Archivi tag: Planxty

The Good Ship Kangaroo

Leggi in italiano
A sea shanty from the music hall composed by Harry Clifton (1824-1872) and published in 1856 as On Board Of The Kangaroo; Stan Hugill in his “Shanties of the Seven Seas” gives two versions and ranks as capstan shanty, one from Stanley Slade of Bristol, and one from Elizabeth Cronin of Macroom, County Cork.

THE GOOD SHIP KANGAROO

Apparently the song was not so popular in the sea shanty and its diffusion in the folk circuit is part of the revival of the 70s.
Planxty from After the Break 1979 (Elizabeth Cronin version)

THE GOOD SHIP KANGAROO
I
Once I was a waitin’ man that lived at home at ease
Now I am a mariner that ploughs the angry seas
I always loved sea-faring life I bid my love adieu
I shipped as steward and cook, my boys, on board the ‘Kangaroo’ (1)
Chorus
I never thought she would prove false or either prove untrue
As we sailed away through the Milford bay on board the kangaroo

II
“Think of me oh think of me”,
she mournfully did say
“When you are in a foreign land
and I am far away
And take this lucky threepenny bit
it’ll make you bear in mind
That lovin’ trustin’ faithful heart you left in tears behind”
“Cheer up cheer up my own true love don’t weep so bitterly”
She sobbed she sighed she choked
she cried and could not say goodbye
“I won’t be gone for very long ‘tis
but a month or two.
When I will return again
of course I’ll visit you”
III
Our ship was homeward bound
from many’s the foreign shore
And many’s the foreign presents
unto my love I bore
I brought tortoises from Tenerife
and toys from Timbuktoo
A china rat and a Bengal cat and a Bombay cockatoo
Paid off I sought her dwelling on a street above the town
Where an ancient dame upon the line was hanging out her gown
“Where is my love? “”She’s vanished sir about six months ago
With a smart young man that drives the van for Chaplin Son & Co (2)”
IV
Here’s a health to dreams of married life to soap suds and blue (3)
Heart’s true love and patent starch (4) and washing soda too,
I’ll go unto some foreign shore
no longer can I stay
On some China Hottentot(5) I’ll throw myself away
My love she is no foolish girl
her age it is two score
My love she is no spinster
she’s been married twice before
I cannot say it was her wealth that stole my heart away
She’s a washer in a laundry for one and nine a day

NOTES
1) t
here have been several ships to take the name of Kangaroo, probably it is from the SS Kangaroo a British passenger and merchant transport ship, whose navigation period coincides with the era of the song
2) Chaplin, Horne and Co was the largest transport company in the United Kingdom
3) Reckitt’s Blue:  before the modern optical brighteners, there was a mysterious blue sachet that was dissolved in the last rinse water and raised the yellowish color from the cotton
4)  Harry Clifton writes: Farewell to dreams of married life! to soap, to suds, and blue, To “Glenfield starch” and “Harper Twelvetrees’ washing powder” too.
A claim to two products for the laundry of the perfect housewife! The music hall writers received financial compensation from producers for advertising their goods; Glenfield starch was so popular that another company put a production in Glenfield to give the same name to their starch, but lost the legal battle.
5) ‘hottentot’ is the derogatory term with which a tribe of the southern African Khoikhoi was called, in the nineteenth century Africans were taken as exotic curiosities and the missing link of Darwinian eviction, the koi were the most popular because of their short stature, women had the peculiarity of accumulating large amounts of fat in the thighs and buttocks: it’s going to fat-ass

Stanley Slade: Where we sail away from Bristol Quay

Among the last shantyman to sail on sailing vessels, with a powerful voice, the sailor Stanley Slade was hired on the first steam ships as a singer to entertain passengers with the most obscene versions of his repertoire.

ABOARD THE KANGAROO
Chorus

I never thought she would prove false or either prove untrue
As we sailed away from Bristol quay
on board the Kangaroo

I
I thought I’d like seafarin’ life, so I bid my love adieu,
And shipped aboard as bosun’s mate, aboard the Kangaroo…
II
My love, she was no foolish girl,
her age is was two score;
My love she was no spinister,
she’d been married twice before…
III
You would not think it was her wealth that stole me heart away;
She was starcher at a launderer’s for eighteen pence a day…
IV
Paid off, I sought her dwelling place, ‘twas high on Munjoy Hill;
Where an ancient dame upon the stoop was tossing out the swill…
V
“Where is my love?” “She’s married, sir, about six months ago,
To a smart young man who’s skipper of a bark that trades the coast in coal…”
VI
Farewell to dreams of married bliss, of soapsuds and the blue;
Farewell to all you Bristol gals, you’re fickled minded too…
VII
I’ll seek some distant foreign shore,
no longer will I stay;
An’ on some Chinese Hottentot I’ll waste my life away…

LINK
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/207slade.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/kangaroo.html
https://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/good-ship-kangaroo/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/onboardthekangaroo.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=8460
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/aboard-the-kangaroo-.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/on-board-of-the-kangaroo-.html

A bordo del Kangaroo

Read the post in English
Una sea shanty nata  per il music hall composta da Harry Clifton (1824-1872) e pubblicata nel 1856 con il titolo “On board of the Kangaroo”; Stan Hugill nella sua raccolta , “Shanties of the Seven Seas” ne riporta due versioni e le classifica come capstan shanty,  una da Stanley Slade di Bristol, e l’altra da Elizabeth Cronin di Macroom, Contea di Cork.

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

A quanto pare il brano non era poi così popolare nelle canzoni marinaresche e la sua diffusione nel circuito folk si colloca nel revival degli anni 70.
Planxty in After the Break 1979 dalla testimonianza di Elizabeth Cronin


I
Once I was a waitin’ man that lived at home at ease
Now I am a mariner that ploughs the angry seas
I always loved sea-faring life I bid my love adieu
I shipped as steward and cook, my boys, on board the ‘Kangaroo’ (1)
Chorus
I never thought she would prove false or either prove untrue
As we sailed away through the Milford bay on board the kangaroo

II
“Think of me oh think of me”,
she mournfully did say
“When you are in a foreign land
and I am far away
And take this lucky threepenny bit
it’ll make you bear in mind
That lovin’ trustin’ faithful heart you left in tears behind”
“Cheer up cheer up my own true love don’t weep so bitterly”
She sobbed she sighed she choked
she cried and could not say goodbye
“I won’t be gone for very long ‘tis
but a month or two.
When I will return again
of course I’ll visit you”
III
Our ship was homeward bound
from many’s the foreign shore
And many’s the foreign presents
unto my love I bore
I brought tortoises from Tenerife
and toys from Timbuktoo
A china rat and a Bengal cat and a Bombay cockatoo
Paid off I sought her dwelling on a street above the town
Where an ancient dame upon the line was hanging out her gown
“Where is my love? “”She’s vanished sir about six months ago
With a smart young man that drives the van for Chaplin Son & Co (2)”
IV
Here’s a health to dreams of married life to soap suds and blue (3)
Heart’s true love and patent starch (4) and washing soda too,
I’ll go unto some foreign shore
no longer can I stay
On some China Hottentot(5) I’ll throw myself away
My love she is no foolish girl
her age it is two score
My love she is no spinster
she’s been married twice before
I cannot say it was her wealth that stole my heart away
She’s a washer in a laundry for one and nine a day
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un tempo ero un uomo che viveva comodo a casa,
oggi sono un marinaio che solca i mari furiosi
ho sempre amato la vita del mare e ho detto addio al mio amore
per imbarcarmi come maggiordomo e cuoco, ragazzi, a bordo del Kangaroo
Coro
Non avrei mai immaginato che lei si rivelasse traditrice e bugiarda,
mentre si salpava da Milford bay
a bordo del Kangaroo

II
“Pensami, o pensami”
mi diceva lamentandosi
“quando sei in una terra straniera
e io sono lontana
e prendi questi tre penny portafortuna perchè ti faranno ricordare
che un cuore fedele e d’amore sincero hai lasciato in lacrime dietro di te”
“Rallegrati, rallegrati, mio vero amore non piangere così amaramente”
Singhiozzava e sospirava , soffocava e piangeva e non poteva dire addio!
“Non starò via per molto,
solo un mese o due.
Quanndo ritornerò di sicuro verrò a trovarti”
III
La nostra nave era in partenza
per più di una terra straniera
e molti regali  esotici
al mio amore ho preso
ho comprato tartarughe da Tenerife
e giocattoli da Timbuktoo
un topo dalla Cina e un gatto del Bengala e un pappagallo di Bombay
Appena pagato ho cercato la sua abitazione  in una strada  sopra la città
dove una vecchia dama stava appendendo al filo il suo vestito
“Dov’è il mio amore?”
“E’ scomparsa signore, circa sei mesi fa
con un simpatico giovanotto che guida il camioncino della Chaplin Son & Co”
IV
Addio sogni di una vita matrimoniale all’acqua saponata e sbiancante e al vero amore del cuore e anche  all’amido e alla soda da bucato,
andrò in qualche terra straniera
non posso più restare,
a qualche culona cinese
mi offrirò!
Il mio amore non è una stupida
ha una quarantina d’anni,
il mio amore non è una zitella,
è stata sposata due volte prima,
non posso dire che sia stata la sua ricchezza ad avermi rubato il cuore
è una apprettatrice in una lavanderia per uno e nove al giorno

NOTE
1) ci sono state varie navi a prendere il nome di Kangaroo, probabilmente si tratta dalla SS Kangaroo una nave di trasporto passeggeri e mercantile britannica, il cui periodo di navigazione coincide con l’epoca della canzone
2) Chaplin, Horne and Co fu descritta all’epoca come la più grande impresa di trasporti in Gran Bretagna
3) Reckitt’s Blue: la polvere blu è stata utilizzata negli ultimi trecento anni per rendere i bianchi più bianchi; prima dei moderni sbiancanti ottici, c’era una misteriosa bustina blu che veniva sciolta nell’ultima acqua di risciacquo e levava il colore giallastro dal cotone
4) nella varsione di Harry Clifton dice:
Farewell to dreams of married life! to soap, to suds, and blue, To “Glenfield starch” and “Harper Twelvetrees’ washing powder” too.
una reclame a due prodotti per il bucato della perfetta massaia, gli scrittori del music hall ricevevano un compenso economico da parte di produttori per la pubblicità alla loro merce; l’amido Glenfield starch era talmente popolare da avere imitatori “furbetti”, un’altra azienda mise una produzione a Glenfield per poter dare lo stesso nome al loro amido, ma perse la battaglia legale.
5) ‘hottentot’ è il termine dispregiativo con cui era chiamata una tribù dell’africa meridionale i Khoikhoi, nell’Ottocento gli africani erano presi come curiosità esotiche e l’anello mancante dell’evuluzione darwinaiana, i koi erano quelli più popolari a causa della loro bassa statura, le donne avevano la particolarità di accumulare grosse quantità di grasso nelle cosce e nei glutei, più di una donna è stata esibita come fenomeno da baraccone in Europa. Letteralmente “ottentotta cinese”

La versione di Stanley Slade: Where we sail away from Bristol Quay

Tra gli ultimi shantyman ad aver navigato su vascelli a vela, dalla voce potente, il marinaio Stanley Slade fu ingaggiato sulle prima navi a vapore come cantante  per intrattenere i passeggeri  con le versioni più oscene del suo repertorio.

