita dal signor Tapscott diretta a New York.

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1  (su Spotify).


I
As I was a-walking down
by the Clarence Dock (1),
I overheard an Irish girl
conversing with Tapscott (2).
Chorus (after each verse):
And away you santy (3), my dear Annie,
Oh you santy, I’ll love you for your money
II
“Good morning Mister Tapscott,
good morning, sir,” says she,
“O have you got a ship of fame
to carry me o’er the sea?”
III
“O yes, I have a ship of fame,
tomorrow she sets sail,
She’s lieing in the Waterloo Dock taking in her mail.”
IV
The day was fine when we set sail
but night has scare begun (4)
A dirty nor’west wind came up
and drove us back again.
V
Our captain, being an Irishman,
as you shall understand,
He hoisted out his small boat on the banks of Newfoundland.
V
‘Twas at the Castle Gardens (5) fair
they landed me on shore,
And if I marry a Yankee boy
I’ll go to sea no more.
VI
I went down to Fulton Ferry (6)
but I could not get across,
I jumped on the back
of a ferryboat man
and rode him like an hoss.
VII
My father is a butcher,
my mother chops the meat,
My sister keeps a slap-up
shop way down on Water Street.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo giù
al  Molo Clarence
ascoltai una ragazza irlandese
conversare con Tapscott.
Coro
E andiamo Santa, mia cara Annie,
tu Santa, ti amerò per i tuoi soldi
II
Buon giorno signor Tapscott,
buon giorno signore -dice lei-
avete una nave di chiara fama
che mi porti oltre mare?”
III
“O si, ho una nave di chiara fama
che partirà domani
è in rada nel Molo Waterloo
a prendere la posta”
IV
Il giorno era bello quando salpammo, ma la notte ci mise in apprensione, un dannato vento di tramontana arrivò e ci ricacciava indietro.
V
Il Capitano, era irlandese,
come capirete,
ammarò la sua barcaccia sulle rive di Terranova.
V
Fu a Castle Gardens
che mi sbarcarono a riva
e se sposerò un americano
non andrò più per mare
VI
Andai al  Fulton Ferry
ma non riuscii a salire sul traghetto, così saltai sulla schiena di un traghettatore e lo cavalcai come un cavallino
VII
Mio padre è un macellaio, mia madre trita la carne, mia sorella tiene una bottega di prima qualità in fondo a Water Stree

NOTE
1) Il porto di Liverpool è un sistema portuale lungo l’estuario del fiume Mersey. Il primo bacino di Liverpool fu costruito nel 1715 sviluppandosi poi in un sistema di docks interconnessi che permettevano i movimenti delle navi ininterrottamente nonostante le maree. La maggior parte delle piccole banchine della parte sud del porto di Liverpool vennero chiuse nel 1971, man mano che s’inauguravano i nuovi bacini adatti ad ospitare le nuovi navi cargo.
2)I fratelli William e James Tapscott (il primo con sede a Liverpool e il secondo a New York) organizzavano il viaggio per gli emigranti dalla Gran Bretagna all’America, spesso approfittando dell’ingenuità dei loro clienti. Inizialmente lavoravano per la Black Ball Line poi misero su una loro linea di trasporto che procurava un viaggio per le Americhe molto economico, perciò le condizioni del viaggio erano tremende e il cibo scadente. Nel 1849 William Tapscott ha fatto bancarotta ed è stato processato e condannato per frode verso gli azionisti della compagnia. continua
3) richiamo ad un altro sea shanty e a Santy Anna- Santiana . Usato come vezzeggiativo, senza un particolare significato
4) I passeggeri soffrivano spesso il mal di mare specialmente con i forti venti di tramontana
5) Castle Clinton o Fort Clinton o Castle Garden è un ex forte circolare situato nella Città di New York a Battery Park, nella parte meridionale dell’isola di Manhattan: dalla metà del XIX secolo, fu utilizzato come primo centro di smistamento per l’immigrazione proveniente dall’Europa. La stazione fu in funzione fino al 1890, anno in cui l’amministrazione federale, sotto pressione di una seconda e più imponente ondata immigratoria proveniente da tutti gli stati d’Europa, decise di aprirne una più funzionale rispetto alla nuova situazione verificatasi, appunto quella di Ellis Island.
6) Fulton Ferry era il traghetto che collegava Brooklyn con New York e che rimase in attività fino alla costruzione del famoso ponte (1883) vedi

SECONDA VERSIONE: IRISH GIRL

Questa versione riprende  la sea shanty “Doodle Let Me Go” (Yallow Girl)
Il coretto è però diverso da “Doodle let me go” e riprende invece un’altra sea shanty dal titolo  “We’re bound to go” che così inizia
Oh Johnny was a rover and to-day he sails away.
Heave away, my Johnny, Heave away-ay.
Oh Johnny was a rover and to-day he sails away.
Heave away my bully boys, We’re all bound to go.

