Archivi tag: Oisin

Beltane Chase: Fith Fath song

Leggi in italiano

THE  BELTANE CHASE SONG

The text was written by Paul Huson in his “Mastering Witchcraft” – 1970 inspired by the Scottish ballad “The Twa  Magicians“: Fith Fath is a enchantment of concealment or transmutation, in this lyrics it is the seasonal cycle of transmutations. Caitlin Matthews added a melody in 1978. Today the song is considered a traditional one.

The ritual of the Love chase was to be typical in Beltane when the Queen of May or the Goddess Maiden and the King of May, the Green Man was united to renew the life and fertility of the Earth: still in the Middle Age the boys dressed in green like forest elves ventured into the greenwood (the sacred wood), playing a horn so the girls could find them. Or they turned into hunters and followed magical transmutations with their prey.

Beltane Fire Festival: Green Man and the May Queen

Caitlin Matthews 
Damh The Bard from Herne’s Apprentice – 2003

Pixi Morgan

FITH FATH SONG
I
I shall go as a wren(1) in Spring
With sorrow and sighing on silent wing(2)
CHORUS I
I shall go in our Lady’s name
Aye till I come home again
II
Then we shall follow as falcons grey
And hunt thee cruelly for our prey
CHORUS II
And we shall go in our Horned God’s name(3)
Aye to fetch thee home again
III
Then I shall go as a mouse in May
Through fields by night and in cellars by day.
CHORUS I
IV
Then we shall follow as black tom cats
And hunt thee through the fields and the vats.
CHORUS II
V
Then I shall go as an Autumn hare
With sorrow and sighing and mickle care. (4)
CHORUS I
VI
Then we shall follow as swift greyhounds/ And dog thy steps with leaps and bounds
CHORUS II
VII
Then I shall go as a Winter trout
With sorrow and sighing and mickle doubt.
CHORUS I
VIII
Then we shall follow as otters swift
And bind thee fast so thou cans’t shift
CHORUS II

NOTES
1) The Gaelic name “Druidh dhubh” translates as “bird druid” also called “Bran’s sparrow” (the god of prophecy). Sacred animal whose killing was considered taboo and a bearer of misfortune, but not during the time of Yule. In his book “The White Goddess”, Robert Graves explains that in the Celtic tradition, the struggle between the two parts of the year is represented by the struggle between the king holly (or mistletoe), -the nascent year- and the king oak -the dying year. At the winter solstice the king holly wins over the king oak, and vice-versa for the summer solstice. In oral tradition, a variant of this fight is represented by the robin and the wren, hidden between the leaves of the two respective trees. The wren represents the waning year, the robin the new year and the death of the wren is a passage of death-rebirth. see more 
2) the mystery can not be revealed in words: the initiatory path is accomplished and once understood it is not possible to express.
3) the Horned God is a syncretic sum of ancient deities represented with horns and symbols of fertility and abundance (Celtic Cernunnos and Greek-Roman divinities Pan and Dionysus). According to some scholars, this deity was the pagan alternative of the Christian God, to whom those who remained anchored to the old traditions continued to pay veneration, in short, the ideal candidate for the figure of the Devil! But in my opinion it was been the Christian fanaticism to flatten and standardize all the other cults in a single devilish cult.
The idea of ​​the Horned God developed in the occult circles of France and England in the nineteenth century and his first modern depiction is that of Eliphas Levi of 1855, but it was Margaret Murray in “The Witch-cult in Western Europe”, 1921 to build the thesis of a unique pagan cult that survived the advent of Christianity. This theory, however, is not supported by rigorous documentation and certainly we can find the persistence up to the modern age of cults or beliefs present in various parts of Europe attributable to religion towards the Ancient Gods. Many of these beliefs were absorbed into Christianity and finally fought as diabolical when it was not possible to incorporate them into the new cult.
According to the Wicca tradition, the God is born at the Winter solstice, marries the Goddess to Beltane and dies at the Summer Solstice being the masculine principle equivalent to the triple lunar Goddess that governs life and death.

65440797_zernunn4

4) Similarly Isobel Gowdie, tried for witchcraft in 1662 in Scotland reveals to his torturers the formula of a Fith Fath
I sall gae intil a haire,
Wi’ sorrow and sych and meikle care;
And I sall gae in the Devillis name,
Ay quhill I com hom againe.
Much has been written about witches, especially on the great witch-hunt that took place on the two sides of the Christian religion one step away from the “Century of Enlightenment” and not in the dark Middle Ages. Symptom of a cultural change that will shake the “certainties” of the Western religion. Witches or sorcerers have always existed, they are those who use magic, who can see beyond the material accidents and undertake a journey of research and ancient knowledge. Obscene it was been what Catholics and Protestants did in their “struggle” for power, to annihilate those who were seen as a threat to the True Faith: a bloody struggle of religion that has exacerbated the boundaries of tolerance.

DEER ASPECT

Fith Fath is a spell of concealment or transmutation. It is reported and described in the book “Carmina Gadelica” by Alexander Carmicheal (vol II, 1900)
“They are applied to the occult power which rendered a person invisible to mortal eyes and which transformed one object into another. Men and women were made invisible, or men were transformed into horses, bulls, or stags, while women were transformed into cats, hares, or hinds. These transmutations were sometimes voluntary, sometimes involuntary. The ‘fīth-fāth’ was especially serviceable to hunters, warriors, and travellers, rendering them invisible or unrecognisable to enemies and to animals.” (from here)

English translation*
FATH fith(1)
Will I make on thee,
By Mary(2) of the augury,
By Bride(3) of the corslet,
From sheep, from ram,
From goat, from buck,
From fox, from wolf,
From sow, from boar,
From dog, from cat,
From hipped-bear,
From wilderness-dog,
From watchful ‘scan,'(4)
From cow, from horse,
From bull, from heifer,
From daughter, from son,
From the birds of the air, (5)
From the creeping things of the earth,
From the fishes of the sea,
From the imps of the storm.

FATH fith

Ni mi ort,
Le Muire na frithe,
Le Bride na brot,
Bho chire, bho ruta,
Bho mhise, bho bhoc,
Bho shionn, ‘s bho mhac-tire,
Bho chrain, ‘s bho thorc,
Bho chu, ‘s bho chat,
Bho mhaghan masaich,
Bho chu fasaich,
Bho scan (4) foirir,
Bho bho, bho mharc,
Bho tharbh, bho earc,
Bho mhurn, bho mhac,
Bho iantaidh an adhar,
Bho shnagaidh na talmha,
Bho iasgaidh na mara,
‘S bho shiantaidh na gailbhe

NOTES
* translated by Alexander Carmicheal
1) “deer aspect”; in reality with the spell it is possible to change into any animal form.
The red deer is the animal par excellence of the woods, the coveted prey of hunting, but also mythological animal lord of the Wood and of the Rebirth. For the Celts of the Gauls Cernunnos was the god of fertility with antlers on his head, the animal equivalent of the spirit of wheat. Magic guide, messenger of the fairies, the deer (especially if white) is associated with the Great Mother (and the lunar goddesses) but also with Lug (the Celtic equivalent of a solar deity). As Lugh’s animal it represents the rising sun (with the horns equivalent to the rays) and so in Christianity it is the representation of Christ (or of the soul that yearns to God): it is the king Deer cyclically sacrificed to the Mother Goddess to ensure fertility of the earth. “I am the seven-stage stag” sings the bard Amergin and so the druid-shaman should be dressed during the rituals with horns and deer skins see more
2) Danu (or Anu) mother goddess of the waters. It was the time of primordial chaos: dry deserts and boiling volcanoes, it was the time of the great emptiness. Then from the dark sky a trickle of water fell on the earth and life began to blossom: from the ground grew the sacred tree and Danu (the goddess Mother), the water that descended from the sky, nourished it. From their union the Gods were born ..
Hypogeic waters, labyrinthine caves, spring waters but also river running waters were the sites of prehistoric and protohistoric worship throughout Europe. In particular for the Keltoi Danu was the Danube near whose springs their civilization was born. see more
3) The name derives from the root “breo” (fire): the fire of the blacksmith’s forge combined with that of artistic inspiration and the healing energy. Also known as Brighid, Brigit or Brigantia, she is the goddess of the triple fire, patron saint of blacksmiths, poets and healers. He bore the nickname Belisama, the “Shining” and was a Solar Goddess (near the Celts and the Germans the Sun was female). It was dedicated to her the End of Winter Festival which was celebrated in Celtic Europe at the Calends of February. It was the party of IMBOLC, the festival of the purification of the fields and of the house to mark the slow awakening of Nature.
4) nobody knows that animal is a vigilant explorer, surely a mistake of transcription of Carmicheal
5) follows an invocation of the three kingdoms, Nem (sky), Talam (Earth) Muir (sea) and or if we want world above, middle and below

THE MIST OF AVALON

With the invocation a magical fog it is materialized, that is the mist of Avalon (or Manannan), which acts as a means of transport to the Otherworld. The fog has a dual nature, of concealment and of passage. Another word for “fog”, in Irish origins, is féth fiadha which means “the art of resembling”. Both gods and druids can evoke magical fog as a means of communication between the two worlds. The divination was therefore the féth fiadha.
The prayer “Fath Fith” seems to be the invocation of the hunter to hide from his prey, but it was also used as a form of divination in a “threshold place” for the magical experience of space such as the river bank or the coast of the sea, the compartment of an access door to the building or a bridge. But also time like dawn and sunset which are neither day nor night nor the holy days that are on the border between the seasons.
In doing so you find yourself in a place that is a non-place that some call the opaque world.

