Archivi tag: Paddy Tunney

Lark in the Morning

Leggi in italiano

The irish song “The Lark in the Morning” is mainly found in the county of Fermanagh (Northern Ireland): the image is rural, portrayed by an idyllic vision of healthy and simple country life; a young farmer who plows the fields to prepare them for spring sowing, is the paradigm of youthful exaltation, its exuberance and joie de vivre, is compared to the lark as it sails flying high in the sky in the morning. Like many songs from Northern Ireland it is equally popular also in Scotland.
The point of view is masculine, with a final toast to the health of all the “plowmen” (or of the horsebacks, a task that in a large farm more generally indicated those who took care of the horses) that they have fun rolling around in the hay with some beautiful girls, and so they demonstrate their virility with the ability to reproduce.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners

Alex Beaton with a lovely Scottish accent

The Quilty (Swedes with an Irish heart)

CHORUS
The lark in the morning, she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy, she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy, he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing, over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,, she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing, then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home, from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green, and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble, all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”,  this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks, they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice, how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble, all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king
NOTES
1) The lark is a melodious sparrow that sings from the first days of spring and already at the first light of dawn; it is a terrestrial bird which, however, once safely in flight, rises almost vertically into the sky, launching a cascade of sounds similar to a musical crescendo.
Then, closed the wings, he lets himself fall like a dead body until he touches the ground and immediately rises again, starting to sing again . see more
2) blade= boy, term used in ancient ballads to indicate a skilled swordsman
3) The story’s backgroung is that of the season of haymaking, starting in May, when farmers went to make hay, that is to cut the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.. see more

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, from Paddy Tunney (only I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), the most extensive version comes from the Sussex Copper family, but Lisa further changes some verses.

I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may

 

THE ENGLISH VERSION

This version was collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 as heard by Ms. Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, Horsham in Sussex, but already circulated in the nineteenth-century broadsides and then reported in Roy Palmer’s book “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Became into the English folk music circuit in the 60s the song was recorded in 1971 by the English folk rock group Steeleye Span with the voice of Maddy Prior.

The refrain is similar to that of the previous irish version, but here the situation is even more pastoral and almost Shakespearean with the shepherdess and the plowman who are surprised by the morning song of the lark, but with the reversed parts: he who tells her to stay in his arms, because there is still the evening dew, but she who replies that the sun is now shining and even the lark has risen in flight. The name of the peasant is Floro and derives from the Latin Fiore.

Steeleye Span from Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior  from Arthur The King – 2001

I
“Lay still my fond shepherd and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro, it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows where the grass is all cut down.

NOTES
1)plow the field but also plow a complacent girl

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

“Lark in the morning” is a jig mostly performed with banjo or bouzouki or mandolin or guitar, but also with pipes, whistles or flutes, fiddles ..
An anecdote reported by Peter Cooper says that two violinists had challenged one evening to see who was the best, only at dawn when they heard the song of the lark, they agreed that the sweetest music was that of the morning lark. Same story told by the piper Seamus Ennis but with the The Lark’s March tune

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes with Alan Murray guitar

Peter Browne uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

LINK
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62

THE LOUSE HOUSE OF KILKENNY

travellersSourceMain“The louse house of Kilkenny” racconta in modo semi-serio la notte di un povero viandante passata con una banda di pidocchi (e altri sgraditi ospiti) trovata nel letto di una pensione di infimo ordine a Kilkenny. La canzone appartiene al repertorio di Paddy Tunney ed è stata divulgata sia dai Dubliners che dai Clancy Brothers negli anni 60-70.
Surprisingly, there are few documented versions of this very popular song having been recorded from traditional singers. Those that have include Kerry Traveller Christie Purcell (1952), Tommy and Gemma McGrath, Waterford (1965) and Kilkenny Traveller Mary Delaney (1976). A degree of confusion has arisen because of the song having been listed under three distinct titles: Christie Purcell’s appeared as ‘Carrick on Suir’ and Mary Delaney’s as ‘The Kilkenny Louse House’. The McGrath version was given the somewhat strange title ‘Burke’s Engine’ due to a mishearing of the name ‘Buck St John’ – the song is occasionally known as ‘Buck St John’s Black Army’. (Jim Caroll tratto da qui)

La versione dei Dubliners per la verità non menziona Kilkenny bensì Carrick-on-Suir e  Rathronan entrambi nella Contea di Tipperary ad una ventina di kilometri di distanza (una distanza mediamente percorribile in una giornata di cammino a piedi).

ASCOLTA Dubliners

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers 1968 (strofe I, II, IV, VI, VII, VIII)

VERSIONE DUBLINERS
I
Oh, the first of me downfall
I set out the door.
I straight made me way on
for Carrick-on-Suir (1).
Going out by Rathronan (2),
‘twas late in the night,
Going out the West Gate
for to view the gaslight (3).
CHORUS:
Radley fal the diddle ay
Radley fal the diddle airo
II (4)
I went to the town’s hall
to see the big lamp,
And who should I meet
but a bloody big tramp.
I finally stepped over
and to him I said:
“Will you kindly direct me
to where I’ll get a bed?”
III
‘Twas then he directed me
down to Cooks Lane
To where old Buck St John
kept an old sleeping cage.
From out of the door
was a small piece of board
Hung out on two nails with a short piece of cord.
IV
I looked (put) up and down
till I found out the door
[And a queerer old household sure I ne’er saw before.]
Then the missus came out and these words to me said:
“If you give me three coppers,
sure I’ll give you a bed.”
V
Well, I then stood aside
with me back to the wall,
And the next thing I saw
was an oul cobbler’s stall,
And there was the cobbler,
and he mending his brogues
With his hammers and pinchers
all laid in a row.
VI
Then she brought me upstairs
and she put out the light,
And in less than five minutes,
I had to show fight.
And in less than five more,
sure the story was worse,
The fleas came around me
and brought me a curse.
VII
‘Twas all around me body
they formed an arch.
‘Twas all around me body
they played the Dead March.
For the bloody oul major (5)
gave me such a nip,
That he nearly made away
with half of me hip.
VIII
Now I’m going to me study,
these lines to pen down,
And if any poor traveller should e’er come to town,
And if any poor traveller should be nighted(6) like me,
Beware of Buck St John
and his black cavalry(7).
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della mia sventura
me ne andai (da casa)
e subito presi il largo
per Carrick-on-Suir:
uscendo da Rathronan,
era tarda notte,
attraversai la Porta Occidentale per vedere l’illuminazione a gas.
CHORUS:
Radley fal the diddle ay
Radley fal the diddle airo
II
Andai nella piazza del municipio
per vedere il grande lampione,
e chi ti incontro
se non un dannato vagabondo?
Alla fine l’ho scavalcato
e gli ho detto:
“Volete gentilmente indicarmi
dove troverò un letto?”
III
Allora lui mi ha mandato
giù verso Cooks Lane
dove il vecchio Buck St John
teneva una vecchia pensione per dormire.
All’aperto c’era un piccolo pezzo di cartone, appeso a due chiodi con un pezzetto di corda.
IV
Guardai su e giù
finché non trovai la porta
e la più bizzarra vecchia casa
che avessi mai visto prima!
Allora venne fuori la padrona
e mi disse queste parole:
“Se mi dai tre monetine,
subito ti do un letto”.
V
Beh, mi feci da parte
con le spalle al muro,
e la cosa seguente che vidi
fu la vecchia postazione di un ciabattino, e c’era il ciabattino, che riparava gli scarponi
con i suoi martelli e le tenaglie
tutti messi in fila.
VI
Poi lei mi ha portato al piano di sopra
e ha spento la luce,
e in meno di cinque minuti,
ho dovuto combattere
e in meno di altri cinque,
la storia andava anche peggio,
le pulci mi hanno circondato
e mi hanno dato il tormento.
VII
Tutto intorno al mio corpo
hanno formato una curva
e intorno al mio corpo
hanno ballato la Danza macabra.
La più grande vecchia bastarda
mi ha dato un tale morso
che mi ha quasi portato via
metà del fianco.
VIII
Ora ho intenzione di scrivere
queste righe a penna:
se qualche povero viaggiatore dovesse mai venire in città,
e se qualche povero viaggiatore dovesse essere sorpreso dalla notte come me,
faccia attenzione a Buck St John
e alla sua nera cavalleria!

