Archivi tag: Old Blind Dogs

Rolling home across the sea

Leggi in italiano

A “rolling home” is a traveling home on wheels, but it is also the title of the best known among the homeward-bound shanty. In America home is California or Boston, while in Europe it is England, London or Hamburg, but also Scotland, Ireland or Dublin, the song is equally popular on German and Dutch ships.
Taken from a homonymous poem written by Charles Mackay in 1858 it is considered a forecastle song, but it has also been a capstan shanty. The question of origin is still controversial, about twenty versions are known and according to Stan Hugill it could have a Scandinavian origin.

STANDARD VERSION

It is the version penned in the poem by Charles Mackay who wrote it on May 26, 1858 while he was on board “The Europe” going home and in effect the verses are a little more elaborate than the phrases usually used by the shantyman
Dan Zanes from Sea Music
Carl Peterson

ROLLING HOME
I
Up aloft, amid the rigging
Swiftly blows the fav’ring gale,
Strong as springtime in its blossom,
Filling out each bending sail,
And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they rise;
“We have tarried here to bear you
To the land you dearly prize”.
CHORUS
Rolling(1) home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea,
Rolling home to dear old Scotland (2)
Rolling home, dear land to thee (3).
II (4)
Full ten thousand miles behind us,
And a thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well remembered shore.
Newborn breezes swell to send us
To our childhood welcome skies,
To the glow of friendly faces
And the glance of loving eyes.
III (5)
I have watched the rolling hillside
Of the wondrous river Clyde (6)
As I sailed away from Greenock
My heart beat fast inside
But I knew as I was sailing
Far from that Scottish shore
I will miss her every minute
But I’ll return once more.

NOTES
1) rolling has many meanings: it is generally synonymous with “sailing” but it can also derive from “rollikins” an old English term for “drunk”; often as Italo Ottonello suggests, we mean in a literal sense that the typical gait of the sea wolves is “rocking”
2) or England
3) according to Hugill the song comes from a Scandinavian version and he notes that the verse is sometimes sung as “the land’s forbee” with “forbee” = “passing by” or “near.” Förbi is Swedish stands for “past, by.”
4) Carl Peterson skips the 2nd stanza of Charles Mackay’s poem
5) the stanza was added by Carl Peterson
6) it refers to the rolling hills near the Clyde estuary that flows near the port city of Greenock, located on the southern coast

SCOTTISH VERSION

Old Blind Dogs from The Gab O Mey 2003, in a version with a lot of Scotsness

ROLLING HOME
I (1)
Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable running clear
Heave around and with the wheel, boys
For our homeland we must steer
Chorus
Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to Caledonia
Rolling home, dear land, to thee
II
From the pines of California
And by Chile’s endless strand
We have sailed the world twice over
Every port in every land
III
And to all ye blaggard pirates
Who would chase us from the waves
Heed ye well that those who’ve tried us
Soon have found their watery graves
IV
We were boarded in Jamaica
Where the Jolly Rodger flew
But our swords were hardly drawn, boys
‘Ere they took a rosy hue
V
We return with precious cargo
And with bounty coined in gold
And our sweethearts will rejoice, boys
For they lo’e their sailors bold

NOTES
1) it resumes the II stanza of the poem by Charles Mackay

IRISH VERSION: Rolling home to Ireland

Irish Rovers different text and melody

ROLLING HOME TO IRELAND
I
I come from Paddy’s land
I’m a rake and ramblin’ man
Since I was young, I’ve had the urge to roam
So don’t you weep for me
When I’m sailing on the sea
For you won’t see me till I come rolling home
Chorus
Rolling home to Ireland, rolling home across the sea
Back to me own con-ter-ree (country)
Two thousand miles behind us
and a thousand more to go

So fill the sails and blow winds blow!
II
We sailed away from Cork
We were headed for New York
I’d always dreamed the sailor’s life for me
But the days were hard and long
With no women, wine, or song
And it wasn’t quite the fun I’d thought ‘twould be
III
We weren’t too long a-sail
When the wind became a gale
Our boat was tossed and turned upon the foam
With waves like moutains high
Well I thought that I would die
I wished to God that I was rolling home
IV
And when I reach the shore
I will go to sea no more
There’s more to life than sailing ‘round the Horn
Good luck to sailor men
When they’re headed out again
I wish them all safe harbor from the storm

LINK
https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/rolling-home
http://www.nathanville.org.uk/web-albums/burgess/scrapbook/victorian-culture/pages/The-collected-songs-of-Charles-Mackay.htm
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/RollingHome.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/rolling.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67591

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17029
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/rolling.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555620.asp

Rolling home

Read the post in English

Con “Rolling home” s’intende una casa viaggiante su ruote, ma è anche il titolo della più conosciuta tra le  homeward-bound shanty. In America casa è la California o Boston, mentre in Europa è l’Inghilterra, Londra o Amburgo, ma anche  la Scozia, l’Irlanda o Dublino, la canzone è altrettanto popolare sulle navi tedesche e olandesi.
Tratta da una poesia omonima scritta da Charles Mackay nel 1858 è considerata una forecastle song, ma è stata anche  una capstan shanty. La questione dell’origine è ancora controversa, si conoscono una ventina di versioni e secondo Stan Hugill potrebbe avere un’origine  scandinava.

LA VERSIONE STANDARD

E’ la versione riportata nella poesia di Charles Mackay che la scrisse il 26 maggio 1858 mentre era a bordo dell’Europa diretto verso casa  e in effetti i versi sono un po’ più elaborati rispetto alle frasi utilizzate di solito dallo shantyman
Dan Zanes in Sea Music
Carl Peterson


I
Up aloft, amid the rigging
Swiftly blows the fav’ring gale,
Strong as springtime in its blossom,
Filling out each bending sail,
And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they rise;
“We have tarried here to bear you
To the land you dearly prize”.
CHORUS
Rolling(1) home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea,
Rolling home to dear old Scotland (2)
Rolling home, dear land to thee (3).
II (4)
Full ten thousand miles behind us,
And a thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well remembered shore.
Newborn breezes swell to send us
To our childhood welcome skies,
To the glow of friendly faces
And the glance of loving eyes.
III (5)
I have watched the rolling hillside
Of the wondrous river Clyde (6)
As I sailed away from Greenock
My heart beat fast inside
But I knew as I was sailing
Far from that Scottish shore
I will miss her every minute
But I’ll return once more.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Sul pennone, in mezzo al sartiame
soffia spedito un vento favorevole,
vigoroso come la primavera in fiore
riempie ogni vela e la flette,
e le onde che ci lasciamo dietro
sembrano mormorare con il movimento” Ci siamo attardate qui per sostenerti fino alla terra che hai cara”
Coro
Naviga a casa, naviga a casa

naviga a casa sul mare,
naviga a casa alla cara vecchia Scozia,
naviga a casa,  cara terra, a te

II
Dieci mila miglia buone dietro di noi
e un un migliaio davanti, le onde dell’antico oceano per trasportarci verso la terra che ricordiamo bene.
Le nuove brezzesi soffiano per guidarci verso i benvenuti cieli della nostra infanzia, al sorriso di volti amici e allo sguardo di occhi amorevoli.
III
Ho visto il profilo ondulato
del meraviglioso fiume Clyde
mente salpavo da Greenock
il mio cuore batteva forte
ma sapevo che stavo navigando
lontano dalla costa scozzese,
mi mancherà ogni minuto
ma ritornerò ancora una volta

NOTE
1)  rolling ha molti significati: in genere è sinonimo di“sailing” ma può anche derivare da “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”; spesso come suggerisce Italo Ottonello si intende in senso letterale come “dondolante” la tipica andatura dei lupi di mare
2) oppure England
3) secondo Hugill la canzone deriva da una versione scandinava e rileva che il verso è a volte cantato come “the land’s forbee” con “forbee”= “passing by” o “near.” Förbi is svedese sta per “past, by.”
4) Carl Peterson salta la II strofa della poesia di Charles Mackay
5) la strofa è stata aggiunta da Carl Peterson
6) si riferisce alle colline ondulate nei pressi all’estuario del Clyde che sfocia in prossimità della città portuale di Greenock,  
situata sulla costa meridionale   stupende immagini del fiume 

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

Old Blind Dogs in The Gab O Mey 2003, in una versione con molta Scotsness


I (1)
Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable running clear
Heave around and with the wheel, boys
For our homeland we must steer
Chorus
Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to Caledonia
Rolling home, dear land, to thee
II
From the pines of California
And by Chile’s endless strand
We have sailed the world twice over
Every port in every land
III
And to all ye blaggard pirates
Who would chase us from the waves
Heed ye well that those who’ve tried us
Soon have found their watery graves
IV
We were boarded in Jamaica
Where the Jolly Rodger flew
But our swords were hardly drawn, boys
‘Ere they took a rosy hue
V
We return with precious cargo
And with bounty coined in gold
And our sweethearts will rejoice, boys
For they lo’e their sailors bold
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Chiama tutti gli uomini per maneggiare l’argano, vedete come la catena scorre bene, avvolgetela ragazzi, perchè verso casa dobbiamo fare rotta
Coro
Navigo a casa, navigo a casa
navigo a casa sul mare,
navigo a casa a Caledonia,
navigo a casa, la cara terra, a te

II
Dai pini della California
e dalla spiaggia infinita del Cile
abbiamo navigato per il mondo due volte, in ogni porto e in ogni terra
III
A tutti voi furfanti di pirati
che vorreste inseguirci tra le onde
ascoltate bene che quelli che ci hanno provato hanno presto trovato la loro tomba nel mare
IV
Ci siamo imbarcati in Giamaica
dove veleggia il Jolly Roger
ma le nostre spade erano ben affilate, ragazzi
e hanno preso una tonalità rossa
V
Ritorniamo con il nostro prezioso carico e con abbondanza di  monete d’oro e le nostre innamorate si rallegreranno, ragazzi
perchè amano il loro marinai coraggiosi

NOTE
1) riprende la II strofa della poesia di Charles Mackay

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

Melodia diversa come pure il testo la Rolling home to Ireland degli Irish Rovers


I
I come from Paddy’s land
I’m a rake and ramblin’ man
Since I was young, I’ve had the urge to roam
So don’t you weep for me
When I’m sailing on the sea
For you won’t see me till I come rolling home
Chorus
Rolling home to Ireland, rolling home across the sea
Back to me own con-ter-ree (country)
Two thousand miles behind us
and a thousand more to go

So fill the sails and blow winds blow!
II
We sailed away from Cork
We were headed for New York
I’d always dreamed the sailor’s life for me
But the days were hard and long
With no women, wine, or song
And it wasn’t quite the fun I’d thought ‘twould be
III
We weren’t too long a-sail
When the wind became a gale
Our boat was tossed and turned upon the foam
With waves like moutains high
Well I thought that I would die
I wished to God that I was rolling home
IV
And when I reach the shore
I will go to sea no more
There’s more to life than sailing ‘round the Horn
Good luck to sailor men
When they’re headed out again
I wish them all safe harbor from the storm
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Vengo dalla terra di Paddy
sono un giramondo gaudentete
da quando ero ragazzo ho avuto la necessità di girovagare,
così non piangere per me
mentre navigo per mare
perchè non mi vedrai finchè non tornerò a casa
Coro
Navigando verso l’Irlanda, navigando verso casa per il mare
di ritorno nel mio paese

due mila miglia dietro alle spalle
e altri mille da fare, così gonfiate le vele e soffiate, venti, soffiate!