The Tale of Ossian and the Fawn

Still Alexander Carmicheal always in the chapter of Fith Fath tells the meeting of the boy Oisin (Ossian) with his mother: Ossian is a legendary bard of ancient Scotland or Ireland, compared to Homer and Shakespeare, thanks to the alleged discovery of his poems in Scotland . His legends chase in Ireland, Isle of Man and Scotland, but his popularity only grew in the mid-1700s when James MacPherson wrote “The Songs of Ossian” claiming to have found his manuscripts and fragments in the Scottish Highlands, among them a epic poem about Fingal, the father, who said he had “simply” translated, actually inventing: the ossianic fashion flared up throughout Europe giving life to Romanticism. continua

According to this Scottish version, Oisin borned by Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) and a mortal woman, but previously Finn had been the lover of a fairy that he had abandoned to marry the daughter of men; so the fairy for revenge made the spell of the “Fath Fith” on the human bride turning her into a hind that went away and shortly thereafter gave birth to Oisin (the little fawn) on the island of Sandray (Outer Hebrides) in the Loch-nan-ceall in Arasaig.
Now we must make a leap of time and resume the story at the time of Ossian’s childhood when he returned to live with his father and the rest of the Fianna. One fine day, as usual, the are a-chasing a majestic deer on the mountain, when a magical mist descended over them, causing them to separate and disperse.
So Ossian wandered without knowing where he was and found himself in a deep green valley surrounded by high blue mountains, when he saw a fawn so beautiful and graceful that he remained admired to look at her. But when the spirit of the hunt took over in him and he was about to hurl the spear, she turned to look him straight in his eye and said “Do not hurt me, Ossian,I am thy mother under the “fīth-fāth,” in the form of a hind abroad and in the form of a woman at home. Thou art hungry and thirsty and weary. Come thou home with me, thou fawn of my heart “And Ossian followed her and passed a door in the rock and as soon as they crossed the threshold, the door disappeared and while the hind changed into a beautiful woman dressed in green and with golden hair.
After feasting on his fill, refreshed by drinks and music and having rested for three days, Ossian wanted to return to his Fianna, so he discovered that the three days in the mound under the hill, was equivalent to three years on earth. Ossian then wrote his first song to warn the mother-hind to stay away from the hunting grounds of the Fianna: ‘Sanas Oisein D’a Mhathair (Ossian’s To-To-His-Mother) of which Carmicheal reports a dozen stanzas

Stanilaus Soutten Longley (1894-1966)-Autumn

third part 

LINK
“I misteri del druidismo” di Brenda Cathbad Myers
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/beltane-love-chase/
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2014.htm
http://www.annwnfoundation.com/ians-blog/pwyll-pen-annwn-shapeshifting-and-the-fith-fath
http://www.devanavision.it/filodiretto/default.asp?id_pannello=2&id_news=6950&t=IL_DRUIDISMO
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59312
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/print.php?sid=252

STREETS OF DERRY

Gli studiosi datano l’origine della ballata tra il 1817 e il 1830, collegandola con “The Maid Freed from the Gallows” ma anche con la ballata di Geordie; più in generale “Streets of Deyy” si inserisce nel filone delle “ballate del patibolo“: il protagonista viene salvato dalla forca da un perdono giunto all’ultimo momento portato dalla fidanzata che arriva al galoppo su uno stremato cavallo.


Alcune versioni chiamano l’eroina Ann O’Neill e la maggior parte indicano  la città di Derry come il luogo in cui sta per avvenire l’impiccagione; in alcune compare anche un sacerdote pronto ad accogliere la confessione del condannato (e a ritardare l’esecuzione).
Eleanor R. Long (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada) nel suo saggio “Derry Gaol From Formula to Narrative Theme in International Popular Tradition” analizza 27 versioni della ballata e le classifica in 5 filoni. Così osserva la Long “Certain aspects of the ballad’s narrative, however, are timeless in their reflection of Irish history and culture. The public execution of Irish patriots was a familiar phenomenon throughout the period of British occupation, and history as well as ballad-literature reports the ubiquity of sorrowing relatives at the execution site, requests for appropriate religious rites for the dying, and desperate, not infrequently successful appeals for last-minute pardons f or political offenders. But during the time-period under consideration (1817-1830), two specific historical events occurred which corroborate the circumstances described in Laws L 11 without localizing those circumstances in northern Ireland: the Catholic clergy developed an exceptionally militant attitude toward the denial of freedom of conscience to prisoners in British penitentiaries, and in the summer of 1821 King George IV became the first English monarch to set foot on Irish soil since the Reformation, winning by that gesture a degree of popularity among the Irish people that was as unprecedented as it was temporary.” (vedi)

ASCOLTA su Spotify  Bothy Band (voce Triona Ni Dhomhnaill)  in “Out of the Wind, Into the Sun”, 1977 (testo qui)
ASCOLTA su Spotify  Peter Bellamy in “Both Sides Then”, 1979
ASCOLTA Oisin in Winds of Change”, 1989

ASCOLTA Cara Dillon & Paul Brady


I
After morning there comes an evening
And after the evening another day.
And after false love there comes a true love;
I’ll have you listen now to what I say.
II
My love he is as fine a young man
As fair as any the sun shone on.
But how to save him I do not know it,
For now he’s got a sentence to be hung.
III
As he was a-marching through the streets of Derry,
I’m sure he marched up right manfully,
Being much more like a commanding officer
Than a man to die upon a gallows tree.
IV
But the very first step he did put on that ladder,
His bloomin’ colour began to fail
And with heavy sighin’ and bitter cryin’,
“Is there no releasement from Derry Gaol?
V
And the very next step he did put on that ladder,
His lovin’ clergyman was standing by,
Cryin’, “Stand you back, you false prosecutors,
For I’ll make you see that he may not die.”
VI
“Yes, I’ll make you see that you may not hang him
Until his confession to me is done,
And then you’ll see that you may not hang him
‘Til within ten minutes of the setting sun.
VII
“What keeps my love, she’s so long a-coming?
Oh, what detains her so long from me?
Or does the think it’s a shame or scandal
To see me die on the gallows tree?”
VIII
He looked around and he saw her coming,
And she was dressed all in woollen fine
The weary steed that my love was riding
It flew more swifftly than the wind
IX
Come down, come down from that cruel gallows
I’ve got your pardon from the king
And I’ll let them see that they dare not hang you
And I’ll crown my love with a bunch of green 
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Dopo il mattino viene la sera
e dopo la sera un altro giorno
così dopo un falso innamorato arriva il vero amore,
ascoltate bene cosa vi dico
II
Il mio amore è un bel giovanotto
bello come pochi sotto il sole, ma come fare per salvarlo non so, perchè è stato condannato all’impiccagione
III
Mentre camminava per le strade di Derry (1)
di certo marciava spavaldo
molto più simile a un comandante
che a un condannato sul punto di morire sulla forca
IV
Ma al primo passo che mise su quella scaletta
il suo colorito iniziò a spegnersi
e con profondi sospiri gridò amaramente “Non c’è il perdono dal carcere di Derry?”
V
E il secondo passo che mise su quella scaletta il suo caro sacerdote (2) gli stava accanto
gridando “State indietro, falso pubblico ministero,
che vi mostrerò perchù lui non può morire!
VI
Si, vi mostrerò che non potete
impiccarlo

finchè non mi ha rilasciato la sua confessione, e così vedete che non potete impiccarlo
fino a quando mancheranno 10 minuti al tramonto”
VII
Cosa trattiene il mio amore che ci mette tanto a venire?
Che cosa la tiene così lontana da me?
Crede forse che sia una vergogna o uno scandalo
vedermi morire sulla forca?

VIII
Si guardò intorno e la vide
arrivare
ed era vestita di un bel panno
il destriero affaticato che il [suo] amore cavalcava
volava più veloce del vento.
IX
Scendi, scendi da quella forca crudele
ho ottenuto il perdono dal Re (3)
farò loro vedere che non oseranno impiccarti
e incoronerò il mio amore con una ghirlanda verde (4)”

NOTE
1) il riferimento alle strade di Derry o alla prigione di Derry appare nelle varianti della ballata solo a partire dal 1830
2) il tema del sacerdote che cerca di ottenere tempo sul patibolo è sostituito in altre versioni dalla richiesta di conforto rivolta ai congiunti ad esempio i Bothy Band
His beloved father was standing by
“Come here, come near, my beloved father
And speak one word to me before I die”
3) nella versione di Bellamy è “the Queen” in altre versioni la grazia arriva “dal Re e dalla Regina”
4) nella versione dei Bothy Band diventa un “a laurel leaf”, Al O’Donnell canta invece “…with a bunch of bloom”.

