Archivi tag: Robin Hood

Beltane Love Chase: The Two Magicians

Leggi in italiano

63_rackham_siegfried_grimhildeLove Chase is a typical theme of popular songs, according to the proper ways of the courting song it is the contrast between two lovers, in whice he tries to conquer her and she rejects him or banters in a comic or coarse situation
So the ballad “The Twa Magicians” is a Love Hunt in which the natural prudery of the maid teases the man, because her denial is an invitation to conquer.

THE TWA MAGICIANS

The ballad originates from the north of Scotland and the first written source is in Peter Buchan’s “Ancient Ballads and Song of the North of Scotland” – 1828, later also in Child # 44 (The English and Scottish Popular Ballads by Francis James Child ). It is believed to come from the Norse tradition. The versions are numerous, as generally happens for popular ballads spread in the oral tradition, and even with different endings. In its “basic” form it is the story of a blacksmith who intends to conquer a virgin; but the girl flees, turning into various animals and even objects or elements of Nature; the man pursues her by changing form himself.
There is a written trace of the theme already in 1630 in a ballad entitled “The two kind and Lovers” – in which however the woman is to chase the man.
The ballad begins with the woman who says

if thou wilt goe, Love,
let me goe with thee
Because I cannot live,
without thy company
Be thou the Sunne,
Ile be the beames so bright,
Be thou the Moone.
Ile be the lightest night:
Be thou Aurora,
the usher of the day,
I will be the pearly dew,
upon the flowers gay.
Be thou the Rose,
thy smell I will assume,
And yeeld a sweet
odoriferous perfume

It is therefore a matter of complementary and non-opposing couples, a sort of total surrender to love on the part of the woman who declares her fidelity to man. Let us not forget that ancient ballads were also a form of moral teaching.
And yet we find buried in the text traces of initiation rituals, pearls of wisdom or druidic teachings, so the two wizards are transformed into animals associated with the three kingdoms, Nem (sky), Talam (Earth) Muir (sea) or world above, middle and below and the mystery is that of spiritual rebirth.
Other similarities are found with the ballad “Hares on the Mountain

BUCHAN VERSION

In general, the Love Chase ends with the consensual coupling.
Today’s version of “The Two Magicians” is based on the rewriting of the text and the musical arrangement of Albert Lancaster Lloyd (1908-1982) for the album “The Bird in the Bush” (1966);

(all the verses except XV and XVI)

Celtic stone from Celtic Stone, 1983: (American folk-rock group active in the 80s and 90s), an ironic vocal interpretation, a spirited musical arrangement that happily combines acoustic guitar with the dulcimer hammer (verses from I to VII, XI, IX, XIV, X, XV, XVI, XVII)

Damh the Bard from Tales from the Crow Man, 2009. Another minstrel of the magical world in a more rock version (verses from I to VII, XI, IX, XII, X, XIV, XV, XVI,XVII, XVIII)

Jean-Luc Lenoir from “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2013 (voice Joanne McIver) 
– a lively and captivating arrangement taken from a traditional (it’s a mixer between the two melodies)
Owl Service from Wake The Vaulted Echo (2006)
Empty Hats from The Hat Came Back, 2000 the choice of speech is very effective

VERSIONE A.L. Lloyd
I
The lady stood at her own front door
As straight as a willow wand
And along come a lusty smith (1)
With his hammer in his hand
CHORUS
Saying “bide lady bide
there’s a nowhere you can hide
the lusty smith will be your love
And he will lay your pride”.
II
“Well may you dress, you lady fair,
All in your robes of red  (2)
Before tomorrow at this same time
I’ll have your maidenhead.”
III
“Away away you coal blacksmith
Would you do me this wrong?
To have me maidenhead
That I have kept so long”
IV
I’d rather I was dead and cold
And me body in the grave
Than a lusty, dusty, coal black smith
Me maide head should have”
V
Then the lady she held up her hand
And swore upon the spul
She never would be the blacksmith’s love
For all of a box of gold  (3)
VI
And the blacksmith he held up his hand/And he swore upon the mass,
“I’ll have you for my love, my girl,
For the half of that or less.”
VII
Then she became a turtle dove
And flew up in the air
But he became an old cock pigeon
And they flew pair and pair
VIII
And she became a little duck,
A-floating in the pond,
And he became a pink-necked drake
And chased her round and round.
IX
She turned herself into a hare  (4)
And ran all upon the plain
But he became a greyhound dog
And fetched her back again
X
And she became a little ewe sheep
and lay upon the common
But he became a shaggy old ram
And swiftly fell upon her.
XI
She changed herself to a swift young mare, As dark as the night was black,
And he became a golden saddle
And clung unto her back.
XII
And she became a little green fly,
A-flew up in the air,
And he became a hairy spider
And fetched her in his lair.
XIII
Then she became a hot griddle (5)
And he became a cake,
And every change that poor girl made
The blacksmith was her mate.
XIV
So she turned into a full-dressed ship
A-sailing on the sea
But he became a captain bold
And aboard of her went he
XV 
So the lady she turned into a cloud
Floating in the air
But he became a lightning flash
And zipped right into her
XVI
So she turned into a mulberry tree
A mulberry tree in the wood
But he came forth as the morning dew
And sprinkled her where she stood.
XVII
So the lady ran in her own bedroom
And changed into a bed,
But he became a green coverlet
And he gained her maidenhead
XVIII
And was she woke, he held her so,
And still he bad her bide,
And the husky smith became her love
And that pulled down her pride.

NOTES
1) in popular songs the blacksmith is considered a synonym of virility, a very gifted lover with a portentose force. Here he is also a magician armed with a hammer while the girl is a antagonist (or complementary) holds a willow wand.
One thinks of a sort of duel or challenge between two practicing wizards
2) in ancient ballads some words are codes that make the alarm bells ring out in the listener: red is the color of fairies or creatures with Magic powers. Red was also the color of the bride in antiquity and is a favorable color for fertility
3) also written as “pot of gold” and immediately it come to mind the leprechaun
4) the hare-hound couple is the first of the transformations in the Welsh myth of Taliesin’s birth. Gwion is the pursued that turns into a lunar animal, takes in itself the female principle symbol of abundance-fertility, but also creativity-intuition, becomes pure instinct, frenzy.
The dog is not only predator, but also guardian and psychopomp ‘The dog plays with many populations the function of guardian of the sacred places, guide of the man on the night of death, defender of the kingdom of the dead, overseer in all cases of the kingdom spiritual.
In particular among the Celts it was associated with the world of the Warriors. In fact, the dog was present in the Warrior initiations. Hunting, like war, was a sacred act that could be accomplished only after an initiation and a ritual preparation of divine protection. (Riccardo Taraglio from Il Vischio e la Quercia) 
see more
5) scottish pancake: a special tool to cook the Beltane bannock.The two iron griddle could be smooth or variously decorated honeycomb or floral carvings, written or geometric designs, were hinged on one side and equipped with a long handle: placed on the fire it was turned over for cooking on the other side. In the Middle Ages they had become masterpieces of forging made by master wares or refined silversmiths, and they were a traditional engagement gift. see more

Ferro da cialde, Umbria, sec. XVI

SHARP VERSION

The song is reported by Cecil Sharp in One Hundred English Folksongs (1916) in the notes he says he heard it from Mr. Sparks (a blacksmith), Minehead, Somerset, in 1904.

Steeleye Span from “Now we are six”, 1974 – a funny video animation

I
She looked out of the window
as white as any milk
And he looked in at  the window
as black as any silk
CHORUS
Hello, hello, hello, hello,
you coal blacksmith

You have done me no harm
You never shall  have my maidenhead
That I have kept so long
I’d rather die a maid
Ah, but then she said
and be buried all in my grave

Than to have such a nasty,
husky, dusky, fusky, musky

Coal blacksmith,
a maiden, I will die

II
She became a duck,
a duck all on the stream
And he became a water dog (1)
and fetched her back again.
She became a star,
a star all in the night
And he became a thundercloud
And muffled her out of sight.
III
She became a rose,
a rose all in the wood
And he became a bumble bee  (2)
And kissed her where she stood.
She became a nun,
a nun all dressed in white
And he became a canting priest
And prayed for her by night.
IV
She became a trout,
a trout all in the brook
And he became a feathered fly
And caught her with his hook.
She became a corpse,
a corpse all in the ground
And he became the cold clay
and smothered her all around (3)

NOTES
1) water dog is a large swimmer retriever dog or a dog trained for swamp hunting,
2) the bumblebee is related to the bees, but does not produce honey and is much larger and stocky than the bee
3) “Which part of the word NO do not you understand?” that is, the categorical and virginal refusal of the woman to the sexual act repeatedly attempted by an ugly, dark and even stinking blacksmith. In escaping the man’ s longing she turns into duck, star, rose, nun and trout (and he in marsh dog, cloud, bumblebee, priest, fishing hook); apparently the girl prefers her death rather than undergoing a rape: this is a distorted way of interpreting the story, it is the “macho” mentality convinced that woman is not a victim but always in complicit with the violence and therefore to be condemned.
In my opinion, instead, it is the return to the earth with the fusion of the feminine principle with the male one; the two, now lost in the vortex of transformations, merge into a single embrace of dust and their death is a death-rebirth.

Beltane Fire Festival

THE BLACKSMITH

The hunter man here is a “supernatural” figure, the blacksmith was considered in ancient times a creature endowed with magical powers, the first blacksmiths were in fact the dwarves (the black or dark elves) able to create weapons and enchanted jewels. The art of forge was an ancient knowledge that was handed down among initiates.
So in the Middle Ages the figure of the blacksmith took on negative connotations, just think of the many “forges of the devil” or “the pagan” that gave the name to a place once a forge.

Vulcan Roman God, Andrea Mantegna

By virtue of his craft, the smith is a mighty man with well-developed muscles, yet precisely because of his knowledge and power the smith is often lame or deformed: if he is a mortal his impairment is a sign that he has seen some divine secret, that is, it has seen a hidden aspect of the divinity thus it is punished forever; it is the knowledge of the secret of fire and of metals, which turn from solid to liquid and blend into alloys. In many mythologies the same gods are blacksmiths (Varuna, Odin), they are wizards and they have paid a price for their magic.
The lameness also hides another metaphor: that of the overcame test that underlies the research, be it a spiritual conquest or a healing or revenge act (a fundamental theme in the Grail cycle).

But the magicians of the ballad are two so the girl is also a shapeshifter or perhaps a shaman.

SHAPE-SHIFTER

Cerridwen_EmpowermentThe theme of transformation is in Ovid’s Metamorphoses: a succession of Olympian gods who, through their lust, transform themselves into animals (but also in golden rain) and seduce beautiful mortals or nymphs.
The pursuit through the mutation of the forms recalls the chase between Cerridwen and his apprentice in the Welsh history of the the bard Taliesin birth (534-599) . A boy is escaping, having drunk the magic potion from the cauldron he was watching over; he escapes the wrath of the goddess by becoming various animals (hare, fish, bird). At the end he is a wheat grain to hide like a classic needle in a haystack, but the goddess changed into a hen eating it. From this unusual coupling is born Taliesin alias Merlin

THE SONG OF AMERGIN *
I am a stag: of seven tines,
I am a flood: across a plain,
I am a wind: on a deep lake,
I am a tear: the Sun lets fall,
I am a hawk: above the cliff,
I am a thorn: beneath the nail,
I am a wonder: among flowers,
I am a wizard: who but I
Sets the cool head aflame with smoke?


That is, in order to become Wisdom, to Understand, one must experience the elements …

This poem by Taliesin could condense the mystery of the initiatory journey, in which Wisdom is conquered with the knowledge of the elements, which is profound experience, identification, through the penetration of their own essence, becoming the same traveler the essence of the elements.
Changing shape means experiencing everything, experiencing oneself in everything in continuous change and experiencing the encounter between the self and the other, prey and predator, not separated but inseparably linked, as in a dance.from here)

SCIAMANIC FLIGHT

The main characteristic of the shaman is to “travel” in conditions of ecstasy in the spirit world. The techniques for doing this are essentially the ecstatic sleep (mystical trance) and the transformation of one’s spirit into an animal. As a magical practice it involves a transformation of a part of the soul into the spirit of an animal to leave the body and travel in both the sensitive and the supersensible world. Another technique is to leave your body and take possession of the body of a living animal.

In this way the shaman “rides”, that is, takes as a means to move, the bodies of animals that are also his driving spirits. In some rituals, psychoactive plants are used, or the drum beat, or the skins or the mask of the animal that you want to “ride” are worn. This practice is not free from risks: it may happen that the shaman can no longer return to his body because he forgets himself, his human being, or travels too far from the body and falls into a coma or the physical body dies because too weakened by separation.
The spirit can be captured in the afterlife or the animal can be wounded or killed on the ground level and therefore, as the soul of the shaman is captured or wounded or killed, so does his body report its consequences.

second part 

LINK
http://web.tiscali.it/artigianidaltritempi/fabbro.htm
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=252
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thetwomagicians.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sciamani.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch044.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/child/2magics.html
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=247
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40723
http://www.yourultimateresource.com/the-two-magicians/

Helston Flora Day (Cornwall)

Leggi in italiano

 

In Helston, Cornwall it takes place every year on 8 May the Furry Dance (Flora or Floral dance) in the Feast of St. Michael. The meaning of Furry is found in the root of the gaelic  fer = fair. Inside the program of the tipical dance there is a sacred representation with historical and mythical theme, which unfolds in a procession that starts from the church: the characters are Robin Hood and his brigade, Saint George and Saint Michael, which announce the arrival of Spring.
1834733

SEE MORE 

THE FURRY DANCE

The dance is a very long promenade of young couples (and not really young) parading behind the band: they are for the most part walking (or hopping step) alternating a couple of turns with their partner. There are two shows, one in the morning and the second in the midday with more formal dresses (long dress and elaborate hat for ladies, tight and top hat for gentlemen: of British origin, the tight or taitè also called morning dress because worn during the day, it is the male dress in public ceremonies and for all occasions concerning the English royal family.)