II
Abbiamo navigato lontano da Cork
eravamo diretti a New York
ho sempre sognato la vita del marinaio per me
ma i giorni erano duri e lunghi
senza donne, vino o canzoni
e non era proprio il divertimento che credevo
III
Eravamo da poco in alto mare, quando il vento è diventato una tempesta
la nostra barca fu sbattuta dai marosi
con onde alte come montagne.
Beh, pensavo che sarei morto
e sperai che Dio mi facesse ritornare a casa
IV
E quando raggiungerò la riva
non andrò più per mare
c’è di più nella vita che navigare intorno all’Horn.
Buona fortuna ai marinai
quando vanno di nuovo fuori
vorrei che fossero tutti al sicuro dalla tempesta

FONTI
https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/rolling-home
http://www.nathanville.org.uk/web-albums/burgess/scrapbook/victorian-culture/pages/The-collected-songs-of-Charles-Mackay.htm
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/RollingHome.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/rolling.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67591

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17029
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/rolling.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555620.asp

FAREWELL TO THE BANKS OF AYR

Leggi in italiano

Lyrics: The Banks Of Ayr by Robert Burns 1786
Tune:  Roslin Castle (aka House of Glamis) old Scottish Slow Air

The   gloomy night is gath’ring fast” or “The bonie banks of Ayr” was written by Robert Burns on the autumn of 1786 when he was 27 years old; crucial year for Burns in which he decides to embark for Jamaica in search of fortune; to pay for the trip, on July 31 he published “Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect” (also known as “The Kilmarnock Edition“), but … the unexpected success achieved with his first publication and the persuasion of his friends, it brought him to Edinburgh at the end of November.

burns 1787
Robert Burns in Edinburgh 1787, the living room of Jane Duchess of Gordon

Welcomed with benevolence in the most fashionable houses of Edinburgh, the handsome Robbie has become famous throughout Scotland, even if he was always nagged by economic problems.

FAREWELL TO COILA (SCOTLAND)

The song reflects the dark thoughts of the poet, the worries of today, the fears of facing a long journey by sea and his heartfelt farewell to his beloved Scotland. “I composed this song as I conveyed my chest so far on my road to Greenock, where I was to embark in a few days for Jamaica. I meant it as my  farewell dirge to my native land.”

Le rive dell'Ayr
The banks of Ayr

ARYSHIRE

Ayr is a capital harbor town of Ayrshire (south-west Scotland) located at the mouth of the river Ayr, center of the “Burns an ‘a’ that” the May festival to pay homage to the Bard of Scotland: the feast lasts a whole week and it is a succession of concerts, literary and artistic events. Several other places associated with the poet and his youthful years can be found in the Burnay National Heritage Park in Alloway. These include the Burns Cottage, the museum and the Tam o ‘Shanter Experience, as well as the Auld Alloway Kirk, the Burns monument and the Brig o’ Doon.
Around the city lies the sparsely populated Scottish countryside and beautiful landscapes: in the Aryshire region there are forty castles, many of which can be visited.

ROSLIN CASTLE

The tune is an example of the Italian influence on eighteenth century Scottish music. The tune has been attributed to James Oswald (or composed by William McGibbon and printed by James Oswald)
Charles Nicholson in his Preceptive Lessons for the Flute of 1821
(http://www.oldflutes.com/articles/roslincastle.htm)

Old Blind Dogs  in The World’s Room 1999 (violino e flauto) Jonny Hardie (violino) e Rory Campbell (whistle), sotto il delicato arpeggio della chitarra di Jim Malcolm

The Albanach Guitar Duo
Kate Steinbeck, (flute) · Alicia Chapman, (oboe)· Jacquelyn Bartlett, (harp)

THE BANKS OF AYR

However, there are not many versions of the song, listen to Jim Malcom (Farewell To the Banks of Ayr)
New Celeste in “It’s a new day” – 1997: the group of Glasgow made a very characteristic arrangement (the music is composed by Iain Fergus), with the moaning of the bagpipe, vibrato and melancholic, which defines the “mood” of the whole piece. On a slow battery base, delicate arrangements and touches of guitar, violin arquings, flute riffs

I
The gloomy night is gath’ring fast,
Loud roars the wild,  inconstant blast,
Yon murky cloud  is foul with rain,
I see it driving  o’er the plain;
The hunter now has  left the moor,
The scatt’red coveys meet secure;
While here I wander,   prest with care,
Along the lonely  banks of Ayr.
II
The Autumn mourns her rip’ning corn
By early Winter’s  ravage torn;
Across her placid,  azure sky,
She sees the  scowling tempest fly:
Chill runs my blood  to hear it rave;
I think upon the  stormy wave,
Where many a danger  I must dare,
Far from the bonie banks of Ayr.
III
‘Tis not the surging billow’s roar,
‘Tis not that fatal, deadly shore;
Tho’ death in ev’ry  shape appear,
The wretched have no  more to fear:
But round my heart  the ties are bound,
That heart transpierc’d with many a wound;
These bleed afresh,  those ties I tear,
To leave the bonie banks of Ayr.
IV
Farewell, old Coila’s(1) hills and dales,
Her healthy moors  and winding vales;
The scenes where  wretched Fancy roves,
Pursuing past, unhappy loves!
Farewell, my  friends! farewell, my foes!
My peace with these,  my love with those:
The bursting tears  my heart declare-
Farewell, the bonie banks of Ayr!

NOTES:
1) Coyla is the name of Burns’ muse, identified with Scotland

http://www.burnsmuseum.org.uk/collections/object_detail/3.6275.b
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18500/18500-h/18500-h.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/4150

To the Begging I Will Go

La protesta contro il “sistema” all’insegna del sex-drinks&piping s’incanala in uno specifico filone di canti popolari (britannici e irlandesi) sul mestiere di mendicante, uno spirito libero che vagabonda per il paese senza radici e vuole solo essere lasciato in pace. Molti sono i canti in gaelico in cui il protagonista rivendica l’esercizio della libera volontà, niente tasse, preoccupazioni e dispiaceri, ma la vita presa come viene affidandosi a lavori saltuari e alla carità della gente. (continua)

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE: To the Begging I Will Go

Esistono molte varianti della canzone a testimonianza della sua vasta popolarità e diffusione. Una vecchia bothy ballad che affonda nella materia medievale dei canti dei vaganti, quel vasto sottobosco di umanità un po’ artistoide, un po’ disadattata, un po’ morta di fame che si arrabattava a sbarcare il lunario esercitando i mestieri più improbabili e spesso truffaldini.
Probabilmente già lo stesso Richard Brome si ispirò  a questi canti dei mendicanti per la sua commedia “A Jovial Crew, or the Merry Beggars” (1640), in cui scrive il coro “The Beggar” detto anche The Jovial Beggar, con il refrain: 
And a Begging we will go, we’ll go, we’ll go,
And a Begging we will go.
Come sia la melodia raggiunge una notevole popolarità moltiplicandosi in tutta una serie di “clonazioni” A bowling we will go, A fishing we will go, A hawking we will go, and A hunting we will go e così via.

ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary “To the Begging I Will Go” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

PRIMA VERSIONE
Tae the Beggin’ / Maid Behind the Bar

ASCOLTA Ossian, la melodia che accompagna il canto è “Maid Behind the Bar”, un Irish reel


I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

II
And I’ll gang tae the tailor
wi’ a wab o’ hoddin gray,
and gar him mak’ a cloak for me
tae hap me night and day.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

III
An’ I’ll gang tae the cobbler
and I’ll gar him sort my shoon
an inch thick tae the boddams
and clodded weel aboun.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
IV
And I’ll gang tae the tanner
and I’ll gar him mak’ a dish,
and it maun haud three ha’pens,
for it canna weel be less.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

V
And when that I begin my trade,
sure, I’ll let my beard grow strang,
nor pare my nails this year or day
for beggars wear them lang.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VI
And I will seek my lodging
before that it grows dark –
when each gude man is getting hame, and new hame frae his work.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VII
And if begging be as good as trade,
and as I hope it may,
it’s time that I was oot o’ here
an’ haudin’ doon the brae.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VIII=I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for  when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
 
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri che conosco,
di sicuro il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
E andrò dal sarto
con una pezza di ruvida lana grigia
e gli chiederò di farmi un mantello
per ricoprirmi di notte e giorno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò, a mendicare andrò
III
Andrò dal calzolaio
e gli chiederò di risuolare le mie scarpe con del cuoio spesso
per camminare bene sulle zolle.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
IV
E andrò dal tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte perchè non si può fare con meno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

V
E quando poi inizierò il mio mestiere, di sicuro mi lascerò crescere la barba quest’anno o oggi, nè mi taglierò le unghie, perchè i mendicanti le portano lunghe. A mendicare andrò,
andrò, a mendicare andrò