ASCOLTA We’re All Bound To Go


As I walked out one summer’s morn’, down by the Salthouse Dock(1),
Heave away m’ Johnnies,
heave away!
I met an emigrant Irish girl,
conversing with Tapscott(2),
And away m’ bully boys,
we’re all bound to go.
“Good morning Mr. Tapscott sir” “Good morning, gir” says he,
“Oh have you got any packet ships all bound for Amerikee?”
“Yes, I got a packet ship.
Oh, I’ve got one or two,
I’ve got the JINNY WALKER
and I’ve got the KANGAROO (3).”
I’ve got the Jinny Walker,
and today she does set sail
With five and fifty emigrants and a thousand bags of meal. (4)
The day was fine when we set sail,
but night had barely come,
and every emigrant never ceased
to wish himself at home.
“Bad luck to them irish sailor boys bad luck to them” I say.
“but they all got drunk and broke into me bunk and stole me clothes away.
Twas at the Castle Garden(5)
they landed me on shore
And if I marry a Yankee boy I’ll cross the seas no more.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Mentre camminavo un mattino d’estate verso il Salthouse Dock (1)
virate a lasciare, compagni,
virate a lasciare
ho incontrato una ragazza irlandese che parlava con Tapscott (2)
virate a lasciare, allegri compagni,
siamo in partenza.
“Buon giorno signor Tapscott, signore”,
“Buon giorno signorina” dice lui
“Avete una nave che parte per l’America?”
“Si ho un postale,
oh ne ho un paio,
ho la Jinny Walker
e la Kangaroo (3)”
Ho preso la Jinny Walker
e oggi prende il largo
con 55 emigranti e un migliaio di sacchi di posta (4).
Il giorno era bello quando prendemmo il mare, ma la notte venne presto
e ogni emigrante non smetteva
di desiderare la propria casa.
“Mala sorte a quei marinai irlandesi, la malasorte a loro auguro, perchè si ubriacarono e fecero irruzione nella mia cuccetta e mi rubarono i vestiti.
Fu al Castle Garden (5) che mi sbarcarono a riva e se sposerò un americano non attraverserò mai più il mare”

NOTE
1) in altre versioni diventa Clarence Dock, Albert dock, Landing Stage, Sligo dock, del porto di Liverpool
2) I fratelli William e James Tapscott (il primo con sede a Liverpool e il secondo a New York) organizzavano il viaggio per gli emigranti dalla Gran Bretagna all’America, spesso approfittando dell’ingenuità dei loro clienti. Inizialmente lavoravano per la Black Ball Line poi misero su una loro linea di trasporto che procurava un viaggio per le Americhe molto economico, perciò le condizioni del viaggio erano tremende e il cibo scadente. Nel 1849 William Tapscott ha fatto bancarotta ed è stato processato e condannato per frode verso gli azionisti della compagnia. continua
3)’Joseph Walker’, Kangaroo e Henry Clay sono i nomi dei vascelli di linea tra Gran Bretagna e America
4) scritto anche come “male”: i vascelli facevano anche da servizio postale e meal è la pronuncia irlandese per mail; ma con Yellow meal si indicava la polentina fatta con la semola di mais servita a bordo .
5) Castle Clinton o Fort Clinton o Castle Garden è un ex forte circolare situato nella Città di New York a Battery Park, nella parte meridionale dell’isola di Manhattan: dalla metà del XIX secolo, fu utilizzato come primo centro di smistamento per l’immigrazione proveniente dall’Europa. La stazione fu in funzione fino al 1890, anno in cui l’amministrazione federale, sotto pressione di una seconda e più imponente ondata immigratoria proveniente da tutti gli stati d’Europa, decise di aprirne una più funzionale rispetto alla nuova situazione verificatasi, appunto quella di Ellis Island.

continua 

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/mrtapscott.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/doodleletmego.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49421
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/mrtapscott.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/heave_away/shay.html
http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/tapscott.shtml
http://www.tomlewis.net/lyrics/heave_away.htm
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Doe062.html
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/HEAVEAWA.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59218
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm

General Taylor gained the day

Una sea shanty dal titolo “Carry him to his burying ground” o “General Taylor” ; riguardo alle origini c’è chi parteggia per i marinai inglesi e chi per gli schiavi afro-americani. AL Lloyd la imparò da ‘Harding the Barbadian Barbarian’ e Cecil Sharp la collezionò dal marinaio John Short.
Ci sono due riferimenti incrociati ad altri canti marinareschi: Santy Ano e Stormalong; Stormy è un marinaio del mito, il suo funerale è una sorta di ultimo addio alla gloriosa era dei grandi velieri, sconfitti sul finire dell’Ottocento dai battelli a vapore.

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span (voce Tim Hart) 1971

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol. 1 su spotify, che la interpreta secondo la versione della collezione John Short così è scritto nelle note dell’album
Another shanty that refers to Stormy. Despite its popularity in recent years, this is a rare shanty in the collections. The extraordinary melodic lines of the shantyman’s lead, in what might be regarded as “chorus”, were, with difficulty, meticulously notated by Sharp, and are virtually impossible to replicate in performance—Sam [Lee] has followed the style rather than the exact notation. Other shantymen tend to sing a very simplified version—or give it all to the crew as chorus.