ABOARD THE KANGAROO
Chorus

I never thought she would prove false or either prove untrue
As we sailed away from Bristol quay
on board the Kangaroo

I
I thought I’d like seafarin’ life, so I bid my love adieu,
And shipped aboard as bosun’s mate, aboard the Kangaroo…
II
My love, she was no foolish girl,
her age is was two score;
My love she was no spinister,
she’d been married twice before…
III
You would not think it was her wealth that stole me heart away;
She was starcher at a launderer’s for eighteen pence a day…
IV
Paid off, I sought her dwelling place, ‘twas high on Munjoy Hill;
Where an ancient dame upon the stoop was tossing out the swill…
V
“Where is my love?” “She’s married, sir, about six months ago,
To a smart young man who’s skipper of a bark that trades the coast in coal…”
VI
Farewell to dreams of married bliss, of soapsuds and the blue;
Farewell to all you Bristol gals, you’re fickled minded too…
VII
I’ll seek some distant foreign shore,
no longer will I stay;
An’ on some Chinese Hottentot I’ll waste my life away…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Non avrei mai immaginato che lei si rivelasse traditrice e bugiarda
mentre si salpava 
dal molo di Bristol
a bordo del Kangaroo

I
Credevo mi sarebbe piaciuta la vita del mare così ho detto addio al mio amore
per imbarcarmi come nostromo a bordo del Kangaroo
II
Il mio amore non era una stupida
aveva una quarantina d’anni,
il mio amore non era una zitella,
è stata sposata due volte prima
III
Non si potrebbe dire che sia stata la sua ricchezza ad avermi rubato il cuore
era una apprettatrice in una lavanderia per 18 penny al giorno
IV
Appena pagato ho cercato la sua abitazione, era in cima a Munjoy Hill
dove una vecchia dama sulla veranda stava gettando la spazzatura
V
“Dov’è il mio amore?” “Si è sposata signore, circa sei mesi fa, con un simpatico giovanotto , capitano di una chiatta nel commercio del carbone”
VI
Addio ai sogni di felicità coniugale all’acqua saponata e sbiancante;
addio a tutte le ragazze di Bristol e anche addio ai dispiaceri
VII
Cercherò qualche terra straniera
non posso più restare,
a qualche culona cinese
mi offrirò!

FONTI
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/207slade.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/kangaroo.html
https://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/good-ship-kangaroo/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/onboardthekangaroo.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=8460
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/aboard-the-kangaroo-.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/on-board-of-the-kangaroo-.html

THREE DRUNKEN MAIDENS

Un classico delle rievocazioni storiche in tema Bucanieri questa allegra drinking song, risalente alla metà del 1700: il titolo è anche semplicemente “Drunken Maidens” e le fanciulle sono talvolta “Three drunken maidens” ma anche “Four drunken maidens”.
A.L. Lloyd associò una melodia di sua composizione al testo che aveva trovato in “A Pedlar Pack of Ballads and Songs” di W H. Logan’s  (1869) e registrò la canzone, accompagnato da Al Jeffery al banjo,  nel suo album “English Drinking Songs” (1956) , che ebbe un discreto seguito nei circuiti dei folk clubs.
In seguito Lloyd trovò nel “Tune Book” (1770) di John Vickers la melodia originaria che accompagnava la canzone,  ma orami la versione standard era diventata la sua.
La canzone viene associata a Christy Moore e considerata una irish driinking song, ma è stata eseguita anche dai Fairport Convention e gli Steeleye Span.

ASCOLTA A.L. Lloyd in All For Me Grog, 1961

ASCOLTA The Planxty live

ASCOLTA Denis Murray & Napper Tandy live 1997


I
There were three drunken maidens
Come from the Isle of Wight (1)
They drunk from Monday morning
Nor stopped till Saturday night
When Saturday night would come, me boys
They wouldn’t then go out
Not them three drunken maidens,
they pushed the jug about (2).
II
Then in comes bouncing Sally
Her cheeks as red as blooms
“Move up me jolly sisters
And give young Sally some room
Then I will be your equal
Before the night is out”
And these four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
III
There’s woodcock and pheasant
There’s partridge and hare
There’s all sorts of dainties
No scarcity was there
There’s forty quarts of beer, me boys
They fairly drunk them out
And these four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
IV
And up comes the landlord
He’s asking for his pay
“It is a forty pound bill, me boys
These gobs have got to pay
That’s ten pounds apiece, me boys”
But still they wouldn’t go out
These four drunken maidens
They pushed the jug about
V
Oh where are your feather hats
Your mantles rich and fine?
They all got swallowed up, me lads
In tankards of good wine
And where are your maidenheads
You maidens frisk and gay?
We left them in the alehouse
We drank them clean away(3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre signorine ubriache
che veniva dall’Isola di Wright
bevevano dal lunedì mattino
e non smettevano fino alla notte del sabato.
Quando arrivava sabato notte, ragazzi,
non avrebbero poi voluto uscire
non queste tre fanciulle ubriache
che facevano girare la bottiglia!
II
Allora entrò la rotondetta Sally
dalle guance come rose fiorite
“Spostatevi, mie allegre sorelle
e fate un po’ di posto alla piccola Sally
allora sarò vostra pari
prima che la notte sia finita”
Così queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
III
C’erano la beccaccia e il fagiano
c’erano la pernice e la lepre
e di tutte le prelibatezze
non c’era penuria.
C’erano quaranta litri di birra, ragazzi
e li bevvero tutti equamente
e queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
IV
Ed ecco che arriva l’oste
e chiede di essere pagato
“E’ un conto di 40 sterline, ragazzi
dovete pagare questo gruzzolo,
sono dieci sterline a testa, ragazzi”
Eppure non volevano andarsene
queste quattro fanciulle ubriache
facevano girare la bottiglia
V
Dove sono i vostri cappelli piumati
i mantelli preziosi e belli?
“Sono stati tutti inghiottiti, ragazzi
in boccali di buon vino.”
E dove sono le vostre verginità
voi fanciulle sveglie e allegre?
“Le lasciammo in birreria,
ce le siamo bevute”

NOTE
1) l’isola di Wight era un deposito per i contrabbandieri di liquori provenienti dalla Francia
2) Non è automatico tradurre in italiano il temine jug: in fiorentino si direbbe boccia, che richiama l’immagine delle bottiglie di vino da 5 litri (una bottiglia piuttosto grande con il collo stretto). Ma può essere anche una caraffa con tanto di manico e collo più svasato che assomiglia a una brocca. Potrebbe anche essere un vaso di vetro per conservare marmellate o ortaggi o il barattolo del miele. Un termine quanto mai generico che a me richiama l’orcio toscano, il recipiente di terracotta, panciuto e di forma allungata con il collo ristretto, spesso a due manici in cui si conservavano o trasportavano i liquidi. In antico era una unità di misura equivalente a circa 38 litri, ma rimpicciolito ecco che l’orcio era usato come una brocca.
jug= boccia, brocca, caraffa, bottiglia.
3) non avendo soldi per pagare l’oste, hanno pagato in natura

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thedrunkenmaidens.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=274

LITTLE DRUMMER BY FRANK HARTE

Ho sentito questa ballata nella versione dei Planxty che la registrarono nel loro album “Cold Blow and the Rainy Night” (1974) Nelle note di copertina leggiamo “Frank Harte of Dublin taught us The Little Drummer, it tells of a novel style of courtship where the scorned lover threatens to shoot himself on finding that his chosen bride is reluctant to have him.”
“Little Drummer” (da non confondersi con la christmas carol The Little Drummer Boy ) è una courting song un po’ melodrammatica tipica del sentimentalismo irlandese: un giovane tamburino resta colpito da una bellezza a passeggio per il porto e detto fatto il giorno dopo si mette tutto in tiro per conquistarla; lei fa la preziosa e si atteggia a gran dama, lui minaccia di spararsi un colpo in testa, lei casca ai suoi piedi e i due corrono a sposarsi.
Non è una ballata tra le più note ma è finita nella soundtrack della sea shanty edition di Assassin’s Creed Rogue, il video gioco ambientato al tempo della guerra dei sette anni tra Francia e Inghilterra, in particolare sul fronte nord americano, per il controllo del Nuovo Mondo (1752-1761).

ASCOLTA Planxty 1974

La ballata deve essere stata portata in America dagli emigranti irlandesi e la ritroviamo tra i boscaioli  della Pennsylvania settentrionale e del sud di New York; Ellen Stekert la registrò nel suo album “Song of a New York Lumberjack” (1958) avendola ascoltata da Ezra “Fuzzy” Barhight un boscaiolo in pensione che viveva a  Cohocton, New York che così inizia
“Early one morning, one bright summers’ day
Twenty-four ladies were making their way
A regiment of soldiers were marching nearby
The drummer on one of them cast a rude eye
And it’s so hard fortune.” continua
ma la versione della ballata in Assassin’s Creed Rogue non è quella americana bensì quella dublinese di Frank Harte


I
One fine summer’s morning both gallant and gay
Twenty-four ladies (1) went out on the quay
A regiment of soldiers it did pass them by
A drummer and one of them soon caught his eye
II
He went to his comrade and to him did say
“Twenty-four ladies I saw yesterday
And one of those ladies she has me heart won,
And if she denies me then surely I’m done”

III
“Go to this lady and tell her your mind
Tell her she has wounded your poor heart inside
Go and tell her she’s wounded your poor heart, full sore,
And if she denies you what can she do more?”
IV  (2)
So early next morning the young man arose,
Dressed himself up in a fine suit of clothes,
A watch in his pocket and a cane in his hand
Saluting the ladies he walked down the strand
V
He went up to her and he said “Pardon me,
Pardon me lady for making so free,
Oh me fine honored lady, you have me heart won,
And if you deny me then surely I’m done.”