VI
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cali la sera –
quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

VII
E se il mendicare sarà un buon affare, come spero lo sia,
è tempo che io vada via da qui e m’incammini per la collina.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

SECONDA VERSIONE: To the Beggin’ I Will Go

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs

Chorus
To the beggin’ I will go, go
To the beggin’ I will go
O’ a’ the trades a man can try,
the beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s weary
he can just sit down and rest.
First I maun get a meal-pock
made out o’ leather reed
And it will haud twa firlots (1)
wi’ room for beef and breid.
Afore that I do gang awa,
I’ll lat my beard grow strang
And for my nails I winna pair,
for a beggar wears them lang.
I’ll gang to find some greasy cook
and buy frae her a hat(2)
Wi’ twa-three inches o’ a rim,
a’ glitterin’ owre wi’ fat.
Syne I’ll gang to a turner
and gar him mak a dish
And it maun haud three chappins (3)
for I cudna dee wi’ less.
I’ll gang and seek my quarters
before that it grows dark
Jist when the guidman’s sitting doon
and new-hame frae his wark.
Syne I’ll tak out my muckle dish
and stap it fu’ o’ meal
And say, “Guidwife, gin ye gie me bree,
I winna seek you kail”.
And maybe the guidman will say,
“Puirman, put up your meal
You’re welcome to your brose (4) the nicht, likewise your breid and kail”.
If there’s a wedding in the toon,
I’ll airt me to be there
And pour my kindest benison
upon the winsome pair.
And some will gie me breid
and beef and some will gie me cheese
And I’ll slip out among the folk
and gather up bawbees (5).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
Di tutti i mestieri che un uomo può fare, il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare.
Per prima cosa prenderò una bisaccia
fatta di cuoio
e conterrà due staia
con un posto per carne e pane.
Prima di andare via
mi farò crescere la barba lunga
e non mi taglierò le unghie
perchè il mendicante le porta lunghe.
(Andrò a cercare un grassa cuoca
e comprerò da lei un cappello
con la falda di due o tre pollici
tutto scintillante di grasso.)
E andrò da un tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte
perchè non posso fare con meno.
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cada il buio
– quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
Poi tirerò fuori il mio grande piatto
e lo riempirò di farina d’avena
e dico “Buona donna, se mi date del brodo, non vi chiedo del cavolo”
E forse il padrone di casa dirà
“Poveruomo, metti da parte la tua farina, saluta il tuo brose di stasera
come pure il pane e cavolo”
Se ci sarà un matrimonio in città
mi recherò là
ed elargirò la mia più cara benedizione
su quella bella coppia.
E qualcuno mi darà il pane
e manzo e qualcuno mi darà del formaggio e mi aggirerò tra la gente
a raccogliere delle monetine

NOTE
1) unità di misura scozzese
2) il senso della frase mi sfugge
3) vecchia misura scozzese per liquidi equivalente e mezza pinta
4) il brose è il porrige preparato alla maniera scozzese. Se ho capito bene il senso del discorso , il mendicante chiede alla padrona di casa un po’ di brodo caldo per prepararsi il suo brose a base di farina d’avena, ma il padrone di casa lo invita a mangiare alla sua tavola cibi ben più sostanziosi
5) bawbees: half pennies

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

E’ la versione del Lancashire riportata in “Folk Songs of Lancashire” (Harding 1980). Leggiamo nelle note ” This version was collected from an old weaver in Delph called Becket Whitehead by Herbert Smith and Ewan McColl.”
ASCOLTA Ewan McColl


I
Of all the trades in England,
a-beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s tired,
he can sit him down to rest.
And to a begging I will go,
to the begging I will go
II
There’s a poke (1) for me oatmeal,
& another for me salt
I’ve a pair of little crutches,
‘tha should see how I can hault
III
There’s patches on me fusticoat,
there’s a black patch on me ‘ee
But when it comes to tuppenny ale (2),
I can see as well as thee
IV
My britches, they are no but holes,
but my heart is free from care
As long as I’ve a bellyfull,
my backside can go bare
V
There’s a bed for me where ‘ere I like,
& I don’t pay no rent
I’ve got no noisy looms to mind,
& I am right content
VI
I can rest when I am tired
& I heed no master’s bell (3)
A man ud be daft to be a king,
when beggars live so well
VII
Oh, I’ve been deef at Dokenfield (4),
& I’ve been blind at Shaw (5)
And many the right & willing lass
I’ve bedded in the straw
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri in Inghilterra
il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
Ho una tasca per la farina d’avena
e un’altra per il sale
ho un paio di stampelle, dovreste vedere come riesco a zoppicare!
III
Ci sono toppe sul mio cappotto frusto e una toppa nera sul mio occhio ma quandosi tratta di birra da due penny, riesco a vedere bene quanto te!
IV
I miei pantalono non hanno che buchi
ma il mio cuore è libero dall’affanno
finchè ho la pancia piena
il mio fondoschiena può andare nudo
V
C’è un letto per me ovunque mi piaccia
e non pago l’affitto
non ho pensieri fastidiosi in testa
e sono proprio contento
VI
Mi riposo quando sono stanco
e non ascolto la campana del padrone
è da pazzi voler essere un re 
quando i mendicanti vivono così bene!
VII
Sono stato sordo a Dokenfield
e sono stato cieco a Shaw
e più di una ragazza ben disposta
ho portato a letto nella paglia

NOTE
1) poke è in senso letterale un sacchetto ma in questo contesto vuole dire pocket
2) tippeny ale è la birra a buon mercato bevuta normalmente dalla gente comune
2) non ha un padrone o un principale da cui correre appena sente suonare il campanello/sirena
3) Dukinfield è una cittadina nella Grande Manchester
4) Shaw and Crompton, detta comunemente Shaw è una cittadina industriale nella Grande Manchester

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: The Beggarman’s song

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://www.spiersfamilygroup.co.uk/Tae%20the%20Beggin%20I%20will%20go.pdf
https://tullamore.band/track/1238160/tae-the-beggin-maid-behind-the-bar
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/thebeggingsong.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/tothe.htm
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49513&lang=it
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82650
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/gd/fullrecord/60319/9
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/126.html
http://www.kitchenmusician.net/smoke/beggin.html

Johnny the Brine

Una ‘Border Ballad’ trascritta dal professor Child al numero 114 in ben 13 versioni:  Johnny the Brine, Johnnie Cock, Johnnie (Jock)  o’ Breadislee, Jock O’Braidosly, Johnnie o’ Graidie sono i vari nomi con cui è identificato questo bracconiere/bandito del Border scozzese.

LA GUERRA AL BRACCONAGGIO

“La foresta ha occupato un posto importantissimo nella vita inglese fino dai tempi antichi; ancora durante il regno della regina Elisabetta, fitte boscaglie ricoprivano le aree di intere contee, ed il mondo della foresta aveva guardie, leggi e tribunali propri ai quali neanche i nobili ed il clero potevano sottrarsi completamente. Dall’invasione normanna fino a Giorgio III è stata una continua lotta, per lungo tempo assai sanguinosa, tra il popolo da una parte e, dall’altra, le inique leggi che trattavano l’uccisione d’un cervo alla stregua di un assassinio e sottoponevano i cacciatori di frodo, quando non alla morte, all’abbacinamento o alla mutilazione degli arti. La foresta veniva “monopolizzata” dalla nobiltà per l’esclusivo “sport” della caccia, mentre per la gente essa rappresentava uno dei pochi mezzi di sostentamento. Il bracconaggio era dunque un’attività rischiosissima e poteva davvero costare la vita, anche perché i guardacaccia avevano la facoltà di abbattere sul posto chiunque fosse stato scoperto a cacciare di frodo. Da qui la denominazione di “guerra del bracconaggio“, che rende esattamente l’idea di che cosa davvero si trattasse (anche perché le foreste, ideale rifugio di banditi e Outlaws, venivano spesso soggette a vere e proprie spedizioni militari.” (Riccardo Venturi tratto da qui)

Nell’Alto Medioevo i bracconieri  erano considerati alla stregua di fuorilegge e uccisi sul posto dai guardacaccia. Successivamente le pene si mitigarono prevedendo l’incarcerazione e/o l’amputazione della mano (o l’abbacinamento) fino alla pena capitale quando gli animali erano della riserva di caccia del Re. In Inghilterra con la Magna Charta libertatum (1215) vennero abolite le pene per la caccia di frodo, ma nella prassi quotidiana i giudici della contea (ovvero gli stessi nobili “derubati”) raramente erano ben disposti verso i bracconieri. Le condanne  nei secoli successivi furono progressivamente più miti e nel settecento il bracconiere rischiava solo la detenzione in carcere per qualche mese e/o le frustate. Era inoltre possibile pagare una multa (anche se salata) per riavere la libertà.

La ballata è ancora popolare in Scozia (dal Fife all’Aberdeenshire fino al Border) e le sue prime versioni in stampa risalgono alla fine del Settecento: si narra di un giovane che va a caccia di cervi, ma in sprezzo del pericolo, dopo il buon esito della caccia, se ne resta nel bosco appisolandosi dopo un lauto banchetto. Sorpreso da un servitore della zona viene denunciato ai guardacaccia del Re i quali gli tendono un’imboscata per ucciderlo: sono sette contro uno ma Johnny riesce a ucciderne sei. Il finale varia a seconda delle versioni: il settimo guardacaccia riesce a mettersi in salvo fuggendo sul cavallo, o viene lasciato in vita per poter riferire l’accaduto; in altre è un uccellino che viene inviato a casa con la richiesta di soccorso, ma la fine è sempre tragica e il bracconiere muore a causa delle ferite.