ASCOLTA Richard Thompson w/ Jack Shit Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 su Spotify


General Taylor gained the day(1)
Walk him along, John, carry him along
Oh General Taylor he gained the day
Carry him to his burying ground
Chorus
To me way hey, you Stormy (2)
Walk him along, John, carry him along
To me way hey, you Stormy
Carry him to his burying ground
VERSIONE STEELEYE SPAN
Oh I wish I was old Stormy’s son
I’d build a ship ten thousand tons
I’d load her down with ale and rum
And every shellback should have some
Oh we dig his grave with a silver spade
And his shroud of the softest silk is made
And we lower him down on a golden chain
On every link we’ll carve his name
General Taylor’s dead and gone


VERSIONE RICHARD THOMPSON
We dig his grave with a silver spade
shroud of the finest silk is made
And we lower him down on a golden chain
On every link we’ll carve his name
General Taylor died long ago
He’s gone where the stormy winds won’t blow
General Taylor’s dead and gone
General Taylor’s dead and gone
Tell me where you’re Stormy
Tell me where you’re Stormy
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il generale Taylor ha vinto il giorno(1)
accompagnalo John, portalo con te
il generale Taylor ha vinto il giorno
portalo al suo cimitero
Coro
a me via, ehi tu Stormy
accompagnalo John, portalo con te
a me via, ehi tu Stormy
portalo al suo cimitero
VERSIONE STEELEYE SPAN
Se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy
costruirei una nave di mille tonnellate. La stiverei con birra e rum
e tutti i marinai ne avrebbero un po’.
Scaviamo la fossa con una spada d’argento,
il sudario è fatto della migliore seta
e lo caliamo giù con una catena d’argento,
a ogni anello incideremo il suo nome
Generale Taylor è morto stecchito


VERSIONE RICHARD THOMPSON
Scaviamo la fossa con una spada d’argento, il sudario è fatto della migliore seta e lo caliamo giù con una catena d’argento,
a ogni anello incideremo il suo nome
il Generale Taylor morì molto tempo fa
è andato dove i venti di tempesta non soffiano più
Generale Taylor è morto stecchito
Generale Taylor è morto stecchito
Dimmi dove sei Stormy
Dimmi dove sei Stormy

NOTE
1) Il generale Zachary Taylor sconfisse il generale messicano Santa Ana a Buenavista nel febbraio 1847, contribuendo ad assicurarsi il Texas e ad ottenere la California, per gli Stati Uniti. Divenne Presidente degli Stati Uniti dopo la guerra con il Messico, ma morì dopo solo un breve periodo in carica. Nelle versioni irlandesi la verità storica viene stravolta ed è Santa Ana ad aver vinto la battaglia di quel giorno  (vedi)
2) al Generale Taylor viene tributato un funerale rituale come al leggendario Stormy

continua

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/generaltaylor.html
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/santy-anna-santy-ano/
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/stormalong-john/
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79270
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/stormalong.html

THE JEW’S GARDEN

“Little Sir Hugh”, “Fatal Flower Garden”, “Sir Hugh, or the Jew’s Daughter”  è una antica ballata registrata al numero 155 dal professor Francis James Child, una murder ballad incentrata  apparentemente su un “omicidio rituale“; siamo alle radici delle leggende metropolitane sui rapimenti dei bambini a sfondo religioso, così in Inghilterra la morte di Hugh di Lincoln nel 1255 riportata ne “The Annals of Waverly” scatena l’odio razziale contro gli Ebrei: il corpo del bambino viene ritrovato un mese dopo la sua scomparsa in un pozzo e la “vox populi” addita gli Ebrei; uno di loro sotto tortura confessa l’assassinio e per buona misura una ventina di ebrei sono impiccati con l’accusa di omicidio rituale (e ovviamente i loro beni sono incamerati dalla Corona).
Così scrive il cronista “This year [1255] about the feast of the apostles Peter and Paul [27 July], the Jews of Lincoln stole a boy called Hugh, who was about eight years old. After shutting him up in a secret chamber, where they fed him on milk and other childish food, they sent to almost all The cities of England in which there were Jews, and summoned some of their sect from each city to be present at a sacrifice to take place at Lincoln, in contumely and insult of Jesus Christ. For, as they said, they had a boy concealed for the purpose of being crucified; so a great number of them assembled at Lincoln, and then they appointed a Jew of Lincoln judge, to take the place of Pilate, by whose sentence, and with the concurrence of all, the boy was subjected to various tortures. They scourged him till the blood flowed, they crowned him with thorns, mocked him, and spat upon him; each of them also pierced him with a knife, and they made him drink gall, and scoffed at him with blasphemous insults, and kept gnashing their teeth and calling him Jesus, the false prophet. And after tormenting him in diverse ways they crucified him, and pierced him to the heart with a spear. When the boy was dead, they took the body down from the cross, and for some reason disemboweled it; it is said for the purpose of their magic arts
Manco a dirlo il bambino viene venerato e chiamato” il piccolo Ugo di Lincoln” (non proprio un santo ma nella Cattedrale viene approntato un piccolo santuario subito meta di pellegrinaggi)