VI
“Be off little drummer, now what do you mean (3)?
For I’m the lord’s daughter of Ballycasteen.
Oh, I’m the lord’s daughter that’s honored, you see,
Be off little drummer, you’re making too free.”
VII
He put on his hat and he bade her farewell
Saying “I’ll send my soul down to heaven or hell
For with this long pistol that hangs by my side,
Oh, I’ll put an end to my own dreary life.”
VIII
“Come back little drummer, and don’t take it ill,
For I do not want to be guilty of sin,
To be guilty of innocent blood for to spill.
Come back little drummer, I’m here at your will.
IX
We’ll hire a car and to Bansheer we’ll go (4).
There we’ll be married in spite of our foes.
Oh, but what can they say when it’s over and done,
But I fell in love with the roll of your drum?”
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
In un bel mattino d’estate tutte intrepide e allegre
24 dame passeggiavano per la banchina del porto
un reggimento di soldati tosto passò loro accanto
e una di loro catturò lo sguardo del tamburino
II
Andò dal suo commilitone
e gli disse
Ho visto 24 dame ieri
e una di loro mi ha conquistato
il cuore
e se lei mi respinge sarò di certo finito!

III
Va da questa dama e dille i tuoi propositi, dille che ti ha ferito nel profondo del cuore
va e dille che ha lacerato il tuo povero cuore dolente
e se lei ti respinge che cosa altro potrà fare?”
IV
Così  il mattino seguente il tamburino si alzò,
si vestì con un bel
completo
l’orologio nel taschino e un bastone in mano,
salutando le dame
passeggiava per la via maestra
V
Andò da lei e disse
Chiedo scusa,
perdonatemi per la mia franchezza
Oh mia bella dama degna di rispetto,
voi avete conquistato il mio cuore
e se mi respingerete sarò di certo finito”

VI
“Smamma piccolo tamburino, adesso che mi significa?
Sono figlia di un Signore
di Ballycasteen.
sono una rispettabile figlia di Lord
come vedi

smamma piccolo tamburino e non prenderti tante libertà”
VII
Lui si mise il cappello e la salutò dicendo
“Spedirò la mia anima in cielo
o all’inferno

con questa pistola appesa al mio fianco
metterò fine alla mia desolata, giovane vita”
VIII
“Torna indietro giovane tamburino non prenderla così male,
non voglio essere responsabile del peccato, 
essere responsabile per il sangue innocente versato, torna indietro giovane tamburino, sono alla tua mercè.
XI
Noleggeremo un calesse e andremo a Bansheer
là ci sposeremo in barba ai nostri nemici
perchè che cosa avranno da dire quando sarà tutto finito se non che mi sono innamorata del rullare del tuo tamburo?”

NOTE
1) nelle ballate le brigate sono sempre 24 di numero per lo più giovanette o giovanetti intenti nel gioco della palla (vedi)
2) strofa saltata in Assassin’s Creed
3) nonostante le sue pretese di nobiltà a me questa “dama” mi sembra più una popolana!
4) oggi viene da tradurre car come automobile, ma siccome la ballata risale quantomeno all’Ottocento è più probabile che si tratti di un calesse;  nella versione di Ellen Stekert dice
‘Oh, we’ll go to the stable and saddle a horse
To London we’ll ride, and married we’ll be!
And what will we say when the deed it is done?
I’ll tell them that you won me with a roll of your drum .’

FONTI
http://www.folkways.si.edu/ellen-stekert/songs-of-a-new-york-lumberjack/american-folk/music/album/smithsonian
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6190
https://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/little-drummer/
https://www.itma.ie/goilin/singer/harte_frank

P STANDS FOR PADDY

P stands for Paddy” (come pure “The verdant braes of Screen“) affronta il tema dell’amore falsamente corrisposto.
Però la melodia è più gioiosa di quanto ci si aspetterebbe da questo genere di warning songs e il dialogo tra i due sembra più un bisticcio tra innamorati che una separazione.
Così il commento di A.L. Lloyd alla versione dei Waterson “T stands for Thomas” “These B for Barney, P for Paddy, J for Jack songs are usually Irish in origin though common enough in the English countryside. Often the verses are just a string of floaters drifting in from other lyrical songs. So it is with this piece, which derives partly from a version collected by Cecil Sharp from a Gloucestershire gipsy, Kathleen Williams. Some of the verses are familiar from an As I walked out song sung to Vaughan Williams by an Essex woodcutter, Mr Broomfield (Folk Song Journal No. 8). The verses about robbing the bird’s nest recall The Verdant Braes of Skreen.”

ASCOLTA Planxty in Cold Blow and the Rainy Night , 1974, i quali hanno divulgato la canzone al grande pubblico (per il testo vedi)

Old Blind Dogs in Tall Tails 1994 ovvero la formazione degli esordi con Ian F. Benzie (voce e chitarra) Jonny Hardie (violino), Buzzby McMillian (cittern) Davy Cattanach (percussioni)

ASCOLTA Cara Dillon per la serie live Transatlantic Sessions, un godibile live con artisti di tutto rispetto


I
As I went out one May morning to take a pleasant walk
Well, I sat m’self down by an old faill wall just to hear two lovers talk
To hear two lovers talk, my dear,
to hear what they might say
That I might know a little more about love before I went away
Chorus 
P stands for Paddy, I suppose,
J for my love, John
W stands for false Willie(1),
oh but Johnny is the fairest man
Johnny is the fairest man, my dear, aye, Johnny’s the fairest man
I don’t care what anybody says,
Johnny is the fairest man

II
Won’t you come and sit beside me, beside me on the green
It’s a long three quarters of a year or more since together we have been Together we have been, my dear, together we have been
It’s a long three quarters of a year or more since together we have been
III
No, I’ll not sit beside you, not now nor at any other time
For I hear you have another little girl, and your heart’s no longer mine
Your heart’s no longer mine, my dear, your heart’s no longer mine
For I hear you have another little girl, and your heart’s no longer mine
IV
So I’ll go climb the tall, tall tree,
I’ll rob the wild bird’s nest
When I come down, I’ll go straight home to the girl that I love best
To the girl that I love best, my dear, the girl that I love best
When I come down, I’ll go straight home to the girl that I love best
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA  SALTO
I
Mentre andavo un mattin di maggio
a fare una bella passeggiata
beh, sostai presso un vecchio muro diroccato solo per ascoltare la conversazione di due innamorati,
per ascoltare quello che si dicevano
e per poter conoscere un po’ di più sull’amore prima di andare via.
CORO
P sta per Paddy, credo,
J per il mio amore John
W sta per il bugiardo Willie,
ma Johnny è l’uomo più bello
Johnny è l’uomo più bello, si, il mio amore,
Johnny è l’uomo più bello,
non mi interessa quello che gli altri dicono, Johnny è l’uomo più bello

II
“Non vorresti venire a sederti accanto a me sull’erba?
Sono nove mesi fa o più,
da quando siamo stati insieme
insieme siamo stati, mia cara
insieme siamo stati,
sono nove mesi fa o più
da quando siamo stati insieme”
III
“No non mi stenderò sull’erba accanto a te, nè adesso nè mai
perchè ho saputo che tu hai un’altra ragazza e il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio, e il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio, mio caro, perchè ho saputo che tu hai un’altra ragazza e
il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio.”
IV
“Mi arrampicherò su di un albero alto alto e ruberò il nido di un uccello selvatico e quando ritornerò giù, andrò dritto alla casa della ragazza che amo di più tra le braccia della ragazza che amo di più, mia cara,
quando ritornerò giù, andrò dritto alla casa della ragazza che amo di più”

NOTE
1) Willie è il tipico nome del falso innamorato vedi in Willy Taylor
2) In questa canzone  è l’uomo  ad arrampicarsi sull’albero più alto per prendere il nido e portarlo alla donna che ama dandole così prova d’amore. In genere è lei a donare il suo “nido” ad un altro uomo, più degno di essere amato. Il finale è aperto: a chi Johnny porterà il nido?

FONTI
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5037 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/paddy.htm http://thesession.org/tunes/10172

COLD BLOW ON A RAINY NIGHT

Nella tradizione popolare sono assai numerose le ballate dette “night-visiting song” in cui l’amante (un vagabondo, un soldato o un marinaio, ma anche un bracciante agricolo o un giovane apprendista) bussa di notte alla finestra (porta) della fidanzata e viene fatto entrare nella camera da letto. Una versione popolare della visita notturna di Romeo al balcone di Giulietta. (vedi prima parte)
Le variante testuali sono molte anche con titoli diversi ma tutte riconducibili alla stessa matrice e diffuse in Scozia, Irlanda e Inghilterra.

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: Cold Blow And The Rainy Night

Nella versione irlandese l’uomo è identificato come un soldato che cerca d’intenerire il cuore della fanciulla, supplicandola alla finestra perchè lo faccia entrare nel suo letto, che la notte è fredda, piove e tira vento. Lei all’inizio resiste, ma poi lo accoglie a braccia aperte e con teneri baci, e prontamente lui le toglie la verginità. Ovviamente il soldato promette il matrimonio, salvo poi dimenticarsene e lei si pente di essersi concessa! (vedi anche As I roved)

La ballata è diffusa anche in Inghilterra e compare in diversi broadsides del 1800: vedi una ballata del 1819 e l’altra del 1844.

