Archivi tag: Rogue’s Gallery

Blood Red Roses, a whale shanty

Leggi in italiano

Ho Molly, come down
Come down with your pretty posy
Come down with your cheeks so rosy
Ho Molly, come down”
(from Gordon Grant “SAIL HO!: Windjammer Sketches Alow and Aloft”,  New York 1930)

To introduce two new sea shanties in the archive of Terre Celtiche blog I start from Moby Dick (film by John Huston in 1956) In the video-clip we see the “Pequod” crew engaged in two maneuvers to leave New Bedford, (in the book port is that of Nantucket) large whaling center on the Atlantic: Starbuck, the officer in second, greets his wife and son (camera often detaches on wives and girlfriends go to greet the sailors who will not see for a long time: the whalers were usually sailing from six to seven months or even three – four years). After dubbing Cape of Good Hope, the”Pequod” will head for Indian Ocean.
It was AL Lloyd who adapted  “Bunch of roses” shanty for the film, modifying it with the title “Blood Red Roses”. It should be noted that at the time of Melville many shanty were still to come

Albert Lancaster Lloyd, Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger

It’s round Cape Horn we all must go
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
For that is where them whalefish blow
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Go down, you blood red roses, Go down
It’s frosty snow and winter snow
under’s many ships they ‘round Cape Horn
It’s your boots to see again
let you them for whaler men

oswald-brierly
Oswald Brierly, “Whalers off Twofold Bay” from Wikimedia Commons. Painting is dated 1867 but it shows whaling and the Bay as it was in the 1840s

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage)


Me bonnie bunch of Roses o!
Come down, you blood red roses, come down (1)
Tis time for us to roll and go
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
Oh, you pinks and posies
Come down, you blood red roses, Come down
We’re bound away around Cape Horn (2), Were ye wish to hell you aint never been born,
Me boots and clothes are all in pawn (3)/Aye it’s bleedin drafty round Cape Horn.
Tis growl ye may but go ye must
If ye growl to hard your head ill bust.
Them Spanish Girls are pure and strong
And down me boys it wont take long.
Just one more pull and that’ll do
We’ll the bullie sport  to kick her through.

NOTES
1) this line most likely was created by A.L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick, reworking the traditional verse “as down, you bunch of roses”, and turning it into a term of endearment referring to girls (a fixed thought for sailors, obviously just after the drinking). I do not think that in this context there are references to British soldiers (in the Napoleonic era referring to Great Britain as the ‘Bonny bunch of roses’, the French also referred to English soldiers as the “bunch of roses” because of their bright red uniforms), or to whales, even if the image is of strong emotional impact:“a whale was harpooned from a rowing boat, unless it was penetrated and hit in a vital organ it would swim for miles sometimes attacking the boats. When it died it would be a long hard tow back to the ship, something they did not enjoy. If the whale was hit in the lungs it would blow out a red rose shaped spray from its blowhole. The whalers refered to these as Bloody Red Roses, when the spray became just frothy bubbles around the whale as it’s breathing stopped it looked like pinks and posies in flower beds” (from mudcat here)
2) Once a obligatory passage of the whaling boats that from Atlantic headed towards the Pacific.
3) as Italo Ottonello teaches us “At the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee compliance with the contract, it was provided in the form of “I will pay”, payable three days after the ship left the port, “as long as said sailor has sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory note at a discounted price, usually of forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind. “The purchasers, boarding agents and various procurers,” the enlisters, “as they were nicknamed,” were induced to ‘seize’ the sailors and bring them on board, drunk or drugged, with little or no clothes beyond what they were wearing, and squandering or stealing all sailor advances.

Sting from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys” ANTI 2006. 
The textual version resumes that of Louis Killen and this musical interpretation is decidedly Caribbean, rhythmic and hypnotic ..


Our boots and clothes are all in pawn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

It’s flamin’ drafty (1) ‘round Cape Horn
Go down, you blood red roses,
Go down

Oh, you pinks and posies Go down,
you blood red roses, Go down
My dear old mother she said to me,
“My dearest son, come home from sea”.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn we all must go
‘Round Cape Horn in the frost and snow.
You’ve got your advance, and to sea you’ll go
To chase them whales through the frost and snow.
It’s ‘round Cape Horn you’ve got to go,
For that is where them whalefish blow(2).
It’s growl you may, but go you must,
If you growl too much your head they’ll bust.
Just one more pull and that will do
For we’re the boys to kick her through

NOTES
1) song in this version is dyed red with “flaming draughty” instead of “mighty draughty”. And yet even if flaming has the first meaning “Burning in flame” it also means “Bright; red. Also, violent; vehement; as a flaming harangue”  (WEBSTER DICT. 1828)

Jon Contino

“Go Down, You Blood Red Roses” is a game for children widespread in the Caribbean and documented by Alan Lomax in 1962

(second part)

LINK
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/debunking-myth-that-go-down-you-blood.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/coming-down-with-bunch-of-roses-lyrics.html

http://songbat.com/archive/songs/english-americas/blood-red-roses
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/bloodredroses.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34080 http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Blood%20Red%20Roses.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/blood.htm http://will.wright.is/post/1367066738/jon-contino

Farewell Lovely Nancy by Cecil Sharp

Leggi in italiano

“Farewell Lovely Nancy” or “Lovely Nancy” is a traditional ballad collected in 1905 by Cecil Sharp from Mrs. Susan Williams, Somerset (England), where the handsome sailor leaving for the South Seas, dissuades his sweetheart who would like to follow him disguising herself as a cabin boy, telling her that working aboard ships is not for females!

AL Lloyd writes in the notes to the LP “A Sailor’s Garland”: To dress in sailor’s clothes and smuggle oneself aboard ship was a pretty notion that often occurred to young girls a century or two ago, if the folk songs are to be believed. This song has been widely found in the south of England, also in Ireland.”