THE GAMES OF ROBIN HOOD

In the late Middle Ages the “Robin Hood Games” were practiced during the May Day. It began with a parade of the various characters of the legendary Robin Hood, the masks of the horse and the dragon and the May pole brought by the oxen. The May pole was then raised and a dance took place around it. After the buffoon performances of the horse and dragon masks the competition began: the challenge of archery.
At the end people dancing around the May pole until late. Tradition has lasted until the end of the nineteenth century

img013

LINK
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

More commonly known under the title “Hal an tow” is the main song in the representation of mummers at Flora Day in Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band from ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband from Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arranged in rock version has become very popular among the groups of the genre celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o

NOTES
1)  The translation of Hal an tow could be “May day garland” (halan = calende) and the same name was attributed to the groups of youths who, early in the morning, went into the woods to cut the branches of the May and brought them to the village dancing and singing for the arrival of Spring.
But many scholars tend to refer to the meaning of “heel and toe,” referring to the dance step of the Morris dancing.
Another interpretation translates it as “pulling the rope” (from the Dutch “Haal aan het Touw” derived from the Saxon) referred to the work of the sailors on the ships but also to the game of tug of war, one of the few survivors from the May Games by Robin Hood. Some interpret all the stanzas in a seafaring key, as if the song were a sea-shanty and explain the term “rumbelow” as the rum in the vessel at the time of the pirates!
What shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.How do you deny the reference to the deer god and, more generally, to the symbolism of the deer as a sacred animal, the bearer of fertility? see more
3) Shirley Collins:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: the image is ironic about the Spaniards who eat goose feathers by english arrows to whom the roast goose is mockingly due as the winners
5)  Shirley Collins:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) St George day in many populations of the Mediterranean rural world, represents the rebirth of nature and the arrival of Spring, the Saint has inherited the functions of a more ancient pagan deity associated with solar cults: St. George defeating the Dragon became the solar god who defeats the darkness. see more
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Our Lady  Originally, therefore, the invocation was a prayer referring to the goddess of spring. In other versions the sentence becomes”The Lord and Lady bless you” 

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html

ROW ME BULLY BOYS ROW

La versione più recente di questa popolarissima sea shanty viene dal film “Robin Hood Principe dei Ladri” di Ridley Scott (2010), ed è stata scritta per l’occasione da Alan Doyle (front man della band canadese Great Big Sea),  il quale ha mantenuto la melodia e la struttura del ritornello di Liverpool Judies ma ha riscritto il testo, pescando tra le tipiche frasi dei questi canti marinareschi; va da se che ognuno ci aggiunge la strofa che più gli piace.

russel crow crew
I’ll sing you a song, it’s a song of the sea
I’ll sing you a song if you’ll sing it with me
While the first mate is playing the captain aboard
He looks like a peacock with pistols and sword
The captain likes whiskey, the mate, he likes rum
Us sailers like both but we can’t get us none
Well farewell my love it is time for to roam
The old blue peters are calling us home

ASCOLTA In Taberna  che ne fanno un bell’arrangiamento

ASCOLTA Strangs and Stout bella anche questa versione con l’innesto del tune Julia Delaney

le versioni testuali che ho trovato in rete sono molte


CHORUS
And it’s row me bully boys
We’re in a hurry boys
We got a long way to go
And we’ll sing and we’ll dance
And bid farewell to France
And it’s row me bully boys row.
I’ll sing you a song,
it’s a song of the sea
Row me bully boys row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
Chorus

Well farewell my love
it is time for to roam
Row me bully boys row
The old blue peters
are calling us home
And it’s row me bully boys row
Chorus
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
remate bravacci
abbiamo fretta, ragazzi
ci vuole ancora molto
e noi canteremo e danzeremo
e diremo addio alla Francia,
remate bravacci

Vi canterò una canzone,
è una canzone marinaresca
remate bravacci
Navigammo
nei mari più pericolosi
remate bravacci
ma adesso siamo di ritorno,
così custodite le vostre figlie
remate bravacci
CORO

Addio amore mio
è tempo di andare
remate bravacci
L’Old Blue Peter
ci riporta verso casa
remate bravacci
CORO

ASCOLTA Barnacle Buoys


When we set sail for Bristol
the sun was like crystal
And it’s row, me bully boys, row
We found muddier water
when passing Bridge Water
And it’s row, me bully boys row
Chorus:
And it’s row, me bully boys,
we’re in a hurry, boys
We’ve got a long way to go
And we’ll drink as we glance
– a last look at France
row, me bully boys, row
We sailed away
in the roughest of waters
But now we’re returning
so lock up your daughters
So we’ve been away
for many a day now
So we’ll fill out our sails
and drink all the ale now
So we’ll drink and we’ll feast
with no care in the least
And soon, as we’re craving’,
we’ll sail up to Avon
As we tied up in Bristol,
me heart was a-thumpin’
Then I found my girl Alice,
who took me a-scrumpin’
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
Quando siamo salpati per Bristol
il sole era come cristallo
remate bravacci
abbiamo trovato acque fangose
superato Bridge Water
remate bravacci
CORO
remate bravacci
abbiamo fretta, ragazzi
ci vuole ancora molto
e noi berremo e daremo un’ultima occhiata per dire addio alla Francia,
remate bravacci

Abbiamo navigato
nei mari più pericolosi
ma adesso siamo di ritorno,
così custodite le vostre figlie.
Siamo stati via
per tanto tempo
così andremo a gonfie vele
e berremo tutta la birra.
Berremo e faremo festa
senza preoccuparci del resto
e presto come abbiamo desiderato
sbarcheremo a Avon.
Mentre ci siamo imbarcati a Bristol
il mio cuore batteva forte
allora ho trovato la mia ragazza Alice che mi ha dato una fregatura

e chi ne ha più ne mette!

LA VERSIONE ITALIANA: VOGA AMICO MIO VAI

Ecco come è stato tradotto il testo nell’adattamento in italiano


CORO
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più (amico)

un altro po’, dove si va non lo so
Balliamo cantiamo e la Francia lasciamo
voga un altro po’ vai
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Voga un altro po’ dove si va non lo so
La Francia non la rivedremo giammai
Voga amico mio vai
E’ tardi oramai voi siete già nei guai
Voga amico mio vai
O voi non scherzate oppure rischiate
Voga voga un po’ di più
Ma non si può stare troppo via dal mare
Voga voga, voga un po’ di più
Partiamo di nuovo per non ritornare
Voga amico mio vai

FONTI
https://thesession.org/discussions/24758
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Rambling-Sailors/Row-Me-Bully-Boys
http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/misc-soundtrack-robin-hood-row-me-bully-boys-chords-s376527
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562
https://reelsoundtrack.wordpress.com/2010/05/15/robin-hood-soundtrack/

GILDEROY BEWARE HIGHWAYMAN!

ritratto di un capo clan delle Highland nel XVII secolo (Lord Mungo Murray – di John Michael Wright) in cui viene indossato un belted plaid

Gilleruadh (Gilderoy = il ragazzo dai capelli rossi ) fu il soprannome di un famoso brigante scozzese di nome Patrick McGregor che è stato catturato e giustiziato nei pressi di Edimburgo nel 1636 o nel 1638. Nel “The Complete Newgate Calendar” (1926) è riportato che uccise madre e sorella, impiccò un giudice e venne giustiziato nel 1658. Ma queste notizie infamanti potevano essere un effetto delle proscrizione del Clan: Giacomo VI di Scozia emanò infatti un editto nel 1603 in cui si proclamava il nome MacGregor come “altogidder abolisheed”. Nell’annosa lotta contro il Clan Campbell i MacGregor finirono per essere espropriati di tutte le loro terre (tra Argyle e Perthshire); un’altra faida con il clan MacLaren ebbe inizio nel 1558
Reduced to the status of outlaws, they rustled cattle and poached deer to survive. They became so proficient at these endeavours many other clans would pay them not to steal their cattle as they exhausted other means of stopping them.” (tratto da qui)

LA MELODIA
Le varianti più antiche della melodia vengono fatte risalire al canto gregoriano del XII secolo ‘En Gaudeat’ (in Revue du Chant Greorien, A. Gastoue) poi in “Congaudeat” (Piae Cantiones 1582)
ASCOLTA David Solomons (clarinetto e chitarra)
LA DANZA
La melodia è riportata anche nel “The Dancing Master” (1651) di John Playford con il titolo di “GoddessesASCOLTA o in una versione più veloce ASCOLTA
per i passi di danza:
VIDEO
VIDEO

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

Teatro delle scorribande era il Perthshire scozzese e Patrick McGregor tra razzie di bestiame e bracconaggio finì per essere una figura alla Robin Hood o per essere confuso con il personaggio di un’altra ballata altrettanto famosa, quella di Geordie (vedi). Già alla fine del Seicento circolava un broadside dal titolo “The Scotch lover’s lamentation or, Gilderoy’s last faewe” e secondo George Farquhar Graham la ballata Gilderoy era già stata pubblicata nel 1650, poi per tutto il 1700 e il 1800 comparvero numerose variazione testuali e melodiche.

TESTE ROSSE

Probabilmente la figura di Patrick il rosso si confuse con Bob il rosso il più famoso Bob Roy capo del Clan McGregor del secolo successivo anch’egli fuorilegge, e può essere che le versioni di fine settecento si riferiscano alla sua storia (egli però non morì impiccato ma di morte naturale nel suo letto).
La popolarità di Rob Roy deriva da ben due romanzi uno scritto quando era ancora in vita, uno da Daniel Defoe (Highland Rogue 1723), l’altro da Sir Walter Scott (Rob Roy 1818) e più recentemente dal film Rob Roy di Michael Caton-Jones (1995)

 

Il bel Patrick il rosso oltre che un fuorilegge (ladro di bestiame e bracconiere) era anche un rubacuori, e si suppone che la canzone sia stata scritta da una delle sue amanti affascinata dalla sua eleganza!

ASCOLTA su Spotify Toronto Consort in “All in a Garden Green” 2013
Delle XIII strofe sono riportate solo VI


I
“Gilderoy was a bonnie boy,
Had roses to his shoon;
His stockings were of silken soy,
With garters hanging down.
It was, I ween, a comely sight
To see so trim a boy;
He was my jo, and heart’s delight,
My handsome Gilderoy.
II
Wi’ meikle  joy we spent our prime,
Till we were baith sixteen;
And aft we pass’d the langsome time
Amang the leaves sae green;
Aft on the banks we’d sit us there,
And sweetly kiss and toy;
Wi’ garlands gay wad deck my hair,
My handsome Gilderoy.
III
O, that he still had been content
Wi’ me to lead his life;
But ah, his manfu’ heart was bent
To stir in feats of strife;
And he in many a venturous deed
His courage bald wad try,
And now this gars my heart to bleed
For my dear Gilderoy.
IV
My Gilderoy baith far and near
Was fear’d in ilka toun,
And bauldly bear away the gear
Of mony a lowland loun ;
Nane e’er durst meet him hand to hand,
He was say brave a boy;
At length wi’ numbers he was ta’en
My handsome Gilderoy.
V
Of Gilderoy sae fear’d they were,
They bound him meikle strong;
Till Edinburgh they led him there,
And on a gallows hung;
They hung him high abune the rest,
He was sae trim a boy;
There died the youth whom I loved best,/My handsome Gilderoy.
VI
Thus having yielded up his breath,
I bore his corpse away;
Wi’ tears that trickled for his death,
I washed his comely clay;
And siccar in a grave sae deep,
I laid the dear loved boy;
And now for ever maun I weep
For winsome Gilderoy.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Gilderoy era un bel ragazzo
aveva scarpe di broccato (1)
e le calze di seta,
sorrette dalle giarrettiere (2).
credo fosse uno affascinante spettacolo vedere un ragazzo così elegante; era il mio amato, la delizia del mio cuore, il mio bel Gilderoy.
II
Tra tanta letizia passammo la fanciullezza fino all’età di sedici anni:
spesso trascorrevamo il tempo andato tra l’erba verde;
o ci sedevamo sulle rive ,
tra dolci baci e balocchi;
e con gaie ghirlande mi decorava i capelli, il mio bel Gilderoy
III
Oh se gli fosse bastato allora
condurre la sua vita con me ;
ma ah il suo cuore valoroso era incline
a infiammarsi in imprese di lotta;
e più di un’avventura il suo forte coraggio ebbe a mettere alla prova e ora questo, fa sanguinare il mio cuore
per il mio caro Gilderoy
IV
Il mio Gilderoy era temuto in ogni fattoria (2) sia lontana che vicina
e arditamente portò via il bestiame
a più di un contadino delle Lowland;
nessuno osava incontrarlo faccia a faccia e si diceva che era un ragazzo coraggioso;
alla fine con i compari è stato preso,
il mio bel Gilderoy
V
Erano così timorosi di Gilderoy
che lo legarono molto stretto;
fino a Edimburgo lo portarono
e su una forca lo appesero;
lo appesero in alto sopra gli altri
era un ragazzo così elegante;
là morì il giovane che amavo di più,
il mio bel Gilderoy
VI
Così dopo che ebbe esalato il respiro
portai via il suo cadavere;
piangendo lacrime per la sua morte,
lavai quel corpo avvenente
e al sicuro in una fossa profonda
distesi il caro e amato ragazzo;
e ora per sempre piangerò
per il bel Gilderoy
il dettaglio delle calzature è tratto da Portrait of a lady thought to be Vere Egerton, Mrs William Booth, attribuito a Robert Peake (1541-1619)