NOTE
1)  cittadina nella contea Tipperary
2) Rathronan è il nome di diversi paesi ma quello della contea di Tipperary è così piccolo  che dubito avesse l’illuminazione a gas ai tempi della canzone. Evidentemente si da per assodato che la direzione presa dal vagabondo sia quello verso la cittadina di Kilkenny
3) l’illuminazione pubblica doveva essere una rarità ai tempi della canzone, se destava tanta meraviglia
4) la strofa dei Clancy Brothers dice
There I met with a youth
and I unto him said
“Would you kindly direct me
to where I’ll get a bed?”
It was then he directed me
down to Cook’s Lane
To where old Dick Darby
kept an old sleeping cage
(traduzione italiano :Là incontrai un giovanotto e gli ho detto:
“Volete gentilmente indicarmi dove troverò un letto?”
Allora lui mi ha mandato giù verso Cooks Lane
dove quel vecchio Dick Darby teneva una vecchia pensione per dormire
5) una pulce invero gigante!In questa versione non viene esplicitamente menzionato il topo è quindi il morso che stacca un pezzo di fianco viene dato nientemeno che da una pulce sanguinaria!!
6) nighted = benighted = overtaken by night or darkness.
7) black cavalry = fleas.

Così come i vari titoli anche le versioni testuali sono molte, alcune come quella di Mary  Delaney contengono termini (qui) provenienti dal gergo degli irish traveller tra i quali pare che questa canzone fosse diffusa. Il genere è un po’ insolito, ma non mancano altre flea-battle songs anche se questa è la più famosa.

ASCOLTA Wolfe Tones

VERSIONE WOLFE TONES
I
The first of me downfall
I walked out the door
I straight made me way (1)
on for Carrick-on-Suir
Going out by Kilkenny
‘twas late in the night
as I went through that city
I saw gaslight(2)
with me fa the diddle ario i a
II
And there in this back street
there was this gas lamp
And under it sat the chap
called the tramp
He asked me for a penny,
and to him I did say,
“could you show me a place
where I could stay
III
He directed me down
to Sweet Lovers Lane
To the place called the refuge,
I think that’s the name
Steps’ inside the door
put my back to the wall
was then that I found out
was the cobblers hall.
IV
Young man in the corner
and he mending some brogue
with his hammer and chisel,
going round like a goat
the old women inside,
and to me she did say,
“if you gave me a shilling sir,
here you can stay.”
V
She brought me upstairs,
and she put out the light,
and in less than 5 minutes
I had to show fright (3),
with bugs and the flies,
they collected to march,
and over me belly,
they formed an arch.
and one big rattier,
gave me such a nip,
I was very near losing
the use of me hip (4).
With me fa the diddle airo i ario i a
VI
I sat up in the bed,
and demanded fair play,
sure if I had me stick,
I could fight my own way
jumped out through the window,
and gathered some stones,
sure if I had sore sides,
I gave him broken bones.
VII
Now come on you fair maiden, wherever you may be,
wherever you travel, by land or by sea,
if your going to Kilkenny,
and intending to stay
beware of the Louse House,
in Sweet Lovers Lane.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della mia sventura
me ne andai (da casa)
e mi fiondai
per Carrick-on-Suir:
uscendo da Kilkenny,
era tarda notte,
mentre camminavo per quella città
ho visto l’illuminazione pubblica
with me fa the diddle ario i a
II
E là in quella stradina
c’era questo grande lampione
e sotto sedeva un tipo
che chiamavano il “barbone”.
Mi ha chiesto un penny
e gli ho detto:
“Volete indicarmi
un posto dove dormire?”
III
Lui mi ha mandato
giù verso Sweet Lovers Lane
in un posto detto Rifugio
credo fosse quello il nome.
Feci un passo oltre la porta
fui con le spalle al muro
e allora  scoprii
che era la stanza del calzolaio
V
C’era un giovanotto nell’angolo
e riparava degli scarponi
con il suo martello e la sgorbia.
Camminando come una capra
la vecchia all’interno
mi disse
“Se mi date uno scellino signore,
potete restare qui”.
V
Lei mi ha portato al piano di sopra
e ha spento la luce,
e in meno di cinque minuti,
mi prese il terrore
con insetti e mosche,
che si raccolsero in marcia
e sulla mia pancia
formarono una curva,
e un grosso topo
mi diede un morso tale
che per poco mi portò via
metà del fianco.
With me fa the diddle airo i ario i a
VI
Mi sono seduto sul letto
e richiesto sangue freddo,
se avessi avuto il mio bastone di certo
avrei potuto affrontarlo,
saltai fuori dalla finestra
e raccolsi delle pietre:
anche se ero tutto ammaccato
io di certo gli ho spezzato le ossa.
VII
Ora venite giovani fanciulle
dovunque voi siate
comunque viaggiate,
via terra o via mare
se andrete a Kilkenny
e avete intenzione di restarci
fate attenzione alla Casa dei Pidocchi
in Sweet Lovers Lane.

NOTE
1) subito presi il largo
2) l’illuminazione pubblica doveva essere una rarità ai tempi della canzone, se destava tanta meraviglia
3) letteralmente “ho dovuto mostrare la paura”
4) letteralmente fui molto vicino a perdere l’uso della mia anca

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25150
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?songid=0658
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/the_kilkenny_louse_house_jlyons.htm
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/puck.htm
http://www.veteran.co.uk/VT149CD%20words.htm

 

 

THE MOUNTAIN STREAMS WHERE THE MOORCOCKS CROW

The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow”  è una canzone d’amore che richiama la primavera. La canzone viene dal repertorio di Paddy Tunney ovvero dalla madre Brigid che amava particolarmente le slow airs dalle complesse melodie. Anche sul versante scozzese si tramanda una versione simile dal titolo “Wi’ my dog and gun

CHE UCCELLO È IL MOORCOCKS?

Due sono gli uccelli che si contendono la traduzione: il gallo cedrone ma anche la pernice di Scozia, entrambi della famiglia dei fagiani.

IL GALLO CEDRONE

Il gallo cedrone o urogallo (Tetrao urogallus, Linnaeus, 1758) detto più comunemente capercaillie: è un gallo di montagna, ardente amatore, tra i primi uccelli a fine inverno a preparare il terreno per l’accoppiamento che si protrarrà da marzo fino a maggio. E’ una specie in via d’estinzione sia nei boschi della Scozia che in quelli del Nord Italia, ma assente in Irlanda: mentre il maschio sembra un piccolo tacchino, la femmina ha l’aspetto di un fagiano.
Si stralcia da Wikipedia “Il gallo cedrone è senza dubbio fra i gallinacei quello che si mostra più eccitato nel periodo amoroso: comincia quando il bosco è ancora silenzioso, e per gli altri uccelli la primavera non è ancora comparsa, e i suoi giochi singolari principiano non appena sull’orizzonte sono comparsi i primi albori. Secondo le parole di Alfred Edmund Brehm, per prima cosa l’uccello sporge il capo obliquamente, rizza le piume del capo e della gola ed emette uno scoppiettio di crescente rapidità fino al momento in cui risuona la battuta principale e incomincia il cosiddetto arrotare. Si tratta di una serie di suoni fischianti che ricordano lo stridere di una lama sulla ruota di un arrotino, accompagnati da movimenti della coda, delle ali e del corpo, da saltelli sui rami e dal drizzarsi di tutte le piume. Si tentò più volte, ma con scarsi risultati, di riprodurre con parole queste voci che i maschi emettono tenendo il becco spalancato, e forzando i muscoli della laringespecialmente quando suona la battuta principale. In questi giochi, gli uccelli sembrano aver perduto completamente l’udito, probabilmente per la forte pressione esercitata sull’atmosfera circostante e per la straordinaria eccitazione da cui sono dominati. È una sorta di follia che arriva alle manifestazioni più singolari: l’uccello si spinge fino ad affrontare gravi pericoli, certi esemplari non temono di collocarsi nelle zone frequentate dall’uomo e di accostarlo, inseguirlo, beccarlo, rinnegando completamente la propria timida natura. Certe superstizioni parlano addirittura di uno spirito maligno che si introduce nel corpo dell’animale. Non sempre il gallo cedrone arriva a questi eccessi, ma è certo, tuttavia, che sfoggia in ogni caso un’indole fortemente bellicosa. Gli adulti non tollerano che i giovani si stabiliscano nei loro paraggi, e combattono da veri cavalieri, ove occorra, fino all’ultimo sangue: i giovani diventano timidi e cantano sommessi quando sanno che nelle vicinanze c’è qualche vecchio campione.
In quest’epoca è pure più facile udire il verso di questi uccelli, vivacissimo allorché spunta il giorno e sensibile anche nelle ore notturne. All’alba i maschi si chetano e si recano presso le femmine che si trastullano a qualche distanza: dopo averle raggiunte, rinnovano le grida, girano loro intorno e alla fine le costringono a cedere ai loro voleri. A volte le femmine mostrano delle predilezioni per questo o quel maschio, e da ciò nascono accanite lotte; certi maschi non riescono a raggiungere il loro scopo e gridano per amore ancora nel maggio, nel giugno e perfino nelluglio. Dopo qualche settimana, i galli cedroni ritornano soddisfatti alle loro sedi, e le femmine si mettono ad edificare il nido.”