ACCUSA DEL SANGUE

L’accusa del sangue così di moda nel mondo cristiano dell’Europa Medievale è basata sulla “dimenticanza” cristiana di un fondamento biblico condiviso dai primi Cristiani, dagli Ebrei e dai Musulmani e più in generale nel pensiero antico: il sangue è vita (anima della carne).
Anticamente per rinnovare la propria forza vitale si beveva sangue o si mangiava la carne delle vittime sacrificate agli dei; ma il Dio del credo monoteista orientale vietava ai suoi seguaci di cibarsi del sangue degli animali offerti in sacrificio; il sangue si appropria allora di un nuovo distintivo significato quello dell’alleanza tra Dio e l’uomo (o meglio il suo popolo): il sangue degli agnelli e la fuga degli Ebrei schiavi dall’Egitto.
Senonchè il sangue di Gesù sulla croce è il simbolo del “nuovo” patto (nel Vangelo è detto “il sangue del patto” ) cioè è il sangue che purifica il cristiano da ogni peccato, da cui il nuovo binomio Cristo = Agnello di Dio che “toglie i peccati dal mondo”

Nella Creazione Dio è decisamente vegetariano e vieta all’uomo e agli animali di nutrirsi di altri esseri viventi diversi dalle piante. Solo dopo il diluvio universale concede a Noè e alla sua famiglia di cibarsi di altri esseri viventi con il divieto di strappare la carne da un animale ancora vivo (Dio non consente di far soffrire inutilmente un animale senza averlo prima ucciso).
La Toràh vieta espressamente “di mangiare sangue” e le carni  kosher vengono macellate e trattate in modo da togliere loro tutto il sangue, la Chiesa invece liberalizza l’uso delle carni contenenti il sangue grosso modo nel 1400, con il Il Concilio di Basilea – Ferrara – Firenze – Roma   in cui si dichiarano definitivamente superate le pratiche giudaiche della circoncisione e del sabato, nonché il decreto di Gerusalemme sulle cose immolate, sul sangue e sulle carni sacrificate.
“La sacrosanta chiesa cattolica, quindi, dichiara apertamente che, da quel tempo, tutti quelli che osservano la circoncisione, il sabato e le altre prescrizioni legali, sono fuori della fede di Cristo, e non possono partecipare della salvezza eterna, a meno che non si ricredano finalmente dei loro errori. Ancora, comanda assolutamente a tutti quelli che si gloriano del nome di cristiani, che si deve cessare dal praticare la circoncisione sia prima che dopo il battesimo perché, che vi si confidi o meno, non si può in nessun modo praticarla senza perdere la salvezza eterna……..Crede fermamente, confessa e predica che ogni creatura Dio è buona e niente dev’essere respinto quando è accettato con rendimento di grazie (1 Timoteo 4,4); poiché, secondo l’espressione del Signore non ciò che entra nella bocca contamina l’uomo (Matteo 15,11). E afferma che la differenza tra cibi puri e impuri della legge mosaica deve considerarsi cerimoniale e che col sopravvenire del Vangelo è passata e ha perso efficacia. Anche la proibizione degli apostoli delle cose immolate ai simulacri, del sangue e delle carni soffocate (Atti 15,29) era adatta al tempo in cui dai giudei e gentili, che prima vivevano praticando diversi riti e secondo diversi costumi, sorgeva una sola chiesa. In tal modo giudei e gentili avevano osservanze in comune e l’occasione di trovarsi d’accordo in un solo culto e in una sola fede in Dio, e veniva tolta materia di dissenso. Infatti ai Giudei per la loro lunga tradizione potevano sembrare abominevoli il sangue e gli animali soffocati, e poteva sembrare che i gentili tornassero all’idolatria col mangiare cose immolate agli idoli. Ma quando la religione cristiana si fu talmente affermata da non esservi più in essa alcun Giudeo carnale, ma anzi tutti d’accordo erano passati alla chiesa, condividendo gli stessi riti e cerimonie del Vangelo, persuasi che per quelli che sono puri ogni cosa è pura (Tito 1,15), allora venne meno la causa di quella proibizione, e perciò anche l’effetto. Essa dichiara, quindi, che nessun genere di cibo in uso tra gli uomini deve essere condannato, e che nessuno, uomo o donna, deve far differenza di animali, qualunque sia il genere di morte che abbiano incontrato, quantunque per riguardo alla salute del corpo, per l’esercizio della virtù, per la disciplina regolare ed ecclesiastica, molte cose, anche se permesso, possano e debbano non mangiarsi. Secondo l’apostolo, infatti, tutto è lecito, ma non tutto conviene (1 Corinzi 6,12 e 1 Corinzi 10,22)”. [Sessione XI  del 4 febbraio 1442 del Concilio di Basilea – Ferrara – Firenze – Roma]
Da allora con la premessa che il cibo è un dono del Signore, la Chiesa  smette di questionare sui tipi di carne consentita e preferisce stilare le norme sull’astinenza e il digiuno.
Anche nel Corano il consumo della carne è permesso ma alcuni animali sono considerati impuri, l’uccisione dell’animale inoltre deve essere sacralizzata come rispetto della vita.
La giurisprudenza islamica, sulla scorta delle prescrizioni coraniche e della tradizione profetica, ha costruito una teoria generale in base alla quale viene regolamentato il regime alimentare del musulmano. Sono infatti considerati impuri e pertanto proibiti (harām): 1) alcune specie di animali e in particolare il maiale; 2) le carogne di animali; 3) gli animali che non siano stati cacciati o che non siano stati macellati secondo il metodo prescritto; 4) le vittime sacrificali; 5) il sangue; 6) i cibi divenuti impuri per contaminazione; 7) il vino e le bevande alcoliche.” (tratto da qui)