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/95a-derry-gaol-or-the-streets-of-derry-bronson.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/derry-gaol-from-formula-to-narrative-theme.aspx
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53736&lang=it
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/thestreetsofderry.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/bothyband/streets.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3780

THE RAMBLING SOLDIER/SAILOR

Il galante soldato (o marinaio) che gira per mari e monti alla ricerca di fanciulle da corteggiare è un topico delle ballate del 700-800, questa in particolare ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides.
Secondo Sam Henry questa canzone è stata modellata sull’irlandese The Suiler Rambling (il mendicante vagabondo), – un genere che deve molto alla ballata scozzese The Gaberlunzieman.
Durante il folk revival e la contestazione giovanile degli anni 60-70 questa tipologia di canti popolari era molto diffusa nei folk-club, ma in origine  il canto doveva trattarsi di una parodia ovvero erano le vanterie di un borioso sergente reclutatore convinto di essere un grande seduttore! (vedi)
Recruiting_party-

Per apprezzare la melodia nello stile d’epoca (probabilmente Tudor) e in versione tradizionale ecco l’arrangiamento dei Swain’s Gold

ASCOLTA Oisin


I
I am a soldier, blythe and gay,
That’s rambled for promotion.
I’ve laid the French and Spaniards low;
many miles I’ve crossed the ocean.
I’ve travelled England and Ireland, too,
I’ve travelled bonny Scotland through,
And many’s the pretty maid I’ve cause for to woo
I’m a bold and a rambling soldier (2)
II
When I was young and in me prime,
Twelve years I went recruiting
Through England, Ireland, Scotland and Spain,
Where’er there was no shooting
With a lady gay and a pleasant life
In every town, a different wife
Seldom was there any strife
For the bold and the rambling soldier
III
In Aldershot I courted by day
A daughter and her mother
And all the time that I was there
They were jealous of eachother
My orders came and I had to part
I left poor Jane with a broken heart
From Aldershot I soon did part
I’m a bold and a rambling soldier
IV
Well now the King has commanded me
To raise the country over
From Aldershot to Patrick town
And from Plymouth and back to Dover
Whatsoever town that I went
To court the damsels I was bent
To marry none was my intent
I’m a bold and a rambling soldier
V
And now the wars are at an end,
I’m not ashamed to mention
The king has given me my discharge,
And granted me a pension.
No doubt some lasses will me blame,
But none of them can tell my name
And if you want to know the same
It’s Jack the rambling soldier
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un soldato bello e allegro
che è in giro per far carriera,
ho attraversato (1) il mare di Francia e Spagna
per miglia ho oltrepassato l’oceano
ho viaggiato anche in Inghilterra e Irlanda
ho viaggiato per la bella Scozia
se ho fatto rammaricare più di qualche ragazza,
io sono un ardito soldato vagabondo (2)
II
Quando ero giovane
e inesperto
a 12 anni mi arruolai
per Inghilterra, Irlanda, Scozia
e Spagna
ovunque non ci fosse da sparare
con una donnina allegra e una bella vita,
in ogni città una moglie diversa
e talvolta c’erano delle lotte
per l’ardito soldato
vagabondo
III
A Aldershot (3) corteggiai di giorno
madre e figlia
e per tutto il tempo che fui là
erano gelose una dell’altra.
Gli ordini arrivarono e io dovetti partire,
lasciai la povera Jane con il cuore spezzato
e da Aldershot tosto partii
sono un ardito soldato vagabondo
IV
Beh ora il re mi ha comandato
di andare a fare reclute per il paese (4)
da Aldershot a Patrick town (5),
e da Plymouth (6) e di ritorno a Dover (7)
e in ogni città dove andavo
ero incline a sedurre tutte le fanciulle, senza avere intenzione di sposarne nessuna,
sono un ardito soldato vagabondo
V
E ora le guerre sono finite,
non ho timore di dire
che il re mi ha dato il congedo
e garantito una pensione.
Senz’altro qualche ragazza mi biasimerà
ma nessuna di loro saprà dire il mio nome (8)
e se vuoi sapere chi sono
chiamami Jack il soldato vagabondo

NOTE
1) la scelta del termine è allusiva infatti “get laid” significa fare sesso
2) si potrebbe tradurre come “soldato di ventura” ma sarebbe un termine improprio perchè il soldato in questione non era propriamente un mercenario, forse un compromesso potrebbe essere “soldato avventuriero”
3) Aldershot nell’Hampshire è detta “Home of the British Army”, da quando nel 1854 fu dondata l’Aldershot Garrison, cittadella militare e campo di addestramento permanente dell’esercito britannico.
4) La frase è un po’ ambigua, potrebbe anche voler dire che il re lo aveva incaricato di girare per il paese a sedurre le giovani fanciulle. L’assunto è che trattandosi di un bel esemplare di soldato, è stato incaricato, come uno stallone da monta, a ingravidare le fanciulle del regno.
5) Downpatrick nell’Irlanda del Nord è il luogo in cui si ritiene siano sepolte le spoglie di San Patrizio
6) Plymouth è una grande città portuale del Devon (Inghilterra sud-ovest)
7) Dover è il punto più orientale della Manica , famosa per le sue bianche scogliere
8) per attribuirgli l’addebito di paternità!!

RAMBLING SOLDIER BY JOHN TAMS

Una versione ridotta della canzone è ripresa nella colonna Sonora della serie tv Sharpe e quindi ambientata al tempo delle guerre napoleoniche.
ASCOLTA John Tams & Barry Coope 1996


I
I am a soldier, I will say,
That rambles for promotion.
I’ve laid the French and Spaniards low
Some miles across the ocean.
So now me jolly boys, I’ll bid you all adieu:
No more to the wars will I go with you;
But I’ll ramble the country through and through…
And I’ll be a rambling soldier.
II
The king he has commanded me
To range this country over.
From Woolwich up to Liverpool,
From Plymouth back to Dover.
A courtin’ all the girls, both old and young
With me ramrod in me hand, and me flattery tongue;
To court them all, but marry none…
And I’ll be a rambling soldier.
III
And when these wars are at an end,
I’m not afraid to mention.
The King will give me my discharge,
A guinea and a pension.
No doubt some lasses will me blame,
But none of them will know my name:
And if you want to know the same…
It’s – the rambling soldier!
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un soldato, vi dirò,
che è in giro per far carriera,
ho attraversato (1) il mare di Francia e Spagna
per miglia ho oltrepassato l’oceano
così ora, miei allegri compagni, vi dirò addio:
non andrò più in guerra
con voi
ma girerò il paese in lungo
e in largo
e sarò un soldato vagabondo
II
Il re mi ha comandato
di vagabondare per il paese (4)
da Woolwich (9) a Liverpool,
e da Plymouth (6) e di ritorno a Dover,
a sedurre tutte le fanciulle, vecchie (10) e giovani,
con la pertica in mano e la mia parlantina
per corteggiarle tutte ma non sposarne nessuna, e sarò un soldato vagabondo
V

E quando le guerre saranno alla fine,
non ho timore di dire
che il re mi darà il congedo
una ghinea e una pensione.
Senz’altro qualche ragazza mi biasimerà
ma nessuna di loro saprà dire il mio nome (8)
e se vuoi sapere chi sono
chiamami  il soldato vagabondo

NOTE
9) Woolwich quartiere sud-est di Londra fu sede dal 1806 al 1939 dell’Accademia Militare per Ufficiali
10) riferito alle zitelle,  un tempo una ragazza che aveva superato i 20 anni senza aver trovato un fidanzato si stava avviando sulla buona strada per passare il resto della sua vita da zitella

continua seconda parte 

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arthur-mcbride.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108324
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/rambling.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ramblingsailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=134274

OSSIAN’S LAMENT

Ossian’s Lament, anche conosciuta come “Cumhadh Fhinn“, “Ossian’s Lament for his Father“, “Oisin’s Lament” è una melodia antica con cui si dice Ossian abbia accompagnato i suoi canti.
Ossian è un bardo leggendario dell’antica Scozia o Irlanda, paragonato ad Omero e a Shakespeare, grazie al presunto ritrovamento dei suoi poemi in Scozia. Le sue leggende si rincorrono in Irlanda, Isola di Man e Scozia, ma la sua popolarità crebbe solo nella metà del 1700 quando James MacPherson scrisse “I Canti di Ossian” affermando di aver ritrovato suoi manoscritti e frammenti nelle Highlands scozzesi, tra i quali un poema epico su Fingal, il padre, che disse di aver “semplicemente” tradotto, in realtà inventando di sana pianta: la moda ossianica divampò per tutta Europa dando vita al Romanticismo.

Ossian Singing, Nicolai Abildgaard, 1787 (by Wiki)

OISIN DEI FIANNA

Gli studiosi identificano Ossian con l’Oisin (pronunciato Osciin) guerriero dei Fianna, che visse in Irlanda secondo alcuni nel VII secolo a.C. e secondo altri nel II o IV secolo, di cui si narrano molte leggende. Suo padre era Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) il più famoso degli eroi irlandesi e sua madre nientemeno che la dea Sadb (Sava). Tuttavia un racconto scozzese riportato da Alexander Carmicheal nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900) ci racconta invece che la fata era l’amante tradita avendo Finn preferito sposare ua donna della terra degli uomini (continua).
Oisin Mac Finn fu un guerriero-poeta, amante delle belle donne. Dalla sua moglie terrena Eobhir dai capelli di lino ebbe Oscar, un prode guerriero, l’ultimo comandante dei Fianna o Feniani e dalla compagna divina Niamh una figlia, Plur na mBan (il fiore delle donne), la fanciulla di Beltane.