Per vedere in azione gallo cedrone nel suo canto d’amore  questi bellissimi video:

Capercaillie from The RSPB on Vimeo.

LA PERNICE ROSSA

In realtà il moorcock (moorfowl o moorbird) in questione è il Lagopus lagopus scoticus detto più comunemente red grouse ovvero la pernice bianca di Scozia, una sottospecie della pernice bianca nordica, endemica nelle Isole Britanniche che si distingue dalla sua parente per essere rossastra di piume anche d’inverno. E’ un uccello che dimora nelle brughiere e il suo piumaggio ben si camuffa nell’erica.

ASCOLTA

Nella canzone si descrive l’incontro tra un giovanotto che si diletta nella caccia (alle pernici) e una bella fanciulla che vive “By the mountain streams where the moorcocks crow“, lui le chiede di sposarlo, ma lei è ancora troppo giovane, ed è sicura che i suoi genitori non darebbero mai il loro consenso alle nozze, perchè il bel Johnny non ha abbastanza terra da essere un buon partito. Così gli dice di aspettare fino all’anno seguente, quando presumibilmente lei sarà maggiorenne, ovvero che lei lo aspetterà restandogli fedele e rifiutando nel frattempo gli altri pretendenti. Ma basta cambiare qualche verso e la ballata muta di significato: la ragazza seppur giovane preferisce stare alla larga dai seducenti vagabondi che sanno solo parlar bene ma non hanno sostanze. Da sfondo all’incontro una natura selvaggia e incontaminata..

This song has come down to the Tunneys from John’s Great-great-grandmother Biddy Travers, who lived on the shores of Lough Erne in the decades before the great Famine. It is a classic hero roves out with his dog and gun tale, meets and falls for a beautiful girl but she is not really available. It is one of the really big songs in the Tunney family repertoire and is most closely associated with John’s father Paddy who moulded into the wonderful song it is today. ” (tratto da qui)

Reginald Grange Brundrit: The Wooded Vale, 1933

La versione registrata da “Boys Of the Lough” in  Lochaber No More (1975) ASCOLTA , nelle note scrivono “Learned by Cathal from Paddy and Jimmy Halpin from Co. Fermanagh”, Dolores Keane quando era con i De Dannan ASCOLTA (in versione integrale su Spotify) con il titolo di The Mountain Streams

ma il mio best of va a Jarlath Henderson

ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney live 1970

VERSIONE Paddy Tunney
I
With my dog and gun through the blooming heather
To seek for pastime I took my way,
Where I espied a loveling fair one
Whose charms invited me a while to stay.
II
I said, “My darling, you will find I love you,
Tell me your dwelling and your name also.”
“Excuse my name and you’ll find my dwelling near
The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.”
III
I said, “My darling, if you’ll wed a rover
My former raking I will leave aside.
Here is my hand and I pledge you my honour,
If you prove constant I’ll make you my bride.”
IV
“If my parents knew that I loved a rover
Then a grave affliction I would undergo.
I will stop at home for another season near
The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.”
V
“So farewell, darling, for another season;
I hope we’ll meet in some moorland vale.
There we will kiss and embrace each other,
I’ll pay attention to your lovesick tale.
VI
Then it’s arm in arm we will join together
And I’ll escort you to yon valley low,
Where the linnet sings his note so pleasing near
The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.”

ASCOLTA Brigid Delaney

ASCOLTA Steve Tilston con arrangiamento chitarra

ASCOLTA Francy Devine

Silly Wizard  con il titolo “Wi’ my dog and gun” in So Many Partings, 1979 così scrivono nelle note di copertina dell’album “This used to be a favourite of the older members of Andy’s family and was regularly sung at ceilidhs and when everybody met at the New Year. The young lass in this song shows great common sense when she refuses to be enticed away by a persuasive and reckless young man. The song is widely known in Ireland to a different air, and although the words are typically Scottish both countries claim it for their own.” (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE Andy M. Stewart
I
With my dog and gun through the blooming heather
For game and pleasure I took my way
I met a maid she was tall and slender
Her eyes enticed me some time to stay
II
I said ‘fair maid, do you know I love you?
Tell me your name and your dwelling also?’
‘Excuse my name, but you’ll find my dwelling by
the mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.’
III
I said ‘Fair maid, if you wed a farmer
You’ll be tied for life to one plot of land.
I’m a roving Johnnie if you gang with me
You will have no ties so give me your hand.’(1)
IV
‘But if my parents knew I loved a rover
it is that I am sure would be my overthrow (2)
So I’ll stay at home for another season by
the mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.’
V
‘So its fare thee well, love, another season
We will meet again by yon wooded vale
And I’ll set you down all upon my knew love,
And I’ll listen to your lovesick tale.’
VI
And it’s arm in arm we will go together
through the lofty trees to the valley below
Where the linnets(3) sing their song so sweetly by
the mountain streams where the moorcocks crow.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Con il mio cane e il fucile, attraverso l’erica in fiore, per divertirmi con la caccia mi incamminai
e incontrai una fanciulla, era alta e snella, i suoi occhi mi invitarono a fermarmi un poco.
II
Ho detto “Bella fanciulla, sai che ti amo? Mi dici come ti chiami e anche dove abiti?”
“Oh, non le dico il nome, ma troverete la mia dimora
sui torrenti di montagna dove canta la pernice. ”
III
Ho detto “Bella fanciulla, se sposi un agricoltore, sarai legata per la vita a un pezzo di terra.
Io sono Johnny il vagabondo, e se verrai con me  non avrai alcun legame, così sposami. “(1)
IV
“Ma proprio per questo sono certa che sarei bandita (2) se i miei genitori sapessero che amavo un vagabondo, così resterò a casa per un’altra stagione
sui torrenti di montagna dove canta la pernice. ”
V
“Allora addio, amore, ad un’altra stagione,
ci ritroveremo su per quei boschi della valle,
e ti metterò sulle mie ginocchia, amore,
per ascoltare le tue pene d’amore.
VI
E a braccetto ce ne andremo insieme
per gli alberi alti, nella vallata sottostante,
dove i fanelli(3) cantano la loro canzone così dolcemente
per i torrenti di montagna dove canta la pernice.”