NOTE
1) shoon=shoes; altrove è scritto come “His breath was sweet as rose” (qui); letteralmente si traduce con “aveva le rose sulle scarpe”. Nelle versioni inglesi si riporta come “He’d knots of ribbons on his shoes“. E’ tipica della moda del Seicento la scarpa con fiocchetti e tacchi alti (unisex): le rose potrebbero essere dei ritagli in pelle ma anche il disegno di un tessuto come il broccato molto usato nell’abbigliamento barocco
2) più che un rozzo montanaro in kilt viene descritto un nobiluomo del periodo elisabettiano o più in generale d’epoca Tudor, ecco il dettaglio delle calze sorrette da una giarrettiera annodata con un fiocco, come era la moda del tempo
3) toon=town ma qui si intende le farmertoon scozzesi del Perthshire

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

La ballata viaggiando dalla Scozia verso l’Inghilterra trasforma Gilderoy in una vittima innocente, il cui unico crimine (che gli vale l’impiccagione) sembra essere stato quello di aver fatto sesso con la propria fidanzata! Più propriamente viene definito come un libertino un “rakish boy” e la ballata lo trasforma in un dandy decadente e donnaiolo.
Questa versione proviene dal signor Henry Burstow di Horsham, Sussex, che nel 1894 venne raccolta da Lucy Broadwood (qui)

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl

ASCOLTA Shirley Collins in “For As Many As Will” 1978. Nelle note di copertina dell’album scrive ” Noted from Henry [Burstow] by Lucy Broadwood who wrote in the Folk-Song Journal: “Mr Burstow sang me one verse of Gilderoy and sent me the whole ballad a year later. I have omitted one stanza.” (This was the central part of verse 3.) I searched through the Lucy Broadwood file at Cecil Sharp House and came across the complete song, and the accompanying letter from Henry. He wrote, “Dear Madam … I give you the song the same as I have heard it sung many years ago … I dare say you can alter some of the words …”

ASCOLTA Jim Moray in “Jim Moray” 2006 riprende la versione di Shirley Collins e si ferma alla IV strofa


I
Now Gilderoy was as bonny a boy
as ever Scotland bred,
He’d knots of ribbons on his shoes
and a scarlet cloak so red (1).
He was beloved by the ladies all (so gay); he was such a rakish boy
he was my sovereign heart’s delight,
my handsome (bold young ) Gilderoy.
II
Young Gilderoy and I was born
both in one town together
And not past seven years of age
till we did love each other (3).
Our dads and mothers did agree
and crowned with mirth and joy
To think upon the bridal day (4)
‘twixt me and Gilderoy.
III
Now Gilderoy and I walked out
when we were both fifteen (5)
And gently he did lay me down
among the leaves so green (6).
When he had done what he (a boy) could do he rose and went away (7);
He was my sovereign heart’s delight,
my handsome Gilderoy.
IV
Now what a pity, a man be hanged
for stealing a woman there
For he stole neither house nor land,
nor stole neither horse nor mare (deer).
At length with numbers he was taken,
my handsome Gilderoy
Yet none dare meet him hand to hand, he was such a rakish boy (9).
V
An now we either in Edinburgh Town
it’s long ere I was there,
They hanged him high above
the rest and he wagged in the air.
His relics they were more esteemed
than Hector’s were at Troy,
I never loved to see the face
that gazed on Gilderoy.
VI
Now Gilderoy is dead and gone,
and how then should I live?
With a brace of pistols at my side,
I’ll guard his lonely grave.
They hanged him on the gallows high
for being such a rakish boy,
But he was my sovereign heart’s delight,
was my charming Gilderoy.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Gilderoy era il più bel ragazzo
cresciuto in Scozia ,
aveva le scarpe con i fiocchi
e un mantello scarlatto tanto rosso;
era amato da tutte le donne
e un tale libertino (2),
lui era il mio padrone, la delizia del mio cuore, il mio bel Gilderoy.
II
Il giovane Gilderoy ed io
eravamo dello stesso paese
e non trascorsero nemmeno sette anni
che ci innamorammo uno dell’altra;
i nostri genitori erano d’accordo
-coronato di gioia e letizia –
di pensare al giorno delle nozze
tra me e Gilderoy.
III
Gilderoy ed io, andammo a passeggiare
quando eravamo quindicenni
e con gentilezza lui mi coricò
tra l’erba verde,
dopo che ebbe fatto quello che voleva
si alzò e se ne andò;
era il mio padrone, la delizia del mio cuore, il mio bel Gilderoy.
IV
E che peccato che un uomo sia impiccato
per aver derubato (un’altra) donna
perchè non prese né case, né terre,
e nemmeno cavalli o giumente (8)
Alla fine con i compari è stato preso
il mio bel Gilderoy,
e tuttavia nessuno osava fronteggiarlo
perchè era un tale libertino.
V
Adesso siamo entrambi a Edimburgo,
ma prima che io fossi lì
lo appesero al di sopra
degli altri a penzolare all’aria.
Le sue spoglie erano più stimate
che quelle di Ettore a Troia,
non ho mai amato vedere il viso
che si fissava su Gilderoy.
VI
Ora Gilderoy è morto e sepolto
e allora come posso sopravvivere?
Con un paio di pistole al mio fianco
veglierò sulla sua tomba solitaria.
Lo hanno impiccato sulla forca in alto
perchè era un libertino (10),
ma era il mio padrone e delizia del mio cuore, il mio bel Gilderoy.

NOTE
1) Shirley Collins dice al contrario “and he would not soft ribbons wear./He’s pulled off his scarlet coat, he gartered below his knee.” mentre Jim Morey dice “and he would lots of ribbons wear,
He’s taken off his scarlet coat, and got a garter below his knee.”
2) rakish= rake, dissolute. Un “rake” era un affascinante giovane amante delle donne, delle canzoni, dedito al gioco d’azzardo e all’alcool, uno stile di vita di moda tra i nobili inglesi in quello che venne definito “the period of the rake“, nel corso del 17° secolo, alla corte di Carlo II d’Inghilterra: il libertino aristocratico era intelligente, colto, di spirito arguto e non poneva freni alle avventure amorose e all’abuso di sostanze inebrianti.
3)  Shirley Collins e Jim Morey dicono “And at the age of seventeen we courted one each other.”
4)  Shirley Collins e Jim Morey dicono “To think that I should marry me”
5) Shirley Collins e Jim Morey dicono “all in the fields together”
6) e proseguono: He took me round (by)the waist so small and down we went together.
7) Shirley Collins e Jim Morey dicono “he rose and kissed his joy
8) in altre versioni vengono invece nominati i cervi ricollegando più espicitamente la figura di Gilderoy con le attività tipiche dei fuorilegge dediti al furto di bestiame, alle aggressioni a scopo di rapina e al bracconaggio
9) Shirley Collins cambia completamente il verso e dice:  For he was beloved by the old and the young and he was such a rakish boy,
He was my sovereign heart’s delight, my handsome bold young Gilderoy. Chiude il canto con la V strofa che dice: Now Gilderoy they’ve hung him high and a funeral for him we shall have;
With a sword and a pistol by my side I’ll guard my true love to his grave./For he was beloved by the young and the old and he was such a rakish boy,/He was my sovereign heart’s delight, my handsome bold young Gilderoy.
10) in realtà i libertini che non pagavano i loro debiti erano detenuti in prigione

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/ned-hill.htm
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/gilderoy-2 http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/Gilderoy.html http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/15859 http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/pageturner.cfm?id=94500348&mode=transcription http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-066,-page-67-gilderoy.aspx http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/gilderoy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2457 http://thesession.org/tunes/566 http://52folksongs.com/2012/08/31/as40-gilderoy/ http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38845/38845-h/38845-h.html#gilderoy

BRENNAN ON THE MOOR

William Brennan, il protagonista della ballata, era un eroico fuorilegge irlandese, novello Robin Hood: egli visse tra la fine del Settecento (1770 circa) e il primo decennio dell’Ottocento e di certo fu un popolare bandito anche se le sue notizie biografiche sono avvolte nella leggenda. Forse nato a Kilworth, nella contea di Cork si diede alla macchia dopo aver visto cacciare la sua famiglia dalle terre che lavorava. In altre versioni si trattava di un soldato disertore, di certo il suo terreno di caccia era la contea di Cork. Neanche in merito alla sua morte ci sono fonti sicure, anche se possiamo essere relativamente certi che fu giustiziato mediante impiccagione. Sulla cattura ed esecuzione continua qui

Attack-By-Highway-Men

Come sempre quando l'argomento è stato trattato da Jürgen Kloss c'è ben poco da aggiungere e perciò rimando alla sua ricerca (in Just Another Tune qui) 
Ecco la conclusione a cui perviene Kloss circa l'esistenza del personaggio: The "Brennan On The Moor" of the ballad looks like a composite character based on more than one real person who then served as a focal point for floating motives and stories known from other "heroic outlaws". The "real" William Brennan - whoever that was - is indeed very elusive.  The only thing we know for sure is that outlaws by the name of Brennan were busy in Southern Ireland at that time: one was executed in 1809 and another one in 1812. (Jürgen Kloss)

LA BALLATA OTTOCENTESCA

Tutte le versioni moderne della ballata risalgono ad un testo variamente pubblicato nei broadsides d’Inghilterra e Irlanda durante la seconda metà dell’Ottocento e quindi una trentina d’anni dopo la morte del fuorilegge. L’autore anonimo secondo la comparazione effettuata da Jürgen Kloss ha fatto una specie di frullato di frasi e attribuzioni di molte altre ballate sui banditi eroici, mescolandovi per buona misura anche alcuni riferimenti ai settecenteschi ribelli irlandesi (ad es The Croppy Boy). Alcune analogie sono riscontrabili anche con la ballata scozzese “Bold Brannan On The Moor” (1820-1840) che è però più il lament di un criminale in attesa di essere mandato a morte. Così Kloss ipotizza che la ballata potrebbe aver avuto origine in Scozia.

La ballata è stata associata con melodie diverse forse quella originaria o più antica è quella riportata da PW Joyce nel suo Old Irish Folk Music ( pp. 186-7 ) sempre stralciando dall’articolo di Jürgen Kloss “This is typical for a song dissipated by broadsides. For example Baring-Gould wrote down three more or less different tunes on one manuscript page (SBG/1/2/822). The version collected by Vaughn Williams had a “tune more usually associated with ‘The Tailor In The Tea Chest'” (Palmer, No. 15, p. 25, 187) while Gardiner’s (GG/1/14/890, at The Full English) was “variant of ‘The Wearing Of The Green’“.  But it seems that most common in England was a tune that “belongs to the ‘Villikins and his Dinah’ type of melody, so beloved by the village singer” (Sharp 1904, p. 70).  Kloss cita infine il riferimento di Grattan Flood (nel suo History Of Irish Music, 1906, Chapter XXIII) a una melodia per cornamuse popolare nel 1770 dal nome ‘Brennan on the Moor’ che per l’appunto era suonata nel cantare la storia del noto “rapparee” di cui però non si riesce a trovare riscontro documentato. La versione che è diventata “standard” è quella dai Clancy Brothers che la diffusero mediante registrazioni ed esibizioni live a partire dal 1961; a loro volta ispirarono Bob Dylan nello scrivere la sua “Rambling, Gamblien Willie” (1962) in cui il protagonista diventa un giocatore dì’azzardo

Clancy Brothers &Tommy MakemPat learned this song from his father’s mother, a tall woman who wore a big, black cloak and hood and was known throughout the neighborhood for her fine singing. Brennan, the bold highwayman, was executed in Clonmel, which is twelve miles from where the Clancys lived […] Paddy has shortened and adapted the song from the way he learned it, but the heart of this tale of a ‘brave and undaunted’ highwayman who was ”betrayed by a false-hearted woman’ remains intact” (TLP 1042).


ASCOLTA 97th Regimental String Band in “97th Regimental String Band, Vol. 3″, 2007

Declan Nerney in The One & Only 2013 con tanto di video-animazione (un godibilissimo corto sullo stile delle comiche del muto)


I
‘Tis of a brave young highwayman(1)
This story I will tell
His name was Willie Brennan
And in Ireland he did dwell
It was on the Kilwood Mountain
He commenced his wild career
And many a wealthy nobleman
Before him shook with fear
CHORUS
It was Brennan on the moor,
Brennan on the moor
Bold, brave and undaunted
Was young Brennan on the moor
II
One day upon the highway
As young Willie he went down
He met the mayor of Cashiell(2)
A mile outside of town
The mayor he knew his features
And he said, “Young man, said he
Your name is Willie Brennan
You must come along with me”
III
Now Brennan’s wife
had gone to town
Provisions for to buy
And when she saw her Willie
She commenced to weep and cry
Said, “Hand to me that tenpenny”
As soon as Willie spoke
She handed him a blunderbuss
From underneath her cloak
IV
Now with this loaded blunderbuss
The truth I will unfold
He made the mayor to tremble
And he robbed him of his gold
One hundred pounds was offered
For his apprehension there
So he, with horse and saddle
To the mountains did repair
V
Now Brennan is an outlaw
All on some mountain hight.
With infantry and cavalry
To take him they did try,
But he laughed at them
and he scorned at them
Until it was said
By a false-hearted woman(3)
He was cruelly betrayed.
VI
They hung Brennan at the crossroads;
In chains he swung and dried.
But still they say that in the night
Some do see him ride.
They see him with his blunderbuss
In the midnight chill;
Along, along the King’s highway
Rides Willy Brennan still.
TRADUZIONE DI MARCO ZAMPETTI
I
La storia di un giovane bandito coraggioso (1) vi voglio raccontare,
il suo nome era William Brennan
e viveva in Irlanda,
sui monti di Kilwood
comincio’ la sua carriera
e piu’ di un ricco nobiluomo
fece tremare di terrore.
CORO
E’ stato Brennan della brughiera,
si Brennan della brughiera
spavaldo, coraggioso e temerario,
e’ il giovane Brennan della brughiera
II
Un giorno che il giovane Willie
se ne andava per la strada
incontro’ il sindaco di Cashiell (2),
un miglio fuori dalla città,,
il sindaco conosceva il suo uomo
e disse: “Giovanotto
il tuo nome e’ Willie Brennan
e devi venire con me”
III
Ora, la moglie di Brennan
era andata in citta
per fare provviste
e quando vide il suo Willie
iniziò a piangere e lamentarsi
lui le disse: “passami il coltello”
e, appena ebbe parlato,
lei le passo una pistola
che aveva sotto il mantello.
IV
Ah, con la sua pistola carica,
diro’ la verita’,
fece tremare il sindaco
e lo derubo’ del suo oro.
Furono offerte cento sterline
di taglia sulla sua testa
e cosi’ prese armi e bagagli
e si rifugio sulle montagne.
V
Brennan divenne un latitante
sulle alte montagne
con fanti e cavalieri
provarono a catturarlo
ma lui li beffo’
e derise
finche’, come raccontano,
da una donna falsa e crudele (3)
fu tradito.
VI
Impiccarono Brennan al crocevia,
e così appeso morì in catene,
Ma, ancora oggi, alcuni
raccontano di averlo visto
la notte armato di pistola,
nell’inverno gelato,
lungo la strada del re,
Williy Brennan imperversa ancora