Johnny of Braidislee-Samuel Edmund Waller

LA VERSIONE ESTESA: Jock O’Braidosly

ASCOLTA The Corries, live

ASCOLTA Top Floor Taivers live in un arrangiamento molto personale


I
Johnny got up on a May mornin’
Called for water to wash his hands
Says “Gie loose tae me my twa grey dugs
That lie in iron bands – bands
That lie in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s mother she heard o’ this
Her hands for dool she wrang
Sayin’ “Johnny for your venison
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang – gang
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang”
III
But Johnny has ta’en his guid bend bow
His arrows one by one
And he’s awa’ tae the greenwood gane
Tae ding the dun deer doon – doon
Tae ding the dun deer doon
IV
Noo Johnny shot and the dun deer leapt
And he wounded her in the side
And there between the water and the woods
The grey hounds laid her pride – her pride/The grey hounds laid her pride
V
They ate so much o’ the venison
They drank so much o’ the blood
That Johnny and his twa grey dugs
Fell asleep as though were deid – were deid
Fell asleep as though were deid
VI
Then by there cam’ a silly auld man
An ill death may he dee
For he’s awa’ tae Esslemont (1)
The seven foresters for tae see – tae see
The foresters for tae see
VII
“As I cam’ in by Monymusk (2)
Doon among yon scruggs
Well there I spied the bonniest youth
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs – twa dugs
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs”
VIII (3)
The buttons that were upon his sleeve
Were o’ the gowd sae guid
And the twa grey hounds that he lay between
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood – wi’ blood
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood
IX
Then up and jumps the first forester
He was captain o’ them a’
Sayin “If that be Jock o’ Braidislee
Unto him we’ll draw – we’ll draw
Unto him we’ll draw”
X
The first shot that the foresters fired
It hit Johnny on the knee
And the second shot that the foresters fired
His heart’s blood blint his e’e – his e’e
His heart’s blood blint his e’e
XI (4)
Then up jumps Johnny fae oot o’ his sleep
And an angry man was he
Sayin “Ye micht have woken me fae my sleep
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e – my e’e
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e”
XII
But he’s rested his back against an oak
His fit upon a stane
And he has fired at the seven o’ them
He’s killed them a’ but ane – but ane
He’s killed them a’ but ane
XIII
He’s broken four o’ that one’s ribs
His airm and his collar bane (5)
And he has set him upon his horse
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame – hame
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame
XIV
But Johnny’s guid bend bow is broke
His twa grey dugs are slain
And his body lies in Monymusk
His huntin’ days are dane – are dane
His huntin’ days are dane
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani
“Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri
sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La madre di Johnny che seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
” Johnny per la tua caccia
al bosco non andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo, le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù – per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna spiccò un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda,
la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Molto mangiarono della carne
e bevvero tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono di colpo –
di colpo
si addormentarono di colpo
VI
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio,
che peste lo colga,
che andava a Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia, –
vedere
per vedere i sette guardacaccia.
VII
“Mentre venivo qui da Monymusk
per quella boscaglia
vidi il ragazzo più bello
che giaceva addormentato tra due cani- due cani
giaceva addormentato tra due cani
VIII
I bottoni che portava alla maniche
erano d’oro zecchino
e i due levrieri tra cui era
disteso
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue- di sangue
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue
IX
Saltò su il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Se quello è il giovane Jock o’ Braidislee andremo da lui –
andremo da lui”
X
Il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, colpì Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio- occhio il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
XI
Saltò su Johnny risvegliandosi dal sonno
ed era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Mi avete risvegliato dal sonno
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio”
XII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno – uno
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
XIII
Aveva quattro delle costole rotte
il braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa
XIV
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti – sono finiti, i giorni della caccia sono finiti

NOTE
1) nell’Aberdeenshire si trovano ancora i resti del Castello di Esslemont
2) Monymusk è un ameno paesello, oggi la tenuta Monymusk gestisce una vasta area boschiava lungo le rive del fiume Don (vedi)
3) un classico espediente dei narratori che aggiungevano dettagli sfarzosi alla storia per destare meraviglia tra il pubblico
4) è una strofa riempitiva secondo lo schema della ripetizione tipico delle ballate popolari (vedi)
5) un passaggio un po’ brusco inerente il settimo guardacaccia lasciato in vita, anche se malconcio issato sul cavallo e liberato perchè fosse un testimone di quanto accaduto

SECONDA VERSIONE: Johnny the Brine

La versione è quella della traveller Jeannie Robertson un po’ più rielaborata nelle strofe finali.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee

ed ecco l’intervista filmanta dallo stesso Sam Lee in merito alla trasmissione orale della ballata all’interno della famiglia Robertson


I
Johnny arose one May morning
Called water to wash his hands
“so bring to me my twa greyhounds
They are bound in iron bands, bands
They are bound in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s wife she wrang her hands –
“To the greenwoods dinnae gang
for the sake o’ the venison
To the greenwoods dinnae gang, gang
To the greenwoods dinnae gang”
III
Johnny’s gane up through Monymusk
And doon some scroggs
And there he spied a young deer leap
She was lying in a field of scrub, scrub
She was lying in a field of scrub
IV
The first arrow he fired
It wounded her on the side
And between the water and the wood
His greyhounds laid her pride, pride
His greyhounds laid her pride
V
Johnny and his two greyhounds
Drank so much blood
That Johnny an his two greyhounds
They fell sleeping in the wood, wood
They fell sleeping in the wood
VI
By them came a fool old man
And an ill death may he dee
he went up and telt the forester
And he telt what he did lie, lie
And he telt what he did lie
VII
“If that be young Johnny of the Brine
then let him sleep on (1)”
but the seventh forester denied (2)
he was Johnny’s sister’s son, son
“To the greenwood we will gang”
VIII
The first arrow that they fired
wounded him upon the thigh,
And the second arrow that they fired
his heart’s blood blinded his eye, eye
his heart’s blood blinded his eye
IX
Johnny rose up wi’ a angry growl
For an angry man was he –
“I‘ll kill a’ you six foresters
And brak the seventh one’s back in three, three, three
And brak the seventh one’s back in three”
X
He put his foot all against a stane
And his back against a tree
An he’s kilt a’ the six foresters
And broke the seventh one’s back in three,
and he broke his collar-bone
An he put him on his grey mare’s back
For to carry the tidings home, home
For to carry the tidings home
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani “Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri, sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La moglie di Johnny si torse le mani
“Al bosco non andare
per amor della caggiagione
al bosco non andare, andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Johnny è andato per il Monymusk,
in mezzo alla boscaglia
e lì vide una giovane cerva
distesa nella macchia, macchia
distesa nella macchia
IV
La prima freccia scoccata
la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda, la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
bevvero così tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono nel bosco, bosco
si addormentarono nel bosco
VI
Presso di loro venne un vecchio pazzo,
che peste lo colga,
e andò a chiamare i guardacaccia
per dire dove (John) dormiva, dormiva
per dire dove lui dormiva.
VII
“Se quello è il giovane Johnny of the Brine allora che riposi in pace” eccetto il settimo dei guardacaccia  che li rimproverò, era il figlio della sorella di Johnny, il figlio “e al bosco andremo”
VIII
La prima freccia che tirarono
lo ferì alla coscia, e la seconda freccia che tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
IX
Johnny si alzò con un urlo straziante
perchè era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Ucciderò tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre, tre, tre
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre”
X
Mise un piede contro la pietra
e la schiena contro l’albero
e uccise tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzò la schiena del settimo in tre,
e gli ruppe la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso della sua cavalla grigia
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa

NOTE
1) l’intendo dei guardiaboschi è di cogliere Johnny nel sonno perchè non si risvegli mai più
2) sono tutti daccordo a tendere l’imboscata mentre il bracconiere dorme indifeso, tranne il settimo guardacaccia, il quale li rimprovera, in alcune versioni si dice che nemmeno un lupo avrebbe attaccato un uomo inerme 

TERZA VERSIONE: Johnny O’Breadislee

ASCOLTA Hamish Imlach
ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in “Five” 1997


I
Johnny arose on a May mornin’
Gone for water tae wash his hands
He hae loused tae me his twa gray dogs
That lie bound in iron bands
II
When Johnny’s mother, she heard o’ this
Her hands for dule she wrang
Cryin’, “Johnny, for yer venison
Tae the green woods dinna ye gang”
III
Aye, but Johnny hae taen his good benbow
His arrows one by one
Aye, and he’s awa tae green wood gaen
Tae dae the dun deer doon
IV
Oh Johnny, he shot, and the dun deer lapp’t
He wounded her in the side
Aye, between the water and the wood
The gray dogs laid their pride
V
It’s by there cam’ a silly auld man
Wi’ an ill that John he might dee
And he’s awa’ doon tae Esslemont
Well, the King’s seven foresters tae see
VI
It’s up and spake the first forester
He was heid ane amang them a’
“Can this be Johnny O’ Braidislee?
Untae him we will draw”
VII
An’ the first shot that the foresters, they fired
They wounded John in the knee
An’ the second shot that the foresters, they fired
Well, his hairt’s blood blint his e’e
VIII
But he’s leaned his back against an oak
An’ his foot against a stane
Oh and he hae fired on the seven foresters
An’ he’s killed them a’ but ane
IX
Aye, he hae broke fower o’ this man’s ribs
His airm and his collar bain
Oh and he has sent him on a horse
For tae carry the tidings hame
X
Johnny’s good benbow, it lies broke
His twa gray dogs, they lie deid
And his body, it lies doon in Monymusk
And his huntin’ days are daen
His huntin’ days are daen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e andò al fiume per lavarsi le mani
aveva liberato per me i suoi due levrieri  legati con catene di ferro.
II
Quando la madre di Johnny seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
gridando “Johnny per la tua cacciagione al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo,
le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna diede un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i levrieri presero la preda
V
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio
in animo che John dovesse morire,
ed è uscito da Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia
del Re
VI
Saltò su a parlare il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Potrebbe essere Johnny O’ Braidislee? Andremo da lui!”
VII
E il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono
colpirono Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo che i guardacaccia tirarono il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
VIII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro
la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette i guardacaccia
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
IX
Aveva rotto quattro delle costole di quell’uomo
il suo braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa
X
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti
i giorni della caccia sono finiti


FONTI
http://www.mostly-medieval.com/explore/johnie.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch114.htm
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=9398
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/johnnyobredislee.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/johnny.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/johnobre.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/johnnie-o-breadisley/

Back of Bennachie

Sono numerose le canzoni popolari scozzesi che narrano d’incontri romantici “among the heather”( o come dicono in Scozia “amang the heather”) cioè in camporella, tra procaci pastorelle e baldi giovanotti, questo filone ha come luogo dell’appuntamento lo scenario delle Bennachie Hills, la montagna o collina come dir si voglia più famosa e conosciuta della Scozia nord-orientale.
Situata nel Garioch tra i fiumi  Don e  Gadie è una catena di alture, punto di riferimenti dell’Aberdeenshire della Scozia con la più alta, Oxen Craig, che arriva a circa 500 metri. (vedi prima parte)


This photo of Bennachie Hill Walks is courtesy of TripAdvisor

BACK OF BENNACHIE

Nel Nord della Scozia è una delle canzoni più popolari con il testo rielaborato a partire dal ritornello, con il titolo di “Braes o ‘Bennachie” o “The Back of Bennachie” ma anche “Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs” presenta  molte varianti. La melodia è “The Hessian’s March”  conosciuta dai più associata alla anti-war song My Son David” .
In merito ai testi sono sorte un po’ di confusioni per via delle tante rielaborazioni: il filone è quello agreste con un’idilliaca visione dell’amena località cantata nel mutarsi delle stagioni (John Imlah) oppure una nostalgica canzone dell’emigrante (Rev. John Park), ma anche un lament.