CROSS-DRESSING BALLADS

In the sea songs we find sometimes the theme of the girl disguised as a sailor who faces the hard life of the sea for loving and adventure.
The cross-dressing ballads are in fact mostly inherent in women who go to play a male job, such as the sailor or the soldier.

Ed Harcourt in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys ANTI 2006, a very romantic, almost crepuscular version

Ian Campbell & Dave Swarbrick 1964

 John Molineaux  (live)


I.
“Fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern(1) sea
I am bound for to go.
Don’t let my long absence be
no trouble to you,
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”
II.
“Like some pretty little seaboy
I’ll dress and go with you,
In the deepest of dangers
I shall stand your friend.(2)
In the cold stormy weather
when the winds are a-blowing,
My dear I’ll be willing
to wait for you then”

III.
“Well, your pretty little hands
they can’t handle our tackle,
And dour dainty little feet
to our topmast can’t go.
And the cold stormy weather love
you can’t well endure,
I would have you ashore
when the (raging) winds they do blow.
IV.(3)
So fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern sea
I am bound for to go.
As you must be safe
I’ll be loyal and constant
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”

NOTES
1) in Sharp is “salt seas” but becomes “western ocean” in the version of A. L. Lloyd
2) in A. L. Lloyd becomes “My love, I’ll be ready to reef your topsail”.
3) the closing stanza in an Irish version written in Ancient Irish Music (1873 and 1888) by Patrick Weston Joyce says:
So farewell, my dearest Nancy, since I must now leave you;
Unto the salt seas I am bound for to go,
Where the winds do blow high and the seas loud do roar;
So may yourself contented be kind and stay on shore.

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/fnancy.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/FAREWELL.html

The Grey Funnel Line

Il folksinger Cyril Tawney  scrisse “The Grey Funnel Line” nel 1959 prima di congedarsi dalla Marina Reale del Regno Unito. E’ lo stesso Cyril a raccontare la genesi del brano (vedi): come in molti shanty il marinaio si lamenta del suo arruolamento desiderando con nostalgia la vita accanto al proprio amore, ma sono in genere lacrime da coccodrillo..
ASCOLTA Jolie Holland Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006, una versione con molto soul

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane, Mary Black, Emmylou Harris

ASCOLTA Islands in A Sleep & a Forgetting 2012 Strofe I, II, V, VI


I
Don’t mind the rain or the rolling sea,
The weary night never worries me.
But the hardest time in sailor’s day
Is to watch the sun as it dies away.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line (1).
II
The finest ship that sailed the sea
Is still a prison for the likes of me.
But give me wings like Noah’s dove,
I’d fly up harbour to the girl I love.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
III
There was a time my heart was free
Like a floating spar on the open sea.
But now the spar is washed ashore,
It comes to rest at my real love’s door.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Every time I gaze behind the screws (2)
Makes me long for old Peter’s shoes (3).
I’d walk right down that silver lane
And take my love in my arms again.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Lord, if dreams were only real
I’d have my hands on that wooden wheel (4).
And with all my heart I’d turn her round
And tell the boys that we’re homeward bound.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
VI
I’ll pass the time like some machine
Until blue water turns to green.
Then I’ll dance on down that walk-ashore
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non bado alla pioggia o al mare agitato
la notte fredda non mi preoccupa mai
ma il tempo più duro in una giornata da marinaio è guardare il sole mentre tramonta, un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
II
La nave più bella che solcò il mare è tuttavia una prigione per quelli come me. Ma dammi le ali come la colomba di Noe volerò oltre il porto dalla ragazza che amo. Un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
III
Ci fu un tempo in cui il mio cuore era libero come una piattaforma galleggiante nel mare aperto. Ma ora la piattaforma è trasportata a riva, si ferma alla porta del mio vero amore. un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Ogni volta che guardo dentro ai motori ad elica mi viene da desiderare le scarpe del vecchio Peter.
Camminerei su quella scia d’argento e prenderei di nuovo il mio amore tra le braccia
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Signore, se i sogni fossero realtà
metterei le mani su quella ruota di legno
e con tutto il cuore la farei girare
e direi ai ragazzi che siamo diretti verso casa
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
VI
Passerò il tempo come quella macchina
finchè l’acqua azzurra non diventerà verde.
E ballerò su quel pontile
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line.

NOTE
1) i fumaioli delle navi a vapore essendo i tratti più evidenti e riconoscibili nelle lunghe distanze erano verniciati con colori ditintivi dalla varie linee mercantili, così i fumaioli della Royal Navi per Cyril Tawney erano grigio canna di fucile
2) non so se ho tradotto correttamente
3) Old Peter o Saint Peter’s shoes sono le scarpe del vecchio pescatore biblico, che grazie alla fede camminò sulle acque: Se avesse avuto l’abilità di Pietro di camminare sull’acqua, avrebbe potuto camminare sulla scia della luna per titornare tra le braccia del suo amore
4) il timone

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/thegreyfunnelline.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16942

Old Man of the Sea

Baby Gramps un po’ hobo, un po’ pirata, con una voce da vecchio lupo di mare, nasce a Miami ma finisce a Seattle, inizia come musicista di strada e poi gira per il mondo in concerto, collaborando con artisti di grosso calibro, eppure non abbandona mai la strada e preferisce i piccoli club.