NOTE
1) Highwaymen irlandesi ma dalle origini nobili che scelsero la strada per combattere la loro personale battaglia contro i ricchi possidenti inglesi o scozzesi venuti in Irlanda ad impossessarsi delle terre di famiglia!! continua
2) Caledonian Mercury 18Marzo 1809: “Thursday, Lord Cahir, with an armed force, apprehended the notorious Brennan, near Templemore, in the county of Tipperary, together with one of his comrads, a pedlar, who always accompanied him; the pedlar fired several shots, none of which took effect – Brennan made no resistance“.
3) nei broadsides ottocenteschi il traditore è un uomo; la versione al femminile è quella preferita dalle versioni nord-americane della ballata

FONTI
http://www.justanothertune.com/html/brennanonthemoor.html http://tunearch.org/wiki/Brennan_on_the_Moor http://www.bobdylanroots.com/brennan.html http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=38446&lang=it http://thewildpeak.wordpress.com/2011/12/31/128/
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/brennan.htm

ÉAMONN A’ CHNOIC

Una ballata irlandese del XVII secolo che prima di essere diffusa nella versione in inglese nel XIX secolo con il titolo “Ned of the Hill” era nota come canzone in gaelico irlandese “Éamonn an Chnoic” in onore di Éamonn Ó Riain (Edmund Ryan 1670 – 1724)

NEL DEL COLLE

rapparee001_0Edmond (ovvero Ned) era un giovane rampollo degli O’Ryans di Knockmeoll, Atshanbohy, vicino a Upperchurch Contea di Tipperary diventato fuorilegge sotto la regina Maria (affiancata al trono dal marito Guglielmo III): la sua vita riassume un po’ tutte le vicissitudini passate dai molti rapparees irlandesi  del XVII e XVIII secolo (considerati degli eroici ribelli invece che dei banditi prezzolati); la famiglia di origini cattoliche si vede privata dal possesso della terra dopo la conquista di Cromwell (Act for the Settlement 1652); in difesa della povera gente contro i soprusi dei conquistatori, Edmond si dà alla macchia e poi combatte nella “Williamite War” del 1689-1691; dopo il trattato di Limerick (1691) invece di fuggire come “Wild Geese” continua la sue scorrerie contro i proprietari terrieri protestanti e i militari inglesi; viene tradito per denaro da un suo amico che gli taglia la testa mentre dorme tranquillo ospite nella sua casa!

Di lui si dice fosse un gentiluomo sempre ben vestito, abile spadaccino e dalla ottima mira nello sparare con le pistole, amato non solo dalle donne, perchè era un Robin Hood, un giustiziere dei poveri contro i ricchi che lottava, a suo modo, per la libertà dell’Irlanda.

ÉAMONN Ó RIAIN: LA STORIA

Edmond O’Ryan nacque a Atshanbohy vicino Upperchurch intorno al 1670. I suoi antenati erano stati grandi proprietari terrieri, le cui terre furono confiscate dopo la ribellione di Desmond, cento anni prima. Ora, ricchi possidenti inglesi si impossessarono delle terre, e i Ryan rimasero come tenutari. La sua carriera doveva essere il sacerdozio [e andò in Francia a studiare perchè con le Penal Laws non era possibile per i cattolici accedere allo studio] ma non aveva abbastanza vocazione(*) così ritornò in Irlanda. Poco dopo il suo ritorno è stato coinvolto in una rissa con un esattore delle tasse che voleva prendersi l’unica vacca appartenente ad una povera vedova. Eamonn intervenne in favore della vedova cercando di convincere l’esattore a prendere l’equivalente delle tasse in mobili o altri oggetti a cui la vecchia signora poteva rinunciare. Ma nella rissa Eamonn finì per uccidere l’esattore delle tasse che si era intestardito nel volere la mucca.
Eamonn si diede alla macchia, nascondendosi nei boschi della sua regione nativa, mentre una grossa taglia fu offerta sulla sua testa.
Quando il deposto Giacomo II è arrivato in Irlanda nel 1689, Eamonn era tra i tanti che hanno prontamente aderito al suo esercito nella convinzione errata che la causa giacobita fosse la causa dell’Irlanda. Ma dopo il trattato di Limerick Eamonn tornò nel bosco e visse come fuorilegge, attaccando gli inglesi con la tattica della guerriglia, nel tentativo di mandarli via dalla terra irlandese.

Molte storie sono giunte fino a noi, raccontando come questi uomini siano sopravvissuti, come abbiano derubato e saccheggiato i nuovi proprietari terrieri, come siano riusciti a sfuggire ai soldati che li ricercavano e come abbiano aiutato i poveri e gli oppressi da novelli Robin Hood. La tradizione è particolarmente ricca nel caso di Eamonn …Sappiamo anche che era un poeta di notevole talento. La sua descrizione della vita di un fuorilegge è contenuto nella famosa poesia irlandese “Eamonn un Chnoic“. Un altro poema attribuito a lui e con uno stile simile a “Eamonn un Chnoic” è “Bean Dubh un Gleanna” (The Dark Woman of the Glen), una canzone d’amore forse scritta da sua moglie Mary Leahy. Si è anche pensato che Eamonn sia l’autore di “Scan O’Duibhir un Ghleanna” una poesia patriottica, che incoraggia i giovani a seguire le orme di John O’Dwyer di Kilnamanagh.
Parzialmente tratto e tradotto da http://www.doonbleisce.com/eamonn_a_chnoic.htm
[*altrove è riportato che Ned si trovava in Francia a studiare come sacerdote, quando il padre si ammalò e il giovane ragazzo decise di rientrare a casa; fu allora che difese la vedova e si diede alla macchia assumendosi la colpa dell’uccisione di uno degli esattori.]


LA MELODIA

Secondo il Fiddler’s Companion la melodia proviene dall’Irlanda alla fine del 1500 (sebbene la prima versione in stampa sia del 1729) ma si ritrova anche in Scozia (Scots Musical Museum, 1788 “I Dreamed I Lay” con le parole di Robert Burns)
Oggi eseguita per lo più in versione strumentale, un lament su un valzer lento o una slow air che si presta bene all’arrangiamento per arpa (su Spotify la versione di Patrick Ball)

Ilse de Ziah al violoncello live nel bosco con coro di uccelli e frusciar di fronde

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers in The Tannahill Weavers 1979
ASCOLTA Cherish the Ladies in Most Beautiful Melodies of Irish Music 

VERSIONE IN GAELICO: Éamonn an Chnoic

Ned bussa alla porta della sua innamorata, per chiedere rifugio, ma anche per vederla l’ultima volta e dirle addio. Il fuorilegge è ricercato con una grossa taglia sulla testa e non si fida nemmeno più degli amici, perciò medita di lasciare la sua terra. In seguito ospitato da un amico (o addirittura un parente trattandosi secondo alcune fonti di un cugino del lato materno), sarà tradito e ucciso nel sonno.
La sua testa si dice sia sepolta a Curraheen vicino Hollyford (quantomeno è lì che è stata eretta una lapide commemorativa).

Probabilmente la versione più popolare è quella di Liam Clancy che la canta mestamente accompagnato dall’arpa, con l’andamento di un lament

ASCOLTA Wolf Tones As Gaeilge 1980

VERSIONE IN GAELICO
I
“Cé hé sin amu
a bhfuil faobhar a ghuth,
a’ réabadh mo dhorais dhúnta?”
“Mise Éamonn a’ Chnoic,
atá báite fuar fliuch(1),
ó shíor-shiúl sléibhte is gleannta.”
II
“A lao ghil ‘s a chuid,
cad a dheánfainn-se dhuit
mura gcuirfinn ort binn de mo ghúna?
‘S go mbeidh púdar(2) dubh
‘á lámhach linn go tiubh,
‘s go mbeidh muid araon múchta!”
III
“Is fada mise amu
faoi shneachta is faoi shioc,
‘s gan dánacht agam ar éinne.
Mo bhranar gan cur,
mo sheisreach gan scor,
is gan iad agam ar aon chor!
IV
Níl cara agam—
is danaid liom sin—
a ghlacfadh mé moch ná déanach.
‘S go gcaithfe mé ghoil
thar fairraige soir,
ó’s ann nach bhfuil mo ghaolta.”
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
“Who’s that outside
whose voice is urgent,
pounding on my closed door?”
“I’m Edmond of the hill,
drowned, cold and wet,
from endlessly traveling mountains and glens.”
II
“Dearest love and treasure,
what can I do for you
but to put the hem of my gown over you?
And the snow would be falling on you
still, until we both would be covered!”
III
“I’ve long been outside
in snow and in frost,
not daring to approach anyone.
my grassland without seed
my ploughland without a mark,
and I don’t even have any
IV
I have no friend—
how that grieves me—
who’d take me in, early or late.
And so I must go
eastward across the sea,
for it’s there I have no kindred.”
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
“Chi è che là fuori
chiama con urgenza
e batte alla mia porta chiusa?”
“Sono Edmund Del Colle,
zuppo, gelido e bagnato (1)
e senza posa viaggio per montagne e valli!”
II
“Carissimo amore e tesoro
cosa posso fare per te
se non avvolgerti nel mio
mantello?
E la neve (2) cadrà su di noi
finchè entrambi ne saremo ricoperti”
III
“Sono stato a lungo un fuorilegge (3)
tra la neve e il gelo,
senza fidarmi di nessuno.
La mia terra a maggese,
i miei cavalli senza il giogo
-non ho più nulla!(4)
IV
Non avrò amico
-quale pena-
che mi accoglierà, sia presto o tardi.
Così devo andare
verso est per il mare,
perchè è dove non ho legami”(5)

NOTE
1) Il tema dell’isolamento del fuorilegge e della sua sofferenza alle intemperie è un classico nelle descrizioni dei disagi a cui vanno incontro coloro che vivono da braccati, ma è anche un modo per sottolineare il coraggio e lo spirito di sacrificio di Edmond; si mette in evidenza così la sua vulnerabilità per suscitare empatia e compassione.
2) il termine gaelico “pudar” non si traduce qui come polvere da sparo ma come neve
3) 
Le campagne irlandesi del Seicento-Settecento erano la terra degli highwaymen fuorilegge (outlow) dalle origini nobili che scelsero la strada per combattere la loro personale battaglia contro i ricchi possidenti inglesi o scozzesi venuti in Irlanda ad impossessarsi delle terre di famiglia!! Erano stati “Tories” (i confederati irlandesi del XVII secolo detti comunemente “conservatori”) o “Rapparees” e furono personaggi popolari e famosi la cui vita e imprese erano cantate nelle ballate. Nella tradizione popolare irlandese queste bande di briganti erano capeggiate di solito da una figura affascinante, amata dal popolo e non priva di un codice morale cavalleresco, perchè si ergeva in difesa dei deboli, dei poveri e degli oppressi. Così rubare al ricco non era considerato un furto o disonorevole, quando la ricchezza era stata accumulata con lo sfruttamento della povera gente o con il sopruso! (continua)
4) il senso della frase è “I haven’t finished the work of plowing and planting, but how could I, seeing as how I don’t have a team or land anyway!”
5) nella tradizione irlandese il fuorilegge può essere annientato solo con mezzi sleali o con il tradimento, ciò lo rende un martire da venerare. Spesso, ma non in questo caso, quando il fuorilegge viene meno al codice morale improntato alla difesa del più debole, viene punito con la sconfitta. In questo senso il codice morale è un imperativo categorico, quasi un gessa (divieto) in senso celtico.