Oisin a caccia incontra Niamh sul suo bianco cavallo

La bella Niamh dai Capelli d’Oro figlia di Manannan ovvero il dio del Mare lo portò sulla sua Isola di Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza), insieme vissero trecento anni che a Oisin parvero solo pochi giorni (vedi); quando ebbe il desiderio di ritornare a visitare la sua terra Niamh gli donò un cavallo, il quale magicamente lo avrebbe riportato sulla terra: ma il padre era morto da centinaia d’anni, le grandi fortezze dei Fianna erano in rovina e i luoghi che lui ricordava erano cambiati. Amareggiato, sulla via del ritorno, Oisin cadde di sella e divenne improvvisamente vecchio: i tre anni trascorsi nell’AltroMondo corrispondevano a trecento anni sulla terra!
Secondo una versione della storia Oisin non morì ma sopravvisse magicamente fino all’arrivo in Irlanda di San Patrizio, al quale ebbe modo di narrare le gesta dei Fianna, guerrieri e cacciatori della mitologia irlandese.

IL CICLO FENNIANO

Questi racconti mitologici dell’antica Irlanda vengono anche chiamati “Ciclo Ossianico” perchè si ritenne fossero stati in buona parte scritti da Ossian. Iniziano con l’ascesa di Fionn, il Biondo a capo dei Fianna e si concludono con la sua morte. (e se volete sapere perchè Fionn sia stato soprannominato il Bianco ecco un’altro racconto su in incontro fatato con la Cailleach Biorar  sullo Slieve Gullion !
I fianna furono una milizia che conduceva incursioni guerresche per proprio conto, ma non necessariamente erano dei fuorilegge o predoni. Si trattava spesso di uomini espulsi dal clan di appartenenza, figli di re in contrasto con i padri, individui che volevano vendicare torti privati facendosi giustizia da soli, occasionalmente potevano diventare una milizia al servizio dei diversi re d’Irlanda, per i quali raccoglievano le imposte, ristabilivano l’ordine in caso di necessità, difendevano il regno dalle incursioni dei nemici.
Per essere ammesso nel gruppo ogni candidato doveva superare prove di resistenza e di agilità, ma doveva anche dimostrare di conoscere la poesia e quindi la magia e la sapienza.
I Fenniani vennero annientati dal re supremo Cairbre Mac Cormac “Lifechair” nella battaglia di Gabhra (Cat Gabhra) in cui Caibre venne ucciso da Oscar il quale morì anch’egli poco dopo per le ferite riportate.

Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto
Manifattura di Giovanni Volpato (Roma, 1785-1803) Galata morente, 1786-1789 biscuit, Collezione privata © Foto Giuseppe Schiavinotto

L’intero ciclo presenta molte analogie con il ciclo britannico di re Artù e molto probabilmente le leggende di Finn e di Artù derivano entrambe dalla comune tradizione celtica insulare di una confraternita di cacciatori-guerrieri guidati da un formidabile capo che difendeva il reame contro le incursioni provenienti dall’esterno.

il mio amore è figlio della collina. Insegue il cervo che fugge
i suoi cani grigi ansimano intorno a lui; la corda del suo arco risuona nella foresta. (frammento Ossian)

La melodia è stata abbinata ad un testo in gaelico scozzese all’epoca delle “Highland clearances” (1750 -1880) con il titolo “Ó mo dhùthaich“: il brano contenuto nel “Folksongs and Folklore of South Uist”, 1955 è stato raccolto nell’isola di South Uist (isole Ebridi) da Margaret Fay Shawe scritto originariamente da un nativo isolano, Allan MacPhee di Loch Carnan.

Se avete un po’ di tempo per guardatevi questo reportage dall’isola..

LA MELODIA: Oran an Fheidh

“The air, according to Neil (1991), is thought to be the original melody popular in Lochaber and environs as “Oran an Fheidh” (Song of the Deer). It commemorates the legendary warrior Fingal, Ossian’s father, a brave and shrewd Highland warrior chieftain who was “a faithful friend but an awesome and unforgiving foe as was illustrated when he showed no mercy towards his nephew Diarmid, who had eloped with his beautiful Queen Grainne.” O’Neill (1913) is of the opinion that this ancient lament “makes no appeal to modern ears” and points out that old laments as a genre display much diversity in composition. Paul de Grae finds O’Neill’s air to be a near-duplicate of “Cumhadh Fion: Ossian’s Lament for his Father,” printed in The Scottish Gael, vol. 2 (London, 1831), by James Logan. ” (tratto da qui)
Secondo la leggenda Fionn non è morto realmente, ma dorme in una caverna in attesa di essere richiamato.

ASCOLTA David Tomlinson &Kate Liddell

ASCOLTA William Jackson

Ó MO DHÙTHAICH

Ascoltiamo tutto il brano nella versione del gruppo scozzese Capercaillie (registrato in

I
Ó mo dhùthaich, ‘s tu th’air m’aire,
Uibhist chùmhraidh ùr nan gallan,
Far a faighte na daoin’ uaisle,
Far ‘m bu dual do Mhac ‘ic Ailein.
II
Tìr a’ mhurain, tìr an eòrna,
Tìr ‘s am pailt a h-uile seòrsa,
Far am bi na gillean òga
Gabhail òran ‘s ‘g òl an leanna.
III
Thig iad ugainn, carach, seòlta,
Gus ar mealladh far ar n-eòlais;
Molaidh iad dhuinn Manitòba,
Dùthaich fhuar gun ghual, gun mhòine.
IV
Cha ruig mi leas a bhith ‘ga innse,
Nuair a ruigear, ‘s ann a chìtear,
Samhradh goirid, foghar sìtheil,
Geamhradh fada na droch-shìde.
V
Nam biodh agam fhìn do stòras,
Dà dheis aodaich, paidhir bhrògan,
Agus m’fharadh bhith ‘nam phòca,
‘S ann air Uibhist dheanainn seòladh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I
Oh my country, of thee I am thinking,
Fragrant fresh Uist of the handsome youths(1),
Where may be seen young noblemen,
Where once was the heritage of Clanranald(2).
II
Land of bent grass, land of barley,
Land of all things in plenty,
Where there are young men and youths,
A place of songs and drinking ale.
III
They come to us, cunning and deceitful,
From our homes they would entice us;
To us they praise Manitoba(3),
A cold country without coal or peat.
IV
To tell you of it I need not trouble,
For when one arrives it may be seen,
A short summer, a peaceful autumn,
And a long winter of bad weather.
V
If I was in possession of the wealth,
Of two suits of clothes and a pair of shoes,
And if the fare was in my pocket,
Then for Uist I would be sailing.(4)
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Isola mia a te penso
fragrante e fresca Uist della giovinezza(1)
dove si trova la giovane nobiltà
che un tempo fu fedele al Clanranald(2)
II
Terra di erba frusciante, terra d’orzo,
terra ricca di ogni cosa
dove ci sono uomini giovani
e nobili
un posto di canzoni e bevute.
III
Vennero da noi, con l’astuzia e l’inganno
dalle nostre case ci illusero
e ci lodarono Manitoba(3) un paese freddo, senza carbone o torba
IV
Per raccontarti di ciò, non ho bisogno di darmi tanta pena, perchè quando si arriva si può  vedere una breve estate, un autunno tranquillo e un lungo inverno di maltempo
V
Se fossi ricco e avessi due vestiti eleganti e un paio di scarpe
e cibo nelle mie tasche
allora per Uist vorrei salpare(4).

NOTE
1) nel ricordo l’isola diventa Tír na nÓg (l’Altro Mondo, la Terra dell’Eterna Giovinezza) continua
2) Clan Ranald è un ramo del Clan Donald, uno dei clan scozzesi più numeroso ed articolato in numerose suddivisioni.
3) Manitoba è una provincia del Canada occidentale, nelle Praterie canadesi.
4) evidentemente il signor Allan MacPhee riuscì a ritornare nella sua amata isola e morì a Loch Caman

FONTI
https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Fingal_poema_epico_di_Ossian/Ossian_(Giacomo_Macpherson)
http://www.cima-asso.it/2009/10/i-canti-di-ossian/
http://www.timelessmyths.com/celtic/ossian.html
https://sites.google.com/site/finscealtanaheireann/home/introduction-oisin
http://guide.supereva.it/musica_celtica_/interventi/2003/12/146119.shtml
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Cumhadh_Fhinn
http://www.ceolsean.net/content/CeolMead/Book01/Book01%208.pdf
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/farewell-to-fiunary/ http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ohmodhuthaich.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/omodhuthaich.asp
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/o_mo_dhuthaich_s_tu_th_air_m_aire/
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/1004/cd04_04.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/38295/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/person/4814

L’incantesimo del cervo

Read the post in English

THE  BELTANE CHASE SONG

Il testo è stato scritto da Paul Huson nel suo “Mastering   Witchcraft“- 1970 (pubblicato in lingua italiana dalla casa editrice Astrolabio con  l’infelice titolo Il dominio della magia nera) ispirandosi alla ballata scozzese “The Twa  Magicians”: Fith Fath è un’incantesimo di occultamento o di trasmutazione.
Caitlin Matthews nel 1978 ci aggiunse una melodia. Oggi il brano è considerato un tradizionale.