Con l’aplomb e l’energia di Jack Sparrow, accessioriato di borsalino, capelli lunghi e barba fluente con treccine, canta e suona il folk, il canto della gente e la protesta, canzoni ragtime, l’inizio del rock ‘n’ roll e il country, blues jazz anni 20-30, ma anche brani originali in stile vaudville, con parole che sono giochi di parole, esercizio di stile retorico o enigmistico. Colleziona vecchi e strani strumenti e vecchie canzoni, ed è un autentico musicista indie, indipendente!
La voce particolare alla Popeye (secondo alcuni a metà tra il didgeridoo e il monaco tibetano) è nientemeno che uno stile vocale: “The style is called “vocal fry”.  It has been variously employed for effect by heavy metal artists among others.  The techniques used to achieve it are akin to those used by Central Asian throat-singers and Tibetan monks, though of a lesser order.  Its appropriateness for the singing of pirate songs will be a subject for lively debate” (Tipi Dan)
Anche lo stile con cui suona la chitarra (dobro) è assolutamente personale. In un’intervista dichiara di aver dovuto far di necessità virtù, avendola eraditata dal padre musicista, con relativi tasti consumati e i buchi nel legno: si è dovuto inventare delle cose per riuscire a farla suonare! Il senso ritmico gli viene dagli studi alla batteria, il suo primo strumento, ed è come se applicasse sulla chitarra le tecniche imparate.
Secondo un articolo del Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, Baby Gramps è considerato uno dei 50 musicisti più influenti negli ultimi 100 anni insieme a Ray Charles, Jelly Roll Morton, Ernestine Anderson, John Cage, Bill Frisell, Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones, The Wailers, The Ventures, Soundgarden, e Pearl Jam. Gli è riconosciuto il merito di aver fatto conoscere al pubblico di Seattle vecchi blues e antiche ballate che il resto del mondo ha in buona parte dimenticato.

Nella compilation Rogues Gallery (2006) incide due brani “Cape Cod Girls”  e  Old Man of the Sea, un originale composto e scritto da lui.

Max Klinger, Triton and Nereid (1895)

ASCOLTA Baby Gramps in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006 (strofe da I a V, III, I, II; III)


I
At times I feel the shapeliest of mermaids
Course through my veins
But the feel of these shapely mermaids
Of course is only in vain
II
I would let the seaweed splash
Upon my eyelash
I would let the sea weed splash splash splash.
Upon my eyelash
III
If I were the old man of the sea (1)
I would bathe the lovely mermaids
If I were the old man of the seawee-, wee-, seaweeds,
I’d bathe the lovely mermaids.
IV
Now I dreamt I saw an old mermaids snorkel
Down dangle from the ships portal
And when I tiptoed to peep in (in a bucket of absinthe)
Saw she was soaking her fins
V
I would let miss Octopus
Brush and braid my bush.
I’d let miss octo- miss Octopus
Brush and braid my bush
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
A volte sento la più ben fatta delle sirene
scorrermi nelle vene
ma la sensazione di queste sirene aggraziate naturalmente è vana
II
Lascerei il tocco delle alghe
sulle mie ciglia
Lascerei il tocco delle alghe, tocco, tocco, tocco
sulle mie ciglia
III
Se fossi il vecchio del mare
farei il bagno alla belle sirene
se fossi il vecchio delle alghe
ghee- alghe
farei il bagno alle belle sirene
IV
Ho sognato di vedere una vecchia polena delle sirene
penzolare dall’oblò e quando in punta di piedi facevo capolino (con un secchio d’assenzio),  vidi che stava immergendo le sue pinne
V
Vorrei che miss Piovra
spazzolasse e intrecciasse i miei capelli
Vorrei che miss Pio – miss Piovra
spazzolasse e intrecciasse i miei capelli

NOTE
*la traduzione non rende giustizia all’assonanza delle parole nella lingua originale
1) il vecchio del Mare è un dio, Tritone o lo stesso Poseidone

FONTI
http://www.babygramps.com/
https://ismaels.wordpress.com/2010/05/11/rogue%E2%80%99s-gallery-the-art-of-the-siren-37/
http://spectrumculture.com/2008/11/15/interview-baby-gramps/

The Pinery Boy

“Pinery Boy” è la versione americana di una vecchia canzone inglese (Sailor’s life, Sweet William) ambientata nel mondo dei taglialegna del Wisconsin.

E’ stata raccolta da Franz Rickaby e pubblicata nel suo “Ballads and Songs of the Shanty-Boy” (1926): quando quel mondo stava andando in declino, il giovane Franz viaggiò per l’Alto Midwest (era l’agosto del 1919) con il suo violino, a fare conversazione con quegli uomini, a trascrivere le melodie e i testi, ad annotare le storie dei suoi informatori; morì a 35 anni, nel 1926 e pocchi mesi dopo la sua morte venne pubblicato dalla Harvard University Press “Pinery Boys: Songs and Songcatching in Lumberjack Era”. Quasi un secolo dopo il libro è andato in ristampa con un saggio biografico di Gretchen Dykstra.

Una giovane donna è alla disperata ricerca, lungo il corso del Wisconsin, del suo amante boscaiolo, ma quando apprende che è morto, si lascia morire di crepacuore (o si sflacella con la sua canoa contro le rocce).

ASCOLTA Sam Eskin in Sea Shanties and Loggers’ Songs (1951)- su spotify
ASCOLTA Art Thieme  in On the Wildnerness Road 1986 (su Spotify)
ASCOLTA Nick Cave in Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (strofe da I a VI)  suggestionati dai toni cupi e dalla fama di Nick, non possiamo fare a meno di pensare ad una murder ballad, ma la ballata non ci dice nulla sulle circostanze  della morte del ragazzo, ed è più probabile un incidente sul lavoro.