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

ASCOLTA Connie Dover in If Ever I Return 1997; la melodia non è quella tradizionalmente abbinata, ma ‘Hector the Hero‘ composta dal violinista scozzese James Scott Skinner nel 1903


I (1)
“Cé hé sin amu
a bhfuil faobhar a ghuth,
a’ réabadh mo dhorais dhúnta?”
“Mise Éamonn a’ Chnoic,
atá báite fuar fliuch,
ó shíor-shiúl sléibhte is gleannta.”
II(2)
Oh who is without
That in anger they should
Keep beating my bolted door
I am Ned of the hill
Long weary and chilled
From long trudging
Over marsh and moor
III
My love fond and true
What else could I do
But shield you from wind and from weather
When the shot falls like hail
They us both shall assail
And mayhap we will die together
IV
Through frost and through snow
Tired and hunted I go
In fear of both friend and of neighbour
My horses run wild
My acres untilled
And all of it lost to my labour
V
What grieves me far more
Than the loss of my store
Is there’s noone would shield me from danger
So my fate it must be
To bid farewell to thee
And to languish amid strangers
VI(3)
A chumann ‘s a shearc,
ó rachaimid seal faoi choillte
na meas cumhra,
Mar a bhfaighimid an breac
is an lon ar a nead,
an fia ‘gus an poc ag búireach,
An fhia ‘gus an poc ag búireach
Na h-éiníní binne
Ar ghéigíní a’ seinm
Is an cuaichín ar bharr an úir ghlais
Is go brách, brách,
ní thiocfaidh an bás in ár ngáire i lár
na coille cumhra.
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I (1)
“Chi è che là fuori
chiama con urgenza
e batte alla mia porta chiusa?”
“Sono Edmund Del Colle,
zuppo, gelido e bagnato e viaggio senza sosta per montagne e valli!”
II (2)
“Chi è fuori
che con rabbia continua
a battere alla mia porta chiusa?”
“Sono Ned Del Colle
stanco e congelato
dal lungo arrancare
per paludi e brughiere.”
III
“Amore mio
cos’altro potrei fare
se non proteggerti dal vento e dal cattivo tempo,
quando cade forte la grandine
su entrambi colpirà
e così moriremo insieme”
IV
“Con il gelo e la neve
stanco e braccato vado
temendo sia l’amico
che il vicino;
i miei cavalli corrono liberi
le mie terre stanno incolte
e ogni cosa perduta per il mio lavoro.
V
Ciò che mi addolora di più
della perdita dei miei affari
è che nessuno mi potrà proteggere dal pericolo,
così il mio destino è segnato
nel dirti addio
e languire tra gente straniera!”
VI (3)
Amore mio
andremo raminghi
per boschi odorosi
di alberi in fiore
dove troveremo la trota
e il merlo nel suo nido
il richiamo del cervo e del capro,
gli uccellini che cantano tra i rami
e il piccolo cuculo
in cima al  tasso sempreverde
e mai, mai
la morte ci coglierà tra i sorrisi
nel profondo del bosco odoroso

NOTE
1) (la traduzione in inglese:
Oh, who is that outside with anger in his voice
Beating on my closed door?
I am Eamann of the Hill, soaked through and wet
From constant walking of mountains and glens.)
2) in pratica la seconda strofa è la traduzione in inglese della prima strofa cantata in gaelico così per le restanti strofe in inglese secondo la traduzione di Donal O’Sullivan in “Songs of the Irish” (da qui)
3) l’ultima strofa ritorna in gaelico e la traduzione in inglese dice:
My friend and my love,
oh let’s go for a while
to the woods of the fragrant beeches,
Where we’ll find the trout
and the blackbird on her nest,
the deer and the goat(4) braying,
Sweet little birds singing on branches,
And the little cuckoo on top of the green yew tree;
And never, never will death come into our laughter in the midst of the fragrant woods

Seconda parte continua
FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/ned-hill.htm
http://livingthetradition.com/ned-of-the-hill/

http://www.doonbleisce.com/eamonn_a_chnoic.htm
http://lookingatdata.com/o/253-o-ruin-eamonn-an-chnoic.html
http://www.navan.org/lyrics/eamonn_an_chnoic.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/6508
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72285
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/e/eamonna.html
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~caforum/volume1/pdf/cashman.pdf
http://www.daltai.com/discus/messages/13510/17143.html?1150427281

GEORDIE BALLAD

La ballata di Geordie  Child ballad # 209 ha avuto grande diffusione in tutte le isole britanniche dando luogo a numerosissime varianti ed è stata tradotta anche in molte altre lingue, le varianti inglesi fanno di Geordie un bracconiere, mentre quelle scozzesi lo ritraggono nei panni di un nobile fuorilegge che si è ribellato alla Corona (vedi seconda parte).
amazzone
Nell’Inghilterra medievale la caccia di frodo nelle tenute e nelle riserve reali era punita con la pubblica impiccagione, ma al giovane Geordie viene riservato il privilegio di essere impiccato con una corda d’oro [impropriamente trasformata nella ballata in una “golden chain“] (o d’argento) a causa delle sue origini aristocratiche (probabilmente era un figlio cadetto o un figlio naturale di discendenza reale).
Nemmeno la supplica della giovane e innamorata moglie di Geordie riesce a fare breccia nel cuore del giudice. Colpisce l’immaginario la folle cavalcata della donna che si precipita in città per salvargli la vita

ASCOLTA curioso medley delle varie melodie e testi con immagini d’epoca

GEORDIE VERSIONE AMERICANA

La prima versione di successo internazionale della ballata è probabilmente quella live del 1962 di Joan Baez (che le valse il disco d’oro)

ASCOLTA Joan Baez, 1962

ASCOLTA Alice Castle live

VERSIONE JOAN BAEZ
As I walk’d o’er London Bridge
One misty morning early
I overheard a fair pretty maid,
Was lamenting for her Geordie.
“O, my Geordie will be hang’d in a golden chain,
‘tis not the chain of many,
He was born from King’s royal breed
And lost to a virtuous lady.
Go bridle me my milk-white steed,
Go bridle me my pony,
I will ride to London’s Court
To plead for the life of Geordie.
O Geordie never stole nor cow, nor calf,
He never hurted any,
Stole sixteen of the King’s royal deer
And he sold them in Bohenny.
Two pretty babes have I born,
The third lies in my body,
I’d freely part to them ev’ry one
If you’d spare the life of Geordie.”
The judge look’d over his left shoulder,
He said, “Fair maid, I’m sorry,
So, fair maid, you must be gone,
For I cannot pardon Geordie.”
O my Geordie will be hang’d in a golden chain,
‘tis not the chain of many,
Stole sixteen of the King’s royal deer
And he sold them in Bohenny.
Traduzione italiano di Riccardo Venturi
Mentre attraversavo il Ponte di Londra
Una nebbiosa mattina, presto
Sentii per caso una bella fanciulla
Che si lamentava per il suo Geordie.
“Impiccheranno Geordie con una corda d’oro (1) .
Non è una catena per molti;
È nato da stirpe reale
E fu affidato (2) a una dama virtuosa.
Mettete le redini al mio bianco cavallo,
Mettete le redini al mio pony;
Cavalcherò fino alla Corte di Londra
A implorare per la vita di Geordie.
Geordie mai rubò una mucca o un agnello,
Non ha mai fatto del male a nessuno (3);
Ha rubato sedici cervi del Re (4)
E li ha venduti a Bohenny (5).
Ho partorito due bei bambini,
Il terzo lo porto in grembo;
Darei volentieri tutti e tre
Se salvaste la vita di Geordie.”
Il giudice (6) si guardò la spalla sinistra (7),
Disse, “Mi dispiace, bella fanciulla;
Bella fanciulla, te ne devi andare
Perché non posso perdonare Geordie.”
Impiccheranno Geordie con una catena d’oro, (8)
Non è una catena per molti;
Ha rubato sedici cervi del Re
E li ha venduti a Bohenny.

NOTE
1) sorge spontanea la domanda se la corda d’oro sia una leggenda o una prassi non proprio insolita per il tempo. Così F. Calza, “101 storie su Genova che non ti hanno mai raccontato”, Newton Compton Ed., 2016 riporta di un’impiccagione altrettanto singolare di un ladro (e nemmeno nobile) che aveva rubato la spada con fodero e pomo d’oro donata da papa Paolo III all’ammiraglio Andrea Doria di Genova e sepolta con lui; venne accusato tale Mario Calabrese, un sotto comito delle galee della Repubblica (un sotto ufficiale addetto alla manovra delle vele e ad altri servizi) e impiccato con un cappio d’oro proprio davanti alla chiesa di San Matteo .
2) tradotto anche come “sposato” o “innamorato” oppure “perse la testa per” la frase così diventa “perse la testa per una donna virtuosa”: si avvalora così l’ipotesi avanzata da Buchan che “Geordie” fosse Sir George Gordon of Gight (1514-1562), quarto conte di Huntly, il figlio di Margaret Stewart (figlia illegittima di Giacomo IV), imprigionato per essere entrato nelle grazie della moglie del Signore di Bignet una donna da bene precisa il narratore; il Venturi traduce “fu affidato” un termine con cui  ci si riferisce alla balia a cui viene affidato un bambino e più impropriamente ad una moglie. Nella versione trascritta da Bob Waltz (qui) si dice “And courted a virtuous lady”
3) in alcune versioni di questo filone ritrovare in America è lo stesso Geordie a dire “I’ve never murdered any;
Stole sixteen of the king’s royal deer,
And sold them in Bohenny”
E’ interessante notare che Geordie o sua moglie negano l’accusa di furto di bestiame e di brigantaggio, che lo metteva nel mucchio degli “outlaw” dediti anche al bracconaggio (vedi)
4) quando i boschi da terra di tutti divennero di proprietà esclusiva del re o del signorotto locale nacque il bracconaggio di sussistenza. Ma nel Seicento il bracconaggio era diventata una forma di protesta contro l’autorità ed era praticato non tanto dai poveracci dei villaggi quanto dai nobili scapestrati. Le zone più colpite dal bracconaggio tra la fine del Settecento e l’Ottocento furono quelle delle Midlands e dell’Inghilterra del sud: Suffolk, Norfolk, Sussex, Wiltshire, Oxfordshire e Devon
5) Bohenny: Nessuna città o paese con tale nome è mai stata trovata in Gran Bretagna; una versione inglese ha però Newcastle, il che potrebbe far supporre qualche collegamento con la vicenda dell’impiccagione del bracconiere George Stools, avvenuta nel 1610. Da notare che Geordie è il nome con cui vengono chiamati gli abitanti di Newcastle-upon-Tyne (contea di Tyne e Wear – Northumbria): Geordie male, è il “maschio tipico di Newcastle” fannullone e dedito alla birra, rappresentato da Reg Smythe nella figura di Andy Capp. Esiste però, in Scozia, una Bohenie vicino a Pitlochrie.
6)  il giudice di contea era spesso lo stesso nobile derubato dal bracconiere e quindi poco incline al perdono. Il giudice avrebbe dovuto tener conto delle “attenuanti” come per l’appunto il numero dei figli. Se oggi noi tendiamo a interpretare la frase come memento “la legge è uguale per tutti” non così era la motivazione del tempo, perchè bastava la grazia del re per perdonare anche il più turpe assassinio. Il motivo per cui il giudice non può perdonare Geordie non è certo perchè deve  essere giusto!
7) l’espressione guardarsi le spalle (to look over one’s shoulder) indica la sensazione di un pericolo imminente, ma in questo caso significa “distogliere lo sguardo”
8) I primi bracconieri venivano tranquillamente uccisi sul posto dai guardiacaccia e probabilmente i loro corpi lasciati in pasto alle bestie selvatiche del bosco, successivamente le pene prevedevano l’incarcerazione e/o l’amputazione della mano (o l’abbacinamento)  fino alla pena capitale quando gli animali erano della riserva di caccia del Re. In Inghilterra con la Magna Charta libertatum (1215) vennero abolite le pene per la caccia di frodo, ma nella prassi quotidiana i giudici della contea (ovvero gli stessi nobili “derubati”) raramente erano ben disposti verso i bracconieri. Le condanne  però vennero mitigate nei secoli successivi e nel settecento il bracconiere rischiava solo la detenzione in carcere per qualche mese e/o le frustate. Era inoltre possibile pagare una multa (anche se salata) per riavere la libertà. Nel tardo Cinquecento la caccia al cervo (come veniva chiamata la caccia di frodo) era un’occupazione comune dei giovani e definita un “grazioso servizio”

La “Geordie” settecentesca, secondo quanto scrive Francis James Child, veniva venduta agli angoli delle vie di Londra per un penny. La triste vicenda del giovane bracconiere che viene condannato all’impiccagione con la giovane sposa (già madre di un paio di “pretty babies” ed incinta del terzo) che si reca ad implorare a corte per la sua vita, sembra che abbia avuto un successo clamoroso: “The broadside was sold out in three days and had to be continuously reprinted”, scrive il Child…
Poiché le “broadside ballads” trattavano usualmente di avvenimenti di cronaca (nera, e nei modi piu’ splatter possibili; una vera e propria “Cronaca Vera” dell’epoca), più d’un londinese cominciò ad inveire contro chi condannava a morte un ragazzo per avere rubato dei cervi e, il 17 agosto 1748, si rischio’ una mezza rissa quando un assembramento “pro-Geordie” venne sciolto con la forza vicino al Blackfriars Bridge (proprio quello dove fu ritrovato il cadavere del banchiere Calvi). Insomma, tutti ancora trovavano del tutto normale che un bracconiere potesse essere messo a morte; e questo la dice lunga su quel che dev’essere stata la guerra al bracconaggio. (Riccardo Venturi)
Nell’Ottocento invece il bracconiere rischiava la deportazione in qualche colonia penale (la meta preferita l’Australia continua)

GEORDIE VERSIONE INGLESE

ASCOLTA Anais Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer in Child Ballad 2013