PASQUA DI SANGUE

Nonostante il grande rispetto degli ebrei verso il sangue come fonte della vita, i Cristiani (originariamente una delle tante sette ebraiche) diffondevano a piene mani le calunnie verso gli Ebrei e la Pasqua ebraica arrivando ad affermare che gli Ebrei a Pasqua rapivano i loro bambini  uccidendoli nei modi più atroci per utilizzarne il sangue a scopi rituali (cioè ci pucciavano il pane azzimo o ci facevano un energy-drink con il vino).
I miasmi della propaganda  politico-religiosa mi danno il voltastomaco e perciò qui mi fermo.

LA BALLATA

La leggenda metropolitana è ripresa un secolo più tardi da Geoffrey Chauces nei sui “Racconti di Cantebury” ( il racconto della Madre Priora) e la ballata “Sir Hugh or The Jew’s Daughter” circolò in forma orale in Gran Bretagna e negli Stati Uniti non necessariamente come  ballata antisemita. Il giardino che compare a volte nei titoli è il luogo del magico e del proibito e il giardino dell’Eden in cui il ragazzo viene tentato (tormentato) dal sesso e la morte è un passaggio metaforico che lo trasforma in uomo.
James Orchard Halliwell in Popular Rhymes and Nursery Tales of England (London, 1849) cita “Child Roland and the King of Elfland” come ballata antecedente: là i giovanetti giocano a palla nella città di  Carlisle e con un tiro maldestro la gettano “o’er the kirk he gar’d it flee”; i bambini che la vanno a cercare finiscono uno per volta in una terra incantata; così guardando ancora alle fiabe troviamo “la Principessa e il Ranocchio” in cui la ragazzina giocando con la palla la getta maldestramente nello stagno (o nella fontana o guarda caso un pozzo!) E la palla è tonda e dorata proprio come una mela di Avalon!

‘The Frog Prince’ – Old, Old Fairy Tales, Anne Anderson, 1935.

Ed ecco apparire il secondo elemento sempre tipico delle fiabe che raccontano di amore e di sesso (iniziazione sessuale): l’archetipo del “seduttore” o del “predatore sessuale”, sia esso il Principe Ranocchio o il Cavaliere Elfo o la Sirena/Fata.

Un altro punto fisso o per lo meno ripetuto spesso è quello del cattivo tempo, si descrive una giornata di pioggia o una nevicata o ancora una giornata nebbiosa, non certo il tempo più indicato per stare all’aperto e giocare a pallone, perchè si tratta di un codice letterario che avvisa gli ascoltatori che qualcosa di soprannaturale, funesto o magico sta per accadere.
Un altro punto cardine è quello dell'”oggetto del desidero” cioè una mela o un anello d’oro o una ciliegia; la mela è il classico simbolo della tentazione , l’anello  è al solito la ricompensa del matrimonio d’amore e la ciliegia rosso sangue la minaccia di morte se il ragazzo fallisce la prova.
E’ del tutto evidente che una ballata basata sull’archetipo “femmina fatale che seduce un giovanetto”  si connota in un certo punto storico di un “omicidio rituale” a sfondo antisemitico, ma nelle versioni americane la ragazza diventa “the jeweler’s daughter”, o più genericamente la figlia del Re o del Duca, o ancora la regina o più semplicemente una “lady”. In Scozia e in America diventa una “gipsy”.

In alcune versioni americane la donna è una parente del bambino, una zia a cui è stato affidato e che lo tiene malvolentieri o la stessa madre e il bambino è il figlio illegittimo.