ASCOLTA Cream of Barley in un ruspante live da folk club anni 60 e tutt’ora vispi e arzilli (qui)


I
Me hat is frozen to me head,
Me body is like a lump o’lead,
Me shoes have frozen to me feet
From standing at your window.
CHORUS
Let me come in the soldier cried,
Cold blow and the rainy night,
Let me come in the soldier cried,
I’ll never come back again – oh.
II
Me father’s working down the street,
Me mother the chamber keys does keep,
Me doors and windows all do creek,
I cannot let you in – oh.
III
Then she got up and let him in
And kissed his ruby lips and chin,
They went back to bed again
And the soldier, he won her favour.
CHORUS 
Then she blessed the rainy night,
Cold blow and the rainy night ,
Then she blessed the rainy night,
That ever she let him in – oh.
IV
Now you’ve had your way with me,
Oh soldier will you marry me,
No me love, this never can be,
So fare thee well forever.
CHORUS 
Then she cursed the rainy night,
Cold blow and the rainy night ,
Then she cursed the rainy night,
That ever she let him in – oh.
V
Then he got up out of the bed
And put his hat upon his head,
She had lost her maidenhead
And her mammy had heard the jingle.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’ho il cappello ghiacciato sulla testa,  il corpo è un pezzo di piombo e i piedi congelati nelle scarpe per stare alla tua finestra
RITORNELLO
“Fammi entrare-gridò il soldato-
è una notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
fammi entrare -gridò il soldato-

perchè non ritornerò di nuovo!”
II
“Mio padre lavora lungo la
strada
e mia madre ha la chiave della stanza
porte e finestre sono
sorvegliate
temo di non poter farti entrare, oh”
III
Poi lei si alzò e lo fece entrare (1)
baciò le sue labbra rosse e il mento
ritornarono a letto di nuovo e il soldato conquistò la sua preda (2)
VARIAZIONE RITORNELLO
Allora lei benedì la notte di pioggia
notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
Allora lei benedì la notte di pioggia
in cui lo fece entrare – oh
IV
“Ora che hai fatto il tuo comodo con me oh soldato vuoi
sposarmi?” “No, mia cara non lo farò mai, così addio per sempre”
VARIAZIONE RITORNELLO
Allora lei maledì la notte di pioggia
notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
Allora lei maledì la notte di pioggia
in cui lo fece entrare – oh
V
E lui balzò fuori dal letto
e si mise il cappello in testa
lei aveva perso la sua verginità
e sua madre aveva sentito il baccano.(3)

NOTE
1) mancano le strofe in cui il soldato continua ad insistere
2) si allude al sesso
3) altre canzoni umoristiche sviluppano proprio la storia dal punto di vista degli anziani genitori o dei padroni di casa che soprendono il giovanotto con i pantaloni calati.. (vedi)

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span in Please To See The   King, 1971

ASCOLTA Imagined Village in “The Imagined Village“, 2012 una versione world music della poliedrica Eliza Carthy


I
Oh, my hat, it is frozen to my head
Feet, they are like a lump of lead
Oh, my shoes, they are frozen to my feet
With standing at your window
CHORUS
“Let me in”, the soldier cried
“Cold, haily, windy night, oh”
“Let me in”, the soldier cried
“For I’ll not go back again, no”
II
My father watches down on the street
Mother, the chamber keys do keep
Oh the doors and windows, they do creek
I dare not let you in, no
III
Oh, and she’s rose up and she’s let him in
She’s kissed her true love cheek and chin
And she’s drawn him between the sheets again
She’s opened and she’s let him in
CHORUS VARIATION
Then she has blessed the rainy night
Cold, haily, windy night, oh
Oh, then she has blessed the rainy night
That she’s opened and she let him in, oh
IV
“Soldier, soldier, stay with me
Soldier, soldier, won’t you marry me oh?”
“No, no, no it never can be
So fare thee well forever”
CHORUS VARIATION
Then she has wept for the rainy night
Cold, haily, windy night, oh
Then she has wept for the rainy night
That she’s opened and she let him in, oh
V
Oh he’s jumped up all out of the bed
He’s put his hat all on his head
Oh but she had lost her maiden head
Her mother, she heard the din, oh
CHORUS VARIATION
And then she has cursed the rainy night
Cold haily, windy night, oh
Then she has cursed the rainy night
That she opened and she let him in, oh
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ho il cappello ghiacciato in testa
i piedi, sono come un pezzo di piombo, le scarpe sono ghiacciate dalla punta dei piedi [congelati nelle scarpe]
per stare alla tua finestra
RITORNELLO
“Fammi entrare-gridò il soldato-
è una notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
fammi entrare

perchè non ritornerò di nuovo!”
II
“Mio padre controlla la strada
e mia madre ha la chiave della stanza,
porte e finestre sono
sorvegliate,
temo di non poter farti entrare, no”
III
E lei si alzò e lo fece
entrare dentro (1)
baciò del suo vero amore guancia e mento
e lo fece stendere tra le lenzuola di nuovo
aprì e lo lasciò entrare (2)
VARIAZIONE RITORNELLO
Allora lei benedì la notte di pioggia
notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
Allora lei benedì la notte di pioggia
in cui aprì e lo lasciò entrare
IV
“Soldato, soldato resta con me
soldato, soldato  vuoi
sposarmi?”
“No, non sarà mai
così addio per sempre”
VARIAZIONE RITORNELLO
Allora lei pianse la notte di pioggia
notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
Allora lei pianse la notte di pioggia
in cui aprì e lo lasciò entrare – oh
V
E lui balzò fuori dal
letto
e si mise il cappello in testa
ma lei aveva perso la sua
verginità
e sua madre sentì il frastuono (3)
VARIAZIONE RITORNELLO
Allora lei maledì la notte di pioggia
notte di vento, tempesta e pioggia
Allora lei maledì la notte di pioggia
che aprì e lo fece entrare

Una bella versione strumentale
ASCOLTA Charlotte Balzereit in Celtic Impression 1997

continua

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/coldhailywindynight.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/3.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66793
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/I_Maun_Hae_My_Goon_Made.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/12139
http://thesession.org/tunes/11262

SHE’S CAST A LOOK ON THE LITTLE MUSGRAVE

“Little Musgrave” è una murder ballad  in cui si narra del tradimento di una giovane moglie sposata a un Lord, la quale cogliendo l’opportunità di un assenza del marito, trascorre una notte di passione con il giovane Musgrave (o Matty Groves). Il finale però è tragico con la morte dei due amanti (prima parte).
Una ballata a tinte fosche che andava per la maggiore in quel territorio selvaggio e di frontiera detto il Border (vedi) durante il Medioevo.

PRIMA MELODIA: VERSIONE A (CHILD #81)

La melodia è stata arrangiata da Nic Jones da una versione americana della ballata intitolata “Little Matty Groves”. Come ebbe modo di spiegare Nic Jones: “Musgrave‘s tune is more a creation of my own than anything else, although the bulk of it is based on an American variant of the same ballad, entitled “Little Matty Groves”.
Un decennio più tardi i Planxty ripresero il motivo musicale di Nic su un testo più vicino alla Versione A in Child # 81 (vedi) che si adatta in modo più scorrevole e fluido rispetto al primo testo. Christy Moore scrive nelle note: “Little Musgrove, a version in which I used old lyrics, added some lyrics of my own and put them together with a tune from the singing of Nick Jones“. (tratto da qui).

LUSSURIA O VERO AMORE?

Le strofe in comune introducono il contesto di un giorno di festa in cui Musgrave è in chiesa con il resto del paese e adocchia la più bella, ovvero la moglie di Lord Barnard, ma è soprattutto lei a puntare al giovanotto con il suo sguardo “As bright as summer’s sun“: nella versione di Jones è la donna a mostrarsi più opportunista, e invitando Musgrave, spera che il marito, partito per la caccia, non ritorni mai più.
La versione dei Planxty è più romantica, i due si professano amore reciproco e il giovane è innamorato  da tempo di Lady Barnard.

Il servo messo a guardia della porta, tradisce la padrona e corre subito alla ricerca del padrone per avvisarlo, d’altra parte un servitore del seguito di Lord Barnard cerca di allertare i due suonando il corno di caccia: Musgrave comprende il segnale, ma la Lady lo “distrae” invitandolo a restare tra le sue braccia, così incautamente i due si addormentano.

tumblr_lgp06ebOB21qbjveuo1_500

Il Lord li coglie nel sonno, lascia che Musgrave prenda la spada per ucciderlo onorevolmente in duello, e forse risparmierebbe la donna, ma lei lo oltraggia invece di invocare il perdono, e così il Lord le trafigge il cuore con la spada!

OMICIDIO COLPOSO

Lord Barnard ha sfidato il suo rivale seguendo alla lettera il codice d’onore del tempo e “tecnicamente” non ha compiuto un vero e proprio omicidio, egli ha commesso quello che oggi verrebbe definito “omicidio colposo”, in Horder’s words, to keep a killing done in the heat of anger from being murder, the killer had to show that he was “wiling to fight fairly, to hazard his own life at the same time as he put that of his ultimate victim at risk.  The killer, in other words, had to demonstrate not only that his killing was unpremeditated but also that he had shown courage and respect for his opponent, by allowing the latter to draw his sword before engaging him.” (tratto da qui)
Anche per l’uccisione della moglie Lord Barnard non sarebbe stato incriminato, essendo egli la parte offesa e l’adultera passibile di severe punizioni (proporzionalmente al lignaggio): sempre tecnicamente il duello tra il marito e l’amante equivaleva all’ordalia con la quale la donna poteva cercare una discolpa dall’accusa di adulterio. Ma qui i due sono stati sorpresi a letto e quindi la colpevolezza della donna è fuori discussione.
Così nella versione dei Planxty Lord Barnard è tutto sommato un gentiluomo che si duole di aver ucciso il più valente cavaliere e la donna più bella, e ordina ai suoi di seppellire insieme i due amanti.

ASCOLTA Nic Jones in ‘Ballads and Songs’, 1970

ASCOLTA Planxty in “The Woman I Loved So Well“, 1980.

VERSIONE NIC JONES
I
As it fell out upon a day
As many in the year
Musgrave to the church did go
To see fair ladies there
II
And some came down in red velvet
And some came down in Pall (1)
And the last to come down was the Lady Barnard, The fairest of them all
III
She’s cast a look on the Little Musgrave
As bright as the summer sun
And then bethought this Little Musgrave
This lady’s love I’ve won
IV
Good-day good-day you handsome youth,
God make you safe and free
What would you give this day Musgrave
To lie one night with me
V
Oh, I dare not for my lands, lady
I dare not for my life
For the ring on your white finger shows
You are Lord Barnard’s wife
VI
Lord Barnard’s to the hunting gone
And I hope he’ll never return
And you shall sleep into his bed
And keep his lady warm
VII
There’s nothing for to fear Musgrave
You nothing have to fear
I’ll set a page outside the gate
To watch til morning clear
VIII
And woe be to the little footpage
And an ill death may he die
For he’s away to the green wood
As fast as he could fly
IX
And when he came to the wide water
He fell on his belly and swam
And when he came to the other side
He took to his heels and ran
X
And when he came to the green wood
‘Twas dark as dark can be
And he found Lord Barnard and his men
Asleep beneath the trees
XI
Rise up rise up Master he said
Rise up and speak to me
Your wife’s in bed with Little Musgrave
Rise up right speedily
XII
If this be truth you tell to me
Then gold shall be your fee
And if it be false you tell to me
Then hangéd you shall be
XIII
Go saddle me the black he said
Go saddle me the grey
And sound you not the horn said he
Lest our coming it would betray
XIV
Now there was a man in Lord Barnard’s train,
Who loved the Little Musgrave
And he blew his horn both loud and shrill
Away! Musgrave Away!
XV
Oh, I think I hear the morning cock
think I hear the jay
I think I hear Lord Barnard’s horn
Away Musgrave Away
XVI
Oh, Lie still, lie still, you little Musgrave
And keep me from the cold
It’s nothing but a shepherd boy
Driving his flock to the fold
XVII
Is not your hawk upon its perch
Your steed is eating hay
And you a gay lady in your arms
And yet you would away
XVIII
So he’s turned him right and round about,
And he fell fast asleep
And when he woke Lord Barnard’s men
Were standing at his feet
XIX
And how do you like my bed Musgrave
And how do you like my sheets
And how do you like my fair lady
That lies in your arms asleep
XX
Oh, It’s well I like your bed he said
And well I like your sheets
And better I like your fair lady
That lies in my arms asleep
XXI
Get up, get up young man he said
Get up as swift as you can
For it never will be said in my country
I slew an unarmed man
XXII
I have two swords in one scabbard
Full dear they cost me purse
And you shall have the best of them
I shall have the worst
XXIII
And So slowly, so slowly he rose up
And slowly he put on
And slowly down the stairs he goes
A-Thinking to be slain
XXIV
And the first stroke Little Musgrave took
It was both deep and sore
And down he fell at Barnard’s feet
And word he never spoke more
XXV
And how do you like his cheeks, lady
And how do you like his chin
And how do you like his fair body
Now there’s no life within