As I walked out over London bridge
On a misty morning early
I overheard a fair pretty maid
Crying for the life of her Geordie
“Saddle me a milk white steed
Bridle me a pony
I’ll ride down to London town
And I’ll beg for the life of my Geordie”
And when she came to the courthouse steps/ The poor folks numbered many
A hundred crowns she passed around
Saying, “Pray for the life of my Geordie
He never stole a mule or a mare
He never murdered any
If he shot one of the king’s wild deer
It was only to feed his family”
And then she strode through the marble hall/ Before the judge and the jury/ Down on her bended knee she falls/ Crying for the life of her Geordie
“He never stole, he never slew
He never murdered any
He never injured any of you
Spare me the life of my Geordie”
The judge looked over his left shoulder/He says, “I’m sorry for thee
My pretty fair maid, you’ve come to late/ He’s been condemned already”
“But six pretty babes I had by him
The seventh one lies in my body
And I would bear them all over again
If you give me the life of my Geordie”
“Your Geordie will hang in a silver chain
Such as we don’t hang many
And he’ll be laid in a coffin brave
For your six fine sons to carry”
“I wish I had you in a public square
The whole town gathered around me
With my broad sword and a pistol too
I’d fight you for the life of my Geordie”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto *
Mentre attraversavo il Ponte di Londra
nella prima nebbia del mattino
sentii per caso una bella fanciulla
che si lamentava per la vita di Geordie.
Sellatemi un cavallo bianco,
mettete le redini al pony;
Cavalcherò fino a Londra
a implorare per la vita di Geordie.
E quando arrivò ai piedi del tribunale
c’era molta povera gente,
passò davanti a un centinaio di teste coronate dicendo “Vi supplico per la vita di Georgie, mai rubò un mulo o una giumenta, non ha mai ucciso nessuno;
se ha ucciso uno dei cervi del Re
è stato solo per sfamare la famiglia
Poi attraversò il salone di marmo
davanti al giudice e alla giuria
si gettò in ginocchio
lamentandosi per la vita di Geordie
Non ha mai rubato, né ucciso,
e nemmeno ha mai assassinato
nè offeso nessuno di voi
risparmiate la vita del mio Geordie
Il giudice (1)  distolse lo sguardo
e disse, “Mi dispiace per voi;
bella fanciulla, siete arrivata troppo tardi
è già stato condannato .”
Ho partorito sei bei bambini,
il settimo lo porto in grembo;
li partorirei di nuovo (2)
se salvaste la vita del mio Geordie.”
“Il vostro Geordie sarà impiccato con una catena d’argento (3),
non è una  catena per molti

e sarà deposto in una bella bara
da portare ai vostri cari sei figli.
Vorrei vedervi in una pubblica piazza
con tutta la città riunita introno 
con il mio spadone e anche la mia pistola a lottare conto di voi per la vita di Geordie (4)

NOTE
* dalla versione di Riccardo Venturi
1) il giudice di contea era spesso lo stesso nobile derubato dal bracconiere e quindi poco incline al perdono. Il giudice avrebbe dovuto tener conto delle “attenuanti” come per l’appunto il numero dei figli, ma evidentemente persegue altri interessi e per questo distoglie lo sguardo dalla dama
2) ossia ne metterei al mondo altri sei: la donna fa appello al numero dei figli e a un nascituro perchè erano tra le motivazioni che potevano aver spinto l’uomo al reato
3) una variante della corda d’oro
4) non tanto una sfida a singolar tenzone quanto l’eco di una minacciata ribellione del clan Gordon (vedi versione della ballata di Robert Burns qui)

GEORDIE VERSIONE ITALIANA DI FABRIZIO DE ANDRE’

De Andrè scrive una versione in italiano della ballata inglese, all’epoca ascoltando la traduzione di Maureen Rix ( rintracciata e intervistata da Walter Pistarini per il secondo libro “Fabrizio De André. Canzoni nascoste, storie segrete”) dell’arrangiamento di Joan Baez.
La conoscenza tra i due fu del tutto fortuita, Maureen lavorava come insegnante d’inglese alla scuola parastatale Pareto Ligure in Sampierdarena, (Genova) dove Fabrizio svolgeva la mansione di amministratore (guarda caso il padre Giuseppe era il proprietario della scuola) e i due condividevano l’interesse per la musica tradizionale. Nell’estate del 1965 Fabrizio chiese a Maureen di cercare dischi di musica tradizionale inglese e portarli in Italia durante la sua vacanza a Londra e di ritorno mentre ascoltavano le canzoni lei si mise a canticchiare Geordie..
ASCOLTA Fabrizio De Andrè&Maureen Rix 1966

ASCOLTA Angelo Branduardi in Il rovo e la rosa 2013, un omaggio a De Andrè

I
Mentre attraversavo London Bridge
un giorno senza sole
vidi una donna pianger d’amore,
piangeva per il suo Geordie.
II
Impiccheranno Geordie con una corda d’oro,
è un privilegio raro.
Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.
III
Sellate il suo cavallo dalla bianca criniera
sellatele il suo pony
cavalcherà fino a Londra stasera
ad implorare per Geordie
IV
Geordie non rubò mai neppure per me
un frutto o un fiore raro.
Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.
V
Salvate le sue labbra, salvate il suo sorriso,
non ha vent’anni ancora
cadrà l’inverno anche sopra il suo viso,
potrete impiccarlo allora (1)
VI
Nè il cuore degli inglesi nè lo scettro del re
Geordie potran salvare,
anche se piangeran con te
la legge non può cambiare (2)“.
VII
Così lo impiccheranno con una corda d’oro,
è un privilegio raro.
Rubò sei cervi nel parco del re
vendendoli per denaro.

NOTE
1) tutta la parte femminile è una delicata rielaborazione di De Andè, meno interessato alla realtà dei processi d’epoca medievale e più a suscitare l’empatia del pubblico giovanile di quegli anni
2) De Andrè mette in bocca al giudice una sentenza di pietra “la legge non può cambiare“,  il tema della giustizia è ricorrente nelle canzoni di De Andrè, e qui la legge è suprema, al di sopra di tutto e tutti, nella sua “assoluta” imparzialità, è il principio di autorità che è stato leso con il furto dei cervi del re, un ordine stabilito da Dio.  Ed ecco che riaffiorano le ragioni del cuore e dell’umanità “calpestate” da una giustizia cieca, che non può provare pietà neanche di fronte all’amore più puro.

la versione scozzese continua

BRACCONIERI, FORESTE, OPPOSIZIONE di Riccardo Venturi

Nel poemetto “Piers Plowman” (“Pietro l’Aratore”) di William Langland, scritto in medio inglese nel XIV secolo, vi e’ un famoso passo in cui un contadino si domanda come mai tutti i nomi di animali vivi siano inglesi, mentre quando vengono cucinati diventano francesi. Così l’inglese “pig”, cucinato, diventa “pork”; il “calf” (vitello) diventa “veal” (francese antico “vel”, moderno “veau”); il “deer” (cervo) diventa “cerf” (non più in uso nell’inglese moderno); e così via.
La risposta e’ semplicissima: l’allevamento e la caccia servivano alle tavole dei re e dei ricchi; i quali re e ricchi, nell’Inghilterra di allora, parlavano francese. Per tre secoli, dalla conquista normanna di Guglielmo con la battaglia di Hastings fino al 1362, data meno nota ma che segna il ristabilimento ufficiale della lingua inglese (nel frattempo modificatasi enormemente in seguito all’influsso francese) come lingua di corte ed amministrativa, il francese e’ la lingua delle classi dominanti, mentre il disprezzato inglese e’ la lingua del popolo, delle classi piu’ umili, dello “strato basso”.
Quelli, insomma, che gli animali li devono allevare per farli mangiare agli altri. E di quelli che non possono piu’ andare a cacciare liberamente nelle foreste, per sfamarsi e sfamare le loro famiglie, perche’ nel frattempo una classe dominante ha importato la “nobile arte” della caccia come “sport” di élite, chiudendo le foreste ai poveracci e organizzando il proprio divertimento (che e’ anche forma di addestramento militare) con battitori, cani, cavalli e servi. Nasce cosi’ la “caccia di frodo“, il bracconaggio; una cosa che nell’Inghilterra anglosassone prenormanna non esisteva assolutamente. E viene, da subito, sottoposta a leggi severissime. Le foreste, mezzo di sostentamento delle classi popolari non soltanto con la caccia, diventano luoghi di esclusiva proprieta’ del re e delle classi aristocratiche. Ancora in epoca elisabettiana, la maggior parte del territorio inglese e’ ricoperta da fitte boscaglie; logico, quindi, che in quella che, con tutti le cautele del caso, puo’ essere definita “coscienza popolare”, le foreste diventino un luogo di opposizione. E di durissima opposizione.
Non e’ un caso che, sin dal XIV secolo, si parli di “guerra al bracconaggio”. E non e’ un caso che nasca, forse su basi reali, la leggenda di Robin Hood (che nelle molte ballate tradizionali che lo riguardano, spesso viene definito con l’appellativo di “free hunter”).
Le leggi che riguardavano l’esercizio della caccia divengono via via sempre piu’ draconiane: vengono istituiti i guardacaccia armati al servizio del re o del signore locale, ai quali viene data la facoltà di poter abbattere sul posto chi viene sorpreso a cacciare di frodo. Chi si recava a cacciare in una foresta per mangiare qualcosa rischiava quindi la vita. Si organizzano bande di cacciatori abusivi i quali, a volte, riescono a sopraffare i guardacaccia e ad ucciderli nei modi più atroci (anche, naturalmente, per vendicarsi di trattamenti del tutto analoghi da parte dei guardacaccia).
Nasce così, nella foresta, come luogo di opposizione, la figura dell’ “outlaw“. Con un termine popolare antico, inglesizzato sì, ma di antica derivazione danese (“udlav”). E i signori si trovano a malpartito, ad esprimere tale termine in francese. Rimane in inglese. Gli outlaws parlano soltano la lingua bassa e hanno nomi da bovari, da porcari, da servi.

FONTI
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-LifeGeordie.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2206
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18312
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/geordie.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch209.htm
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geordie
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Gordon
https://ilpalazzodisichelgaita.wordpress.com/2012/02/27/le-foreste-nel-medioevo-tra-economia-ed-ecologia/
http://georgianagarden.blogspot.it/2010/03/il-bracconaggio.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=6782
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=5658&lang=en
http://www.bielle.org/fabriziodeandre/pages/tradpop.htm#scheda
http://www.panorama.it/musica/fabrizio-de-andre-libro-storie-inediti-walter-pistarini/

HAL AN TOW in Helston (Cornovaglia)

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow mayday songs 
Furry Dance di Helston

1834733

A Helston in Cornovaglia si  celebra la Furry Dance (Flora o Floral  dance) che si svolge durante l’arco della giornata dell’8 Maggio. Il significato di Furry si trova  nella radice del gaelico cornico fer = fiera, festa che nel contesto di Helston è dedicata a San Michele. All’interno del nutrito programma delle danze si svolge  una specie di sacra rappresentazione a tema storico e mitico, che si snoda in una processione che parte dalla  chiesa di San Giovanni: i personaggi sono Robin Hood e la sua brigata, San  Giorgio e San Michele, che annunciano l’arrivo della Primavera.


VEDI altre riprese della festa

THE FURRY DANCE

E’ molto semplicemente una lunghissima promenade di giovani (e non proprio giovani) coppie che sfilano dietro alla banda per lo più camminando ( o con passo saltellato) alternando un paio di giri di volta con il proprio partner . Si tratta di due sfilate la prima del mattino e  la seconda di mezzogiorno con abiti più formali (abito lungo e elaborato cappellino per le signore,  tight e cilindro per i signori, very british: di origine britannica, il tight o taitè un capo dell’abbigliamento formale maschile di notevole eleganza, detto anche morning dress (“abito da giorno”) poiché indossato di giorno, è l’abito di rigore nelle cerimonie pubbliche e per tutte le occasioni che riguardano la famiglia reale inglese.)
LA DANZA DEL MATTINO
LA DANZA DI MEZZOGIORNO

I GIOCHI DI ROBIN HOOD

Di moda nel tardo Medioevo i “Giochi di Robin Hood” erano praticati durante la festa del Maggio. Si iniziava con un corteggio in  costume dei vari personaggi del leggendario Robin Hood, chiuso dal palo di  maggio portato al traino dei buoi, e dalle maschere del cavallo e del drago. Il palo del Maggio era quindi innalzato  tra il tripudio generale e si svolgeva una danza intorno ad esso. Quindi  seguivano le esibizioni buffonesche delle maschere del cavallo e del drago.
Aveva inizio quindi la gara vera e  propria: la sfida del tiro con l’arco.
Al termine la lizza era presa d’assalto  dal popolino che proseguivano fino a tardi danzando intorno al palo di  maggio. La tradizione è perdurata fino a tutto l’Ottocento

img013

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

Conosciuta più comunemente con il titolo di “Hal an tow” è la canzone principale nella rappresentazione dei mummers al Flora Day di Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band in ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband in Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arrangiata in versione rock è diventata molto popolare tra i gruppi del  genere celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)
V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
(Coro:
Hal-an-Tow, una bella festa 
ci siamo alzati presto  prima del giorno, per salutare l’estate,
per salutare il Maggio,
perché l’estate è arrivata
e l’inverno se né andato).
I
Da quando l’uomo è stato creato
le sue opere sono state dibattute
si è celebrato
l’arrivo della Primavera
II
Prendi lo scorno e  indossa le corna, era lo stemma quando  sei nato,
il padre di tuo padre lo portava,
e anche tuo padre.
III
Robin Hood e Little John
sono andati entrambi  alla fiera
e andremo nel bosco per cacciare il cervo e la lepre.
IV
Dove sono gli Spagnoli
che si sono vantati  così grandemente? Mangeranno le piume  d’oca e noi mangeremo l’arrosto.
V
Prendiamo San Giorgio o
San Giorgio era un cavaliere o
Di tutti i cavalieri della Cristianità
San Giorgio è il protettore o
in ogni terra
in ogni terra dove andiamo
VI
Ma prendiamo uno ancora più grande di San Giorgio, chi di Helston ha preso le parti, San Michele con le ali spiegate
l’arcangelo così luminoso
che ha combattuto il diavolo
nemico di tutti gli uomini
VII
Dio benedica Santa  Maria (e Mosè)
e tutta la sua  potenza e la forza,
che ci mandi la pace  in Inghilterra,
che ci mandi la pace  notte e giorno