Gin I Were Where The Gadie Runs

L’autore del testo è John Imlah (1799-1846) e nel  ‘The Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection’, vol VI sono riportate cinque versioni della canzone. La canzone nei versi di Imlah è una idilliaca visione dell’amena località cantata nel mutarsi delle stagioni (vedi).
Un testo ulteriormente rielaborato dal Rev. John Park  (1805-1865)  di St Andrew, la trasforma in una nostalgica emigration song!
ASCOLTA Alex Campbell  1963.

Rev. John Park*
O Gin I were whaur the Gadie (1) rins
Whaur the Gadie rins,
whaur the Gaudie rins
Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins
At the back (2) o’ Bennachie
I
Aince mair to hear the wild birds’ sang,
To wander birks an’ braes amang
Wi’ friends and fav’rites left sae lang
At the back o’ Bennachie.
II
Oh, an’ I were whaur Gadie rins,
‘Mang blooming heaths and yellow whins,
Or brawlin’ down the bosky linns
At the back o’ Bennachie.
Chorus
III
O Mary ! There on ilka nicht
when baith our hearts wew young and licht,
we’ve wander’d when the moon was bricht
At the back o’ Bennachie.
IV
O ance, ance mair where Gadue rins
where Gadue rins, where Gadue rins
o micht I dee where Gadie rins
At the back o’ Bennachie.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie

Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie
I
Per ascoltare ancora una volta cantare gli uccelli del bosco e vagare tra boschetti e colline con gli amici e i cari lasciati da tanto, ai piedi del  Bennachie
II
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
tra l’erica in fiore e la gialla ginestra,
o dove rimbottano le cascate dalle rive frondose
ai piedi del  Bennachie
Coro
III
O Maria! Là ogni sera,
quando entrambi i nostri cuori erano giovani e lieti,
andavamo a vagabondare quando la luna era luminosa
ai piedi del  Bennachie
IV
Oh una volta, ancora una volta dove scorre il Gadie, dove scorre il Gadie,
oh se potessi morire dove sorre il Gadie, ai piedi del  Bennachie

NOTE
*in Scots Minstrelsie, vol. I (1893) di John Greig. (qui).
1) Gaudie o Gadie è un ruscello dell’Aberdeenshire che sgorga dalla collina di Bennachie e sfocia nell’Urie, un affluente del Don
2) scritto anche come “foot”: il termine “retro” con cui verrebbe da tradurre “back” non ha molto senso, senonchè Back o ‘Bennachie è il lato nord della cresta montuosa, il lato più accidentato, è proprio il lato dove scorre il Gadie vicino al villaggio di Oyne. Perciò la traduzione corretta è : versante nord di Bennachie. Il titolo Back of Bennachie con cui viene chiamata talvolta questa versione rimanda all’idea-desiderio dell’emigrante di far ritorno nella sua terra natia.

Bennachie

La versione riportata da John Ord nelle sue “Bothy Song and Ballads” (1990) è invece un lament e racconta tutta un’altra storia.  In questa canzone una giovane donna si lamenta di essere stata fidanzata per ben due volte ma di non essersi mai sposata, perchè i suoi innamorati sono morti accidentalmente (uno in una rissa, l’altro affogato): invece dell’abito nunziale la donna indosserà un sudario, come quello dei suoi promessi sposi. Con il titolo The Gaudie è stata anche cantata da Hamish Imlach, in alcuni siti il testo è però erroneamente attribuito a John Imlah.
Alcuni ritengono che il racconto di omicidi e annegamenti nei dintorni del Bennachie sia precedente alla versione idilliaca diffusasi nell’Ottocento, alcuni studiosi ipotizzano un’origine dalle jacobite song.

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in New Tricks 1992


Gin I were whaur the Gaudie (1) rins
Whaur the Gaudie rins,
whaur the Gaudie rins
Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins
At the back o’ Bennachie
I
Oh I niver had but twa richt lads
Aye twa richt lads, twa richt lads
I niver had but twa richt lads
That dearly courted me
II
And ane  was killed at the Lourin Fair(2)
The laurin’ fair, at the Lourin Fair
Oh ane was killed at the Lourin Fair
The ither  was droont in the Dee (3)
III
And I gave to him the haunin'(4) fine
The haunin’ fine, the haunin’ fine
Gave to him the haunin’ fine
His mornin’  dressed tae be
IV
Well, he gave to me the linen fine
The linen fine, the linen fine
Gave to me the linen fine
Me windin’ shee tae be
V
Oh gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins Wi’ the bonny broom an’ the yellow whims Gin I were whaur the Gaudie rins At the back o’ Bennachie
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie
dove scorre il Gadie

Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie
II
Non ho avuto che due ricchi ragazzi
due ricchi ragazzi, due ricchi ragazzi, non ho avuto che due ricchi ragazzi che mi corteggiarono
III
E uno fu ucciso alla Fiera
di Lourin
alla Fiera di Lourin
alla Fiera di Lourin
l’altro fu affogato nel Dee
IV
E gli diedi della tela d’Olanda,
tela d’Olanda, tela d’Olanda
gli diedi della tela d’Olanda
perchè fosse il suo manto funebre
V
Lui mi diede della biancheria fine
biancheria fine, biancheria fine
mi diede della biancheria fine
perchè fosse il mio sudario
VI
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
con la bella erica e la gialla ginestra
Vorrei essere dove scorre il Gadie
ai piedi del Bennachie

NOTE
1) Gaudie o Gadie è un ruscello dell’Aberdeenshire che sgorga dalla collina di Bennachie e sfocia nell’Urie, un affluente del Don
2) una fiera millenaria che si tiene ancora ogni anno nel villaggio di Old Rayne
3) Il Dee  scorre nella regione dell’Aberdeenshire.  L’area intorno al fiume è chiamata Strathdee, Deeside, o “Royal Deeside” dove la Regina VIttoria costrui’ il castello di Balmoral.
4) non riesco a trovare una corrispondenza del termine, probabilmente un refuso o un’incomprensione del termine “Holland”; nelle antiche ballate “holland fine” era un termine spesso utilizzato per indicare la tela d’Olanda, la tela di puro lino  di qualità superiore, pregiata per la sua finezza e lavorazione, dal colore particolarmente bianco e una trama fine ma compatta.

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/poetry/bonaccord/JohnImlahBiography.pdf
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/64507/10;jsessionid=F797E4DFFC105D8EC49E8A160DC7F655
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Bennachie(2).htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/gaudirin.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/gadierin.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/gadie.html
http://www.oldrayne.org.uk/about/index.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27891
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=2561
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=596

https://thesession.org/tunes/6988
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/scottskinner/display.php?ID=JSS0522

Old Blind Dogs

Il gruppo Old Blind Dogs nasce nell’ultima decade del 1900 in un periodo musicale di contaminazioni e fusion, non solo musica tradizionale scozzese ma anche  melodie dalla Galizia e Bretagna oltre a qualche composizione propria.
Loro vivono nell’Aberdeenshire e prediligono le percussioni un po’ afro e le sonorità blues: niente bodhran dunque o batteria ma conga e djembè di Fraser Stone.
E proprio questa loro caratteristica che li distingue dalle altre formazioni folk scozzesi, il repertorio di antiche ballate del nord-est della Scozia cantate in dialetto. Varie le line-up con elemento propulsore del gruppo, la sua anima, il violinista Jonny Hardie, d’impostazione classica ma dal cuore folk, che suona anche all’occorrenza chitarra, mandolino e bouzouki (e canta). Altro depositario della tradizione è stato Ian F. Benzie chitarrista e cantante per tutti gli anni 90, e tuttavia gli arrangiamenti del gruppo non sono orientati a forme tradizionali. Si prenda come esempio il set strumentale “The Walking Nightmare / The Shopgirl /Croix Rousse” (in Five, 1997)

Il gruppo vince nel 2004 e nel 2007 il prestigioso Scots Trad Music Awards come folk band dell’anno.

Play live (2007) è  il nono album la registrazione live del loro tour del 2004 negli Stati Uniti e Canada: l’album racchiude i pezzi migliori della band e la grinta live del gruppo.