XXVI
It’s well I like his cheeks she said
And well I like his chin
And better I like his fair body
Than all your kith and kin
XXVII
And he’s taken up his long long sword
To strike a mortal blow
And through and through the Lady’s heart
The cold steel it did go
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Accadde in un giorno (di festa)
come ce ne son tanti in un anno,
Musgrave andò in chiesa,
per incontrare le belle ragazze
II
Una di loro aveva un velluto rosso,
un’altra una cappa bianca (1);
per ultima giunse Lady Barnard,
di tutte certo la più bella.
III
Lanciò uno sguardo al giovane
Musgrave,
splendente come il sole d’estate,
e pensò allora il giovane
Musgrave
d’averle conquistato il cuore.
IV
“Buon Giorno, buon Giorno a te
bel giovane,
che Dio ti assista
che ne diresti oggi
Musgrave
di passare la notte con me?”
V
“Oh non mi curo delle mie terre (2), signora
non mi curo della mia vita,
ma dell’anello che mostrate al vostro candido dito,
voi siete la moglie di Lord Barnard”
VI
“Lord Barnard è andato
a caccia
e spero non faccia più ritorno (3)
e tu dormirai nel suo letto
e terrai la sua signora al caldo
VII
Non c’è nulla da temere
Musgrave
non hai nulla da temere
metterò un paggio fuori dalla porta
per vegliare fino all’alba”
VIII
Che disgrazia colga il paggetto (4)
e che possa morire di mala morte
perchè  lui andò nel bosco
volando il più velocemente possibile
IX
E quando venne
al fiume
si tuffò e nuotò
e quando arrivò all’altra
riva
si alzò in piedi e corse
X
E quando venne
al bosco
era notte fonda e buia
e lui trovò Lord Barnard
e i suoi uomini
addormentati sotto agli alberi
XI
“Svegliati padrone – disse-
svegliati e parlami,
tua moglie è a letto con il giovane Musgrave
svegliati immediatamente”
XII
“Se questo che mi dici è vero
allora ti darò volentieri l’oro,
ma se dici il falso,
allora ti farò impiccare”
XIII
“Sellatemi, presto, il nero -disse
sellatemi il grigio”
“E non suonate il corno – disse-
per non tradire il nostro arrivo”
XIV
C’era un uomo nel gruppo di Lord Barnard
che amava il giovane Musgrave
e suonò il suo corno forte
e chiaro:
“Scappa, Musgrave, scappa!”
XV
“Credo d’avere sentito il tordo,
credo d’aver sentito la ghiandaia;
credo d’aver sentito il corno di Lord Barnard, scappa, Musgrave, scappa”
XVI
“Stai calmo, stai calmo, giovane Musgrave,
e proteggimi dal freddo.
È solamente un pastorello
che guida le pecore al pascolo.
XVII
“Non hai il falcone sulla staffa,
e il cavallo a mangiare fieno?
Non hai una bella donna tra le braccia,
dunque, vorresti andare via?”
XVIII
Così lui si girò
sul fianco
e si addormentò,
e quando si alzò, gli uomini
di Lord Barnard
stavano ritti ai suoi piedi
XIX
“Quanto ti piace il mio letto Musgrave,
quanto ti piacciono le mie lenzuola?
Trovi bella la mia signora
che giace tra le tue braccia addormentata?”
XX
“Oh molto, mi piacciono il tuo letto e le tue lenzuola
e ancora di più la tua bella signora che giace tra le mie braccia addormentata”
XXI
“Alzati, alzati, piccolo Musgrave,
più in fretta che puoi,
nel mio paese non sarà mai detto
che ho ucciso un uomo nudo (5).
XXII
“Ho due spade nel fodero,
che tanto mi sono costate;
e tu avrai la migliore,
mentre io prenderò la peggiore.”
XXIII
Pian piano lui
si alzò
e piano si mise in piedi
e piano giù per le scale andò
pensando di essere in salvo
XXIV
Il primo colpo che il giovane Musgrave
prese
fu profondo e letale
e giù cadde ai piedi di Lord Barnard
e non parlò più.
XXV
“Quanto ti piacciono le sue guance, signora, e quanto ti piace il uso mento? E quanto ti piace il suo bel corpo ora che è privo di vita?”
XXVI
“Oh molto, mi piacciono le sue guance- lei disse- molto mi piace il suo mento, e ancora di più mi piace il suo bel corpo che tutti i tuoi titoli e terre”
XXVII
Ed egli prese la sua lunga, lunga spada per tirare una stoccata mortale
e colpì dritto il cuore della signora con il freddo acciaio

NOTE
1) pall è il termine con cui si indica il drappo con cui è rivestita la bara, poteva essere nero o bianco
2) Musgrave è probabilmente un laird o forse un figlio cadetto, nella ballataè evidente la distinzione tra il nobile e potente Lord Barnard e il “little” Musgrave
3) la caccia nel Medioevo era uno sport pericoloso
4) nella ballata abbiamo un doppio tradimento quello dell’adultera e quello dei servitori che parteggiano per l’uno o per l’altro dei padroni. Il narratore di questa versione condannando la delazione del servitore implicitamente riconosce la donna come vittima
5) nel senso di “disarmato”

VERSIONE PLANXTY
I
It fell upon a holy day
As many in the year
Musgrave to the church did go
To see fair ladies there
II
And some were dressed in velvet red
And some in velvet pale
Then came Lord Barnard’s wife
The fairest ‘mongst them all
III
She cast an eye on the Little Musgrave
As bright as summer’s sun
Said Musgrave unto himself
This lady’s heart I’ve won
IV
“I have loved you, fair lady,
full long and many’s the day.”
“And I have loved you, Little Musgrave, and never a word did say.”
V
“I’ve a bower in Bucklesfordbury,
it’s my heart’s delight.
I’ll take you back there with me
if you’ll lie in me arms tonight.”
VII
But standing by was a little footpage,
from the lady’s coach he ran,
“Although I am a lady’s page,
I am Lord Barnard’s man.”
VIII
“And milord Barnard will hear of this,
oh whether I sink or swim.”
Everywhere the bridge was broke
he’d enter the water and swim.
IX
“Oh milord Barnard, milord Barnard,
you are a man of life,
But Musgrave, he’s at Bucklesfordbury,
asleep with your wedded wife.”
X
“If this be true, me little footpage,
this thing that you tell me,
All the gold in Bucklesfordbury
I gladly will give to thee.”
XI
But if this be a lie, me little footpage,
this thing that you tell me,
From the highest tree
in Bucklesfordbury hanged you will be.”

XII
“Go saddle me the black,” he said,
“go saddle me the gray.”
“And sound ye not your horns,” he said,
“lest our coming be betrayed.”
XIII
But there was a man in Lord Barnard’s thrain, who loved the Little Musgrave,
He blew his horn both loud and shrill,
“Away, Musgrave, away.”
XIV
“I think I hear the morning cock,
I think I hear the jay,
I think I hear Lord Barnard’s men,
I wish I was away.”
XV
“Lie still, lie still, me Little Musgrave,
hug me from the cold,
It’s nothing but a shepherd lad,
a-bringing his flock to fold.”

XVI
“Is not your hawk upon it’s perch,
your steed eats oats and hay,
And you a lady in your arms,
and yet you’d go away.”
XVII
He’s turned her around and he’s kissed her twice, and then they fell asleep,
When they awoke Lord Barnard’s men were standing at their feet.
XVIII
“How do ye like me bed,” he said,
“and how do you like me sheets?”
“How do you like me fair lady,
that lies in your arms asleep?”

XIX
“It’s well I like your bed,” he said,
“and great it gives me pain,
I’d gladly give a hundred pound
to be on yonder plain.”

XX
“Rise up, rise up, Little Musgrave,
rise up and then put on.
It’ll not be said in this country
I slayed a naked man”
XXI
So slowly, so slowly he got up,
so slowly he put on.
Slowly down the stairs,
thinking to be slain.
XXII
“There are two swords down by my side,
and dear they cost me purse.
You can have the best of them,
and I will take the worst.”
XXIII
And the first stroke that Little Musgrave stroke, it hurt Lord Barnard sore,
But the next stroke Lord Barnard stroke,
Little Musgrave ne’er stroke more.

XXIV
And then up spoke the lady fair,
from the bed whereon she lay,
“Although you’re dead,
me Little Musgrave, still for you I’ll pray.”
XXV
“How do you like his cheeks,” he said,
“How do you like his chin?”
“How do you like his dead body,
now there’s no life within?”