NOTE
1)  La traduzione di Hal an tow potrebbe essere “la ghirlanda del Calendimaggio”  (halan=calende) e lo stesso nome veniva attribuito  ai gruppi di giovinetti che fin dal mattino presto andavano nei boschi a  tagliare i rami del Maggio e li portavano in paese danzando e cantando  l’arrivo della Primavera.
Ma molti studiosi propendono per il significato di “heel and toe,”   del tipo “dagli di tacco, dagli di punta” riferito al passo di  danza proprio delle Morris dancing.
Un’altra interpretazione la traduce come “tirare la corda” (dall’olandese “Haal aan het   Touw” derivato dal sassone) riferito al lavoro  dei marinai sulle navi ma anche al gioco del tiro alla fune, uno dei pochi  sopravvissuti dai Giochi di Maggio di Robin Hood. Alcuni interpretano tutte le  strofe in chiave marinaresca, come se la canzone fosse un sea-shanty  e spiegano il termine “rumbelow” come una storpiatura  di rumbowling – rumbullion  come veniva chiamato il rum e successivamente il grog all’epoca dei pirati!
2) Take the scorn and wear the horns: la prima strofa si ritrova quasi identica nella  commedia di Shakespeare As You Like  scritta nel 1599, Atto IV, Scena II, la scena di caccia nella foresta alla  richiesta di chi abbia ucciso il cervo Jaques risponde “portiamo  quest’uomo al duca, come un trionfale conquistatore romano, che metta le  corna del cervo sulla testa, come la corona della vittoria” e alla  domanda se il guardiacaccia conosca una canzone per l’occasione ecco di  seguito il testoWhat shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.(Traduzione italiano: Cosa dobbiamo dare all’uomo che ha  ucciso questo cervo? Dategli la pelle e le corna da  indossare. Poi cantate questa canzone andando a casa: non vergognatevi di indossare le corna, sono state portate da prima che voi  nasceste, il padre di vostro padre le portava e anche vostro padre. Il corno, il corno vigoroso non è da deridere o da disprezzare). Come si fa a negare il riferimento al  dio cervo e più in generale al simbolismo del cervo come animale sacro  portatore di fertilità? vedi
3) Shirley Collins canta invece:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: l’immagine ironizza sugli Spagnoli che  mangiano le piume d’oca sconfitti dalla muraglia di frecce degli Inglesi ai  quali beffardamente spetta l’arrosto d’oca poichè  vincitori
5)  Shirley Collins canta invece:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) San Giorgio nacque in Palestina e morì decapitato nel 287. La sua festa presso molte popolazioni del mondo rurale mediterraneo, rappresenta la rinascita della natura e l’arrivo della Primavera, il Santo ha ereditato le funzioni di una più antica divinità pagana connessa con i culti solari: San Giorgio che sconfigge il Drago è diventato il dio solare che sconfigge le tenebre. continua
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Santa Maria  o la Madonna. Nel tentativo attuato dalla Chiesa di portare nell’alveo della  venerazione dei Santi i rituali praticati dal popolo verso le divinità pagane  più radicate nella tradizione. In origine quindi l’invocazione era una  preghiera riferita alla dea della primavera. In altre versioni la frase  diventa “The Lord and Lady bless you” con una connotazione più pagana “Il Dio e la Dea vi benedicano”

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html

La Caccia d’Amore di Beltane: Two Magicians

Read the post in English

63_rackham_siegfried_grimhildeLa Caccia d’Amore è un tema tipico dei canti popolari, secondo modi propri della canzone d’amore cortese ovvero i contrasti tra due innamorati, in questi lui cerca di conquistare e lei respinge o dileggia e spesso il contesto è comico o anche scurrile.
Così la ballata “The Twa Magicians” è una Caccia d’Amore in cui la naturale ritrosia della virginale fanciulla ringalluzzisce l’uomo, perchè il di lei diniego è in realtà un invito alla conquista.

THE TWA MAGICIANS

La ballata è originaria del Nord della Scozia e la prima fonte scritta si trova in “Ancient Ballads and Song of the North of Scotland” di Peter Buchan – 1828, successivamente anche in Child #44 (The English and Scottish Popular Ballads di Francis James Child). Si ritiene che provenga dalla tradizione norrena. Le versioni giunte fino a noi sono numerose, come accade in genere per le ballate popolari diffuse nella tradizione orale, e anche con finali diversi tra loro. Nella sua forma “base” si tratta della storia di un fabbro che intende conquistare una vergine; la fanciulla però fugge, trasformandosi in vari animali ed anche oggetti o elementi della Natura; l’uomo la insegue mutando forma egli stesso.
Si trova traccia scritta del tema già nel 1630 in una ballata dal titolo  The two kinde Lovers (The Maydens resolution and will, To be like her true Lover still) – vedi testo in cui però è la donna a inseguire l’uomo.
La ballata inizia con la donna che dice


if thou wilt goe, Love,
let me goe with thee
Because I cannot live,
without thy company

Se tu andrai, Amore
lasciami venite con te
perché non posso vivere
senza la tua compagnia

e prosegue dicendo:
se tu sei il sole io sarò la luna,
se tu sarai l’aurora io sarò la rugiada,
se tu sarai la rosa io sarò il profumo  
..

Si tratta quindi di coppie complementari e non opposte, una sorta di resa totale all’amore da parte della donna che dichiara la sua fedeltà all’uomo. Non dimentichiamoci che le antiche ballate erano anche una forma d’insegnamento o se si vuole di educazione dei giovani.
E tuttavia troviamo sepolte nel testo tracce di rituali d’iniziazione, perle di saggezza o insegnamenti druidici, così i due maghi si trasformano in animali associati ai tre regni, Nem (cielo), Talam (Terra) Muir (mare) o se vogliamo mondo di sopra, di mezzo e di sotto e il mistero è quello della rinascita spirituale.
Altre analogie si riscontrano con la ballata “Hares on the Mountain

VERSIONE BUCHAN

In genere la Caccia d’Amore si conclude con l’accoppiamento consensuale.
La versione diffusa oggi di “The two magicians” è basata sulla riscrittura del testo e l’arrangiamento musicale di Albert Lancaster Lloyd   (1908-1982) per l’album “The Bird in the   Bush” (1966 );

ASCOLTA (tutte le strofe tranne XV e XVI)

Celtic stone in Celtic Stone, 1983: (gruppo americano folk-rock attivo negli   anni 80 e 90), un’ironica interpretazione vocale da consumati menestrelli, un brioso arrangiamento musicale che accosta felicemente chitarra acustica con l’hammer dulcimer
l’ordine delle strofe è alterato rispetto alla versione”standard” e si inseriscono due strofe aggiuntive (strofe da I a VII, XI, IX, XIV, X, XV, XVI, XVII)

Damh the Bard in Tales from the Crow Man, 2009. Altro menestrello del mondo magico in una versione più rock (strofe da I a VII, XI, IX, XII, X, XIV, XV, XVI,XVII, XVIII)

Jean-Luc Lenoir in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2013 (voce Joanne McIver) 
– un arrangiamento brioso e accattivante tratto da un traditional (è un mixer tra le due melodie)
Owl Service in Wake The Vaulted Echo (2006)
Empty Hats in The Hat Came Back, 2000 molto efficace la scelta del parlato

VERSIONE A.L. Lloyd
I
The lady stood at her own front door
As straight as a willow wand
And along come a lusty smith (1)
With his hammer in his hand
CHORUS
Saying “bide lady bide
there’s a nowhere you can hide
the lusty smith will be your love
And he will lay your pride”.
II
“Well may you dress, you lady fair,
All in your robes of red  (2)
Before tomorrow at this same time
I’ll have your maidenhead.”
III
“Away away you coal blacksmith
Would you do me this wrong?
To have me maidenhead
That I have kept so long”
IV
I’d rather I was dead and cold
And me body in the grave
Than a lusty, dusty, coal black smith
Me maide head should have”
V
Then the lady she held up her hand
And swore upon the spul
She never would be the blacksmith’s love
For all of a box of gold  (3)
VI
And the blacksmith he held up his hand/And he swore upon the mass,
“I’ll have you for my love, my girl,
For the half of that or less.”
VII
Then she became a turtle dove
And flew up in the air
But he became an old cock pigeon
And they flew pair and pair
VIII
And she became a little duck,
A-floating in the pond,
And he became a pink-necked drake
And chased her round and round.
IX
She turned herself into a hare  (4)
And ran all upon the plain
But he became a greyhound dog
And fetched her back again
X
And she became a little ewe sheep
and lay upon the common
But he became a shaggy old ram
And swiftly fell upon her.
XI
She changed herself to a swift young mare, As dark as the night was black,
And he became a golden saddle
And clung unto her back.
XII
And she became a little green fly,
A-flew up in the air,
And he became a hairy spider
And fetched her in his lair.
XIII
Then she became a hot griddle (5)
And he became a cake,
And every change that poor girl made
The blacksmith was her mate.
XIV
So she turned into a full-dressed ship
A-sailing on the sea
But he became a captain bold
And aboard of her went he
XV 
So the lady she turned into a cloud
Floating in the air
But he became a lightning flash
And zipped right into her
XVI
So she turned into a mulberry tree
A mulberry tree in the wood
But he came forth as the morning dew
And sprinkled her where she stood.
XVII
So the lady ran in her own bedroom
And changed into a bed,
But he became a green coverlet
And he gained her maidenhead
XVIII
And was she woke, he held her so,
And still he bad her bide,
And the husky smith became her love
And that pulled down her pride.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La dama si sedette alla porta di casa, dritta come una bacchetta di salice
e un gagliardo fabbro le viene vicino
con il martello in mano
CORO:
Dicendo “Aspetta, fanciulla, aspetta, perché non c’è posto dove tu possa nasconderti, il fabbro gagliardo sarà il tuo amante, e vincerà il tuo orgoglio!
II
Ti credi al sicuro, bella dama,
tutta vestita di rosso
ma prima che venga domani a questa stessa ora avrò la tua verginità“.
III
Via, via fabbro nero carbone,
perchè mi faresti questo affronto?
Prendere la verginità
che ho serbato così a lungo!
IV
Preferirei essere morta stecchita
seppellita nella tomba

piuttosto che un fabbro così nero-carbone e grosso, abbia la mia verginità.”
IV
Così la dama alzò la mano
e giurò sulla terra
che non sarebbe mai stata l’amante del fabbro
nemmeno per un sacco d’oro.
VI
Ma il fabbro alzò la mano
e giurò sulla lancia
Ti avrò come amante, ragazza mia
per la metà o molto meno“.
VII
Così lei si trasformò in colomba
e volò alto in cielo,
ma lui divenne un vecchio piccione e volavano appaiati,
VIII
Così lei si trasformò in una paperella
che nuotava nello stagno
ma lui divenne un papero dal collo rosa
che le girava in tondo
IX
Così lei si trasformò in lepre
e corse per tutta la piana
e lui si trasformò in un levriero
e la raggiunse di nuovo
X
Così lei si trasformò in pecorella che pascolava per la brughiera,
ma lui divenne un vecchio ariete
e lesto la montò.
XI
Così lei si trasformò in un’agile cavalla nera come la notte,
ma lui divenne una sella dorata
e le montò sulla schiena.
XII
Così lei divenne una piccola verde mosca per svolazzare nell’aria,
ma lui divenne un ragno peloso
e la trascinò nella sua tana.
XIII
Allora lei divenne un testo rovente
e lui una torta
e a ogni giro che la ragazza faceva,
il fabbro le stava attaccato
XIV
Così lei si trasformò in una nave tutta impavesata e salpò per il mare,
ma lui divenne un intrepido capitano e salì a bordo.
XV
Così la dama si trasformò in una nuvola che fluttuava nell’aria,
ma lui divenne un fulmine luminoso e zigzagò verso di lei.
XVI
Così lei si trasformò in un albero di gelso, un gelso nella foresta,
ma lui divenne rugiada di mattino
e si sparpagliò su di lei.
XVII
Così lei corse nella propria stanza
e si trasformò nel letto,
ma lui diventò un copriletto verde e  prese la sua verginità
XVIII
E quando lei si svegliò la prese ancora, finchè lei capitolò,
così il fabbro divenne il suo amante, e ciò fece capitolare l’orgoglio di lei.

NOTE
1) da sempre nelle canzoni popolari il maniscalco è considerato sinonimo di virilità, amante molto dotato e dalla forza portentosa. Qui egli è anche mago armato di martello mentre la fanciulla sua antagonista (o complementare) impugna una bacchetta di salice.
Viene da pensare a una sorta di duello o sfida tra due praticanti maghi
2) letteralmente: “Come siete ben vestita con i vostri abiti in rosso” come sempre nelle antiche ballate alcune parole sono dei codici che fanno risuonare dei campanelli d’allarme in chi ascolta: il rosso è il colore delle fate ossia delle creature dotate di poteri magici. Rosso era anche il colore della sposa nell’antichità ed è un colore propizio per la fertilità
3) anche scritto come “pot of gold” e subito vengono in mente le pentole piene d’oro del leprecauno
4) la coppia lepre-segugio è la prima delle trasformazioni nel mito gallese della nascita di Taliesin. Gwion è l’inseguito che si muta in un animale lunare, prende in sè il principio femminile simbolo di abbondanza-fertilità, ma anche creatività-intuizione, diventa puro istinto, frenesia.
E’ il cane non solo predatore, ma anche guardiano e psicopompo  ‘Il cane riveste presso moltissime popolazioni la funzione di guardiano dei luoghi sacri, guida dell’uomo nella notte della morte, difensore del regno dei morti, sorvegliante in tutti i casi del regno spirituale.
In particolare presso i Celti era associato al mondo dei Guerrieri. Il cane, infatti, era presente nelle iniziazioni dei Guerrieri. La caccia, come la guerra, era un atto sacro che si poteva compiere solo dopo un’iniziazione e una preparazione rituale di protezione divina’.
(Riccardo Taraglio in  Il Vischio e la Quercia) continua
5) ferri da cialda: il testo è un speciale attrezzo per cucinare il pane o le cialde di Beltane detto anche ferro o meglio al plurale ferri con cui venivano schiacciati e cotti dei piccoli pezzi di pasta all’interno di piatti metallici arroventati sul fuoco. Le due piastre che potevano essere lisce o variamente decorate a nido d’ape o a intagli floreali, scritte o disegni geometrici, erano incernierate da una parte e dotate li un lungo manico: poste sul fuoco man mano che si arroventavano da un lato venivano rigirate per la cottura dall’altro lato. Nel Medioevo erano diventati dei capolavori di forgiatura realizzati da mastri ferrai o raffinati argentieri, ed erano un tradizionale dono di fidanzamento.