Nel testo si compie il ciclo stagionale delle trasmutazioni. Il rituale della Caccia d’Amore che doveva essere tipico a Beltane quando la Regina del Maggio ossia la Dea Fanciulla e il Re del Maggio, l’Uomo Verde si univano per  rinnovare la vita e la fertilità della Terra: ancora nel Medioveo i ragazzi vestiti di verde come elfi dei boschi si avventuravano nel greenwood (il bosco sacro), suonando un corno di modo che le ragazze potessero trovarli. Oppure si trasformavano in cacciatori e seguivano le trasmutazioni magiche con le loro prede.

Beltane Fire Festival: L’Uomo Verde e la Regina del Maggio

Caitlin Matthews 
Damh The Bard in Herne’s Apprentice – 2003

Pixi Morgan

FITH FATH SONG
I
I shall go as a wren(1) in Spring
With sorrow and sighing on silent wing(2)
CHORUS I
I shall go in our Lady’s name
Aye till I come home again
II
Then we shall follow as falcons grey
And hunt thee cruelly for our prey
CHORUS II
And we shall go in our Horned God’s name(3)
Aye to fetch thee home again
III
Then I shall go as a mouse in May
Through fields by night and in cellars by day.
CHORUS I
IV
Then we shall follow as black tom cats
And hunt thee through the fields and the vats.
CHORUS II
V
Then I shall go as an Autumn hare
With sorrow and sighing and mickle care. (4)
CHORUS I
VI
Then we shall follow as swift greyhounds/ And dog thy steps with leaps and bounds
CHORUS II
VII
Then I shall go as a Winter trout
With sorrow and sighing and mickle doubt.
CHORUS I
VIII
Then we shall follow as otters swift
And bind thee fast so thou cans’t shift
CHORUS II
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Uno scricciolo  di primavera cavalcherò
con dolore e affanno sull’ali silenti
Coro I
Mi trasformerò nel nome di nostra Signora, finchè ritornerò in me.
II
Così t’inseguiremo come falchi grigi
e ti cacceremo spietati come  nostra preda
Coro II
E ci trasformeremo  nel nome del Signore Cornuto per riportarti a casa.
III
Mi trasformerò in un topo di Maggio, per i campi di notte e nelle cantine di giorno.
Coro I
IV
Allora ci trasformeremo in grossi gatti neri, e ti daremo la caccia per i campi e le botti.
Coro II
V
Poi mi trasformerò in lepre d’autunno
con dolore e affanno e grande tribolazione.
Coro I
VI
Allora ci trasformeremo in rapidi levrieri e inseguiremo
le tue orme con grandi balzi.
Coro II
VII
Poi mi trasformerò in  trota d’Inverno
con dolore e affanno e grande tribolazione.
Coro I
VIII
Allora ci trasformeremo in lontre veloci e t’incateneremo bene in modo che tu non possa mutare.
Coro II

NOTE
1) Il nome gaelico “Druidh dhubh” si traduce come “druido degli uccelli” detto anche “passero di Bran” (il dio della profezia). Animale sacro la cui uccisione era considerata tabù e portatrice di sventura, ma non durante il tempo di Yule. Nel suo libro “La dea bianca”, Robert Graves spiega che nella tradizione celtica, la lotta tra le due parti dell’anno, è rappresentata dalla lotta tra il re-agrifoglio (o vischio), che rappresenta l’anno nascente e il re-quercia, che rappresenta l’anno morente. Al solstizio d’inverno il re-agrifoglio vince sul re-quercia, e viceversa per il solstizio d’estate. Nella tradizione orale, una variante di questa lotta è rappresentata dal pettirosso e lo scricciolo, nascosti tra le foglie dei due rispettivi alberi. Lo scricciolo rappresenta l’anno calante, il pettirosso l’anno nuovo e la morte dello scricciolo è un passaggio di morte-rinascita. continua
2) il mistero non può essere rivelato a parole: il percorso iniziatico viene compiuto e una volta compreso non si riesce ad esprimere.
3)  l’Horned God è un dio sincretico somma di antiche divinità rappresentate con le corna e simboli di fertilità e abbondanza (il Cernunnos celtico e le divinità greco-romane Pan e Dioniso). Secondo alcuni studiosi tale divinità era l’alternativa pagana del Dio cristiano, al quale coloro che restarono ancorati alle vecchie tradizioni continuarono a tributare venerazione, insomma il candidato ideale per la figura del Diavolo! Ma a mio parere è stato più il fanatismo cristiano ad appiattire e uniformare i culti tributati agli antichi dei in un unico culto diabolico.
L’idea del Dio Cornuto si sviluppò nei circoli  occultistici di Francia e Inghilterra nel XIX secolo e la sua prima raffigurazione moderna è quella di Eliphas Levi del 1855, fu però Margaret Murray nel The Witch-cult in Western Europe (Il culto delle streghe nell’Europa Occidentale, 1921) a costruire la tesi di un culto pagano unico sopravvissuto all’avvento del cristianesimo. Tale teoria non è però supportata da documentazioni  rigorose e di certo si può riscontrare la persistenza fino all’età moderna di culti o credenze presenti in varie parti d’Europa riconducibili alla religione verso gli Antichi Dei. Molte di tali credenze sono state assorbite nel Cristianesimo e infine combattute come diaboliche quando non si riusciva ad inglobarle nei nuovi culti.
Il Dio, secondo la tradizione Wicca, nasce al solstizio d’Inverno, sposa la Dea a Beltane e muore al Solstizio d’Estate essendo il principio maschile equivalente alla triplice Dea lunare che governa la vita e la morte.

65440797_zernunn4

4) Similmente Isobel Gowdie, processata per stregoneria nel 1662 in Scozia rivela ai suoi aguzzini la formula di un Fith Fath

I sall gae intil a haire,
Wi’ sorrow and sych and meikle care;
And I sall gae in the Devillis name,
Ay quhill I com hom againe.
in lepre entrerò
con dolore e grande affanno
e andrò nel nome del diavolo
finchè ritornerò un’altra volta nella mia forma

Molto è stato scritto sulle streghe, specialmente sulla grande caccia alle streghe che ebbe luogo sui due versanti della religione cristiana a un passo dal “Secolo dei Lumi” e non nell’oscuro medioevo.  Sintomo di un  cambiamento culturale che scuoterà le “certezze” della religione occidentale.  Streghe o fattucchiere (come stregoni e maghi) sono sempre esistiti, sono coloro che fanno uso della magia, che riescono a vedere oltre agli accidenti materiali e intraprendono un cammino di ricerca e di antica conoscenza. Turpe e osceno è stato quello che cattolici e protestanti hanno fatto nella loro “lotta” per il potere, per annientare coloro che erano visti come una minaccia contro la Vera Fede: una sanguinosa lotta di religione che ha inasprito i confini della tolleranza.

L’INCANTESIMO DEL CERVO

Il Fith Fath è un’incantesimo di occultamento o di trasmutazione. E’ riportato e descritto nel libro “Carmina Gadelica” di Alexander Carmicheal (vol II, 1900)
“Uomini e donne venivano resi invisibili o gli uomini venivano trasformati in cavalli, tori o cervi, mentre le donne venivano mutate in gatti, lepri o cerve. Queste trasformazioni erano talvolta volontarie, talvolta no. Il “fīth-fath” era particolarmente utile ai cacciatori, ai guerrieri ed ai viaggiatori, rendendoli invisibili o irriconoscibili ai nemici ed agli animali.” (traduzione del testo tratto da qui)

FATH fith
Ni mi ort,
Le Muire na frithe,
Le Bride na brot,
Bho chire, bho ruta,
Bho mhise, bho bhoc,
Bho shionn, ‘s bho mhac-tire,
Bho chrain, ‘s bho thorc,
Bho chu, ‘s bho chat,
Bho mhaghan masaich,
Bho chu fasaich,
Bho scan (4) foirir,
Bho bho, bho mharc,
Bho tharbh, bho earc,
Bho mhurn, bho mhac,
Bho iantaidh an adhar,
Bho shnagaidh na talmha,
Bho iasgaidh na mara,
‘S bho shiantaidh na gailbhe

Traduzione inglese*
FATH fith(1)
Will I make on thee,
By Mary(2) of the augury,
By Bride(3) of the corslet,
From sheep, from ram,
From goat, from buck,
From fox, from wolf,
From sow, from boar,
From dog, from cat,
From hipped-bear,
From wilderness-dog,
From watchful ‘scan,'(4)
From cow, from horse,
From bull, from heifer,
From daughter, from son,
From the birds of the air, (5)
From the creeping things of the earth,
From the fishes of the sea,
From the imps of the storm.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
L’incanto del cervo
farò su di te
per Danu delle Profezie
per Bride dalla Corazza,
da pecora, da ariete,
da capra, da caprone,
da volpe, da lupo,
da scrofa, da cinghiale,
da cane, da gatto,
da orso dai fianchi opimi,
da cane selvatico,
da vigile “esploratore‟ ,
da mucca, da cavallo,
da toro, da giovenca,
da figlia, da figlio,
dagli uccelli dell‟aria,
dalle creature che strisciano sulla terra
dai pesci del mare
dai folletti della tempesta