I
“O father, O father, build me a boat
Then down the Wisconsin I may float
And every raft that I pass by
There I will inquire for my sweet pinery boy (1)”
II
As she was rowing down the stream
She saw three rafts all in the string
And she hailed the pilot as they passed by/And there did she inquire for her sweet pinery boy
III
“O pilot, O pilot, tell me true
Is my sweet Willie among your crew?
O tell me quick and give me joy
For none other will I have but my sweet pinery boy”
IV
“O, auburn was the colour of his hair
And his eyes were blue and his cheeks were fair
And his lips were of a ruby fine
Ten thousand times they’ve met with mine”
V
“O dear, dear lady, he is not here
He has drowned in the dells, I fear
‘Twas at Lone Rock as we passed by
O there is where we left your sweet pinery boy”
VI
She wrung her hands and tore her hair
Just like a lady in grave despair
She rowed her boat against Lone Rock (2)
For a pinery boy her heart was broke
VII
“Dig me a grave both long and deep,
Place a marble slab at my head and feet;
And on my breast a turtle dove
To let the world know that I died for love.
And at my feet a spreading oak
To let the world know that my heart was broke.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Padre o padre, costruiscimi una barca
con cui scenderò il Wisconsin
e a ogni zattera che supererò
chiederò del mio caro ragazzo boscaiolo”
II
Remando lungo il fiume
vide tre zattere in fila,
e salutò il conducente mentre passavano,
e chiese del suo caro giovane boscaiolo
III
“O pilota, pilota, dimmi la verità, il mio bel William è tra il tuo equipaggio?
Dimmi presto e rallegrami
che nessun altro voglio avere tranne il mio caro ragazzo boscaiolo!
IV
Oh rossiccio era il colore dei suoi capelli e i suoi occhi azzurri, e le sue guance chiare,
e le sue labbra erano di puro rubino, diecimila volte si sono incontrate con le mie”
V
“Oh cara, cara madama, non è qui
è caduto nell’acqua, temo,
al Lone Rock che abbiamo passato
oh là è dove giace il tuo caro ragazzo boscaiolo”
VI
Si torse le mani e si strappò i capelli
proprio come una dama in grave lutto,
spinse la sua barca contro il Lone Rock
perchè il suo cuore era spezzato per un giovane  boscaiolo
VII
“Scavatemi una tomba lunga e stretta
mettete un lastra di marmo dalla testa ai piedi;
e sul mio petto una colomba
perchè il mondo sappia che morii per amore
e ai miei piedi una quercia frondosa
per far conoscere al mondo che il mio cuore si era spezzato”

NOTE
1) letteralmente “il ragazzo della piantagione, foresta di conifere” I Lumbermen arruolavano le loro ciurme di boscaioli a Chicago e appena il clima diventava più rigido si partiva per le “miniere di legname” per il taglio, accampandosi nelle baracche dei campi di lavoro. Dopo i primi tempi in cui la falciatura si svolgeva sulle coste dei corsi d’acqua, si dovette procedere sempre più nell’interno della regione. Doveva esserci il ghiaccio per poter trascinare i pesantissimi tronchi fino al bordo dei “pantani” dove restavano accatastati per tutto l’inverno. Con l’arrivo del disgelo i tronchi galleggianti defluivano verso i corsi d’acqua principali per arrivare fino ai Grandi Laghi.
2) la ragazza manda la sua canoa a sflacellarsi contro gli scogli perche vuole morire nello stesso posto in cui è morto il suo amore.

FONTI
“Il maiale e il grattacielo: Chicago, una storia del nostro futuro” di Marco D’Eramo

http://highlandscurrent.com/2017/06/08/chasing-lumberjacks-songs/
https://folkways.si.edu/sam-eskin/sea-shanties-and-loggers-songs/american-folk-celtic/music/album/smithsonian
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/pinery.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/texts-and-additional-notes-on-printed-songs/the-pinery-boy-new-material/

The Cry of Man by Harry Kemp

The poor man is not he who is without a cent, but he who is without a dream.”—Harry Kemp

“The Cry of Man” è un adattamento musicale dei versi del  poeta e scrittore Harry Hibbard Kemp (1883–1960), idolo dei giovani americani del tempo, che amava farsi chiamare «the Vagabond Poet»: assiduo frequentatore del Village Vanguard (il jazz club del Greenwich Village aperto nel 1935, quando agli esordi si suonava folk e si recitavano poesie beat), ma che visse a lungo in una baracca tra le dune di Provincetown, Capo Cod (Massachusetts ) dove morì; da giovane andò marinaio, viaggiò per gli States spostandosi con i treni come un hobo e scrisse alcuni libri autobiografici sulle sue esperienze di vagabondo che ebbero un discreto successo editoriale negli anni 1990-1939.

Oh yes, Harry Kemp was a shack person. When an abscessed tooth nagged him, he removed it himself with a screwdriver. He scratched out his verses with a seagull feather, wore beach rose garlands in his light colored hair, and fancied wearing capes. He knew Greek and Latin (self-taught, of course) and was a serious student of the Bible. Handouts from friends kept him alive. (tratto da qui)

la baracca di Harry Kemp a Provincetown

Seppure non sia una canzone del mare, “The Cry of Man” esprime in pieno lo spirito inquieto e vagabondo del marinaio, la sua inestinguibile sete di avventura.
ASCOLTA Mary Margaret O’Hara – in Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.


I
There is a crying in my heart
That never will be still
Like the voice of a lonely bird
Behind a starry hill
There is a crying in my heart
For what I may not know
An infinite crying of desire
Because my feet are slow
II
My feet are slow,
my eyes are blind,
My hands are weak to hold:
It is the universe I seek,
All life I would enfold!
There is a crying in my heart
That never will be still
Like the voice of a lonely bird
Behind a starry hill …
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è un grido nel mio cuore
che mai tacerà
come la voce di un uccello solitario
dietro a una collina di stelle. (1)
C’è un grido nel mio cuore
per ciò che forse non saprò,
un lamento infinito di desiderio
perchè i miei passi sono lenti.
II
I miei passi sono lenti,
i miei occhi ciechi,
le mie mani hanno una presa debole:
è l’universo che cerco,
tutta la vita lo vorrei abbracciare!
C’è un grido nel mio cuore
che mai si quieterà,
come la voce di un uccello solitario
dietro a una collina di stelle

NOTE
1) c’è sempre qualcosa oltre l’orizzonte

FONTI
http://www.eoneill.com/library/newsletter/iv_1-2/iv-1-2f.htm

Dan Dan, sea shanty

Dan Dan è un sea shanty riportato da Stan Hugill che dice di averlo appreso dall’amico marinaio Barbados Harding, un canto utilizzato come hauling shanty o per lo scarico delle merci, diffuso nelle isole caraibiche e più in generale nelle Indie Occidentali.
Dalle ricerche di Hulton Clint apprendiamo che lo chanty “Dan Dan Oh” riportato da Roger D. Abrahams nel suo “Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore” (1974) ha un testo correlato. Il canto era tipico dei balenieri quando trascinavano la carcassa della balena sulla spiaggia.