Sam Lee in “Ground Of Its Own” 2012 con il titolo Jews Garden: e lo scacciapensieri ti entra in testa e non se ne va più..

o se preferite la versione live 2013

Steeleye Span in Commoners Crown, 1975 con il titolo di Little Sir Hugh che preferiscono la versione americana della ballata senza riferimento diretto alla figlia dell’ebreo


CHORUS
“Mother, mother, make my bed,
Make for me a winding sheet.
Wrap me up in a cloak of gold,
See if I can sleep.”
I
Four and twenty bonny, bonny boys playing at the ball.
Along came little Sir Hugh,
he played with them all.
He kicked the ball very high,
he kicked the ball so low,
He kicked it over a castle wall
where no one dared to go.
II
Out came a lady gay,
she was dressed in green.
“Come in, come in little Sir Hugh,
fetch your ball again.”
“I won’t come in, I can’t come in without my playmates all;
For if I should I know you would cause my blood to fall.”
III
She took him by the milk white hand, led him to the hall
Till they came to a stone chamber where no one could hear him call.
She sat him on a golden chair,
she gave him sugar sweet,
She lay him on a dressing board and stabbed him like a sheep.
IV
Out came the thick thick blood,
out came the thin.
Out came the bonny heart’s blood
till there was none within.
She took him by the yellow hair and also by the feet
She threw him in the old draw well fifty fathoms deep.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto *
CORO
“Madre o madre, fammi il letto
e preparami il sudario
avvolgimi in un manto dorato
che io possa riposare” (1)
I
24 bei ragazzi
giocavano a pallone (2)
giunse il piccolo sir Ugo
ed era il più bravo di tutti.
Calciava la palla verso l’alto
calciava la palla verso il basso
la calciò oltre il muro del castello
dove nessuno osava andare
II
Uscì una dama gaia,
vestita di verde (3)
“Entra, entra piccolo sir Ugo
per riprendere la palla”
“Non entro no;
non senza tutti gli altri calciatori
perchè se lo farò son certo che tu mi caverai il sangue”
III
Lo prese con la bianca mano
e lo portò in casa
fino alla segreta di pietra (4) dove nessuno lo avrebbe sentito gridare
lo mise su una sedia dorata
e gli diede delle gelatine (5)
lo stese su un asse da cucina (6) e lo accoltellò come una pecora
IV
Uscì il sangue, il sangue denso
e uscì quello fluente;
uscì il sangue del suo bel cuore
finchè non ne rimase più.
Lo prese dalla bionda testa e anche dai piedi
e lo gettò nel vecchio pozzo profondo 50 tese.

NOTE
* dalla traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (tratta da qui)
1) nelle versioni più antiche si aggiunge il particolare della madre del bambino alla ricerca del figlio scomparso e della miracolosa apparizione del suo spettro
2) il gioco della palla è un tipico passatempo dei ragazzi e delle giovinette nelle ballate medievali e veniva praticato nelle vie cittadine o nei parchi dei castelli
3) la dama verde vestita potrebbe benissimo essere una Fata
4) letteralmente una stanza di pietra, che suggerisce l’idea di una cantina
5) essendo nel medioevo vien da pensare a dei canditi o a gelè di frutta: sono i dolcetti che la “fata” ha usato per tentare il ragazzo e convincerlo ad entrare, come non pensare  ai lokum offerti a Edmund dalla strega bianca di Narnia? (la ricetta qui)
6) Riccardo Venturi traduce con “tavolo da cucire”, è piuttosto un grande tagliere che richiama per l’appunto il ceppo di legno su cui si tagliano le carni macellate

LA VERSIONE NURSERY RHYMES

La ballata ha una vasta tradizione come filastrocca per bambini ridotta a un paio di strofe, nella storia è la balia a uccidere il bambino, perfetta come ninna-nanna di Halloween

(il post è ancora in elaborazione con approfondimenti prossimamente)
FONTI
https://epub.uni-regensburg.de/27344/1/ubr13573_ocr.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40854
http://www.poetrycat.com/frank-sidgwick/sir-hugh-or-the-jews-daughter
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch155.htm
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/united-kingdom-virtual-jewish-history-tour
https://www.openstarts.units.it/dspace/bitstream/10077/12898/7/Scopel_2016_Prescrizioni_alimentari.pdf
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/the-jews-garden–mo-1903-williams-belden-a.aspx
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/66258/7
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/15412/7
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/27597/7
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/41240/7
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/68905/7
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/4and20.htm
http://theanthologyofamericanfolkmusic.blogspot.it/2009/10/fatal-flower-garden-nelstones-hawaiians.html
http://www.ondarock.it/recensioni/2012_samlee_groundofitsown.htm
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-FatalFlow.html
https://maxhunter.missouristate.edu/songinformation.aspx?ID=184
https://maxhunter.missouristate.edu/songinformation.aspx?ID=0335
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=7550&lang=it
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/littlesirhugh.html

LOVELY MOLLY

Non è ben chiaro dove si sia originata la canzone, che peraltro si inserisce in una nutrita serie di Farewell risalenti al 700 tra un giovane bracciante agricolo arruolatosi come soldato/marinaio per andare in guerra e l’altrettanto giovane fidanzatina.