NOTE
* tradotto da Alexander Carmicheal
1) letteralmente si traduce con “deer aspect”; in realtà con l’incantesimo è possibile mutare in una qualunque forma animale.
Il cervo nobile o cervo rosso (red deer) è l’animale per eccellenza dei boschi, preda ambita della caccia, ma anche animale mitologico signore del Bosco e della Rinascita. Per i Celti delle Gallie Cernunnos era il dio della fertilità con palchi di cervo sul capo, l’equivalente animale dello Spirito del Grano. Guida magica, messaggero delle fate o animale psicopompo, il cervo (specie se bianco) è associato alla Grande Madre (e alle dee lunari) ma anche a Lug (l’equivalente celtico di una divinità solare). Come animale di Lugh rappresenta il sole nascente (con le corna che raffigurano i raggi) e così nel Cristianesimo è la rappresentazione di Cristo (o dell’anima che anela a Dio): è il re Cervo ciclicamente sacrificato alla Dea Madre per assicurare la fertilità della terra. “Io sono cervo dai sette palchi” canta il bardo Amergin e così doveva essere vestito il druido-sciamano durante i rituali con corna e pelli di cervo continua
2) Danu (o Anu) dea madre delle acque. Era il tempo del caos primordiale: aridi deserti e vulcani ribollenti, era il tempo del grande vuoto. Allora dal cielo oscuro un rivolo d’acqua cadde sulla terra e la vita cominciò a fiorire: dal suolo crebbe l’albero sacro e Danu (la dea Madre), l’acqua che scende dal cielo, lo nutrì. Dalla loro unione nacquero gli Dei..
Acque ipogeiche, grotte labirintiche, acque sorgive ma anche acque correnti dei fiumi furono i siti del culto preistorico e protostorico in tutta l’Europa. In particolare per i Keltoi Danu era il Danubio presso le cui sorgenti nacque la loro civiltà. continua
3) Il nome deriva dalla radice “breo” (fuoco): il fuoco della fucina del fabbro unito a quello dell’ispirazione artistica e dell’energia guaritrice. Conosciuta anche come Brighid, Brigit o Brigantia, è la dea del triplice fuoco, patrona dei fabbri, dei poeti e dei guaritori. Portava il soprannome di Belisama, la “Splendente” ed era una Dea Solare(presso i Celti e i Germani il Sole era femmina). A lei era dedicata la Festa di Fine Inverno che si celebrava nell’Europa celtica alle Calende di Febbraio. Era la festa di IMBOLC, la festa della purificazione dei campi e della casa a segnare il lento risveglio della Natura. continua
4) nessuno sa che animale sia un vigile esploratore, sicuramente un errore di trascrizione di Carmicheal
5) segue una invocazione dei tre regni, Nem (cielo), Talam (Terra) Muir (mare) e o se vogliamo mondo di sopra, di mezzo e di sotto

LA NEBBIA DI AVALON

Con l’invocazione si materializza una nebbia magica ovvero la nebbia di Avalon (o di Manannan), che funge da mezzo di trasporto verso l’Altromondo. La nebbia ha una duplice natura, di occultamento e di passaggio. Un’altra parola per “nebbia”, nell’irlandese delle origini, è féth fiadha che significa “l’arte di rassomigliare”. Sia gli dei che i druidi possono evocare la nebbia magica come mezzo di comunicazione tra i due mondi. La divinazione era quindi la féth fiadha.
La preghiera “Fath Fith” sembra proprio l’invocazione del cacciatore per occultarsi  dalle sue prede, ma era anche usata come forma di divinazione in un “luogo di soglia” per l’esperienza magica,  dello spazio come ad esempio la riva del fiume o il litorale del mare, il vano di una porta d’accesso all’edificio oppure un ponte. Ma  anche del tempo come l’alba e il tramonto che non sono nè giorno, nè notte o i giorni sacri che stanno a confine tra le stagioni.
Così facendo ci si trova in un luogo che è un non-luogo che alcuni chiamano il mondo opaco.

Il Racconto di Ossian e la Cerva

Ancora Alexander Carmicheal sempre nel capitolo del Fith Fath  racconta l’incontro del fanciullo Oisin (Ossian) con la madre: Ossian è un bardo leggendario dell’antica Scozia o Irlanda, paragonato ad Omero e a Shakespeare, grazie al presunto ritrovamento dei suoi poemi in Scozia. Le sue leggende si rincorrono in Irlanda, Isola di Man e Scozia, ma la sua popolarità crebbe solo nella metà del 1700 quando James MacPherson scrisse “I Canti di Ossian” affermando di aver ritrovato suoi manoscritti e frammenti nelle Highlands scozzesi, tra i quali un poema epico su Fingal, il padre, che disse di aver “semplicemente” tradotto, in realtà inventando di sana pianta: la moda ossianica divampò per tutta Europa dando vita al Romanticismo. continua

Secondo questa verione scozzese Oisin è stato generato da Finn Mac Coll (Fionn Mac Cumhaill) e da una donna mortale, ma precedentemente Finn era stato l’amante di una fata che aveva abbandonato per sposare la figlia degli uomini; così la fata per vendetta fece l’incantesimo del “Fath Fith” sulla donna trasformandola in cerva che andò raminga e poco dopo partorì Oisin (il piccolo cerbiatto)  nell’isola di Sandray  (Ebridi Esterne) nel Loch-nan-ceall ad Arasaig.
Ora dobbiamo fare un salto temporale e riprendere il racconto al tempo della fanciullezza di Ossian quando era ritornato a vivere con il padre e il resto dei Fianna. Un bel giorno intenti come di consueto alla caccia erano all’inseguimento di un maestoso cervo sulla montagna, quando una nebbia magica calò su di loro, facendoli separare e disperdere.
Così Ossian vagava senza più sapere dove fosse e si ritrovò in una profonda valle verde circondata da alte montagne azzurre, quando vide una cerbiatta talmente bella e aggraziata che restò ammirato a guardarla. Ma quando lo spirito della caccia prese il sopravvento in lui e stava per scagliare la lancia, lei si voltò a guardarlo fisso negli occhi e gli disse “Non farmi del male Ossian, sono tua madre sotto l’incantesimo del cervo, e sono cerva fuori e donna in casa. Tu sei affamato, assetato e stanco, vieni con me, cuore mio” E Ossian la seguì e oltrepassarono una porta nella roccia e appena attraversata la soglia la porta scomparve e ci fu solo la perete rocciosa, mentre la cerva si mutò in una bella donna vestita di verde e con i capelli dorati.
Dopo aver banchettato a sazietà, dilettato da bevande e musiche ed essersi riposato per tre giorni, Ossian volle ritornare dai Fianna, così scoprì che i tre giorni nel tumulo sotto la collina, equivalevano a tre anni sulla terra. Allora Ossian scrisse la sua prima canzone per avvertire la madre-cerva di stare lontano dalle zone di caccia dei Fianna  ‘Sanas Oisein D’a Mhathair (Ossian’s Warning To His Mother) di cui Carmicheal riporta una decina di strofe (vedi)

Stanilaus Soutten Longley (1894-1966)-Autumn

terza parte 

FONTI
“I misteri del druidismo” di Brenda Cathbad Myers
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/beltane-love-chase/
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2014.htm
http://www.annwnfoundation.com/ians-blog/pwyll-pen-annwn-shapeshifting-and-the-fith-fath
http://www.devanavision.it/filodiretto/default.asp?id_pannello=2&id_news=6950&t=IL_DRUIDISMO
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59312
http://www.ynis-afallach-tuath.com/public/print.php?sid=252

THE BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN

Il testo è conosciuto  come “The Young Horseman” oppure “The Bonny Light Horseman” ovvero “Broken Hearted I’ll Wander”; è un lament che risale probabilmente al 1700, non è ben chiaro se sia di origine irlandese (secondo Sam Henry) o inglese (secondo William Barret): di certo si è diffuso come broadside in Irlanda e la sua popolarità è stata tale da essere cantato con due distinte melodie (una propria del Sud Irlanda e l’altra più diffusa nel Nord-Ovest) e in molte varianti testuali.