XXVI
“It’s more I like his cheeks,”
she cried, “and more I want his chin,
It’s more I love that dead body,
than all your kith and kin.”
XXVII
He’s taken out his long long sword,
to strike the mortal blow,
Through and through the lady’s heart,
the cold steel it did go.
XXVIII
“A grave, a grave,” Lord Barnard cried,
“to put these lovers in,
with me lady on the upper hand.
She came from better kin.”
XXIX
“For I’ve just killed the finest knight
that ever rode a steed.”
“And I’ve just killed the finest lady
that ever did a woman’s deed.”
TRADUZIONE  di Cattia Salto
I
Accadde in un giorno di festa
come ce ne son tanti in un anno,
Musgrave andò in chiesa,
per incontrare le belle ragazze
II
Una di loro aveva un velluto rosso,
un’altra un velluto bianco;
poi giunse la moglie di Lord Barnard, di tutte certo la più bella.
III
Lanciò uno sguardo al giovane Musgrave,
splendente come il sole d’estate,
e pensò allora Musgrave
d’averle conquistato il cuore.
IV
“Mi sono innamorato di te, bella signora, oramai da tanti giorni;”
“Anch’io ti amo, giovane Musgrave,
ma non ho detto nulla.”
V
“Ho un rifugio a Bucklesfordbury (6), che è pieno di belle cose.
ti porterò là con me,
se tu starai stanotte fra le mie braccia.”
VII
Ma accanto c’era un paggetto
che saltò sulla carrozza della signora:
“Sebbene io sia il paggio della lady
sono un uomo di Lord Barnard.
VIII
“Il mio Lord Barnard lo deve sapere
anche se dovrò nuotare o annegare.”
Ed anche dove i ponti eran rotti
lui si gettò in acqua e nuotò.
IX
“Milord Barnard,
milord Barnard
sei un uomo ardito,
ma Musgrave è
a Bucklesfordbury
a letto con la tua sposa.”
X
“Se questo è vero, mio piccolo paggio, la cosa che mi stai dicendo
allora ti darò volentieri
tutte le terre di Bucklesfordbery.
XI
Ma se è una bugia, mio piccolo paggio, la cosa che mi stai dicendo,
allorà ti farò impiccare
al più alto albero di Bucklesfordbury.”
XII
“Sellatemi, presto, il nero -disse
sellatemi il grigio”
“E non suonate il corno- disse-
per non tradire il nostro arrivo”
XIII
C’era un uomo nel gruppo di Lord Barnard
che amava il giovane Musgrave
e suonò il suo corno forte
e gridò “Scappa, Musgrave, scappa!”
XIV
“Credo d’avere sentito il tordo,
credo d’aver sentito la ghiandaia;
credo d’aver sentito gli uomini di Lord Barnard e vorrei andare via.”
XV
“Stai calmo, giovane Musgrave,
e proteggimi dal freddo;
è solamente un pastorello
che guida le pecore al pascolo.
XVI
“Non hai il falcone sulla staffa,
e il cavallo a mangiare fieno e avena?
Non hai una donna tra le braccia, e tuttavia vorresti andare via?”
XVII
Lui si girò sul fianco e la baciò due volte (7) e poi si addormentò,
quando si alzò gli uomini
di Lord Barnard stavano ritti innanzi
XVIII
“Quanto ti piace il mio letto -disse-
quanto ti piacciono le mie lenzuola?
Trovi bella la mia bella signora
che giace tra le tue braccia addormentata?”
XIX
“Mi piace il tuo letto -disse –
ed è per questo che sono ancor più triste, darei volentieri cento ghinee
per essere lontano all’aperto.”
XX
“Alzati, alzati, giovane Musgrave,
su, rimettiti i vestiti;
nel mio paese non sarà mai detto
che ho ucciso un uomo nudo (4).
XXI
Pian piano lui si alzò
e piano si mise in piedi
e piano giù per le scale andò
pensando di essere in salvo
XXII
“Ho due spade al fianco,
che tanto mi sono costate;
e tu avrai la migliore,
mentre io prenderò la peggiore.”
XXIII
Il primo colpo dato dal piccolo Musgrave
ferì seriamente Lord Barnard;
ma il secondo colpo lo diede Lord Barnard
e il piccolo Musgrave non colpì più.
XXIV
Allora parlò la bella signora,
nel letto dove giaceva:
“Anche se sei morto, piccolo Musgrave, io voglio pregare per te.
XXV
“Quanto ti piacciono le sue guance – dice lui – quanto ti piace il uso mento? E quanto ti piace il suo cadavere ora che è privo di vita?”
XXVI
“Oh molto, mi piacciono le sue guance- lei gridò- molto mi piace il suo mento, e ancora di più mi piace il suo cadavere che tutti i tuoi titoli e terre”
XXVII
Ed egli prese la sua lunga, lunga spada per tirare una stoccata mortale
e colpì dritto il cuore della signora con il freddo acciaio
XXVIII
“Una tomba, una tomba”, gridò Lord Barnard,
“Per seppellire questi due amanti;
ma stendete sopra la mia sposa
perché era nata da miglior casato.”
XXIX
“Ho ucciso il più valente cavaliere
che mai sia salito a cavallo;
Ed anche la più bella donna
che mai sia stata partorita.”

NOTE
6) per quanto sia difficile collocare il punto d’origine della ballata, in questa versione il castello è a Bucklesfordbury, probabilmente il Barnard Castle nella Contea di Durham. Il termine utilizzato “bower” comprende gli appartamenti del castello riservati alla padrona che comprendono soggiorno e camera da letto.

Barnard Castle – William Turner, 1825

7) possiamo solo immaginarci che furono ben più di due baci

continua

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=142120
http://singout.org/2012/02/24/god-make-you-safe-and-free/

SI BHEAG, SI MHOR

L’arpista irlandese Turlough O’Carolan nel 1691 si ispirò a una leggenda locale per comporre un canto riportato con vari titoli “Sheebeg Sheemore” “Sí bheag Sí mhor” “Si Beag si Mor” “Sidh Beag, Sidh Mor”: nei pressi di Lough Scur (Co Leitrim) due tumuli fatati si fronteggiano e sono la casa di due guerrieri (ovvero clan) rivali i quali continuano a combattere nottetempo la loro battaglia. La leggenda narra che lo stesso eroe celtico Finn McCool (mitico capo dei Fianna) sia sepolto nel Sí mhor (la collina più grande).

La melodia trae ispirazione dal brano tradizionale ‘The Bonny Cuckoo’ e gli studiosi la considerano una variante. Così scrive The Fiddler’s Companion “The air, according to O’Sullivan (1958) and tradition, was probably the first composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O’Carolan (1670-1738). The title of the air often appears as “Sheebag, Sheemore,” an Englished version of the original Gaelic “Si Bheag, Si Mhor” which means “so big, so little,” but it has been suggested that “Si” is derived from the medieval Irish “Siod,” meaning “fairy hill” or “fairy mound;” thus the title may also refer to “big fairy hill, little fairy hill.” It seems that the young Carolan first found favor at the house of his first patron, George Reynolds at Letterfain, Co. Leitrim (himself a harper and poet), who told the harper the legend of the two nearby hills and the fairy bands who lived inside. These fairies had a great battle with much shooting, and Reynolds encouraged Carolan to write a song about the event. Some versions of the legend have the mounds being topped by ancient ruins, with fairy castles underneath in which were entombed heros from the battle between the two rivals. O’Sullivan believes the air to be an adaptation of an older piece called “An chuaichin Mhaiseach” (“The Bonny Cuckoo” or “The Cuckoo”), which can be found in O’Neill, Bunting (1796) and Mulholland’s Collection of Ancient Irish Airs (1810). A dance by Gail Tickner appeared in CDSS news #69, March/April 1986 by the title “The Bonny Cuckoo” to the melody.

Il testo è uno dei rarissimi testi conservati dalla vasta produzione del bardo (che ci è giunta per lo più solo nella melodia) così come pubblicato dalla Irish Text Society in “Amhrain Chearbhallain” (in inglese The Poems of Carolan) (vedi):

I
Imreas mór tháinig eidir na ríoghna,
Mar fhíoch a d’fhás ón dá chnoc sí,
Mar dúirt an tSídh Mór go mb’fhearr í féin,
Faoi dhó go mór ná ‘n tSídh Bheag.
II
“Ní raibh tú ariamh chomh uasal linn,
I gcéim dár ordaíoch i dtuath ná i gcill;
Beir uainn do chaint, níl suairceas ann,
Coinnigh do chos is do lámh uainn!”
III
An tráth chruinnigh na sluaite bhí an bualadh teann,
Ar feadh na machaireacha anonn ‘s anall;
‘S níl aon ariamh dár ghluais ón mbinn
Nár chaill a cheann san ár sin.
IV
“Parlaidh! Parlaidh! agus fáiltím daoibh,
Sin agaibh an námhaid Charn Chlann Aoidh,
Ó bhinn Áth Chluain na sluaite díobh,
‘S a cháirde grá dhach, bí páirteach!”

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
A great contention came between the two queens
A feud that spilled from the two hills of the Sidhe
For it was said that the large mound was better
twice greater, twice greater, than the small mound
II
You have never been as noble as us
In rank decreed by the people or church
Be off with your chatter, nothing but pettiness
Keep your foot and hand from us(1)
III
When the hosts circled round there was mighty striking
On the face of the meadowlands, to and fro
So never a one came down from those peaks
but lost his head in the slaughter there
IV
Parley!(2) Parley! O friends and kin!
Here come our foes from Carn Clann Aoidh
Up from Eachluinn peak, the baneful host
And we must all stand together!
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Un grande contesa accadde tra due regine
una faida che sgorgava dai due tumuli fatati
e si disse che la collina più grande era migliore
due volte più grande che la collina più piccola
II
“Non siete mai stati così nobili come noi nel rango emanato dal popolo o dalla chiesa
non siete altro che meschini nelle vostre chiacchiere
state lontani da noi(1)”
III
Quando gli eserciti assediavano c’era una grande lotta
di fronte ai prati, avanti indietro
così nessuno mai discese da quelle cime
ma perse la testa lì nel massacro
IV
Tregua! O amici e parenti!
Qui vengono i nostri nemici da Carn Clann Aoidh
fino alla montagna di Eachluinn, l’ospite maligno
e dobbiamo stare tutti insieme!

NOTE
1) letteralmente “allontanate mani e piedi da noi”
2) parlè (in lingua inglese parley) quella discussione o conferenza che sussiste fra due parti opposte, o nemiche, per definire i termini di una tregua o altre questioni

O’Carolan, pupillo della famiglia MacDermott Roe, divenne cieco all’età di 18 anni per aver contratto il vaiolo e andò ramingo per l’Irlanda a offrire i suoi servigi di bardo: ‘Sì Bheag Agus Sì Mhor’ fu probabilmente la sua prima composizione quando poco più che ventenne si trovava nella casa di Squire Reynold a Lough Scur.