ASCOLTA David Thomas in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Stan Hugill

ASCOLTA Hulton Clint sulla versione di Roger D. Abrahams


My name, it is Dan Dan
My name, it is Dan Dan
Somebody stole my rum
He didn’t leave me none
That no good son of a gun
My name, it is Dan Dan
A sailor man I am
Somebody took my wife
Somebody took my knife
My name, it is Dan Dan
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
qualcuno mi ha fregato il rum
e non mi ha lasciato niente
quel figlio di buona donna!
Il mio nome è Dan Dan
e sono un marinaio
qualcuno mi ha preso la moglie
qualcuno mi ha preso il coltello
Il mio nome è Dan Dan

ROGUES GALLERY & SON OF ROGUES GALLERY

Sulla scia del film  “Pirati dei caraibi”  il produttore Hal Willner (con Gore Verbinski e Johnny Depp) diede alle stampe una prima compilation (Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys) dedicata a canzoni tradizionali ispirate alla vita della pirateria e della marineria in genere (2006 ). Il bis è arrivato nel 2013 con un altro doppio Cd (Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys)

In the wake of the film “Pirates of the Caribbean” the producer Hal Willner (with Gore Verbinski and Johnny Depp) gave the prints a first compilation, Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys, dedicated to traditional songs inspired by the life of piracy and marine in general (2006). The encore arrived in 2013 with another double CD (Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys)

Anche le grandi star del rock si sono lasciate trascinare dall’idea di comparire in una  galleria di brutti ceffi (“Rogue’s Gallery” nel mondo anglosassone indica gli schedari fotografici dei criminali), in compagnia di grandi interpreti folk, blues, jazz, e chi ne ha più ne metta, per interpretare i canti dei pirati con la propria sensibilità e il relativo background musicale; il progetto coordinato da Hal Willner è iniziata con una lunga ricerca dei testi e delle melodie negli archivi storici e nel web e si è concretizzato in una serie di intense “session” a  Seattle, Los Angeles, Londra, Dublino e New York. Il materiale registrato è bastato per quattro cd pubblicati (in formato doppio) a sei anni di distanza .

Even the great rock stars have been carried away by the idea of appearing in a gallery of ugly guys (“Rogue’s Gallery” in the Anglo-Saxon world indicates the criminal photo files), in the company of great folk, blues, jazz musicians, to interpret pirate songs with their own sensitivity and musical background; the project coordinated by Hal Willner began with a long research of texts and melodies in the historical archives and on the web and it has been realized in a series of high “sessions” in Seattle, Los Angeles, London, Dublin and New York. The recorded material was sufficient for four published CDs (in double format) six years later.

Il regista Verbinski usa metafore marine per descrivere l’esperienza.
«L´oceano. È tutto intorno al grande blu che riempie due terzi del pianeta. Il rapporto dell´essere umano con questo abisso crea un´interessante prospettiva. Credo che i navigatori del tempo stessero danzando con la morte, e queste sono le loro canzoni. Risuonano con la gente in qualche livello interiore che non è immediatamente chiaro perché non è nella nostra memoria, è nel nostro sangue. È quello che ci fa sentire così soli».

Director Verbinski uses marine metaphors to describe the experience. “The ocean. It’s all about the vast blue that engulfs two thirds of the planet. The human being cast against that abyss creates an interesting bit of perspective. I think the sailors of the time were dancing with death, and these were their tunes. They resonate with people on some internal level that is not immediately obvious because it’s not in our memory, it’s in our blood. It operates on a cellular level. It’s what makes us feel so alone.

ROGUES GALLERY: PIRATE BALLADS, SEA SONGS AND CHANTEYS

2006 – Anti-Records

Disc 1:

Cape Cod Girls” – Baby Gramps – 7:14
Mingulay Boat Song” – Richard Thompson – 4:13
My Son John” – John C. Reilly – 1:38
Fire Down Below” – Nick Cave – 2:50
Turkish Revelry” – Loudon Wainwright III – 4:21
Bully in the Alley” – Three Pruned Men (The Virgin Prunes) – 2:30
The Cruel Ship’s Captain” – Bryan Ferry – 3:35
Dead Horse” – Robin Holcomb – 2:54
Spanish Ladies” – Bill Frisell – 2:22
Coast of High Barbary” – Joseph Arthur – 4:02
Haul Away Joe” – Mark Anthony Thompson – 4:10
Dan Dan” – David Thomas – 0:50
Blood Red Roses” – Sting – 2:44
Sally Brown” – Teddy Thompson – 2:54
Lowlands Away” – Rufus Wainwright & Kate McGarrigle – 3:25
Baltimore Whores” – Gavin Friday – 4:40
Rolling Sea” – Eliza Carthy – 4:49
The Mermaid” – Martin Carthy & The UK Group – 2:23
Haul on the Bowline” – Bob Neuwirth – 1:29
A Dying Sailor to His Shipmates” – Bono – 4:44
Bonnie Portmore” – Lucinda Williams – 3:36
Shenandoah” – Richard Greene & Jack Shit – 2:58
The Cry of Man” – Mary Margaret O’Hara – 3:06

Disc 2:

Boney” – Jack Shit – 1:55
Good Ship Venus” – Loudon Wainwright III – 3:15
Long Time Ago” – White Magic – 2:35
Pinery Boy” – Nick Cave – 3:15
Lowlands Low” – Bryan Ferry & Antony Hegarty  – 2:35
One Spring Morning” – Akron/Family – 5:25
Hog Eye Man” – Martin Carthy & Family – 2:44
The Fiddler” – Ricky Jay & Richard Greene – 1:34
Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold” – Andrea Corr – 3:58
Fathom the Bowl” – John C. Reilly – 3:44
Drunken Sailor” – David Thomas – 3:44
Farewell Nancy” – Ed Harcourt – 6:06
Hanging Johnny” – Stan Ridgway – 3:28
Old Man of the Sea” – Baby Gramps – 5:18
Greenland Whale Fisheries” – Van Dyke Parks – 4:41
Shallow Brown” – Sting – 2:30
The Grey Funnel Line” – Jolie Holland – 4:53
A Drop of Nelson’s Blood” – Jarvis Cocker – 7:10
Leave Her Johnny” – Lou Reed – 5:30
Little Boy Billy” – Ralph Steadman – 5:33

SON OF ROGUES GALLERY: PIRATE BALLADS, SEA SONGS AND CHANTEYS

2013 – Anti-Records

Disc 1:


Non sono riuscita a recuperare alcuni testi e per il momento i titoli sono privi di link, se qualcuno avesse la buona volontà di sbobinarli…
(I have not been able to recover some texts and for the moment the titles are without links, if someone had the good will to transcribe them..)

  1. Leaving of Liverpool – Shane MacGowan w/ Johnny Depp & Gore Verbinski
  2. Sam’s Gone Away – Robyn Hitchcock
  3. River Come Down – Beth Orton
  4. Row Bullies Row – Sean Lennon w/ Jack Shit
  5. Shenandoah – Tom Waits w/ Keith Richards
  6. Mr. Stormalong – Ivan Neville
  7. Asshole Rules the Navy – Iggy Pop w/ A Hawk and a Hacksaw
  8. Off to Sea Once More – Macy Gray
  9. The Ol’ OG – Ed Harcourt
  10. Pirate Jenny – Shilpa Ray w/ Nick Cave & Warren Ellis
  11. The Mermaid – Patti Smith & Johnny Depp
  12. Anthem for Old Souls – Chuck E. Weiss
  13. Orange Claw Hammer – Ed Pastorini
  14. Sweet and Low – The Americans
  15. Ye Mariners All – Robin Holcomb & Jessica Kenny
  16. Tom’s Gone to Hilo – Gavin Friday and Shannon McNally
  17. Bear Away – Kenny Wollesen & The Himalayas Marching Band

Disc 2:

Non sono riuscita a recuperare alcuni testi e per il momento i titoli sono privi di link, se qualcuno avesse la buona volontà di sbobinarli…
(I have not been able to recover some texts and for the moment the titles are without links, if someone had the good will to transcribe them..)

    1. Handsome Cabin Boy – Frank Zappa & the Mothers of Invention
    2. Rio Grande – Michael Stipe & Courtney Love
    3. Ship in Distress – Marc Almond
    4. In Lure of the Tropics – Dr. John
    5. Rolling Down to Old Maui – Todd Rundgren
    6. Jack Tar on Shore – Dan Zanes w/ Broken Social Scene
    7. Sally Racket Sissy Bounce – Katey Red & Big Freedia with Akron/Family
    8. Wild Goose – Broken Social Scene
    9. Flandyke Shore – Marianne Faithfull w/ Kate & Anna McGarrigle
    10. The Chantey of Noah and his Ark (Old School Song) – Ricky Jay
    11. Whiskey Johnny – Michael Gira
    12. Sunshine Life for Me – Petra Haden w/ Lenny Pickett
    13. Row the Boat Child – Jenni Muldaur
    14. General Taylor – Richard Thompson w/ Jack Shit
    15. Marianne – Tim Robbins w/ Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs
    16. Barnacle Bill the Sailor – Kembra Phaler w/ Antony/Joseph Arthur/Foetus
    17. Missus McGraw – Angelica Huston w/ The Weisberg Strings
    18. The Dreadnought – Iggy Pop & Elegant Too
    19. Then Said the Captain to Me (Two Poems of the Sea) – Mary Margaret O’Hara

FONTI/LINK
http://www.anti.com/releases/pirate-ballads-sea-songs-and-chanteys/
http://www.anti.com/artists/rogues-gallery/
http://www.anti.com/press/hal-willner-productions-presents/

Greenland Whale Fishery

” Greenland (Sperm) whale fishery” è una canzone del mare che risale forse al 1700, eppure ancora oggi, la più popolare canzone sulla caccia alla balena:  una baleniera in rotta verso la Groenlandia incrocia una balena, ammaina le lance per la caccia, ma uno degli equipaggi viene scagliato in mare  e il capitano  si rammarica per la perdita dei suoi uomini (e ancor più rimpiange il mancato guadagno!)

Ovviamente oggi facciamo il tifo per la balena, ma all’epoca la caccia in alto mare era una lotta quasi ad armi pari tra uomini e il gigantesco mammifero!
La canzone ha avuto un discreto successo durante il folk revival degli anni 60 (The Weavers, Burl Ives) eseguita con una melodia lenta, (essendo sostanzialmente un lament) ma anche con un arrangiamento più spavaldo ed energico.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners 1969

ASCOLTA Peter, Paul and Mary

ASCOLTA The Pougues, la versione che va per la maggiore tra i gruppi folk-rock.