Mary Ann Carolan sang The Bonny Light Horseman to Roly Brown at home in Hill o’ Rath, Co. Louth in 1978. It was released in 1982 on her Topic album Songs from the Irish Tradition. Sean Corcoran commented in the sleeve notes: This English song was circulated on ballad sheets in Ireland and became quite popular. Versions have been found in Wexford (Stanford-Petrie No. 779), and the P.J. McCall Collection in the National Library in Dublin, in Galway (sung by Sean O Conaire) and in Antrim (Sam Henry, Songs of the People, No. 122). It was sung to two distinct airs—a Southern and a Northern/Western. Mrs Carolan sings the Southern air while the Galway tune is the same as Henry’s version A, although Sean O Conaire sings it in the highly decorated sean-nós style of Connemara. When first recorded in 1970 Mrs. Carolan sang this song in a much faster tempo. (tratto da qui)
[traduzione in italiano: Mary Ann Carolan ha cantato The Bonny Light Horseman a Roly Brown nella sua casa a Hill o’ Rath, contea di Louth nel 1978. La registrazione è stata pubblicata nel 1982 nell’album Songs from the Irish Tradition. Sean Corcoran scriveva nelle note di copertina di quel disco: Questa canzone inglese è stata diffusa su fogli volanti in Irlanda e divenne abbastanza popolare. Versioni diverse sono state raccolde a Wexford, nella collezione P.J. McCall conservata presso la Biblioteca Nazionale a Dublino, a Galway (cantata da Sen O Conaire) e ad Antrim (Sam Henry, Songs of the People, No. 122). Era cantata su due arie diverse, una diffusa nel sud e una nel nord ovest. Mrs Carolan canta l’aria del sud, mentre la melodia raccolta a Galway è la stessa della versione A di Henry, anche se Sean O Connaire la canta nello stile pieno di abbellimenti tipico del Connemara. Nella prima registrazione del 1970 Mrs Carolan cantava questa canzone con un ritmo molto più veloce. (tratto da qui)]

Per un sintetico raffronto delle diverse melodie qui

ASCOLTA Mary-Ann Carolan, in Songs from the Irish Tradition 1982 (dalla registrazione sul campo del 1978) sebbene  la signora Carolan sia di origini Nord-irlandesi la sua  versione melodica è più simile  a quella diffusa nel sud.


I
When Bonaparte(1),
commanded his troops for to stand
and planted  his cannons
all over the land;
he planted his cannons,
the whole victory to gain,
And they killed my light horseman(2)
returning from Spain.
CHORUS
Broken-hearted I wander
for the loss of my lover,
He’s my bonny light horseman,
in the wars he was slain
II
If you saw my love on sentry(3)
on a cold winter’s day,
With his red rosy cheeks
and his flowing brown hair.
all mounted on horseback,
the whole victory for to gain,
And he’s over the battlefield
great honours to gain.
III
If I were a blackbird
and had wings to fly
I would fly to the spot
where my true love does lie
And with me little fluttering wings
his wounds I would heal
And ’tis all the night
on his breast I would remain.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
I
Quando Bonaparte
comandò alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i sui cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i sui cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
ed essi uccisero il mio bel cavaliere
di ritorno dalla Spagna
CORO
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
Egli è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se aveste visto il mio amore di sentinella
in una notte in pieno inverno
con le sue guance rosee
e i suoi fluenti capelli scuri
montare in sella al cavallo,
per ottenere la vittoria
è sul campo di battaglia
per guadagnarsi grandi onori
III
Se fossi un merlo
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei fin dove
giace il mio vero amore
e con le mie piccole ali tremanti
le sue ferite guarirei
e per tutta la notte
sul suo petto resterei

NOTE
1) In Irlanda la figura di Napoleone è stata trasfigurata in quella dell’eroe che avrebbe liberato gli Irlandesi dal dominio inglese. Ma la sua leggenda è controversa essendo anche considerato un conquistatore sanguinario sempre pronto a promuovere una campagna di guerra: ed è proprio in questa ottica negativa che  si declina la canzone (vedi)
2) una traduzione più pertinente del termine light horse è cavalleggeri per indicare più genericamente uno squadrone a cavallo: unità denominate variamente come Corazzieri, Dragoni, Lancieri e Ussari si distinguevano principalmente in cavalleria pesante, in linea e leggera. Fu Napoleone a sfruttare al meglio la cavalleria adattandola alle moderne tecniche di guerra (vedi)
3) scritto come sentry= sentinella;  ma anche scritto come Santry è un sobborgo di Dublino, un tempo piccolo villaggio nell’area anticamente denominata Fingal (in inglese “fair-haired foreigner”. ) perchè insediamento di pacifiche comunità di contadini norvegesi che seppero trasformare il fertile terreno in ricchi campi coltivati.

ASCOLTA Oisín & Geraldine MacGowan in Over the Moor to Maggie, 1980. Una versione testuale simile alla precedente e con l’aggiunta di una amara strofa (la stessa versione anche in Kate Rusby)


I
Bonaparte he commanded
His troops for to stand
He planted his cannon
all over the land
He planted his cannon
The whole victory for to gain
And they killed my light horseman
returning from Spain.
CHORUS
Broken-hearted I’ll wander
For the loss of my lover
He’s my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain.
II
If you saw my love in Santry(3)
On a cold winter’s night
With his rosy red cheeks
And his flowing brown hair
All mounted on horseback
The whole victory for to gain
And he’s on the battlefield
Great honours to gain
III
If I were a blackbird
And I had wings to fly
I would fly to the spot where
My true love does lie
And with my little fluttering wings
His wounds I would heal
And all the night long
On his breast I would lie
IV
Oh Boney, Oh Boney
I have caused you no harm
Tell me why, Oh tell me why
You have caused this alarm(1)
We were so happy together
My true love and me
Ah but now you have stretched him
In death o’er the sea
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
I
Bonaparte comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i sui cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i sui cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
ed essi uccisero il mio bel cavaliere
di ritorno dalla Spagna
CORO
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
Egli è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se aveste visto il mio amore a Santry
in una notte in pieno inverno
con le sue guance rosee
e i suoi fluenti capelli scuri
montare in sella al cavallo
per ottenere la vittoria
ed è sul campo di battaglia
per guadagnarsi grandi onori
III
Se fossi un merlo
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei fin dove
giace il mio amore
e con le mie piccole ali tremanti
le sue ferite guarirei
e per tutta la notte
sul suo petto starei
IV
Oh Boney, Oh Boney
io non ti ho fatto del male,
allora dimmi perchè oh dimmi perchè
tu hai suscitato questo allarme?
Eravamo così felici insieme
il mio vero amore ed io,
ma ora lo hai condotto
alla morte oltre il mare

QUALE GUERRA D’EGITTO?

Un bel e giovane irlandese/inglese arruolato nei cavalleggeri, muore in battaglia ed è compianto dalla sua innamorata.  Come sempre non è semplice inquadrare storicamente la canzone specialmente se è più probabile che non sia riferita ad una specifica battaglia , ma attualizzata ad una generale guerra napoleonica essendo stato Napoleone Bonaparte un personaggio molto discusso e ammirato, nel bene e nel male.
“Which war is being invoked is difficult to say but the tentative suggestion here is that Bonny Light Horsemanitself is of an eighteenth century vintage.  Regiments of light horse in the British army, deriving from the private regiments raised during the latter part of the seventeenth century and during a considerable part of the eighteenth, do not appear to begin to have been so-named until around 1748 (The Duke of Cumberland’s Light Horse) and after (1759 – Hale’s Light Horse…Burgoyne’s Light Horse).  So, taking the appellation ‘Light Horse’ into account and despite the fact that Britain was engaged in conflict through most of the century in Europe (War of Jenkins’ Ear, 1739), at home (the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745), and in North America (1775-1783, (the American revolutionary war), before the all-embracing French wars, we can discount the War of Austrian Succession (1740-1748) because Britain did not play a major role in a conflict that was, essentially, between the Austrians and the Prussians; and a more likely stimulus, though by no means a certainty, would have been the Seven Year’s War (1756-1763), when Britain finally broke French power in North America.  By the 1780s the more precise regimental appellations had been regularly adopted – Dragoon, Hussar and so on – that is, before the French wars.  This regular transmogrification of horse regiments into Lancers, Dragoons and Hussars might suggest that our text already had an attachment to the generic.” (tratto da qui)

ARTIGLIERIA VERSUS CAVALLERIA

I tempi moderni stanno per dare l’addio all’uso di una formidabile forza militare, la cavalleria, appannaggio esclusivo inizialmente dei nobiluomini e dopo il medioevo emblema della borghesia emergente e delle classi benestanti, una forza d’urto che si rivelerà sempre più inadeguata alle battaglie in campo aperto contro lo spiegamento delle potenti armi da fuoco (i cannoni prima e le mitragliatrici poi). Nella canzone si evidenzia proprio la spersonalizzazione della guerra e la trasformazione dei soldati in carne da cannone.

ASCOLTA Planxty in una versione più marziale, in After the Break 1979: l’arrangiamento di Andy Irvine sostanzialmente riprende la versione di Dolores Keane e John Faulkner ASCOLTA

ASCOLTA Maranna McCloskey la melodia è quella del Nord Irlanda e il testo quello dei Planxty


CHORUS
Oh, Napoleon Bonaparte(1),
you’re the cause of my woe
Since my bonny light horseman
to the wars he did go
Broken hearted I’ll wander,
broken hearted I’ll remain
Since my bonny light horseman(2)
in the wars he was slain
I
When Boney commanded
his armies to stand
And proud lift his banners
all gayly and grand
He levelled his cannons
right over the plain
And my bonny light horseman
in the wars he was slain
II
And if I was some small bird
and had wings and could fly
I would fly over the salt sea
where my true love does lie
Three years and six months now,
since he left this bright shore
Oh, my bonny light horseman
will I never see you more?
III
And the dove she laments
for her mate as she flies
“Oh, where, tell me
where is my true love?” she sighs
“And where in this wide world
is there one to compare
With my bonny light horseman
who was killed in the war?”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
CORO
Oh Napoleone Bonaparte
sei la causa del mio dolore
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è andato in guerra
con il cuore a pezzi camminerò,
e con il cuore a pezzi resterò
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso in battaglia
I
Quando Boney comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
e con orgoglio innalzò il suo stendardo
così allegramente e in alto,
puntò i suoi cannoni
proprio sulla piana
e il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso nella battaglia
II
Se fossi un uccellino
e avessi le ali per poter volare
volerei oltre il mare salato
fin dove il mio vero amore giace
sono tre anni e sei mesi adesso,
da quando ha lasciato questa bianca spiaggia
o mio bel cavaliere,
non ti vedrò mai più?
III
La colomba si lamenta
per il compagno mentre vola
“Oh dove, ditemi
dov’è il mio vero amore?” sospira
“e dove in questo vasto mondo
c’è n’è uno eguale
al mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in guerra?”