ASCOLTA Mark Harmer live: arpa e sussurri del vento  in un campo di campanule o giacinti selvatici ai piedi del bosco, semplicemente magico

ASCOLTA Planxty (probabilmente la versione più conosciuta)

ASCOLTA Deiseal in una versione più accelerata

ASCOLTA William Coulter

Il brano è stato arrangiato da molti chitarristi segnalo in particolare

ASCOLTA Ed Harris

Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) Nato da una famiglia di nobili origini ma caduta in miseria, a 18 anni perse la vista a causa del vaiolo. Accolto nella famiglia nobiliare dei McDermott Roe, entrò nelle simpatie della signora MacDermott Roe che lo fece studiare presso l'arpista locale per tre anni, e quando si ritenne che fosse in grado di iniziare la professione, gli procurò un arpa, un cavallo e un aiutante per guidarlo. Arpista itinerante e compositore, sebbene sia vissuto in un triste periodo della storia irlandese, ebbe una vita di successo e la sua musica è suonata ancora oggi quasi come un "classico" (tratto da qui)

continua 

FONTI
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/si-bheag-si-mhor/
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/i-bardi-delle-terre-celtiche/
http://eigse.blogspot.it/2008/07/si-beg-and-si-mor-by-turloch-ocarolan.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/449
http://www.irishpage.com/songs/carolan/sheebeag.htm

SALLY BROWN I ROLLED ALL NIGHT..

Nei sea shanties Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola con la quale il nostro marinaio cerca di spassarsela. Di probabile origine giamaicana secondo Stan Hugill, era un canto popolare nei porti delle Indie Occidentali negli anni 1830. Le varianti testuali e melodiche sono molte. (vedi prima parte)

shallow-brawn-shore

SECONDA VERSIONE: I ROLLED ALL NIGHT

In questa versione il coro si sviluppa su più versi e la canzone è classificata, anche con il titolo di “Roll and Go”(1), nelle capstan shanty cioè i canti eseguiti durante il sollevamento dell’ancora per mezzo dell’argano (o verricello). Gli shanty di questa categoria hanno ritmi regolari e di solito raccontano una storia perchè per salpare l’ancora si impiegava un bel po’.

ASCOLTA Planxty live (che non a caso ridacchiano, dato la nomea della canzoncina)

ASCOLTA Irish Descendants

Shipped on board a Liverpool liner,
CHORUS
Way hey roll(1) on board;
Well, I rolled all night
and I rolled all day,
I’m gonna spend my money with
Sally Brown.
Miss Sally Brown is a fine young lady,
She’s tall and she’s dark(2) and she’s not too shady
Her mother doesn’t like the tarry(3) sailor,
She wants her to marry the one-legged captain
Sally wouldn’t marry me so I shipped across the water
And now I am courting Sally’s daughter
I shipped off board a Liverpool liner
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool-Caraibi
CORO Salpa(1) e vai,
ho lavorato(1) tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
e spenderò i miei soldi
con Sally Brown.
La signorina Sally Brown è una bella ragazza, è alta e scura(2) e non è troppo equivoca
ma a sua madre non piacciono i marinai(3), vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally non mi vuole sposare, così ho preso il mare
e ora faccio la corte alla figlia di Sally e mi sono imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool-Caraibi

NOTE
1) non è un termine propriamente nautico, ma è genericamente utilizzato dai marinai per dire molte cose
2) si potrebbe riferire al colore dei capelli più che della pelle, anche se in altre versioni è identificata come creola o mulatta. Il termine “creolo” può essere inteso in due eccezioni: dallo spagnolo “crillo”, che originariamente si riferiva alla prima generazione nata nel “Nuovo Mondo”, figli di coloni dall’Europa (Spagna o Francia) e gli schiavi neri. Il significato più comune è quello che si riferisce a  tutti i neri mezzosangue della Giamaica dal colore della pelle che passa dal marrone al nero-blu. Nell’Ottocento con questo termine si indicava anche una piccola società urbana elitaria di pelle chiara nella Louisiana  (residente per lo più a New Orleans) risultato degli incroci tra le belle schiave nere e i proprietari terrieri bianchi che le prendevano come amanti
3) tarry è un termine dispregiativo per contraddistinguere il tipico marinaio. Più in generale Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro.

ASCOLTA Teddy Thompson in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate   Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys,  ANTI 2006 in una versione più meditativa e malinconica

Sally Brown she’s a nice young lady,
CHORUS
Way, hay, we roll an’ go (1).
We roll all night
And we roll all day
Spend my money on Sally Brown.
Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Mother doesn’t like a tarry sailor(3)
She wants her to marry a one legged captain
Sally Brown she’s a bright lady(2)
She drinks stock rum
And she chews tobacco
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Salpa e vai,
ho lavorato tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
spenderò i miei soldi con Sally Brown.
imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool-Caraibi, a sua madre non piacciono i marinai, vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally Brown è una bella ragazza(2)
beve la riserva di rum
e mastica tabacco

NOTE
2) la “fine young lady” si beve la riserva di rum (ovvero grandi quantità di rum) e mastica tabacco – non proprio quello che si dice “una lady”!!!

continua terza parte

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

THE BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN

Il testo è conosciuto  come “The Young Horseman” oppure “The Bonny Light Horseman” ovvero “Broken Hearted I’ll Wander”; è un lament che risale probabilmente al 1700, non è ben chiaro se sia di origine irlandese (secondo Sam Henry) o inglese (secondo William Barret): di certo si è diffuso come broadside in Irlanda e la sua popolarità è stata tale da essere cantato con due distinte melodie (una propria del Sud Irlanda e l’altra più diffusa nel Nord-Ovest) e in molte varianti testuali.

Mary Ann Carolan sang The Bonny Light Horseman to Roly Brown at home in Hill o’ Rath, Co. Louth in 1978. It was released in 1982 on her Topic album Songs from the Irish Tradition. Sean Corcoran commented in the sleeve notes: This English song was circulated on ballad sheets in Ireland and became quite popular. Versions have been found in Wexford (Stanford-Petrie No. 779), and the P.J. McCall Collection in the National Library in Dublin, in Galway (sung by Sean O Conaire) and in Antrim (Sam Henry, Songs of the People, No. 122). It was sung to two distinct airs—a Southern and a Northern/Western. Mrs Carolan sings the Southern air while the Galway tune is the same as Henry’s version A, although Sean O Conaire sings it in the highly decorated sean-nós style of Connemara. When first recorded in 1970 Mrs. Carolan sang this song in a much faster tempo. (tratto da qui)
[traduzione in italiano: Mary Ann Carolan ha cantato The Bonny Light Horseman a Roly Brown nella sua casa a Hill o’ Rath, contea di Louth nel 1978. La registrazione è stata pubblicata nel 1982 nell’album Songs from the Irish Tradition. Sean Corcoran scriveva nelle note di copertina di quel disco: Questa canzone inglese è stata diffusa su fogli volanti in Irlanda e divenne abbastanza popolare. Versioni diverse sono state raccolde a Wexford, nella collezione P.J. McCall conservata presso la Biblioteca Nazionale a Dublino, a Galway (cantata da Sen O Conaire) e ad Antrim (Sam Henry, Songs of the People, No. 122). Era cantata su due arie diverse, una diffusa nel sud e una nel nord ovest. Mrs Carolan canta l’aria del sud, mentre la melodia raccolta a Galway è la stessa della versione A di Henry, anche se Sean O Connaire la canta nello stile pieno di abbellimenti tipico del Connemara. Nella prima registrazione del 1970 Mrs Carolan cantava questa canzone con un ritmo molto più veloce. (tratto da qui)]

Per un sintetico raffronto delle diverse melodie qui

ASCOLTA Mary-Ann Carolan, in Songs from the Irish Tradition 1982 (dalla registrazione sul campo del 1978) sebbene  la signora Carolan sia di origini Nord-irlandesi la sua  versione melodica è più simile  a quella diffusa nel sud.


I
When Bonaparte(1),
commanded his troops for to stand
and planted  his cannons
all over the land;
he planted his cannons,
the whole victory to gain,
And they killed my light horseman(2)
returning from Spain.
CHORUS
Broken-hearted I wander
for the loss of my lover,
He’s my bonny light horseman,
in the wars he was slain
II
If you saw my love on sentry(3)
on a cold winter’s day,
With his red rosy cheeks
and his flowing brown hair.
all mounted on horseback,
the whole victory for to gain,
And he’s over the battlefield
great honours to gain.
III
If I were a blackbird
and had wings to fly
I would fly to the spot
where my true love does lie
And with me little fluttering wings
his wounds I would heal
And ’tis all the night
on his breast I would remain.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
I
Quando Bonaparte
comandò alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i sui cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i sui cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
ed essi uccisero il mio bel cavaliere
di ritorno dalla Spagna
CORO
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
Egli è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se aveste visto il mio amore di sentinella
in una notte in pieno inverno
con le sue guance rosee
e i suoi fluenti capelli scuri
montare in sella al cavallo,
per ottenere la vittoria
è sul campo di battaglia
per guadagnarsi grandi onori
III
Se fossi un merlo
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei fin dove
giace il mio vero amore
e con le mie piccole ali tremanti
le sue ferite guarirei
e per tutta la notte
sul suo petto resterei

NOTE
1) In Irlanda la figura di Napoleone è stata trasfigurata in quella dell’eroe che avrebbe liberato gli Irlandesi dal dominio inglese. Ma la sua leggenda è controversa essendo anche considerato un conquistatore sanguinario sempre pronto a promuovere una campagna di guerra: ed è proprio in questa ottica negativa che  si declina la canzone (vedi)
2) una traduzione più pertinente del termine light horse è cavalleggeri per indicare più genericamente uno squadrone a cavallo: unità denominate variamente come Corazzieri, Dragoni, Lancieri e Ussari si distinguevano principalmente in cavalleria pesante, in linea e leggera. Fu Napoleone a sfruttare al meglio la cavalleria adattandola alle moderne tecniche di guerra (vedi)
3) scritto come sentry= sentinella;  ma anche scritto come Santry è un sobborgo di Dublino, un tempo piccolo villaggio nell’area anticamente denominata Fingal (in inglese “fair-haired foreigner”. ) perchè insediamento di pacifiche comunità di contadini norvegesi che seppero trasformare il fertile terreno in ricchi campi coltivati.