La prima versione testuale scritta risale a Sam Henry che aveva raccolto il canto nella contea di Antrim tra il 1923-29, e gli studiosi ritengono che le successive versioni  di Jeannie Robertson e di Lizzie Higgins siano un adattamento in chiave scozzese di questa versione irlandese.
Ma ovviamente gli scozzesi non concordano e rivendicano la canzone al tempi della prima rivolta giacobita.

Prendiamo atto della bellezza di questa slow air che trasmette tutta la precarietà di una giovane vita privata del suo futuro (lavorare dignitosamente e invecchiare insieme alla propria sposa) e che molto probabilmente mai più ritornerà a seminare  la terra in Primavera .

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Fade in time, 2015 (Arthur Jeffes & Roundhouse Choir) il suo mentore Stanley Robertson era il nipote di Jeannie Robertson (figura storica della tradizione musicale scozzese) e in questa versione Sam da prova di tutte le sue corde espressive

ASCOLTA Lindsay Straw


I
I once was a ploughboy (1),
but a soldier I’m now,
I courted lovely Molly,
as I followed the plough;
I courted lovely Molly,
from the age of sixteen,
But now I must leave her,
and serve James, my king.
Chorus
Oh Molly, lovely Molly,
I delight in your charms,
there is many’s the long night
you hae laid in my arms.
But if ever I return again,
it will be in the Spring
Where the mavis and the turtle dove
and the nightingale sing.
II
You can go to the market,
you can go to the fair;
You can go to the church on Sunday,
and meet your new love there.
But if anybody loved you
as much as I do,
I won’t stop your marriage,
and farewell, adieu
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un tempo ero un bracciante agricolo
ma ora sono un soldato,
corteggiai la bella Molly
quando seguivo l’aratro,
corteggiai la bella Molly
dall’età di 16 anni
ma ora la devo lasciare
per servire Giacomo, il mio re
Coro
Oh Molly bella Molly
deliziato dal tuo fascino
per più di una lunga notte
sei stata tra le mie braccia,
ma se mai ritornerò ancora
sarà in Primavera
quando il tordo e la tortora
e l’usignolo cantano
II
Tu puoi andare mercato
e puoi andare alla fiera
puoi andare in chiesa la domenica
per incontrare un nuovo innamorato.
Ma se qualcuno ti amerà
tanto quanto io ti amo
non impedirò il tuo matrimonio
e addio, addio

NOTE
1) un bracciante stagionale o un mezzadro, in Scozia un bothy boy, in Irlanda uno spailpin

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arthur-mcbride.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34875
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/lovelymolly.html

I WAS A BLACKBIRD BY MAY BRADLEY

Una canzone piuttosto recente sebbene di autore anonimo risalente forse alla fine dell’ottocento o più probabilmente ai primi del novecento, “If I was a Blackbird” è stata resa  popolare in Gran Bretagna e America negli anni 30 e 40 da Delia Murphy e negli anni 50 da Ronnie Ronalde. La melodia tradizionale è un valzer, rallentato più spesso come slow air.
Molti studiosi considerano il brano un lavoro di ricucitura  ottenuto mettendo insieme dei ‘floating verses’ presi da varie canzoni popolari (un mash-up si direbbe oggi) . (prima parte)

LA VERSIONE GALLESE

Una versione diversa da quella “irlandese” interpretata da Delia Murphy (qui) è invece la testimonianza di May Bradley (1902-1974), proveniente da una famiglia di gitani  (di origine Romany) depositaria dei canti rurali della parte Ovest del Midlands inglese e del Galles.

Oh Lord, madam, I could tell you lovely ‘istory …  But it’d take me such a long while to think back, you know.

The speaker is May Bradley, talking to Fred and Margaret Hamer in Ludlow, Shropshire, half a century ago.  Over the course of a number of visits she did indeed impart a great deal of ‘lovely ‘istory’, committing to posterity a wealth of songs the origins of which date back to long before she was born, and telling us much in passing about working-class rural life experiences during the first quarter of the twentieth century.  She was born 19 January 1902 to Romany parents named Robert and Esther Smith.  When enumerated in the 1911 census, aged only nine years, her parents gave her birthplace as Clipstone, in Glamorganshire, although in later life she claimed to have been “bred, borned and raised just ‘round ‘ere [i.e.  the vicinity of Ludlow] …  Well, Monmouthshire …  Chepstow in Monmouthshire I were born.” Her own and many other Romany families travelled extensively around the west Midlands and into the near areas of Wales, wherever the opportunity for gainful employment led them.  May Bradley was descended from a long line of singers within her immediate family, and from close contact with other travellers over an extended period additionally absorbed many items into her repertoire. (Rod Stradling da qui)