Ferro da cialde, Umbria, sec. XVI

VERSIONE SHARP

Il brano è riportato da Cecil Sharp in One Hundred English Folksongs  (1916) nelle note dice di averlo ascoltato  dal signor Sparks (di mestiere fabbro), Minehead, Somerset, nel 1904.

Steeleye Span nell’album “Now we are six”, 1974

VERSIONE STEELEYE SPAN
I
She looked out of the window
as white as any milk
And he looked in at  the window
as black as any silk
CHORUS
Hello, hello, hello, hello,
you coal blacksmith

You have done me no harm
You never shall  have my maidenhead
That I have kept so long
I’d rather die a maid
Ah, but then she said
and be buried all in my grave

Than to have such a nasty,
husky, dusky, fusky, musky

Coal blacksmith,
a maiden, I will die

II
She became a duck,
a duck all on the stream
And he became a water dog (1)
and fetched her back again.
She became a star,
a star all in the night
And he became a thundercloud
And muffled her out of sight.
III
She became a rose,
a rose all in the wood
And he became a bumble bee  (2)
And kissed her where she stood.
She became a nun,
a nun all dressed in white
And he became a canting priest
And prayed for her by night.
IV
She became a trout,
a trout all in the brook
And he became a feathered fly
And caught her with his hook.
She became a corpse,
a corpse all in the ground
And he became the cold clay
and smothered her all around (3)
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Dalla finestra lei guardava fuori ,
pallida come del latte
Dalla finestra lui guardava dentro,
scuro come una calza di seta
Coro
Ciao, ciao, ciao
nero fabbro ferraio 

non mi hai fatto del male
e mai avrai la mia verginità
che ho custodito così a lungo,
preferisco  morire da fanciulla
allora lei disse
e essere sepolta nella tomba,
piuttosto che avere un fabbro ferraio così brutto, grosso, scuro e puzzolente,
nero come carbone.
Morirò vergine”

II
Lei diventò un anatra,
un anatra nel fiume
e lui si trasformò in un cane
per darle la caccia.
Lei diventò una stella,
una stella nella notte
e lui diventò una nuvola di temporale e la nascose alla vista.
III
Lei  diventò una rosa,
una rosa del bosco
e lui in un bombo
e la baciò sul posto.
Lei diventò una monaca,
una monaca vestita di bianco
e lui diventò un prete  ipocrita, per pregare con lei tutta la notte.
IV
Lei diventò una trota,
una trota nel ruscello
e lui diventò un amo con l’esca
e la prese con il suo uncino.
Lei diventò un cadavere,
steso sul terreno
e lui diventò fredda terra
e l’avvolse tutta

NOTE
1) water dog è una cane di riporto grande nuotatore ossia un cane addestrato per la caccia di palude, insomma una parola troppo lunga da utilizzare per la traduzione in italiano
2) il bombo è imparentato con le api, ma non produce il miele ed è molto più grosso e tozzo dell’ape
3) Qui la storia si potrebbe tradurre come “Quale parte della parola NO non capisci?” ossia il categorico e virginale rifiuto della donna all’atto sessuale ripetutamente tentato da un fabbro brutto, scuro e anche un po’ puteolente   (oggi si direbbe puzzone). Per sfuggire alla bramosia dell’uomo lei si trasforma in anatra, stella, rosa, monaca e trota (e lui nei suoi persecutori, ossia cane da palude, nuvola, bombo, prete, amo da pesca); apparentemente la fanciulla preferisce la morte piuttosto che subire uno stupro: questo è un modo distorto d’interpretare la storia, è la mentalità “maschilista” convinta che la donna sia sempre complice della violenza e quindi da condannare, non una vittima.
A mio avviso invece è  il ritorno alla terra nella fusione del principio femminile con quello maschile; i due, ormai persi nel vortice delle trasformazioni, si fondono in un unico abbraccio di polvere e la loro morte è una morte-rinascita .

Beltane Fire Festival 

IL FABBRO

L’uomo cacciatore qui è però una figura “soprannaturale”, il fabbro considerato nei tempi antichi una creatura dotata di poteri magici, i primi fabbri furono infatti i nani (gli elfi neri o oscuri) capaci di creare armi e gioielli incantati. L’arte della forgia era una conoscenza antica che si tramandava tra iniziati.
Così nel Medioevo la figura del fabbro assunse delle connotazioni negative basti pensare alle tante “fucine del diavolo” o “del pagano” che davano il nome a località un tempo sede di forgia.

Vulcano, Andrea Mantegna

In forza del suo mestiere il fabbro è uomo possente con muscoli ben sviluppati, eppure proprio a causa della sua conoscenza e del suo potere il fabbro è spesso zoppo o orbo: se comune mortale la sua menomazione è un segno che egli ha visto (si è impadronito) di un qualche segreto divino, ossia ha visto un aspetto nascosto della divinità dal quale viene punito per sempre; è la conoscenza del segreto del fuoco e dei metalli, che si tramutano da solido a liquido e si mescolano in leghe. In molte mitologie sono gli stessi dei ad essere fabbri (Varuna, Odino) sono dei maghi e anche loro hanno pagato un prezzo per la loro magia.
La zoppia inoltre nasconde un’ulteriore metafora: quello della prova che è alla base della ricerca, sia essa una conquista spirituale oppure un’atto risanatore o di vendetta (un tema fondamentale nel ciclo del Graal).

Ma i maghi della ballata sono due dunque anche la fanciulla è una mutaforma o forse una sciamana.

MUTAFORMA

Cerridwen_EmpowermentIl tema della trasformazione è l’ispirazione delle Metamorfosi di Ovidio: un susseguirsi di divinità dell’Olimpo che per la propria lussuria si trasformano in animali (ma anche in pioggia dorata) e seducono belle mortali o ninfe dei boschi (le quali a loro volta si trasformano nel loro antagonista).
Del resto l’inseguimento attraverso la mutazione delle forme ricorda quello tra Cerridwen e il suo apprendista nella storia gallese della nascita del bardo Taliesin. A fuggire è qui un ragazzo, avendo bevuto la pozione magica dell’Ispirazione dal calderone che stava sorvegliando, si sottrae all’ira della dea trasformandosi in vari animali (lepre, pesce, uccello). Alla fine diventa chicco di grano per nascondersi come il classico ago nel pagliaio, ma la dea mutata in gallina se lo mangia. Da questo insolito accoppiamento nasce   Taliesin (534-599) alias Merlino..

IL CANTO DI AMERGIN
Sono stato una goccia di pioggia nei cieli,
sono stato la più lontana delle stelle.
Sono stato cibo al festino,
sono stato corda di un’arpa.
Sono stato una lancia aguzza
scudo nella battaglia
spada nella stretta delle mani.
Nell’acqua e nella schiuma
Sono stato temprato nel fuoco.


Ovvero, per divenire Saggezza, per Comprendere, si devono sperimentare gli elementi…

Questo poema di Taliesin potrebbe condensare il mistero del viaggio iniziatico, in cui la Saggezza viene conquistata con la conoscenza degli elementi, che è esperienza profonda, immedesimazione, attraverso la penetrazione della loro propria essenza, divenendo il viandante stesso essenza degli elementi.
Cambiare forma significa sperimentare tutto, sperimentare se stessi in ogni cosa in continuo cambiamento e sperimentare l’incontro tra il sé e l’altro, preda e predatore, non separati ma inscindibilmente legati, come in una danza. (tratto da qui)

VOLO SCIAMANICO

La caratteristica principale dello sciamano è quella di “viaggiare” in condizioni di estasi nel mondo degli spiriti e di utilizzarne i poteri per il singolo o per l’intera comunità. Le tecniche per far questo sono essenzialmente il sonno estatico (trance mistica) e la trasformazione del proprio spirito in animale. Mutare forma come pratica magica comporta una trasformazione di una parte dell’anima nello spirito di un animale per lasciare il corpo e viaggiare sia nel mondo sensibile che in quello sovrasensibile. Un’altra tecnica consiste nel lasciare il proprio corpo e prendere possesso del corpo di un animale vivente.

In questo modo lo sciamano “cavalca”, cioè prende come mezzo per spostarsi, i corpi degli animali che sono anche suoi spiriti-guida. In alcuni rituali si utilizzano piante psicoattive oppure il   battito del tamburo, oppure si indossano le pelli o la maschera dell’animale che si desidera “cavalcare”. Tale pratica non è indenne da rischi: può accadere che lo sciamano non possa più ritornare al suo corpo perché si dimentica di sé, del suo essere umano, oppure viaggia troppo lontano dal corpo e cade in coma o il corpo fisico muore perché troppo debilitato dalla separazione.
Lo spirito può essere catturato nell’aldilà o l’animale   può essere ferito o ucciso sul piano terreno e quindi, come l’anima dello sciamano è catturata o ferita o uccisa, così il suo corpo ne riporta le conseguenze.

continua seconda parte 

vedi anche traduzioni pubblicate in
https://lyricstranslate.com/it/two-magicians-i-due-maghi.html-0
https://lyricstranslate.com/it/twa-magiciansthe-two-magicians-i-due-maghi.html

FONTI
http://web.tiscali.it/artigianidaltritempi/fabbro.htm
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=252
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thetwomagicians.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sciamani.html
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch044.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/child/2magics.html
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=247
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40723
http://www.yourultimateresource.com/the-two-magicians/

LE DANZE DEL MAGGIO: COME, LASSES AND LADS

Il testo di “Come, Lasses and Lads” è contenuto anche in “Ancient Poem, Ballads and Song of the Peasantry of England” -Robert Bell con il titolo “The rural dance about the May Pole” datato al 1671.
Pubblicato come libretto illustrato in varie edizioni e versioni ottocentesche, si rimanda a quella di Randolph Caldecott per una visione integrale (vedi). Quindi anche se il testo è secentesco, le illustrazioni che seguono vanno a documentare una tipica festa di Maggio ottocentesca.

00000004

ASCOLTA Michael Bannett in Journey through the British Isles -2004 : una briosa melodia barocca eseguita con strumenti d’epoca e interpretata dalla voce soprano (o se vogliamo controtenore) di Michael, un dodicenne prodigioso!

VERSIONE DI MICHAEL BANNETT
I
Come, lasses and lads,
take leave of your dads
And away to the maypole hie,
For every he has got his she,
And the fiddler’s standing by,
There’s Toddie has got his Jane,
And Johnny has got his Joan,
And there to jig it, jig it,
and trip it up and down.
II
“You’re out!” says Dick.
“Not I!” says Nick.
“‘Twas the fiddler played it wrong.”
“‘Tis true!” says Hugh,
and so says Sue
And so says everyone.
The fiddler then began
To play the tune again,
And every girl did foot it and foot it,
And trip it to the men.
III
Now they did stay there all that day,
And tired the fiddler quite,
all dancing and play,
without any pay,
From morning until night;
At last they told the fiddler,
They’d pay him for his play,
and each top it, top it
top it even it went away.
IV
“Goodnight!” says Harry. “Goodnight!” says Mary.
“Goodnight!” says Paul to John.
“Goodnight!” says Sue
to her sweetheart, Hugh.
“Goodnight!” says everyone.
Some walked and some did run.
Some loitered on the way,
And bound themselves, by kisses twelve, to meet the next holiday.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Venite ragazze e ragazzi,
prendete congedo dai vostri padri
per affrettarvi al Palo di Maggio
per ogni lui c’è una lei
e il violinista è già pronto,
c’è Toddy con la sua Jane,
e Johnny con la sua Joan
per ballare e ballare
e volteggiare su e giù
II
“Sei fuori!” dice Dick
“Io no!” risponde Nick.
“E’ il violinista che ha sbagliato”
“Vero” dice Hugh
e anche Sue
e così dicono tutti.
Il violinista allora ricomincia
a suonare la melodia di nuovo
e ogni ragazza muove i piedi
e balla con gli uomini.
III
Stavano là l’intero giorno
fino a sfinire il violinista
tutti ballando e scherzando,
senza preoccupazioni,
da mane a sera;
alla fine dicevano al violinista
che lo avrebbero pagato per la musica
e ciascuno dava dava
finchè si andava via.
IV
“Buonanotte!” dice Harry
“Buonanotte” dice Mary
“Buonanotte!” dice Paul a John
“Buonanotte!” dice Sue
a Hugh, il suo innamorato.
“Buonanotte!” dicono tutti.
Chi passeggiava e chi camminava svelto
chi indugiava per la strada
e decideva, con dodici baci
di incontrarsi la prossima festa

00000012

LA FESTA DEL MAGGIO NELL’OTTOCENTO

Prendendo spunto dalle illustrazioni di R. Caldelcott possiamo ricostruire una tipica festa del maggio ottocentesca in Inghilterra: era spesso giorno di fiera, con bancarelle e attrazioni, una festa per grandi e piccini. Al centro di un grande prato si ergeva il palo del maggio, un segnale ben visibile da tutti i punti della festa: ai danzatori si univano le maschere con le loro pantomime ovvero l’allegra brigata di Robin Hood, con Lady Marion, Fra Tack, l’hobby horse e il giullare.

img013

continua