ASCOLTA Oisín & Geraldine MacGowan in Over the Moor to Maggie, 1980. Una versione testuale simile alla precedente e con l’aggiunta di una amara strofa (la stessa versione anche in Kate Rusby)


I
Bonaparte he commanded
His troops for to stand
He planted his cannon
all over the land
He planted his cannon
The whole victory for to gain
And they killed my light horseman
returning from Spain.
CHORUS
Broken-hearted I’ll wander
For the loss of my lover
He’s my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain.
II
If you saw my love in Santry(3)
On a cold winter’s night
With his rosy red cheeks
And his flowing brown hair
All mounted on horseback
The whole victory for to gain
And he’s on the battlefield
Great honours to gain
III
If I were a blackbird
And I had wings to fly
I would fly to the spot where
My true love does lie
And with my little fluttering wings
His wounds I would heal
And all the night long
On his breast I would lie
IV
Oh Boney, Oh Boney
I have caused you no harm
Tell me why, Oh tell me why
You have caused this alarm(1)
We were so happy together
My true love and me
Ah but now you have stretched him
In death o’er the sea
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
I
Bonaparte comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i sui cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i sui cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
ed essi uccisero il mio bel cavaliere
di ritorno dalla Spagna
CORO
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
Egli è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se aveste visto il mio amore a Santry
in una notte in pieno inverno
con le sue guance rosee
e i suoi fluenti capelli scuri
montare in sella al cavallo
per ottenere la vittoria
ed è sul campo di battaglia
per guadagnarsi grandi onori
III
Se fossi un merlo
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei fin dove
giace il mio amore
e con le mie piccole ali tremanti
le sue ferite guarirei
e per tutta la notte
sul suo petto starei
IV
Oh Boney, Oh Boney
io non ti ho fatto del male,
allora dimmi perchè oh dimmi perchè
tu hai suscitato questo allarme?
Eravamo così felici insieme
il mio vero amore ed io,
ma ora lo hai condotto
alla morte oltre il mare

QUALE GUERRA D’EGITTO?

Un bel e giovane irlandese/inglese arruolato nei cavalleggeri, muore in battaglia ed è compianto dalla sua innamorata.  Come sempre non è semplice inquadrare storicamente la canzone specialmente se è più probabile che non sia riferita ad una specifica battaglia , ma attualizzata ad una generale guerra napoleonica essendo stato Napoleone Bonaparte un personaggio molto discusso e ammirato, nel bene e nel male.
“Which war is being invoked is difficult to say but the tentative suggestion here is that Bonny Light Horsemanitself is of an eighteenth century vintage.  Regiments of light horse in the British army, deriving from the private regiments raised during the latter part of the seventeenth century and during a considerable part of the eighteenth, do not appear to begin to have been so-named until around 1748 (The Duke of Cumberland’s Light Horse) and after (1759 – Hale’s Light Horse…Burgoyne’s Light Horse).  So, taking the appellation ‘Light Horse’ into account and despite the fact that Britain was engaged in conflict through most of the century in Europe (War of Jenkins’ Ear, 1739), at home (the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745), and in North America (1775-1783, (the American revolutionary war), before the all-embracing French wars, we can discount the War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748) because Britain did not play a major role in a conflict that was, essentially, between the Austrians and the Prussians; and a more likely stimulus, though by no means a certainty, would have been the Seven Year’s War (1756-1763), when Britain finally broke French power in North America.  By the 1780s the more precise regimental appellations had been regularly adopted – Dragoon, Hussar and so on – that is, before the French wars.  This regular transmogrification of horse regiments into Lancers, Dragoons and Hussars might suggest that our text already had an attachment to the generic.” (tratto da qui)

ARTIGLIERIA VERSUS CAVALLERIA

I tempi moderni stanno per dare l’addio all’uso di una formidabile forza militare, la cavalleria, appannaggio esclusivo inizialmente dei nobiluomini e dopo il medioevo emblema della borghesia emergente e delle classi benestanti, una forza d’urto che si rivelerà sempre più inadeguata alle battaglie in campo aperto contro lo spiegamento delle potenti armi da fuoco (i cannoni prima e le mitragliatrici poi). Nella canzone si evidenzia proprio la spersonalizzazione della guerra e la trasformazione dei soldati in carne da cannone.

ASCOLTA Planxty in una versione più marziale, in After the Break 1979: l’arrangiamento di Andy Irvine sostanzialmente riprende la versione di Dolores Keane e John Faulkner ASCOLTA

ASCOLTA Maranna McCloskey la melodia è quella del Nord Irlanda e il testo quello dei Planxty


CHORUS
Oh, Napoleon Bonaparte(1),
you’re the cause of my woe
Since my bonny light horseman
to the wars he did go
Broken hearted I’ll wander,
broken hearted I’ll remain
Since my bonny light horseman(2)
in the wars he was slain
I
When Boney commanded
his armies to stand
And proud lift his banners
all gayly and grand
He levelled his cannons
right over the plain
And my bonny light horseman
in the wars he was slain
II
And if I was some small bird
and had wings and could fly
I would fly over the salt sea
where my true love does lie
Three years and six months now,
since he left this bright shore
Oh, my bonny light horseman
will I never see you more?
III
And the dove she laments
for her mate as she flies
“Oh, where, tell me
where is my true love?” she sighs
“And where in this wide world
is there one to compare
With my bonny light horseman
who was killed in the war?”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
CORO
Oh Napoleone Bonaparte
sei la causa del mio dolore
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è andato in guerra
con il cuore a pezzi camminerò,
e con il cuore a pezzi resterò
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso in battaglia
I
Quando Boney comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
e con orgoglio innalzò il suo stendardo
così allegramente e in alto,
puntò i suoi cannoni
proprio sulla piana
e il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso nella battaglia
II
Se fossi un uccellino
e avessi le ali per poter volare
volerei oltre il mare salato
fin dove il mio vero amore giace
sono tre anni e sei mesi adesso,
da quando ha lasciato questa bianca spiaggia
o mio bel cavaliere,
non ti vedrò mai più?
III
La colomba si lamenta
per il compagno mentre vola
“Oh dove, ditemi
dov’è il mio vero amore?” sospira
“e dove in questo vasto mondo
c’è n’è uno eguale
al mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in guerra?”

IL LAMENT

Ma la canzone è sostanzialmente un lament cantato dalla donna che ha perduto il suo uomo in guerra e perciò trovo molto suggestive queste due versioni al femminile,  il grido di dolore delle donne (madri e mogli, compagne) che restano a casa mentre gli uomini fanno la guerra (la storia universale di una perdita che si rinnova per ogni soldato che muore in guerra)
ASCOLTA Cherish the Ladies in Threads of Time, 1997


Broken-hearted I’ll wander
For the loss of my lover
He is my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain
I
When Boney commanded
his armies to stand
He leveled his cannon
right over the land
He leveled his cannon
his victory to gain
And slew my light horseman
on the way coming in
Chorus:
Broken-hearted I’ll wander
Broken-hearted I’ll remain
Since my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain
II
And if I was a small bird
and had wings to fly
I would fly o’er the salt seas
to where my love does lie
And with my fond wings
I’d beat over his grave
And kiss the pale lips
that lie cold in the clay
III
Well, the dove, she laments
for her mate as she flies
“Tell me where,
tell me where is my true love,” she cries
And where in this wide world
is there one to compare
With my bonny light horseman
who was slain in the war
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
I
Quando Bonaparte comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i suoi cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i suoi cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
e uccise il mio bel cavaliere
all’assalto
Coro
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò,
con il cuore a pezzi resterò
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se fossi un uccellino
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei oltre il mare salato
fin dove giace il mio amore
e con le mie ali appassionate
demolirei la sua tomba
per baciare le pallide labbra
che stanno nella fredda terra
III
La colomba si lamenta
per il compagno mentre vola
” ditemi dove
dov’è il mio vero amore?” si lamenta
“e dove in questo vasto mondo
c’è n’è uno eguale
al mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in guerra?”

ASCOLTA Niamh Parsons in Heart’s Desire 2008 con il titolo di Brokenhearted I’ll Wander

per completezza riporto anche questa versione raccolta sul campo proveniente dall’Irlanda Ovest.

ASCOLTA Martin Howley. Raccolta da Jim Carroll e Pat Mackenzie nell’abitazione di Martin Howley a Fanore, Co. Clare, nell’estate 1975.  In  “A Story I’m Just About to Tell” (The Voice of the People Series Volume 8), 1998


I once loved a soldier
and a soldier bright and gay,
So now he has left me
and gone far away.
To the dark plains of Egypt
he was forced for to go
To die in the fields
or to conquer his foe.
Broken-hearted I’ll wander,
broken-hearted I will be,
Since my lovely young horseman
to the war he’s gone from me.
And it’s early each morning
as I come down for to dress,
I gaze at his picture hung over my head.
Such a lovely young fellow
so manly and so tall.
It was scarcely you would think
they would kill him at all.
It was brave Napoleon,
it was he who took command,
And he planted his cannons
all over the land.
He planted his cannons
for some victory to gain,
And he slew brave MacDonald
coming over from Spain.
If I was an eagle
and had wings for to fly,
I would fly to the plains
where my own darling lie.
And in his cold grave
I would build my own nest,
And contented I’d be
on his lily-white breast.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Un tempo amavo un soldato,
un soldato bello e allegro
ma ora mi ha lasciata
ed è andato lontano
verso le pianure oscure dell’Egitto
è stato arruolato per andare
a morire in battaglia
o per vincere sul nemico
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
con il cuore a pezzi starò
da quando il mio amato giovane cavaliere
per la guerra è andato via da me.
Tutte le mattine pesto
quando scendo giù per vestirmi
guardo alla sua foto appesa sopra la testa
un così bel giovane compagno
così virile e alto.
non avresti creduto
che lo avrebbero ucciso
E’ stato il prode Napoleone,
è stato lui che ha preso il comando
e ha piazzato i suoi cannoni
per tutta la pianura
ha piazzato i suoi cannoni
per riportare qualche vittoria
e ha ucciso il prode MacDonald
proveniente dalla Spagna.
Se fossi un aquila
e avessi le ali per volare
voleri sul campo
dove il mio amore giace
e nel suo freddo sepolcro
costruirei il mio nido
e soddisfatta starei
sul suo petto bianco-giglio

FONTI
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2363/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_25.htm
http://www.waterlooweb.co.uk/living/?p=128
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=46608
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thebonnylighthorseman.html
http://folkinfusion.blogspot.it/2013/10/bonny-light-horseman.html
https://ridiculousauthor.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/my-bonnie-light-horseman-a-lite-look-at-british-cavalry-jonathan-hopkins/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10951

http://www.contemplator.com/england/horseman.html

http://www.contemplator.com/england/horse2.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=822
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=845
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=949
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5960