May registrò il brano ben tre volte e possiamo ascoltarla nella raccolta “May Bradley: Sweet Swansea” ristampata nel 2010 dalle registrazioni sul campo di  Fred Hamer a Ludlow, Shropshire, (settembre 1959, luglio e settembre 1965, aprile 1966).
Una versione ripresa da Sam Lee  (giovane artista il cui cd  d’esordio è stato premiato come migliore album del 2012 dalla rivista Froots) nel suo secondo Cd uscito nel 2015. Dice Sam Lee  “She has this amazing modal tune for it, unlike anyone else’s and lyrically, hers is so much more punchy and tenacious – about loving this soldier, being pregnant, being cast out by her community.” (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Sam Lee&Friends in ‘The Fade in Time’, 2015
Scrivono in “A walk around Britain“: Sam seems to agree with us that the most fitting place for traditional British songs is deep in the landscape that produced them. Concrete and car-horns are not the finest folk accompaniment, but birds of the field, wind through woods, and rhythmic sea-tide, most certainly are. These are the contexts that birthed the old songs, the invisible background to all ballads of Britain.
E così a guardare il video diretto da Michael Smythe finiamo completamente immersi nella terra e con lo sguardo perduto nel cielo

Nel web circola una versione testuale molto diversa da quella veramente cantata da Sam, così sono risalita alla versione di May Bradley riportata qui e le differenze sono minime


I
Now it’s of a  fair damsel (1) my fortune were had
I were overcourted by a rakish (2) young lad.
I have kept me love’s company night and be day
But now Johnny’s lifted, sure he’s gone far away.
Now if I were a blackbird (3) I’d whistle, I’d sing
I would follow the ship that my true love sailed in
On the top of his mainmast I would build my nest (4)
That long night, sure I’d gaze upon his lily white breast.
II
My love’s an old soldier but he’s neat, tall and thin.
There is none in the army come equal to him.
With his red rosy cheeks and his curly black hair
His flattering tongue draws my heart to a snare.
III
Now some people’s talking I’m out of my mind.
Some people says that I’m large with a child
But it’s let them be talking and say what they will
For the love I’ve got for him I’ll keep it up still.
IV
Now if I were a scholar I’d handle me pen
I would write him a letter, to him would I send.
God sends him safe sailings and fair winds to blow
There is adieu to my true love wherever he go.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ero una giovane fanciulla che ebbi la fortuna
di essere corteggiata da un ragazzo  vagabondo(2),
ho accettato la compagnia del mio amore notte e giorno
ma oggi Johnny mi ha lasciato, è così, è partito.
Se fossi un merlo (3), potrei fischiettare e cantare,
seguirei la nave su cui naviga
il mio amore

e in cima all’albero maestro potrei costruire il mio nido (4)
e per tutta la notte volgerei lo sguardo sul suo candido petto 
II
Il mio amore è un veterano ma è bello, alto e snello,
nessuno nell’esercito
lo eguaglia
con le sue guance rosee e i neri capelli ondulati
la sua parlantina, ha preso il mio cuore in trappola
III
C’è chi dice che sono pazza,
altri dicono che sono incinta,
ma lasciate che sparlino e dicano quello che vogliono (5),
perchè l’amore che ho per lui resterà sempre saldo
IV
Se fossi uno studioso e sapessi maneggiare  la penna
gli scriverei una lettera e a lui la manderei,
che Dio lo preservi al sicuro in mare e che i venti favorevoli lo sostengano
ecco il saluto al mio vero amore
ovunque egli vada.

NOTE
1) Sam dice “” young woman”
2) La parola “Rake” si traduce in italiano con libertino forse un diminutivo di ‘rakehell’ (dissoluto), che, a sua volta, deriva dall’Islandese antico “reikall,” dal significato di “wandering” (nomade) o “unsettled” (instabile). Un “rake” era un affascinante giovane amante delle donne, delle canzoni, dedito al gioco d’azzardo e all’alcool, ma anche uno stile di vita di moda tra i nobili inglesi nel corso del 17° secolo. Nel suo significato più negativo il libertino è un debosciato in quello più “trasgressivo” è un giovane scapolo gaudente che si diverte fin che può prima di sistemarsi con il matrimonio e “mettere la testa a posto”.
3) i merli formano coppie stabili che vivono isolate. Le migrazioni avvengono durante la notte dalle regioni più settentrionali con spostamenti verso sud-ovest. In Italia i merli sono stanziali.
4) negli antichi velieri in cima all’abero maestro c’era la crocetta detta colloquialmente crow’s nest (= nido del corvo) era una piattaforma riparata nel punto più alto della nave per gli avvistamenti, così nel verso successivo l’innamorata dichiara che se fosse di vedetta sulla crocetta, punterebbe il suo cannocchiale sull’innamorato e non sull’orizzonte
5) il pettegolezzo delle malelingue è un topico dei canti trobadorici.

FONTI
https://shailapersonalspace.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/messaggero-il-merlo/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bradley.htm
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2012/oct/28/sam-lee-gypsy-folk-music
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/ifiwereablackbird.html