NOTE
1) letteralmente “dammi la tua mano”
2) la ragazza rifiuta la proposta di matrimonio perchè non si lascia sedurre dalle belle parole del “rover”, sposarlo sarebbe la sua rovina, preferisce quindi dare retta agli insegnamenti impartiti dalla famiglia
3) lenties= linnets Linaria cannabina (Linnaeus, 1758) è un passerotto della famiglia dei fanelli apprezzato per il suo canto melodioso. In genere nidifica sui cespugli nei pressi di corsi d’acqua

FONTI
http://www.agraria.org/faunaselvatica/gallocedrone.htm
http://www.uccellidaproteggere.it/Le-specie/Gli-uccelli-in-Italia/Le-specie-protette/GALLO-CEDRONE
http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/capercaille
http://www.arkive.org/red-grouse/lagopus-lagopus/video-sc09a.html
http://www.uccellidaproteggere.it/Le-specie/Gli-uccelli-in-Italia/Le-specie-protette/FANELLO
https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/themountainstreamswherethemoorcockscrow.html http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=954
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46396
https://thesession.org/tunes/13895

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

Con lo stesso titolo si identificano due diverse melodie, la prima è quella più comunemente nota come “Shamrock shore” (vedi) per il titolo del testo a cui è abbinata

ERIN SHORE O LOUGH ERIN SHORE

ASCOLTA The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995)

ASCOLTA The Corrs in “Unplugged” 1999

oppure la versione live The Corrs & The Chieftains 2008

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

angelabetta3La seconda è una Irish pastoral love song probabilmente una “Ulster Hedge School ballad” del 1700 o 1800. Per il soggetto ricorda un’altra ballata dal titolo “The Pretty Girl Milking the Cow” (vedi). La melodia è una slow air tipica delle aisling song (rêverie song) ossia un genere letterario della poesia irlandese (per lo più in gaelico) proprio del 1600-1700 in cui il protagonista (spesso un poeta) ha la visione in sogno di una bella fanciulla che rappresenta l’Irlanda. Questa in particolare sebbene non sia pervenuta nella sua versione in gaelico si ritiene provenga dal un maestro di scuola (hedge-school) del Fermanagh

ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney (vedi scheda)
ASCOLTA Paul Brady & Andy Irvine  in “Andy Irvine and Paul Brady” (1976).
ASCOLTA La Lugh

Old Blind Dogs in Wherever Yet May Be 2010 (Jonny Hardie violino, Aaron Stone voce e chitarra, Ali Hutton  border pipes, Fraser Stone percussioni)

VERSIONE PADDY TUNNEY da “The Stone Fiddle”
I
One morning as I went a-fowlin’,
bright Phoebus(1) adorned the plain.
It was down by the shades of Lough Erne(2),
I met with this wonderful dame.
II
Her voice was so sweet and so pleasing;
these beautiful notes she did sing.
And the innocent fowl of the forest,
their love unto her they did bring.
III
Well, it being the first time I met her,
my heart, it did lep with surprise.
And I thought that she could be no mortal,
but an angel that fell from the skies.
IV
Her hair it resembled gold tresses;
her skin was as white as the snow.
And her lips were as red as the roses
that bloom around Lough Erne shore.
V
When I heard that my love was eloping,
these words unto her I did say:
“Oh, take me to your habitation,
for Cupid(1) has led me astray.”
VI
“For ever I’ll keep the commandments;
they say that it is the best plan.
Fair maids who do yield to men’s pleasures,
the scriptures do say they are wrong.”
VII
“Oh, Mary, don’t accuse me of weakness,
for treachery I do disown.
I will make you a lady of the splendour
if with me, this night, you’ll come home.”
VIII
Oh, had I the lamp of great Al-addin(3),
his rings and his genie that’s more,
I would part with them all for to gain you,
and live around Lough Erne shore.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Una mattina mentre ero a passeggio, il luminoso Febo(1) soleggiava la pianura così mi addentrai nei boschetti del Lago Erne (2) e incontrai una bella dama.
II
La sua voce era così dolce e armoniosa,
le belle note che cantava gli innocenti uccelli del bosco (ri)portavano con l’amore a lei.
III
Essendo la prima volta che la incontravo il mio cuore fece un balzo per la sorpresa e pensai che lei non potesse essere una mortale, ma un angelo caduto dal cielo.
IV
I capelli sembravano trecce d’oro, la pelle bianca come la neve, e le labbra rosse come le rose
in fiore lungo le rive del Lago Erne.
V
Quando mi accorsi che mi ero innamorato,
le dissi queste parole
“Oh portatemi alla vostra dimora, che Cupido(1) mi ha colpito”.
VI
“Osserverò i comandamenti per sempre, dicono che sia il miglior proposito. Le scritture dicono che sono in errore le belle fanciulle che soggiacciono ai voleri degli uomini”
VII
“Oh Maria non accusarmi di debolezza
perchè io rinnego il tradimento,
ti farò una signora ricca se con me, questa notte, verrai!
VIII
Avessi la lampada del grande Aladino(3)
e in più i suoi anelli e il genio,
li condividerei tutti con te per vivere sulla riva del Lago Erne”

NOTE
1) l’autore da sfoggio delle sue conoscenze classiche citando a Febo (ovvero Apollo) il dio del sole  e Cupido il dio dell’amore
2) Il Lough Erne è un complesso di due laghi situati nelle Midlands d’Irlanda: Lower e Upper. “Senza alcuna fretta di raggiungere il mare, il fiume Erne serpeggia da una parte all’altra dell’acquosa e boscosa contea Fermanagh. Scorre fino a formare un lago composto di due bacini, Lower e Upper Lough Erne, nel cui centro si trova l’isoletta su cui sorge il capoluogo di contea, Enniskillen. Paradiso per uccelli, fiori e piante selvatiche e pescatori, Lough Erne è un corso d’acqua meraviglioso, ideale per crocere e gite in barca. ” (tratto da qui)
3) il verso si ritrova anche in una canzone dallo stesso tema “The Pretty Maid Milking her Cow

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19864
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11428
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28342
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lough_Erne’s_Shore

MOORLOUGH MARY

Guido Bach (1828-1905) Portrait of young peasant girl 1860-1866

La ballata proviene dall’Irlanda del Nord e si ritiene sia stata scritta nel 1876 da James Devine di Loughash (Donemana, Contea di Tyrone). Moorlough in questo contesto non è un cognome ma una località.  E’ la richiesta di matrimonio di un uomo innamorato (un pastorello o un contadinello) respinto dalla ritrosa Mary, così egli si allontana in una valle lontana (forse emigra) affranto dal dolore; il contesto è bucolico e i personaggi coinvolti sono certamente di umile estrazione. Le rive del Moorlough erano tristemente famose nelle ballate per infrangere i cuori! vedi

Il testo con alcune varianti è stato abbinato a molte e diverse melodie, si riportano le due versioni più accreditate dalla tradizione, che i cantanti mescolano a loro discrezione. Non è facile trovare una versione su You Tube, ma queste due sono un classico!

ASCOLTA John Doherty 1965
ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney (strofe I, II V, VI, IX, VIII, VII, X, XI, XII)

VERSIONE TESTO SAM HENRY “SONGS OF THE PEOPLE”, 1928
I
When first I saw you [I met],
sweet Moorlough Mary,
‘twas on the fair day
of sweet Strabane(1),
Your smiling countenance
[Her killing glances]
was so engaging,
the hearts of young men
you did trepann(3).
II
Your killing glances
bereaved my senses
of peace and comfort
by night and day,
In my silent [in smiling] slumber
I start with wonder[and murmur]
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?
III
To see you, darling,
on a summer’s morning
when Flora’s fragrance(4)
bedecks the lawn,
Your neat deportment
and manners courteous,
around you sporting
the lambs and fawn
IV
On you I ponder where’er I wander
and will grow fonder,
sweet maid, of thee,
By thy matchless charms
I am enamoured –
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?
V
Were I a man of great education,(5)
or Erin’s isle at my commands
I’d lay my head on your snowy bosom,
in wedlock’s bands(8),
love, we’d join our hands,
I’d entertain(9) you
both night and morning,
VI
With robes I’d deck you
both night and day,
With jewels rare, love,
I would adorn you (10)
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?
VII
Now I’ll away to my situation,
for recreation is all in vain,
On the river Mourne
I’ll sing your praises
till the rocks re-echo
my plaintive strain.
VIII
[I’ll press my cheese
while my wool it’s a-teasing(11),
my ewes I’ll milk
by the peep o’ day,
When the whirrying moorcock
and lark alarm me –
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?]
IX
On Moorlough banks
I will never wander
where heifers graze
on a pleasant soil,
Where lambkins sporting,
fair maids resorting,
the timorous hare
and blue heather bell.
X(12)
[The thrush and blackbird
all sing harmonious
their notes melodious
on Ruskey braes
And pretty small birds
all join in chorus –
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?]
XI
Farewell, my charming
Moorlough Mary,
ten thousand times
I bid you adieu,
While life remains
in my glowing bosom
I’ll never cease, love,
to think of you.
XII
Now I’ll away to some lonesome valley,
with tears lamenting
both night and day,
To some silent arbour
where none can hear me –
och, Moorlough Mary,
will you come away?