La voce del gruppo è stata dal  1990 al 1999 Ian F. Benzie a cui subentra Jim Malcolm (una voce calda, morbida e vellutata, dagli accenti blues): entrambi sono stati coinvolti nel progetto di Fred Freeman per la Linn Records con il titolo di “The Complete Song of Robert Burns” (1996 & 2002)
Nel 1996 il gruppo si assesta in una formazione di quintetto con  l’aggiunta della cornamusa e pur modificando ancora la line-up diffonde il suo stile per il mondo.
Nel 2007 Jim abbandona il gruppo e nonostante  venissero dati per spacciati gli Old Blind Dogs proseguono l’attività restando definitivamente un quartetto, significativo l’album del dopo Jimmy intitolato “Four on the Floor” dice Hardie in un’intervista “For me it was a matter of going back to thinking of the original sound of Old Blind Dogs. The band was a four piece for six years and, in many ways, I prefer the sound of four–with everyone having to work a little harder. We now have the ingredients for everyone to contribute songs rather than a front man and three backing singers. Because we all have a responsibility, we tend to focus on making sure the harmonies are right.” (tratto da qui)

Da The Gab O Mey (2003): 10 tracce divise tra song e brani strumentali tra cui spicca il  Breton&Galician set, dapprima violino e whistle suonano una melodia bretone accompagnati dalla chitarra e poi subentra la gaita e l’atmosfera diventa quella di una Terra Galenga. Il pipaiolo è Rory Campbell figlio di un piper dell’isola di Barra che suona fin da bambino la little-pipe e il whistle

Da Four on the Floor (2007): il brano per l’ascolto è intitolato Gaelic song ma è la canzone in gaelico scozzese “Latha dhomh ’s mi ’m Beinn a’ cheathaich” conosciuta con il nome inglese di Misty Mountain . 

Old Blind Dogs live California WorldFest 2009: la voce è del violinista Jonny Hardie affiancato da Ali Hutton (whistle e border pipes), Aaron Jones (bouzouki) e Fraser Stone (percussioni). Sono rimasti in quattro ma ci mettono l’anima, lo strumentale finale (lungo quasi come la parte cantata) è da mozzafiato con i duetti cornamusa-violino e irish-bouzouki+percussioni

Da Wherever Yet May Be 2010

CAMERA CON VISTA

Nell’ultimo cd (il tredicesimo uscito in primavera 2017 e da ascoltare tutto qui) accanto a Jonny Hardie  Aaron Jones (attivo già dal 2003 con il bouzouki e voce ), Ali Hutton (cornamusa, whistles nella formazione dal 2008), e una percussione/batteria rock con la new entry di  Donald Hay (tra i più ricercati percussionisti sulle scene folk scozzesi e più in generale inglesi) . Il Cd, dopo sei anni da “Wherever Yet May Be”, s’intitola “Room with a view”  e in copertina (foto di Archie MacFarlane) campeggia tra erica e felci, il rudere di un caminetto in pietra accanto a cui viene ricreato un salottino stile vecchia Scozia con l’immancabile bottiglia di whisky : 9 tracce di tutto rispetto per lo più strumentali (l’unico difetto del Cd è essere troppo breve), coinvolgenti sia nei set di danza che nelle melodie, e la morbida fusione di quattro “vecchi” talenti musicali,

Saranno anche ciechi questi cani ma sanno benissimo quale direzione prendere! Beviamo alla salute degli Old Blind Dogs!

In alto Ali Hutton; in basso da sinistra: Donald Hay, Aaron Jones, Jonny Hardie

JIM MALCOLM

Scozzese purosangue del Perthshire, cantautore nonchè sensibile interprete della tradizione (e in particolare di Robert Burns, ma anche di Robert Tannahill)  suona anche egregiamente l’armonica a bocca. Ha registrato 14 album come solista e 4  come voce leader del gruppo Old Blind Dogs.
Si definisce come l’ultimo “Scots troubadour” che gira il mondo con la sua chitarra: con la sua voce intensa, ricca e sensibile riesce a coinvolgere il pubblico creando un clima d’intimità, delicato e tenero.
ASCOLTA Fields of Angus

In occasione del 250 esimo anniversario di Robert Burns si è vestito come lui e ha registrato un dvd Bard Hair Day (2009)

Alcune delle canzoni scritte da Jim (a volte partendo da un frammento di un vecchio testo, una poesia o una vecchia melodia) sono diventati dei classici del circuito folk scozzese.

Segui il tag Old blind dogs e il tag Jim Malcolm
FONTI
https://www.oldblinddogs.co.uk/
https://oldblinddogs.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.jimmalcolm.com/

P STANDS FOR PADDY

P stands for Paddy” (come pure “The verdant braes of Screen“) affronta il tema dell’amore falsamente corrisposto.
Però la melodia è più gioiosa di quanto ci si aspetterebbe da questo genere di warning songs e il dialogo tra i due sembra più un bisticcio tra innamorati che una separazione.
Così il commento di A.L. Lloyd alla versione dei Waterson “T stands for Thomas” “These B for Barney, P for Paddy, J for Jack songs are usually Irish in origin though common enough in the English countryside. Often the verses are just a string of floaters drifting in from other lyrical songs. So it is with this piece, which derives partly from a version collected by Cecil Sharp from a Gloucestershire gipsy, Kathleen Williams. Some of the verses are familiar from an As I walked out song sung to Vaughan Williams by an Essex woodcutter, Mr Broomfield (Folk Song Journal No. 8). The verses about robbing the bird’s nest recall The Verdant Braes of Skreen.”

ASCOLTA Planxty in Cold Blow and the Rainy Night , 1974, i quali hanno divulgato la canzone al grande pubblico (per il testo vedi)

Old Blind Dogs in Tall Tails 1994 ovvero la formazione degli esordi con Ian F. Benzie (voce e chitarra) Jonny Hardie (violino), Buzzby McMillian (cittern) Davy Cattanach (percussioni)

ASCOLTA Cara Dillon per la serie live Transatlantic Sessions, un godibile live con artisti di tutto rispetto


I
As I went out one May morning to take a pleasant walk
Well, I sat m’self down by an old faill wall just to hear two lovers talk
To hear two lovers talk, my dear,
to hear what they might say
That I might know a little more about love before I went away
Chorus 
P stands for Paddy, I suppose,
J for my love, John
W stands for false Willie(1),
oh but Johnny is the fairest man
Johnny is the fairest man, my dear, aye, Johnny’s the fairest man
I don’t care what anybody says,
Johnny is the fairest man

II
Won’t you come and sit beside me, beside me on the green
It’s a long three quarters of a year or more since together we have been Together we have been, my dear, together we have been
It’s a long three quarters of a year or more since together we have been
III
No, I’ll not sit beside you, not now nor at any other time
For I hear you have another little girl, and your heart’s no longer mine
Your heart’s no longer mine, my dear, your heart’s no longer mine
For I hear you have another little girl, and your heart’s no longer mine
IV
So I’ll go climb the tall, tall tree,
I’ll rob the wild bird’s nest
When I come down, I’ll go straight home to the girl that I love best
To the girl that I love best, my dear, the girl that I love best
When I come down, I’ll go straight home to the girl that I love best
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA  SALTO
I
Mentre andavo un mattin di maggio
a fare una bella passeggiata
beh, sostai presso un vecchio muro diroccato solo per ascoltare la conversazione di due innamorati,
per ascoltare quello che si dicevano
e per poter conoscere un po’ di più sull’amore prima di andare via.
CORO
P sta per Paddy, credo,
J per il mio amore John
W sta per il bugiardo Willie,
ma Johnny è l’uomo più bello
Johnny è l’uomo più bello, si, il mio amore,
Johnny è l’uomo più bello,
non mi interessa quello che gli altri dicono, Johnny è l’uomo più bello

II
“Non vorresti venire a sederti accanto a me sull’erba?
Sono nove mesi fa o più,
da quando siamo stati insieme
insieme siamo stati, mia cara
insieme siamo stati,
sono nove mesi fa o più
da quando siamo stati insieme”
III
“No non mi stenderò sull’erba accanto a te, nè adesso nè mai
perchè ho saputo che tu hai un’altra ragazza e il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio, e il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio, mio caro, perchè ho saputo che tu hai un’altra ragazza e
il tuo cuore non appartiene più al mio.”
IV
“Mi arrampicherò su di un albero alto alto e ruberò il nido di un uccello selvatico e quando ritornerò giù, andrò dritto alla casa della ragazza che amo di più tra le braccia della ragazza che amo di più, mia cara,
quando ritornerò giù, andrò dritto alla casa della ragazza che amo di più”

NOTE
1) Willie è il tipico nome del falso innamorato vedi in Willy Taylor
2) In questa canzone  è l’uomo  ad arrampicarsi sull’albero più alto per prendere il nido e portarlo alla donna che ama dandole così prova d’amore. In genere è lei a donare il suo “nido” ad un altro uomo, più degno di essere amato. Il finale è aperto: a chi Johnny porterà il nido?

FONTI
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5037 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/paddy.htm http://thesession.org/tunes/10172

CRUEL SISTER

Bonny_Swan_by_SarachmetLa ballata “The two sisters” è originaria dalla Svezia o più in generale  dai paesi scandinavi (in epoca pre-cristiana) ma si è diffusa largamente  anche in alcuni paesi dell’Est e nelle isole britanniche. Le varianti in cui è presente sono molteplici come pure i titoli: The Twa Sisters, The Cruel Sister, The Bonnie Milldams of Binnorie, The Bonny Bows o’ London, Binnorie  and Sister, Binnorie, Minnorie,  Dear Sister, The Jealous Sister (Minorie), Bonnie  Broom, Swan Swims Sae Bonny O, The Bonny Swans, Bow  Your Bend to Me.

Nella prima parte ho analizzato il plot della ballata descritta nella fiaba scozzese “The singing breastbone” e la sua messa in musica nella versione scozzese di “Binnorie”. (vedi prima parte)

The Merciless Lady (Dante Rossetti, 1865)

Nel dipinto di Rossetti si esplora ancora il triangolo amoroso e se la rappresentazione ha sicuramente una rispondenza nella biografia del pittore (qui) è anche altrettanto evidente la citazione alla ballata “The two sisters”: i tre protagonisti sono seduti sotto ad un pergolato con il giovane pretendente nel mezzo e sebbene la sua mano sia intrecciata a quella della dama bruna, tutta la sua attenzione è rivolta verso la fanciulla bionda intenta a cantare e a suonare il salterio. L’atteggiamento del giovane è ambiguo, sicuramente non terrebbe per mano la dama bruna se tra di loro non ci fosse un legame (e nella ballata è proprio la sorella maggiore ad essere la promessa sposa), ma l’interesse verso  la dama bionda è fin troppo evidente! Tre calici sono ai piedi dei protagonisti due vicini a toccarsi e il terzo vuoto e dalla parte della sorella bionda: ne preannuncia la morte imminente?