ASCOLTA Van Dyke Parks in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006 (strofe I, II, IV, V) – testo qui

Versione The Dubliners
I
Oh in eighteen-hundred and-forty-four(1)/Of March the eighteenth day
We hoisted our colours to the top of the mast
And for Greenland bore away, brave boys/And for Greenland bore away
II
The lookout on the mainmast(1) he stood/His spyglass in his hand
“There’s a whale, there’s a whale, there’s a whale fish” he cried
“And she blows at every span, brave boys/And she blows at every span”
III
The captain stood on the quarter deck
The ice was in his eye
“Overhaul, overhaul, let your jib sheets fall
And go put your boats to sea, brave boys/ And go put your boats to sea”
IV
The boats were lowered and the men aboard
The whale was full at view
Resolved, resolved was each whalerman bold/For to steer where the whalefish blew, brave boys
For to steer where the whalefish blew
V
The harpoon struck and the line paid out/With a single flourish of his tail
He capsized our boat and we lost five men(3)
And we did not catch that whale, brave boys/And we did not catch that whale
VI
The losin’ of those five jolly men
It grieved out captain sore
But the losin’ of that sperm whale fish
Now it grieved him ten times more, brave boys
Now it grieved him ten times more
VII
“Up anchor now” our captain he cried
“For the winter stars do appear
And it’s time that we left this cold country/And for the England we will steer, brave boys
And for the England we will steer”
VIII
Well, Greenland is a barren land
A land that bears no green
Where there’s ice and snow and the whalefishes blow
And the daylight’s seldom seen, brave boys/And the daylight’s seldom seen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Nel 1844
il 18 marzo
issammo la bandiera sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e per la Groenlandia partimmo, miei bravi e per la Groenlandia partimmo
II
La vedetta stava sulla crocetta
con il cannocchiale in mano
“C’è una balena, c’è una balena, c’è una balena gridò
“E soffia a ogni gettito, mie bravi
soffia a ogni gettito”
III
Il capitano era in piedi sul ponte
con il ghiaccio negli occhi
“Ammainate le vele, ammainate le vele
di fiocco
e mettete le lance in mare, miei bravi, 
mettete le lance in mare
IV
Le lance furono calate con gli uomini a bordo,
la balena era in piena vista
risoluto, risoluto era ogni baleniere e spavaldo,
per portarsi dove soffiava la balena, miei bravi, per portarsi dove soffiava la balena
V
L’arpione colpì e la lenza mollata,
con un solo colpo della coda
rovesciò la lancia e perdemmo cinque uomini
e non catturammo quella balena miei bravi, non catturammo quella balena
VI
La perdita di quei cinque bravi ragazzi
addolorò il nostro capitano,
ma la perdita di quel capodoglio
ora lo addolorava dieci volte tanto, miei bravi
lo addolorava dieci volte tanto
VII
“Alzate l’ancora- gridò il capitano-
perchè sorgono le stelle d’inverno
ed è tempo di lasciare queste fredde terre
e per l’Inghilterra faremo rotta, miei bravi
per l’Inghilterra faremo rotta
VIII
Beh la Groenlandia è una terra sterile
una terra che non fiorisce,
dove c’è ghiaccio e neve e le balene soffiano
e la luce del sole è vista raramente, miei bravi,  la luce del sole è vista raramente

NOTE
1) Già nel 1576 l’Inghilterra aveva ottenuto il monopolio per la cattura delle balene nel Mare del Nord e nel Mar Bianco, e nel 1786 con una flotta di 162 navi avviò la caccia alla balena franca e alla balena di Groenlandia nello stretto di Davis:  è probabile che il testo sia stato rimaneggiato nei vari secoli, perlomeno fino al 1830 quando i mari della Groenlandia erano diventati poco proficui e la caccia si spostò verso la Baia di Baffin. A seconda delle versioni vengono citate date diverse e anche il nome di diverse navi, come pure cambia il nome del capitano
2) in the crosstrees
3) l’equipaggio di ogni barca era composto da sei uomini, il capitano o un ufficiale, l’arpionista e 4 rematori

ASCOLTA A. L. Lloyd, dal disco LP registrato insieme ad Ewan MacColl negli anni ’50 “Thar She Blows!” un classico canto ricreativo dei balenieri. Scrive nelle note: This is the oldest—and many think the best—of surviving songs of the whaling trade. It had already appeared on a broadside around 1725, very shortly after the South Sea Company decided to resuscitate the then moribund whaling industry, and sent a dozen fine large ships around Spitsbergen and the Greenland Sea. The song went on being sung with small changes all the time to bring it up to date. Our present version mentions the year 1834, the shipLion, its captain Randolph. Other versions give other years, and name other ships and skippers (there was a whaler the Lion, out of Liverpool, but her captain’s name was Hawkins, and she was lost off Greenland in 1817). We may take it that the incident described in the song is not historical but imaginary, a stylisation like those thrilling engravings of whaling scenes that were once so popular. But the song’s pattern of departure, chase, and return home, was imitated in a large number of whaling ballads made subsequently. It is the ace and deuce of whale songs. (tratto da qui)


I
They signed us weary whaling men
For the icy Greenland ground
They said we’d take a shorter way While we was outward bound, brave boys
While we was outward bound
II
Oh, the lookout up in the barrel stood With a spyglass in his hand
There’s a whale, there’s a whale, there’s a whale! He cried
And she blows at every span, brave boys And she blows at every span
III
The captain stood on the quarter-deck And the ice was in his eye
Overhaul, overhaul, let your davit tackles fall
And put your boats to sea, brave boys And put your boats to sea
IV
Well the boats got down and the men aboard
And the whale was full in view Resolved, resolved were these whalermen bold /To steer where the whale fish blew, brave boys/ To steer where the whale fish blew
V
Well, the harpoon struck, the line ran out/ The whale give a flurry with his tail/ And he upset the boat, we lost half a dozen men No more, no more Greenland for you, brave boys No more, no more Greenland for you
VI
Bad news, bad news – The captain said And it grieved his heart full sore
But the losing of that hundred pound whale Oh, it grieved him ten times more, brave boys Oh, it grieved him ten times more
VII
The northern star did now appear It’s time we’ll anchor weigh
To stow below our running gear
And homeward bear away, brave boys And homeward bear away
VIII
Oh Greenland is a dreadful place
A place that’s never green
Where the cold winds blow and the whale fish go
And the daylight’s seldom seen, brave boys And the daylight’s seldom seen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ci arruolarono stanchi balenieri per le terre ghiacciate della Groenlandia
Ci dissero che avremmo preso una strada più breve mentre eravamo in partenza,  miei bravi
mentre eravamo in partenza