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
La prima volta che ti vidi
bella Mary di Moorlough
fu al mercato
della bella Strabane ,
il volto sorridente
[i suoi sguardi assassini]
era(no) così seducente(i),
i cuori dei giovanotti
trapanavi.
II
I suoi sguardi assassini
mi lasciarono privo di sensi,
di pace e conforto
notte e giorno
nel mio dormiveglia
mi sorpresi a dire
” Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?”
III
Per vederti mia cara
in una mattina d’estate
quando il profumo di Flora
adorna i prati,
con il tuo portamento
e i tuoi modi educati,
intorno a te giocano
gli agnelli e i cerbiatti.
IV
A te sempre penso ovunque io vada,
e di te sarò sempre più innamorato, bella fanciulla, di te
per il tuo fascino ineguagliabile
sono innamorato
“Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?”
V
Se fossi un uomo ben nato
o con l’Irlanda al mio comando appoggerei la testa sul suo petto niveo: nel nastro degli sposi,
amore, legherei le nostre mani,
ti farei divertire
dalla sera al mattino
VI
Ti farei vestire con abiti lussuosi
dalla sera al mattino,
di gioielli preziosi
ti ricoprirei
“Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?”
VII
Allontanarsi a causa della situazione
e cercare una distrazione è vano,
sul fiume Mourne
canterò le tue lodi
fino a quando le rocce riecheggeranno il mio lamento.
VIII
Metterò sotto pressione il formaggio mentre la lana sarà da dipanare
e le pecore mungerò
allo spuntar del giorno,
fino a quando la pernice
e l’allodola mi allertano,
“Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?”
IX
Dalle rive di Moorlough
non potrò mai separarmi,
dove le giovenche fissano lo sguardo su quella terra dilettevole,
dove gli agnellini giocano,
le belle fanciulle rincorrono
la timida lepre
e le campanelle blu dell’erica.
X
Il tordo e il merlo
cantano tutti in armonia
le loro note melodiose
sulle sponde del Ruskey
e gli uccellini
si uniranno in coro
“Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?”
XI
Addio, mia incantevole
Mary di Moorlough
mille volte
addio,
finchè avrò vita
nel mio petto
non smetterò mai, amore
di pensare a te.
XII
Fuggirò in una valle solitaria
per piangere lacrime
notte e giorno
presso un bosco silenzioso
dove nessuno mi potrà vedere
“Mary di Moorlough,
vieni via con me?” 

NOTE
1) Strabane è una città a Ovest della contea di Tyrone, Irlanda del Nord e si trova sul confine con la Repubblica d’Irlanda, prorpio dall’altra parte del fiume Foyle. La città è stata devastata per tutti gli anni 70 e 80 dal conflitto nordirlandese.
2) one= boy; più comunemente “The hearts of young men”
3) dal francese antico trepan= trapanare. Si riferisce all’operazione chirurgica già praticata nel Medioevo in cui si forava il cranio umano per curare le malattie mentali (la pratica era probabilmente eseguita fin dai tempi preistorici per far uscire gli spiriti maligni)
4) Flora’s fragrance, letteralmente il profumo di Flora= i fiori
5) a man of great education= un uomo della gentry, ben nato che può permettersi un’educazione culturale
6) il fiume Mourne attraversa il centro della città di Strabane e con il Finn formare il Foyle 7) ochane, oh hone, O hoan, O hone, ohon, ochone, och hone, ohone: del gaelico sia irlandese che scozzese esclamazione di lamento. La frase si traduce come: nel sentire l’impetuoso lamento; più comunemente sostituita con “And Erin’s Nation at my own command ”
8) la cerimonia dell’handfasting spunta spesso nelle ballate popolari: di solito i due innamorati si trovano in un bosco e si scambiano le promesse senza testimoni (e poi ovviamente consumano il matrimonio tra le verdi frasche o la ginestra in fiore). Ovviamente dell’antico rituale celtico nulla possiamo conoscere, e l’handfasting (il legame delle mani) è di origine medievale: i polsi degli sposi vengono legati insieme con un lungo nastro (o l’intreccio di due nastri a simboleggiare rispettivamente il principio maschile e quello femminile o a riprendere i colori del clan di appartenenza). Il matrimonio nella sua essenza è suggellato da una stretta di mano ed è un unione consensuale tra due adulti, senza bisogno di sacerdote, notaio o testimoni e nemmeno del consenso delle famiglie. (continua)
9) nel senso di consumazione dell’atto sessuale
10) Tunney dice “With kisses sweet I would embrace you”
11) il lavoro di cardatura della lana è propriamente femminile per questo ritengo che la frese sia pronunciata dalla donna piuttosto che dall’uomo come risposta e motivazione del rifiuto
12)  Tunney dice
“Where the thrush and blackbird do join harmonious
Their notes melodious on the river brae.
And the little songbirds do join in chorous
Oh! Moorlough Mary, won’t you come away.”

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE: Moorlough Maggie

Non è corretto correlare le due canzoni tra di loro, gli studiosi ritengono che quella scozzese sia più probabilmente la ripetizione di un frammento preso da chissà quale ballata. Sam Lee l’ha imparata dal suo mentore Stanley Robertson.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee live al GlobalFEST live Sam


I
And do ye see love,
yon flock o sheep
One hundred must I own
but two or three
I’ll grant them all to
my Moorlough Maggie
if she consents for to gang wi me
(Chorus)
To give consent love I dare not give
To herd yer sheep high
in yon heathery hills
I’ll grant them all to
my Moorlough Maggie
if she consents for to gang wi me
II
And do ye see love
yon herd o kye
One hundred must I own
but two or three
I’ll grant them all to
my Moorlough Maggie
if she consents for to gang wi me
III
And do ye see love
yon ships at sea
One hundred must I own
but two or three
I’ll grant them all to
my Moorlough Maggie
if she consents for to gang wi me
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vedi amore?
Un centinaio di pecore del gregge
dovrei avere
invece di due o tre
Le darò tutte
alla mia Maggy di Moorlough
se acconsentirà di sposarmi
(coro)
Al consenso amore non oso sperare
e allevare le tue pecore sugli alti pascoli delle colline  d’erica
Le darò tutte
alla mia Maggy di Moorlough
se acconsentirà di sposarmi

II
Vedi amore?
Un centinaio di mucche del bestiame
dovrei avere
invece di due o tre
Le darò tutte
alla mia Maggy di Moorlough
se acconsentirà di sposarmi
III
Vedi amore?
Un centinaio di navi del mare
dovrei avere
invece di due o tre
Le darò tutte
alla mia Maggy di Moorlough
se acconsentirà di sposarmi

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/matrimonio-celtico-storia.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/moorloughmary.html http://comhaltasarchive.ie/compositions/10
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=101556

CRAIGIE HILL, IRISH SONG OF EMIGRATION

Emigrants_leave_Ireland“Craigie Hill” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese collezionata dalla madre di Paddy Tunney il quale riteneva che la canzone fosse originaria di Larne, Contea di Antrim, il porto da cui partivano gli emigranti nord-irlandesi. Come è scritto su Wikipedia (qui) “Un monumento di Curran Park commemora i Friends Goodwill, la prima nave di emigranti a salpare da Larne nel maggio 1717, per raggiungere Boston negli Stati Uniti. Le radici irlandesi di Boston derivano infatti da Larne. Anche Larne è stata investita dalla grande carestia irlandese della metà dell’Ottocento.” Ma per dirla come Paddy stesso “every Irish port had an emigrant ship” (vedi emigration songs)

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan 1981
ASCOLTA Dolores Keane 1982
ASCOLTA Susan McKeown 1998
ASCOLTA Cara Dillon in Cara Dillon 2003