SECONDA VERSIONE: THE CRUEL SISTER

La versione inglese mantiene la storia già vista in “Binnorie” saltando a piè pari il ritrovamento del cadavere da parte del mugnaio (e anche il suo eventuale ruolo nella vicenda, ruolo che emergerà invece nelle versioni americane).
“In questa versione sempre nelle Child ballads non c’è traccia del mugnaio, né della figlia dal mugnaio, però inizia con una signora che viveva vicino alla spiaggia del Nord e che partorisce due sorelle, una bionda e l’altra bruna.
La bionda è paragonata alla luce del sole mentre la mora è nera come il carbone, minerale sotterraneo ritenuto vicino al diavolo. Si ricordi che la ballata ha origini scandinave, dove la maggior parte delle genti era bionda o rossa e che quelli che avevano i capelli neri erano i diversi, talvolta i nemici di altre tribù lontane. Non a caso nella loro mitologia, che è diventata comune anche nel resto d’Europa, la fata buona è bionda mentre la strega ha sempre i capelli neri. “(Giordano Dall’Armellina)

Furono i Pentangle a riportare in auge la ballata quasi dimenticata
ASCOLTA Pentangle in Cruel Sister (1970) . La melodia su cui il canto è impostato è quella di Riddles Wisely Expounded  e il sitar aggiunge una nota incantata

Old Blind Dogs in “Close to the Bone“,1993, nella prima formazione con la voce di Ian F. Benzie, il gruppo ha ripreso l’arrangiamento dei Pentangle aggiungendoci un bel po’ di ritmo

ASCOLTA Bedlam Boys (Gregor Harvey & Grant Foster) riportano la ballata in una versione più aderente alla vena renaissance folk

VERSIONE PENTANGLE
There lived a lady by the north (1) sea shore
Lay the bairn tae the bonnie broom (2)
Twa daughters were the bairns she bore
Fa la la la la la la la la la
One was as bright as is the sun
Sae coal black grew the elder one (3)
A knight came riding to the ladies’ door
He travelled far to be their wooer
He courted one, aye with gloves and rings (4),
But he loved the other above all things”
Sister, sister won’t you walk with me
An’ see the ships sail upon sea?”
And as they stood on that windy shore
The elder sister pushed the younger o’er
Sometimes she sank or sometimes she swam
Crying, “Sister, reach to me your hand”
And there she floated just like a swan(5)
The salt sea carried her body on
Two minstrels walking by the north sea strand
They saw the maiden, aye float to land
They made a harp out of her breast bone(6)
The sound of which would melt a heart of stone
They took three locks of her yellow hair
And wi’ them strung that harp so rare
The first string that those minstrels tried
Then terror seized the black-haired bride
The second string played a doleful sound
“The younger sister, oh she is drowned”
The third string, it played beneath their bow(7)
“And surely now her tears will flow”
TRADUZIONE di Giordano Dall’Armellina
Viveva una donna presso le rive del Mare del Nord (1), poni il giunco con la  bella ginestra (2)
Due figlie erano le bimbe che lei partorì
Fa la la la la la la   la la la
Mentre una cresceva luminosa come il sole, così nera come il carbone cresceva la più grande (3).
Un cavaliere arrivò cavalcando alla porta della donna,
Aveva viaggiato a lungo per essere il loro pretendente. Corteggiò una di loro con guanti e anelli (4),
Ma amava l’altra sopra ogni cosa.
“Oh sorella vuoi venire con me
A guardare le navi che solcano il mare?”
E mentre stavano in piedi sulla riva spazzata dal vento
La ragazza bruna gettò la sorella (in mare)
Talvolta affondava, talvolta nuotava,
gridando, “Sorella, dammi la mano!”
E lì galleggiava come un cigno,(5)
Il mare salato teneva su il suo corpo.
Due menestrelli camminavano lungo la spiaggia
E videro la fanciulla che il mare aveva portato a terra.
Fecero un’arpa con le sue ossa pettorali(6),
Il cui suono scioglierebbe un cuore di pietra.
Presero tre ciocche dei suoi capelli biondi,
e con loro fecero le corde di un’arpa senza eguali.
La prima corda che quei menestrelli toccarono:
terrorizzò la sposa dai capelli neri.
La seconda corda cantò un suono lamentoso,
“la sorella minore è affogata”
La terza corda cantò sotto il loro archetto (7),
“E di sicuro ora le sue lacrime scorreranno”

NOTE
1) nel codice delle ballate britanniche il Nord è inteso dagli ascoltatori come negativo e quindi nel richiamarlo li prepara a qualcosa di luttuoso.
2) il significato dell’intercalare Lay the bairn tae the bonnie broom è stato a lungo dibattuto, alcuni traducono “bent” nel senso di “ricurvo” e quindi come un modo di descrivere l’horn cioè il corno (richiamando il corno o la tromba dell’elfo nella ballata “The Elfin Knight“) altri invece riconducono il termine all’Inglese antico (derivato dal sassone) nel senso di pianta o cespuglio della brughiera ossia l’erica o più in genera il giunco; la traduzione proposta da Dall’Armellina –poni il giunco con la bella ginestra- è una sorta di codice che introduce una storia di corteggiamento. La frase è contenuta nella canzone Riddles Wisely Expounded sempre nelle Child Ballads dalla quale i Pentangle hanno tratto la melodia: in cui si descrive una prova d’intelligenza tra il diavolo e la fanciulla saggia per la risoluzione di una serie di indovinelli. La frase avrebbe un significato di protezione contro il male, ma potrebbe anche voler dire: “spazza con tanta forza fino a piegare la scopa” cioè “metti un po’ di forza nello spazzare il pavimento” e quindi essere un intercalare umoristico senza senso come per il fa la la la seguente. Un’altra possibile interpretazione traduce la frase come “Danza intorno alla vecchia quercia
3) altro linguaggio codificato per indicare chi è la fanciulla buona e chi quella cattiva. La fanciulla bionda è quella solare, positiva, mentre la fanciulla bruna è quella oscura, negativa.
4) Dare l’anello e un guanto era una promessa di matrimonio. Il secondo guanto veniva dato nel giorno delle nozze. Come da consuetudini ad essere corteggiata era la sorella maggiore , si tratta con evidenza di un matrimonio combinato in cui però il giovane si innamora della sorella più giovane
5) La gelosia è il movente (premeditato) dell’omicidio: mentre le due sorelle passeggiano per ammirare le barche in mare la bruna getta la bionda nell’acqua, il cui corpo resterà a galla sostenuto dalla forza del mare, come se fosse un candido cigno che nuota. Anche in questo casa il paragone oltre ad essere poetico sottolinea la purezza e l’innocenza della fanciulla che si presume non abbia incoraggiato le avance del pretendente.
6) si tratta ovviamente di un’arpa magica, infatti non appena posata su una pietra si mette a cantare da sola. Qui si fa riferimento alla credenza vichinga secondo la quale l’anima risiede nelle ossa (le ossa dei morti accusano i loro assassini). La sorella assassina che stava per andare in sposa viene smascherata dal fantasma della sorella e sicuramente sarà punita come merita.
7) sebbene nella strofa precedente si indichi harp come il nome dello strumento è lecito presumere che si tratti della crotta o lyra ad arco: detto anche “rotta” o “rotta germanica”-per sottolineare il suo areale nordico- lo strumento può essere dotato anche di una tastiera centrale e si suona con l’archetto essendo probabilmente l’antenata del violino. In Galles porta il nome di crwth (mentre in Irlanda è detta cruith) e la tastiera centrale porta le sei corde di cui due le drone strings (“corde fannullone”) sono di bordone. Questo strumento, che gli studiosi sono incerti se ritenere totalmente autoctono ed attribuito all’area scandinava, compare verso il II° sec, si presenta in una forma analoga a quella attuale intorno al VII sec. (vedi)

continua terza parte

FONTI E APPROFONDIMENTO
L’ottimo saggio di Giordano  Dell’Armellina in “Racconti comuni in ballate italiane, svedesi e  britanniche: un confronto” continua
Giordano  Dell’Armellina: “Ballate Europee da Boccaccio a Bob Dylan”.
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_cruel_sister.htm
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49269&lang=it

THE BONNIE BANKS O FORDIE

Una lugubre ballata britannica sull’incesto-stupro e il femminicidio come si dice oggi, le cui origini risalgono al medioevo scandinavo, collezionata dal professor Child al numero 14.  Un bandito/cavaliere solitario aggredisce tre (o due) sorelle nel bosco e troppo tardi scopre di esserne il fratello.

CHILD #14 Versione A
Motherwell’s Minstrelsy

Nella ballata il bandito (chiamato a volte Baby Lon) invece di “O la borsa o la vita!” dice alle ragazze “O mi sposi o muori”, cioè le aggredisce ad una ad una, ed esse pur di preservare la loro virtù, si fanno uccidere. Così comanda la legge dell’onore, la donna deve difendere la sua sessualità a costo della vita, per non gettare vergogna su di lei e sulla sua famiglia. E proprio alla famiglia fa appello la più giovane, il fratello le avrebbe di certo vendicate, senonchè si scopre che il bandito e il fratello sono esattamente la stessa persona! Ma che “colpo di scena” un’agnizione del teatro classico!
Solo dopo la rivelazione il bandito sembra provare rimorso per quanto commesso e si suicida.

IL SESSO NEL BOSCO

La prassi di violentare le fanciulle così ingenue da addentrarsi da sole e senza scorta nei boschi per raccogliere fiori (tema che ritroviamo anche nella ballata dell’elfo Tam Lin), non era un tempo socialmente così deprecabile da meritare la morte dell’uomo, al massimo, quando riconosciuto colpevole, si pagava una cifra in denaro alla famiglia della vittima. In fondo è la donna che è andata a cercare la violenza, ha indotto l’uomo con il suo comportamento incauto alla tentazione, ha per così dire “provocato” l’uomo. Semmai era la donna a dover pagare con la morte, se non fisica andava bene anche quella sociale (emarginazione, riprovazione etc).