II
Oh la vedetta stava sulla crocetta
con il cannocchiale in mano
“C’è una balena, c’è una balena, c’è una balena gridò
“E soffia a ogni gettito, mie bravi
soffia a ogni gettito”
III
Il capitano era in piedi sul ponte
con il ghiaccio negli occhi
“Ammainate, ammainate mollate le cime
e mettete le lance in mare, miei bravi, 
mettete le lance in mare
IV
Le lance furono calate con gli uomini a bordo,
la balena era in piena vista
risoluto, risoluto era ogni baleniere e spavaldo,
per portarsi dove soffiava la balena, miei bravi, per portarsi dove soffiava la balena
V
L’arpione colpì e la lenza mollata,
la balena dieve un colpo della coda
e rovesciò la lancia e perdemmo una mezza dozzina di uomini
niente più Groenlandia per voi, miei bravi, niente più Groenlandia per voi,
VI
Pessime notizie, pessime notizie -gridò il capitano – con il cuore addolorato dalla pena, ma la perdita di quelle 100 sterline di balena, Oh  lo addolorava dieci volte tanto, miei bravi
lo addolorava dieci volte tanto
VII
“Sorge la stella polare è tempo di  alzare l’ancora-
stivare la nostra attrezzatura
e seguire la rotta verso casa, miei bravi
e seguire la rotta verso casa
VIII
La Groenlandia è posto spaventoso
una terra che non fiorisce,
dove i venti freddi soffiano e le balene vanno
e la luce del sole è vista raramente, miei bravi,  la luce del sole è vista raramente

NOTE
1) la data è quantomai variabile, a seconda delle versioni, c’è da rilevare che la caccia alla balena si spostò nel 1830 dalla Groenlandia alla Baia di Baffin. La caccia in Groenlandia era stata iniziata da Olandesi e Inglesi all’inizio del XVI° secolo
2) in the crosstrees

continua

FONTI
http://www.arcoacrobata.it/flash/pdf/mare1/05.pdf
https://www.grizzlyfolk.com/2017/08/31/greenland-whale-fishery-folk-attic/
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2011/07/when-whale-gets-strike-greenland-whale.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/greenland-whale-fishery/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thegreenlandwhalefishery.html
https://ismaels.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/rogue%E2%80%99s-gallery-the-art-of-the-siren-38/

LITTLE BOY BILLY

Una canzone del mare umoristica (del tipo caustico)  intitolata anche “Three Sailors from Bristol City” o “Little Billie”, che tratta un argomento inquietante per la nostra civiltà, ma sempre dietro l’angolo: il cannibalismo!
Il mare è un luogo d’insidie e di scherzi del fato, una tempesta ti può portare fuori rotta, su una barcaccia di fortuna o una zattera, senza cibo e acqua, un tema trattato anche nella grande pittura ( Theodore Gericault, La zattera della Medusa vedi): la vita umana in bilico tra speranza e disperazione. Così nelle canzoni marinaresche si finisce per esprimere le paure più grandi con una bella risata!

Il brano nasce nel 1863 come parodia scritta da William Thackeray di una canzone marinaresca francese dal titolo “La Courte Paille” (=la paglia corta)– diventata in seguito “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) e finita nelle canzoncine per bambini.

Dalle note del “Penguin Book” (1959):
The Portugese Ballad  A Nau Caterineta  and the French ballad  La Courte Paille  tell much the same story.  The ship has been long at sea, and food has given out.  Lots are drawn to see who shall be eaten, and the captain is left with the shortest straw.  The cabin boy offers to be sacrificed in his stead, but begs first to be allowed to keep lookout till the next day.  In the nick of time he sees land (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) and the men are saved.  Thackeray burlesqued this song in his  Little Billee.  It is likely that the French ballad gave rise to The Ship in Distress, which appeared on 19th. century broadsides.  George Butterworth obtained four versions in Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [issue 17] pp.320-2) and Sharp printed one from James Bishop of Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) with “in many respects the grandest air” which he had found in that county.  The text comes partly from Mr. Bishop’s version, and partly from a broadside.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Secondo Stan Hugill “Little Boy Billy” era una sea shanty per il lavoro alle pompe, un lavoro noioso e monotono che poteva senz’altro essere rallegrato da questa canzoncina!

ASCOLTA Ralph Steadman in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.”
“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(1)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(2) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (3)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre uomini di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare.
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e anche il giovane Billy.
Rubarono una lattina di biscotti al capitano
e una grande bottiglia di whisky.
Ma quando raggiunsero il mare aperto
non era avanzato che un pisello
secco.
Disse Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Non abbiamo niente da mangiare così ti mangerò”
disse Jimmy il Trinca “Sono vecchio e rinsecchito,
è meglio mangiare il giovane Billy”
“Oh Giovane Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti
così sbottona il primo bottone della tua piccola blusa”
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti come la mia cara mamma mi ha raccomandato?”
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e poi si inginocchiò (sulla crocetta).
Ma quando arrivò all’11° comandamento (2)
gridò “Yo Ho! Terra”.
“Vedo Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
Vedo la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B. (3)”
Impiccarono Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
ma fecero ammiraglio il Giovane Billy.

NOTE
1) scritto anche come top fore-gallant
2) i suoi compagni non dovevano essere molto ferrati con la Bibbia (e probabilmente Billy ne avrebbe inventati di nuovi se non avesse avvistato una nave!)
3) sigle di “Knight Commander of the Bath” = Cavaliere Commendatore del Bagno, l’ordine militare cavalleresco fondato da Giorgio I nel 1725

E per corollario ecco la versione francese “Un Petit Navire”

continua

FONTI
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872