ASCOLTA Caladh Nua in Happy Days 2009


I
It being the spring time,
and the small birds were singing,
Down by yon shady arbour
I carelessly did stray;
The thrushes they were warbling,
The violets they were charming:
To view fond lovers talking,
a while I did delay.
II
She said, “My dear don’t leave me all for another season,
Though fortune does be pleasing
I ‘ll go along with you.
I ‘ll forsake friends and relations and bid this holy nation,
And to the bonny Bann banks(1) forever I ‘ll bid adieu.”
III
He said, “My dear, don’t grieve or yet annoy my patience.
You know I love you dearly the more I’m going away,
I’m going to a foreign nation to purchase a plantation,
To comfort(2) us hereafter all in Amerikay.
IV
Then after a short while a fortune does be pleasing,
It’ll cause them for smile at our late going away,
We’ll be happy as Queen Victoria, all in her greatest glory,
We’ll be drinking wine and porter all in Amerikay.
V
The landlords(3) and their agents, their bailiffs and their beagles
The land of our forefathers we’re forced for to give o’er
And we’re sailing on the ocean for honor and promotion
And we’re parting with our sweethearts, it’s them we do adore
VI
If you were in your bed lying and thinking on dying,
The sight of the lovely Bann banks, your sorrow you’d give o’er,
Or if were down one hour, down in the shady bower,
Pleasure would surround you, you’d think on death no more.
VII
Then fare you well, sweet Cragie Hill(4), where often times I’ve roved,
I never thought my childhood days I ‘d part you ever more,
Now we’re sailing on the ocean for honour and promotion,
And the bonny boats are sailing, way down by Doorin shore(5).”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era primavera
e gli uccellini cantavano,
per quell’ombreggiato boschetto sbadatamente camminavo;
i tordi gorgheggiavano e le violette erano incantevoli; a guardare gli amanti appassionati che chiacchieravano mi sono un po’ attardato.
II
Disse lei “Non lasciarmi tutta sola
per un’altra stagione,
se la fortuna ci arriderà,
io verrò via con te.
Abbandonerò amici e parenti e a questa santa nazione
e alle belle rive del Bann (1)
per sempre dirò addio.”
III
Disse lui “Non rattristare e mettere alla prova la mia pazienza,
lo sai che ti amo teneramente anche se sto andando via,
andrò in una nazione straniera per acquistare una piantagione
per dare conforto (2) a tutti noi d’ora in poi in America.
IV
Dopo un po’ la fortuna
ci arriderà
e loro saranno contenti della nostra partenza;
saremo felici come la Regina Vittoria in pompa magna,
berremo vino e porter
in America.
V
Ai proprietari terrieri (3) e i loro agenti, gli ufficiali giudiziari con i loro cani,
la terra dei nostri padri siamo stati costretti a cedere
e solcheremo l’oceano per l’onore e la carriera
e ci separeremo dalle nostre fidanzate,
le sole e uniche che amiamo.”
VI
“Se tu fossi steso nel letto in procinto di morire
la vista delle belle rive del Bann ti avrebbero allevato il dolore,
o se andassi per un ora fino al pergolato ombroso,
il piacere ti circonderebbe e non penseresti più alla morte.”
VII
“Addio amata Craigie Hill (4) dove spesso sono andato in giro,
mai pensavo nei giorni della mia fanciullezza che ti avrei lasciato,
ora stiamo navigando sul mare per l’onore e la carriera
e le belle navi navigano via dalla spiaggia di Doorin (5)”

NOTE
1) The Banks Of The Bann è il titolo di un’altra canzone irlandese sulla separazione. il fiume Bann scorre nel Nord-Est dell’Irlanda ed è il fiume che ha portato lo sviluppo economico nell’Ulster con l’industria del lino. Il fiume fa un po’ da spartiacque tra cattolici e repubblicani a ovest e protestanti e unionisti a est.
2) se ho capito il senso della frase
3) Ai primi del XVII secolo inglesi e scozzesi andarono alla “conquista” dell’Irlanda: la terra fu per lo più confiscata agli irlandesi e la parte cattolica degli Irlandesi venne emarginata; la maggioranza queste “colonie” si concentrò nella parte nord dell’Irlanda
4) Craggy è la roccia scoscesa a più livelli, Craige o Craig si dice anche per il sito di una fortezza preistorica, in inglese “hillfort” o “ring-fort”, in italiano “forte ad anello” ovvero fortificazioni a forma circolare risalenti all’età del ferro (o secondo le ultime datazioni, all’età del primo Medioevo). Le fortezze sono state assorbire dalla campagna ma la memoria storica è rimasta nella credenza che il luogo fosse la dimora delle fate.
5) Doorin Point e un promontorio su Inver Bay, vicino a Mountcharles, nel Donegal

FONTI
http://comhaltasarchive.ie/compositions/5
https://thesession.org/discussions/23580
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=155019 http://songoftheisles.com/2013/04/29/craigie-hills/ http://filstoria.hypotheses.org/tag/irlanda-del-nord

THE WEE WEAVER

weaver-loomFinalmente una canzone d’amore irlandese coronata da un matrimonio felice!
Scritta da un tessitore che lavorava nella propria casa-bottega un “home weavers” probabilmente nell’Ottocento, è stata tramandata nella famiglia di Paddy Tunney.

La prima versione registrata risale al 1952 (ASCOLTA) dalla madre di Paddy Tunney che a sua volta la registrò nel 1975 per il suo album “The Mountain Streams Where the Moorcocks Crow”.

ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney 1975

ASCOLTA Dolores Kaene in Sail Óg Rua 2010


I
I am a wee weaver
confined to my loom,
My lover she’s as fair as
the red rose in June (1).
She is loved by all lovers
which does anger (grive) me
My heart’s in the bosom (2)
of lovely Mary.
II
As Mary and Willie roamed (3)
by yon shady bower
Where Mary and Willie
spent many a happy hour,
Where the thrush and the blackbird (4) they do join in chor
Sing the praises of Mary
round Lough Erin shore.
III
As Mary and Willie roamed
by yonder loughside
Said Willie to Mary:
“Will you be my bride?”
So this couple got married
and they’ll roam no more,
They’ll have treasures and pleasures round Lough Erin shore (5)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un piccolo tessitore,
confinato al mio telaio
e il mio amore è bella
come una rosa rossa in Giugno
E’ amata da tutti i giovanotti
e ciò mi addolora:
Il mio cuore è nel petto
della bella Mary.
II
Così  Mary e Willy passeggiavano
nel boschetto ombroso
dove Mary e Willy
trascorsero molte ore felici
dove i merli e i tordi
fanno concerti in coro
cantano per lodare Mary
sulle rive del Lago Erne
III
Mentre Mary e Willy passeggiavano
verso quella sponda del fiume,
dice Willy a Mary
“Vuoi essere la mia sposa?”
La coppia si è sposata
e non vanno più in giro,
essi avranno gioie e piaceri
sulle rive del Lago Erne

NOTE
1) la versione di Dolores dice: And my love she is fairer, than the red rose in bloom
2) la versione di Dolores dice “There’s a heart in my bosom”
3) Dolores dice “rode by yon shady bough”; l’uso di to ride aggiunge un sapore più antico perchè presuppone lo spostamento con il cavallo
4) Dolores dice the blackbirds and thrushes
5) Dolores dice “and love fair and sure”

IN VIAGGIO: LOUGH ERNE

La storia è ambientata nei pressi del Lough Erne (Loch Éirne in gaelico irlandese) che sono in realtà due laghi lungo il fiume Erne (distinti in Upper e Lower) e si trovano nella contea di Fermanagh (Irlanda del Nord).
DA IRLANDANDO.IT: Paradiso per uccelli, fiori e piante selvatiche e pescatori, Lough Erne è un corso d’acqua meraviglioso, ideale per crociere e gite in barca. Le sponde sono alte e rocciose in alcuni tratti e, oltre alle 154 isole, sono presenti insenature e piccole baie da esplorare. continua

FONTI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigid_Tunney http://www.theballadeers.com/ire/tunney_ft.htm http://comhaltasarchive.ie/compositions/5518 http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/weeweaver.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19280

WHEN A MAN’S IN LOVE

Il testo è del poeta di Antrim Hugh McWilliams, nato a Glenavy nel 1783; egli pubblicò due raccolte di canzoni con lo stesso titolo “Poems and Songs on Various Subjects”, uno nel 1816 e l’altro nel 1831, anno della sua morte. In questo libro la melodia abbinata a “A man in Love” è “Moses Gathering the Children“. Una selezione delle composizioni di McWilliams è stata inserita da John Moulden nel suo “Ulstersongs” del 1993.

A NIGHT VISITING

La canzone si inserisce nel genere classificato come “night visiting” in cui i corteggiatori entrano di soppiatto nella casa dell’amata cercando di carpirne la verginità: a volte sono avventurieri di passaggio, ambulanti, soldati, marinai o lavoratori stagionali, che con il pretesto della notte fredda e della pioggia cercano riparo tra le lenzuola della fanciulla; ovviamente ogni promessa di matrimonio è subito dimenticata una volta raggiunto lo scopo.
images8RTQ2CPXAltre volte, come in questa canzone, è il fidanzato osteggiato dalla famiglia a voler mettere i parenti di fronte al fatto compiuto, anche se più spesso i due facevano una fuitina, ovvero si inscenava una fuga d’amore alla quale seguiva il matrimonio riparatore (vedi).