FRATELLO INCONSAPEVOLE

Ma allora perchè Babylon prova rimorso? Dopotutto il femminicidio era “solo” un morto in più nella lunga catena dei delitti commessi nella sua carriera di bandito. Il vero peccato è stato l’incesto, anche se inconsapevole, un peccato così grave (o tabù culturale) da meritare la punizione con la morte (compito che in alcune versioni spetta a un membro della famiglia delle donne).

La mitologia di molti popoli e la storia ci consegnano moltissima casi di legami incestuosi tra fratelli: tra dei e nobili era una pratica relativamente comune, e nemmeno tanto insolita nel Medioevo. Ma generalmente i matrimoni tra consanguinei sono vietati e considerati socialmente deprecabili, ma non innaturali, recenti studi ad esempio dimostrano una sorta di condizionamento genetico verso il simile, perchè il successo evolutivo spinge a conservare i propri geni (in amore vale dunque la regola che sono i simili ad attrarsi, non gli opposti!). Il filone delle ballate a tema incestuoso è anche più compiutamente trattato in “The Bonny Heyn” (vedi)

I FRATELLI SCONOSCIUTI

Se nelle versioni scandinave gli aggressori sono tre, in quelle scozzesi l’aggressore è uno solo, a volte è un ladro/bandito, più raramente un signore/cavaliere.
La domanda che sorge spontanea è: come mai i fratelli non si riconoscono prima? Se nelle versioni nordiche a volte troviamo la giustificazione del rapimento da fanciulli dei tre maschi della famiglia (prassi abbastanza comune tra popolazioni dedite ai saccheggi) in quelle scozzesi e più in generale inglesi non vengono mai date spiegazioni in merito; l’eccezione nel caso dell’aggressore di nobili origini potrebbe essere l’usanza del vassallaggio secondo la quale i ragazzi cadetti dall’età di circa 7-8 anni venivano allevati presso la corte di un’altra famiglia (a volte erano anche primogeniti e degli “ostaggi” che sancivano la pace tra famiglie rivali) e non ritornavano in famiglia che dopo la nomina a cavaliere e quindi erano a mala pena riconoscibili dai loro stessi parenti.

"The Bonnie Banks O'Fordie," by Charles Hodge Mackie (1892)
“The Bonnie Banks O’Fordie,” by Charles Hodge Mackie (1892)

Nelle versioni scandinave la ballata è una sorta di parabola in cui si testimonia la vittora di Dio su Odino (vedi) in quelle britanniche le strofe sono limitate alla descrizione dell’incesto e alle sue implicazioni.

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan in No More Forever, 1972. Dick omette il primo refrain e raddoppia il secondo verso

ASCOLTA Malinky in The Unseen Hours 2005


There were three sisters
lived in a booer(1)
Hey ho bonnie
An’ they a’ went oot for tae pu’ a flooer(2)
On the bonnie banks o’ Fordie
An’ they hadna pu’ed a flower but yin
When it’s up there stapped a banished man
He’s taen the first yin by the hand(3)
And he’s turned her ‘roond and he’s made her stand (4)
Sayin’, “Will ye be a robber’s wife?
Or will ye die by my penknife
“Oh I’ll no be a robber’s wife
I’d raither die by your penknife”
So he’s taen oot his wee penknife
And there he’s twined her o’ her life
So he’s taen the second by the hand
And he’s turned her ‘roond and he’s made her stand
Sayin’, “Will ye be a robber’s wife
Or will ye die by my penknife
“Oh I’ll no be a robber’s wife
I’d raither die by your penknife”
He’s taen oot his wee penknife
And there he’s twined her o’ her life
He’s taen the third yin by the hand
And he’s turned her ‘roond and he’s made her stand
Sayin’, “Will ye be a robber’s wife
Or will ye die by my penknife
“Oh I’ll no be a robber’s wife
Nor will I die by your penknife
For I hae a brother in yonder tree
And gin ye’ll kill me, well, it’s he’ll kill ye
“Come tell tae me yer brother’s name”
“My brother’s name, it is Baby Lon”
“Oh sister, I hae done this ill
I hae done this dreadful ill tae ye”
He’s taen oot his wee penknife
And there he’s twined his ain dear life
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
C’erano tre sorelle
che vivevano in un castello (1)
Hey ho belle
ed esse uscirono per raccogliere dei fiori (2),
sulle belle rive del Fordie
non fecero in tempo a raccoglierne che qualcuno
e davanti a loro si parò
un fuorilegge,
prese la più grande
per mano (3),
la fece voltare e la distese (4)
dicendo: “Vuoi essere la moglie di un ladro o preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale?”
“No non sarò la moglie di un ladro, preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale”. Così egli tirò fuori il suo pugnale
e là le prese la vita.
Poi prese la sorella mediana per mano e la fece voltare
e la distese dicendo:
“Vuoi essere la moglie di un ladro o preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale?” “No non sarò la moglie di un ladro, preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale”. Egli tirò fuori il suo pugnale
e le prese la vita.
Egli prese la sorella più piccola per mano e la distese dicendo:
“Vuoi essere la moglie di un ladro o preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale?” “No non sarò la moglie di un ladro, e non voglio morire sotto il tuo pugnale. Perchè io ho un fratello nel bosco
e se tu mi uccidi,
allora lui ti ucciderà!”
“Allora dimmi il nome di tuo fratello!” “Mio fratello si chiama Baby Lon (5)”.
“Oh sorella, io ho fatto questo male,
ti ho dato un terribile dolore”
Egli tirò fuori il suo pugnale
e là si tolse la vita così cara

NOTE
1) bower : in senso lato si traduce come castello in senso stretto cono i quartieri femminili del castello. L’inizio della ballata è idiliaco e fiabesco, ma subito il quadro si capovolge e inizia il dramma
2) raccogliere i fiori nel bosco è un modo per dire che le fanciulle erano nella fase di esplorazione della sessualità e la stagione designata nelle ballate è la primavera. I fiori si trovano sulle rive di un fiume così anche in queste versioni l’acqua assume una valenza simbolica anche se non soprannaturalecome per le versioni scandinave.
3) nel codice sottinteso delle ballate antiche prendere una fanciulla per la mano equivaleva a dire di avere un rapporto sessuale con lei
4) sono piuttosto inquietanti le parole usate per descrivere lo stupro
5) la sorella più giovane ha riconosciuto il fratello? O il suo è solo un disperato tentativo di “mediazione”? Il nome del fratello così scritto si traduce con il piccolo Lon ma tutt’insieme è Babilonia

Old Blind Dogs in “New Tricks” 1992.   I versi sono raggruppati in terzine, con coro (su spotify)


Well, there were twa sisters
wha lived in a bouer
Oh an’ they gaed out aye tae pu’ a flouer
They gaed out aye tae pu’ a flouer
A’ doun by the bonnie banks o’ Fordie
Whan by there cam’ a banisht man
Oh he’s turned them ‘roun’ an’ he’s made them stand
He’s turned them ‘roun’ an’ he’s made them stand
He’s taen the first ane by the hand
Oh he’s turned her ‘roun’ an’ he’s made her stand
He’s turned her ‘roun’ an’ he’s made her stand.
“Noo it’s will ye be a robber’s wife?
Or will ye die by my penknife?
Will ye die by my penknife?”
“No, I’ll no be a robber’s wife
And nor will I die by your penknife
Will I die by your penknife”
So he’s taen oot his wee penknife
Oh and he hae taen o’ her life
He hae taen o’ her life
So he’s taen the second ane by the hand
Oh he’s turned her ‘roun’ an’ he’s made her stand
He’s turned her ‘roun’ an’ he’s made her stand
“Oh it’s will ye be a robber’s wife?
Or will ye die by my penknife?
Will ye die by my penknife?”
“No, I’ll no be a robber’s wife
Nor will I die by your penknife
Will I die by your penknife”
“For I hae brither in this country
Well, if you kill me, he’ll kill thee
If you kill me, then it’s he’ll kill thee”
“Gae tell tae me yer brither’s name”
“My brither’s name, it’s Babylon
My brither’s name, it’s Babylon”
“Oh sister, what hae I done tae thee?
Hae I done this dreadful thing tae thee?
Hae I done this dreadful thing tae thee?”
So he’s taen oot his wee penknife
An’ he hae taen o’ his ain life
He hae taen o’ his ain life
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Beh c’erano due sorelle
che vivevano in un castello
ed esse uscirono per raccogliere dei fiori,
uscirono per raccogliere dei fiori
lungo le belle rive del Fordie 
Quando davanti a loro si parò un fuorilegge, le fece voltare
e le mise in piedi,
le fece voltare
e le mise in piedi.
Egli prese la più grande per mano (3),
la fece voltare
e la mise in piedi
la fece voltare
e la mise in piedi
“Vuoi essere la moglie di un ladro o preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale,
preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale?” “No non sarò la moglie di un ladro, preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale,
preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale”. Egli tirò fuori il suo pugnale
e le prese la vita,
le prese la vita.
Poi prese la seconda sorella
per mano
e la fece voltare
e la mise in piedi,
e la fece voltare
e la mise in piedi.
“Vuoi essere la moglie di un ladro
o preferisci morire sotto il mio pugnale, morire sotto il mio pugnale?”
“No non sarò la moglie di un ladro, preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale,
preferisco morire sotto il tuo pugnale. Perchè ho un fratello in questo paese, beh se tu mi uccidi, lui ti ucciderà,
se tu mi uccidi, lui ti ucciderà!”
“Allora dimmi il nome di tuo fratello!” “Mio fratello si chiama Babylon,
mio fratello si chiama Babylon”.
“Oh sorella, che cosa ti ho fatto?
Ti ho dato un terribile dolore,
ti ho dato un terribile dolore”
Così egli tirò fuori il suo pugnale
e si tolse la vita così cara,
si tolse la vita così cara

FONTI
http://singout.org/2012/05/17/the-natural-and-the-unnatural-naturally/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/thebonniebanksoffordie.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/bonnie.htm