IL VIAGGIO OLTREMARE

In aggiunta al tema dell’amore contrastato (perlopiù per le aspettative economiche della famiglia)  il ragazzo è deciso ad emigrare e va a salutare il suo amore per l’ultima volta (con la speranza di una notte di passione!!): di fronte alla separazione la ragazza non ha scelta, lo segue verso l’America!
Nella realtà la situazione era meno “romantica” era solo il ragazzo a partire per tentare la fortuna, e solo dopo anni di sacrifici e lavoro sottopagato, forse riusciva a mettere i soldi da parte per pagare il viaggio alla fidanzata rimasta a casa ad aspettare.

Sebbene esistano alcune variazioni testuali le interpretazioni selezionate per l’ascolto seguono il modello di Paddy Tunney (registrazione del 1965) che ha imparato il brano dallo zio Michael (Mick) Gallagher di Fermanagh nel 1948

The Chieftains in Boil the Breakfast Early 1989

ASCOLTA Mary Dillon in North 2013, l’album debutto da solista dopo la sua ottima performance con i Déanta


I
When a man’s in love he feels no cold
As I not long ago
As a hero bold to see my girl
I ploughed through frost and snowAnd moon she gently shed her light
Along my dreary way
Until at length I came to the spot
Where all my treasure lay.
II
I knocked on my love’s window saying
“My dear, are you within?”
And softly she undid the latch
So slyly I stepped in.
III
Her hand was soft and her breath was sweet
And her tongue it did gently glide
I stole a kiss, it was no miss
And I asked her to be my bride.
IV
“Oh take me to your chamber love,
Oh take me to your bed
Oh take me to your chamber love
To rest my weary head”.
V
“But to take you to my chamber love
My parents would never agree
So sit you down there by yonder fire
And I’ll sit close by thee.”
VI
“Oh many’s the time through frost and snow
I’ve come to visit you
Whether tossed about by cold wintery winds
Or wet by the morning dew
VII
But tonight our courtships at a close
Between you Love and me
So fair you well my own favorite girl
A long fair well to thee
VIII
Yes many’s the time I’ve courted you
Against your parent’s will
But you’ve never said you’d be my bride
So now my girl, sit still
IX
For tonight I am going to cross the sea
To far off Columbia’s shore
And you will never ever see
Your youthful lover more”
X
“Oh are you going to leave me now
Oh pray what can I do?
I will break through every bond of home
And come along with you.
XI
I know my parents won’t forget
Ah but surely they’ll forgive
So from the soul I am resolved
Along with you I will live.”
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Quando un uomo è innamorato non sente il freddo
così anch’io non molto tempo fa
come un eroe coraggioso, per vedere la mia ragazza,
arrancai tra ghiaccio e neve.mentre la luna versava lieve la sua luce
sul mio faticoso cammino,
finche alla fine giunsi proprio là
dove il mio tesoro riposa.
II
Bussai alla finestra del mio amore dicendo
“Mia cara ci sei?”
e piano lei aprì il chiavistello
così furtivamente scivolai dentro.
III
La sua mano era delicata e il respiro profumato e la sua lingua si muoveva piano, le rubai un bacio, non è da rimpiangere,
e le chiesi di diventare mia sposa.
IV
“O portami nella tua camera
amore
portami nel tuo letto
O portami nella tua camera, amore
per riposare la mia testa stanca”
V
“Se ti facessi entrare nella mia stanza, amore
i miei genitori non approverebbero mai
così siediti qui accanto al fuoco
e io siederò accanto a te”
VI
“Sebbene sia la stagione del gelo e della neve
sono venuto a trovarti
anche se sospinto dai freddi venti invernali
e bagnato dalla rugiada del mattino
VII
Ma stanotte il nostro rapporto è alla fine,
tra te amore e me,
così addio mia amata
ragazza
un lungo addio a te.
VIII
SI, ti corteggiai per tanto
tempo
contro la volontà dei tuoi genitori,
ma tu non mi hai mai detto che saresti stata la mia sposa,
così adesso ragazza mia, stai in pace.
IX
Perchè stanotte andrò
per il mare
lontano fino alla riva della Colombia
e tu non mi vedrai mai più
il tuo amore giovanile”
X
“Se stai per lasciarmi proprio
ora
ti prego dimmi cosa posso fare?
Io spezzerò ogni vincolo
famigliare
per andare con te.
XI
So che i miei genitori non dimenticheranno, ah ma di certo perdoneranno, così in fede mia sono decisa: insieme a te vivrò”.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8508
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/whenamansinlove.html

IMMAGINE
http://www.pawelbebenca.com/2012/09/r-g-vintage-engagement-session-dundalk-ireland-love-story/

MORNING DEW

Con questo titolo generico “My Morning Dew”, “The May Morning Dew” o anche solo “Morning Dew” si indicano diverse canzoni e anche brani strumentali della tradizione celtica

Morning_Dew_III_by_Nitrok

Inizio come sempre dalla melodia

MAY MORNING DEW: SLOW AIR O REEL?

“The May Morning Dew” è il titolo di una slow air (vedi)

ASCOLTA Davy Spillane in “The Storm”, 1985

ASCOLTA Patrick Ball e la sua magica arpa dalle corde di metallo (la seconda melodia è The Butterfly jig)

ASCOLTA Mick O’Brien all’uilleann pipes

“Morning Dew” è anche un popolarissimo reel, generalmente in tre parti conosciuto anche con il nome di Giorria Sa BhFraoch, Hare Among The Heather o Hare In The Heather “Morning Dew [1]” has been one of the more popular reels in recent decades, although the title seems a relatively modern appellation. It was printed by James Kerr in Scotland as “Hare Among the Heather (The)” in the 1880’s, and it was recorded under that title by Margret Barry and County Sligo fiddler Michael Gorman in 1956. A portion of the tune was used by Chieftains piper Paddy Moloney for his first film score, Ireland Moving. Accordion player Luke O’Malley’s version starts with the part that usually appears as the 3rd part in most other versions (Kerr’s version also starts on another part). (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA il violino di Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

The Chieftains, live

MAY MORNING DEW AIR

La May Morning Dew (air) è una melodia tradizionale irlandese dalla tristezza infinita, che accompagna il canto di una persona molto anziana la quale, alla vista della vallata natia, richiama i ricordi dei tempi passati: e con essi la tristezza per il vuoto lasciato dalla perdita degli affetti.
La stagione della primavera è ricordata con rimpianto come la stagione della giovinezza ormai sfiorita e le lacrime cadono come rugiada del mattino.

La melodia è molto popolare nella zona Ovest della contea di Clare (Munster, costa occidentale) raccolta in “Around the Hills of Clare” , 2004 (vedi): This song, evoking old age and the passing of time, while being very popular in West Clare, does not seem to have been recorded from traditional singers very often elsewhere; the only other two versions listed by Roud being from Ann Jane Kelly of Keady, Armagh in 1952 and Paddy Tunney of Beleek, Fermanagh in 1965. (tratto da qui)

The Chieftains in “Water from the Well“, 2000


I
How pleasant in winter
To sit by the hob(1)
Just listening to the barks
And the howls of the dog
Or to walk through the green fields
Where wild daisies grew
To pluck the wild flowers
In the may morning dew
II
When summer is coming
When summer is near
With the trees oh so green
And the sky bright and clear
And the wee birds all singing
Their loved ones to woo
And young flowers all springing
In the may morning dew(2)
III
I remember the old folk
All now dead and gone
And likewise my two brothers
Young Dennis and John
How we ran o’er the heather
The wild hare to pursue
And the proud deer we hunted
In the may morning dew
IV
Of the house I was born in
There’s but a stone on the stone
And now all ‘round the garden
Wild thistles have grown
And gone are the neighbours(3)
That I once knew
No more will we wander
Through the may morning dew
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o camminare per i verdi campi
dove crescono le margherite selvatiche, a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
Quando l’estate è in arrivo
quando l’estate è vicina
con gli alberi così verdi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccellini cantano
per corteggiare le innamorate
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Mi ricordo i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei due fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
come correvamo sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
e cacciare il cervo fiero
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
La casa dove sono nato
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciuti i cardi selvatici
e se ne sono andati tutti i vicini
che conoscevo un tempo
non potremo più andare in giro
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

NOTE
1) hob piano di cottura dei camini di un tempo
2) tutta la strofa è tipica dei canti del Maggio, quando le allegre brigate dei giovani andavano nei boschi a raccogliere fiori e ramoscelli da portare in paese per far entrare il Maggio nelle case. continua
3) qui si accenna allo spopolamento del paese e il senso di abbandono del luogo si riverbera sulla condizione della vecchiaia

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane


I
How pleasant in winter
to sit by the hearth
Listening to the barks
and the howls of the dog
Or in summer to wander
the wide valleys through
And to pluck the wild flowers
in the May morning dew.
II
Summer is coming,
oh summer is here
With leaves on the trees
and the sky blue and clear
And the birds they are singing
their fond notes so true
And the flowers they are springing
in the May morning dew(2)
III
The house I was reared in
is but a stone on a stone
And all round the garden
the weeds they have grown
And all the kind neighbours
that ever I knew
Like the red rose they’ve withered
in the May morning dew
IV
God be with the old folks
who are now dead and gone
And likewise my brothers,
young Dennis and John
As they tripped through the heather
the wild hare to pursue
As their joys they were mingled
in the May morning dew
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o in Estate camminare
per le ampie valli
a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
L’estate è in arrivo
l’estate è qui
con le foglie sugli alberi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccelli cantano
le loro melodie appassionate e sincere
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Ma la casa dove sono cresciuto
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciute le erbacce
e tutti i vicini cordiali
che ho mai conosciuto
come la rosa rossa sono appassiti
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
Dio sia con i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
mentre corrono sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
quando le loro gioie si univano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

FONTI
https://thesession.org/tunes/8547
https://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/songs/themaymorningdew.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31905
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Morning_Dew_(1)_(The)
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_oconway.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_khayes.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_jlyons.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_pegmcmahon.htm

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

Read the post in English

La irish song “The Lark in the Morning”  è diffusa principalmente nella contea di Fermanagh (Irlanda del Nord): l’immagine è agreste, ritratto di una visione idilliaca della sana e semplice vita di campagna; un giovane contadino che ara i campi per prepararli alla semina primaverile, è il paradigma dell’esaltazione giovanile, la sua esuberanza e gioia di vivere, viene paragonata all’allodola mentre s’invola cantando alta nel cielo al mattino. Come molte canzoni del Nord Irlanda è altrettanto popolare anche in Scozia.
Il punto di vista è maschile, con tanto di brindisi finale alla salute di tutti gli “aratori” (o dei cavallanti, mansione che in una grande fattoria indicava più genericamente coloro che si prendevano cura dei cavalli) che se la spassano rotolandosi nel fieno con le belle ragazze, e così dimostrano la loro virilità con la capacità di procreare.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners dalla melodia gioiosa e allegra in sintonia con il testo

Alex Beaton (con un adorrrabile accento scozzese)

ASCOLTA The Quilty (svedesi con il cuore irlandese!)


CHORUS
The lark in the morning
she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy
she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy
he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing
over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,
she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing
then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home
from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green
and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble
all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”, this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks
they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice
how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,
-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble
all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass
a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy
as a prince or a king
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ritornello
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore
lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
I
O Roger l’aratore
è un ragazzo affascinante
fischiettando e cantando si avvicina laggiù all’ombra delle fronde
e s’incontra con la dolce Susan,
che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente
di tutti gli uccelli del cielo
II
Una sera tornando a casa
dalle taverne della città
essendo tutti i prati verdi
e l’erba essendo stata appena falciata
ebbi l’occasione di rotolare
in tutto il fieno appena tagliato
“Oh baciami ora o mai più amore”,
disse questa bella fanciulla.
III
Quando venti lunghe settimane
erano finite e passate
sua madre iniziò a notare
come lei si arrotondasse in vita
“E’ stato il bell’aratore”,
le disse la ragazza
“che ci fece cadere in tutto il fieno appena falciato.”
IV
Ecco alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che amano avere una graziosa fanciulla
seduta sulle ginocchia
con un boccale di buona e forte birra scura, fischiettate e cantate
perché un aratore è felice
proprio come un principe o un re

NOTE
1) L’allodola è un passerotto dal canto melodioso che risuona nell’aria fin dai primi giorni della primavera e già alle prime luci dell’alba; è un uccello terricolo che però una volta sicuro nel volo si innalza quasi verticalmente nell’alto del cielo lanciando una cascata di suoni simili a un crescendo musicale.
Poi, chiuse le ali, si lascia cadere come corpo morto fino a sfiorare la terra e subito risorge ricominciando a cantare. continua
2) blade= boy, termine usato nelle antiche ballate per indicare un abile spadaccino
3) il contasto dell’amoreggiamento è quello della stagione della fienagione, a partire da maggio, quando si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi. continua

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, dalla registrazione di Paddy Tunney di cui però abbiamo solo due strofe (I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), la versione più estesa viene dalla famiglia Copper del Sussex, ma Lisa modifica ulteriormente alcuni versi.

Trascrizione di Cattia Salto
I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may
(traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’allodola al mattino si alza dal nido
e fischietta e canta,con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
II
Roger l’aratore è un bel ragazzo
va fischiettando e cantando per quella verde radura
e s’incontra con  Susan dagli occhi scuri, che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente degli uccelli nel cielo
III
Una sera tornando a casa dalle taverne della città
con i prati verdi che erano tutti verdi e l’erba appena tagliata
lei si rotolò  nel  fieno appena falciato
“Amami adesso o mai più”, disse questa bella fanciulla.
IV
Quindi alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che prenderanno  una graziosa fanciulla per farla sedere sulle ginocchia
..
non c’è vita migliore di quella dell’aratore nel bel mese di Maggio

 

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Questa versione invece è stata collezionata da Ralph Vaughan Williams nel 1904 come ascoltata dalla signora Harriet Verrall di Monk’s Gate, Horsham nel Sussex, ma circolava già nei broadsides ottocenteschi e quindi riportata nel libro di Roy Palmer “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Entrata nel circuito della musica folk inglese negli anni ’60 è stata registrata nel 1971 dal gruppo inglese folk rock Steeleye Span con la voce di Maddy Prior.

Il ritornello è simile a quello della versione precedente, ma qui la situazione è ancora più pastorale e quasi shakespeariana con la pastorella e l’aratore che sono sorpresi dal canto mattutino dell’allodola ma con le parti invertite: lui che dice a lei di restare ancora tra le sue braccia, perché c’è ancora la rugiada della sera, ma lei gli risponde che il sole ormai risplende e anche l’allodola si è alzata in volo. Il nome del contadinello è Floro e deriva dal latino Fiore.

Steeleye Span in Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior nel Cd “Arthur The King” – 2001


I
“Lay still my fond shepherd
and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love
and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro
and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro,
it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining
and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning
she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air
with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy
she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return
to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done
all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows
where the grass is all cut down.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Giaci ancora mia appassionata pastorella e non alzarti
è una bella mattina fresca ma, amore mio, c’è la rugiada”
“Non è poi così umido, amore mio,
e nemmeno così freddo,
mi alzerò mio amato Fiore
e andrò via con il gregge.
Oh no mio bel Fiore,
non è cosa da niente
c’è il sole luminoso che risplende
e l’allodola è in  volo”
II
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e s’innalza in aria
con la rugiada sul petto
e come il bell’aratore
lei fischietterà e canterà
e la sera ritornerà
di nuovo nel suo nido
Quando l’aratore ha fatto
tutto quanto doveva fare (1),
balla nei prati
dove l’erba è tutta falciata.

NOTE
1) frase a doppio senso: arare il campo ma anche arare una fanciulla compiacente

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

La melodia “Lark in the morning” è una jig per lo più eseguita con il banjo o il bouzouki o il mandolino o la chitarra, ma anche con le pipes, i whistles o i flutes, i fiddles..
Un aneddoto riportato da Peter Cooper racconta che due violinisti si erano sfidati una sera per vedere chi fosse il migliore, solo all’alba nel sentire il canto dell’allodola, convennero che la musica più dolce fosse quella dell’allodola del mattino. Stessa storiella raccontata dal piper Seamus Ennis ma con la melodia The Lark’s March

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely alla uilleann pipes accompagnato alla chitarra da Alan Murray

Peter Browne alla uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

FONTI
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62