IL LAMENT

Ma la canzone è sostanzialmente un lament cantato dalla donna che ha perduto il suo uomo in guerra e perciò trovo molto suggestive queste due versioni al femminile,  il grido di dolore delle donne (madri e mogli, compagne) che restano a casa mentre gli uomini fanno la guerra (la storia universale di una perdita che si rinnova per ogni soldato che muore in guerra)
ASCOLTA Cherish the Ladies in Threads of Time, 1997


Broken-hearted I’ll wander
For the loss of my lover
He is my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain
I
When Boney commanded
his armies to stand
He leveled his cannon
right over the land
He leveled his cannon
his victory to gain
And slew my light horseman
on the way coming in
Chorus:
Broken-hearted I’ll wander
Broken-hearted I’ll remain
Since my bonny light horseman
In the wars he was slain
II
And if I was a small bird
and had wings to fly
I would fly o’er the salt seas
to where my love does lie
And with my fond wings
I’d beat over his grave
And kiss the pale lips
that lie cold in the clay
III
Well, the dove, she laments
for her mate as she flies
“Tell me where,
tell me where is my true love,” she cries
And where in this wide world
is there one to compare
With my bonny light horseman
who was slain in the war
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
a causa della perdita del mio amore
è il mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in battaglia
I
Quando Bonaparte comandò
alle sue truppe di disporsi
puntò i suoi cannoni
proprio sulla piana
puntò i suoi cannoni
per ottenere la vittoria
e uccise il mio bel cavaliere
all’assalto
Coro
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò,
con il cuore a pezzi resterò
da quando il mio bel cavaliere
è stato ucciso in battaglia
II
Se fossi un uccellino
e avessi le ali per volare
volerei oltre il mare salato
fin dove giace il mio amore
e con le mie ali appassionate
demolirei la sua tomba
per baciare le pallide labbra
che stanno nella fredda terra
III
La colomba si lamenta
per il compagno mentre vola
” ditemi dove
dov’è il mio vero amore?” si lamenta
“e dove in questo vasto mondo
c’è n’è uno eguale
al mio bel cavaliere
che è stato ucciso in guerra?”

ASCOLTA Niamh Parsons in Heart’s Desire 2008 con il titolo di Brokenhearted I’ll Wander

per completezza riporto anche questa versione raccolta sul campo proveniente dall’Irlanda Ovest.

ASCOLTA Martin Howley. Raccolta da Jim Carroll e Pat Mackenzie nell’abitazione di Martin Howley a Fanore, Co. Clare, nell’estate 1975.  In  “A Story I’m Just About to Tell” (The Voice of the People Series Volume 8), 1998


I once loved a soldier
and a soldier bright and gay,
So now he has left me
and gone far away.
To the dark plains of Egypt
he was forced for to go
To die in the fields
or to conquer his foe.
Broken-hearted I’ll wander,
broken-hearted I will be,
Since my lovely young horseman
to the war he’s gone from me.
And it’s early each morning
as I come down for to dress,
I gaze at his picture hung over my head.
Such a lovely young fellow
so manly and so tall.
It was scarcely you would think
they would kill him at all.
It was brave Napoleon,
it was he who took command,
And he planted his cannons
all over the land.
He planted his cannons
for some victory to gain,
And he slew brave MacDonald
coming over from Spain.
If I was an eagle
and had wings for to fly,
I would fly to the plains
where my own darling lie.
And in his cold grave
I would build my own nest,
And contented I’d be
on his lily-white breast.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Un tempo amavo un soldato,
un soldato bello e allegro
ma ora mi ha lasciata
ed è andato lontano
verso le pianure oscure dell’Egitto
è stato arruolato per andare
a morire in battaglia
o per vincere sul nemico
Con il cuore a pezzi camminerò
con il cuore a pezzi starò
da quando il mio amato giovane cavaliere
per la guerra è andato via da me.
Tutte le mattine pesto
quando scendo giù per vestirmi
guardo alla sua foto appesa sopra la testa
un così bel giovane compagno
così virile e alto.
non avresti creduto
che lo avrebbero ucciso
E’ stato il prode Napoleone,
è stato lui che ha preso il comando
e ha piazzato i suoi cannoni
per tutta la pianura
ha piazzato i suoi cannoni
per riportare qualche vittoria
e ha ucciso il prode MacDonald
proveniente dalla Spagna.
Se fossi un aquila
e avessi le ali per volare
voleri sul campo
dove il mio amore giace
e nel suo freddo sepolcro
costruirei il mio nido
e soddisfatta starei
sul suo petto bianco-giglio

FONTI
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2363/
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_25.htm
http://www.waterlooweb.co.uk/living/?p=128
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=46608
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thebonnylighthorseman.html
http://folkinfusion.blogspot.it/2013/10/bonny-light-horseman.html
https://ridiculousauthor.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/my-bonnie-light-horseman-a-lite-look-at-british-cavalry-jonathan-hopkins/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10951

http://www.contemplator.com/england/horseman.html

http://www.contemplator.com/england/horse2.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=822
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=845
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=949
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5960

L’ALTROMONDO CELTICO

Altrove è la terra della felicità eterna dove vivono gli uomini dopo la vita sulla terra: dove non ci sono peccati da espiare o buone azioni da premiare; dove vivere una vita piena e perfetta e non una non-vita come quella immaginata dai Greci e dai Romani. Altrove è anche la terra dove vivono gli antichi dei, ovvero è il Regno delle Fate (Elfland).

Sebbene Altrove si raggiunga solo con la morte, alcune leggende e poesie celtiche narrano di poeti, eroi semi-divini o semplici visitatori che ci sono arrivati in vita, alcuni sono imram ovvero racconti di avventure per mari inesplorati, altri rientrano nel vasto tema popolare del rapimento fatato. continua
a1f86855d7044e1aa5b7af2828658bc5

LAND OF YOUTH: OISIN E NIAMH

Il racconto arriva dall’Irlanda ed è Oisin (in italiano cerbiatto) poeta e guerriero dei Fianna o Feniani (mitici guerrieri-cacciatori vissuti all’epoca di Cormac mac Airt  – II o IV secolo vedi) ad essere rapito da Niamh dai Capelli d’Oro, figlia di Manannan di Tír na nÓg. Dopo tre anni Oisin ebbe il desiderio di ritornare a visitare la sua terra e Niamh gli raccomandò di restare sempre sul cavallo. il quale magicamente lo avrebbe riportato sulla terra: ma sulla Terra il padre era morto da centinaia d’anni, le grandi fortezze dei Fianna erano in rovina e i luoghi che lui ricordava erano cambiati. Amareggiato, sulla via del ritorno, Oisin cadde di sella e divenne improvvisamente vecchio: i tre anni trascorsi nell’AltroMondo corrispondevano a trecento anni sulla terra!
Secondo una versione della storia Oisin non morì ma sopravvisse magicamente fino all’arrivo in Irlanda di San Patrizio, al quale ebbe modo di narrare le gesta dei Fianna.

“Oisin and St. Patrick”, P.J. Lynch

OISIN IN THE LAND OF YOUTH

Ecco le parole pronunciate da Niamh dai Capelli d’Oro per convincere Oisin a montare sul suo cavallo bianco e seguirla nella sua Isola dell’AltroMondo.

(tratto da qui)
“Delightful is the land beyond all dreams,
Fairer than anything your eyes have ever seen.
There all the year the fruit is on the tree,
And all the year the bloom is on the flower.
There with wild honey drip the forest trees;
The stores of wine and mead shall never fail.
Nor pain nor sickness knows the dweller there,
Death and decay come near him never more.
The feast shall cloy not, nor the chase shall tire,
Nor music cease for ever through the hall;
The gold and jewels of the Land of Youth
Outshine all splendors ever dreamed by man.
You will have horses of the fairy breed,
You will have hounds that can outrun the wind;
A hundred chiefs shall follow you in war,
A hundred maidens sing thee to your sleep.
A crown of sovereignty your brow shall wear,
And by your side a magic blade shall hang,
And you will be lord of all the Land of Youth,
And lord of Niamh of the Head of Gold.”
TRADUZIONE  CATTIA SALTO
“Deliziosa è la terra al di là di tutti i sogni
Più bella di ogni altra cosa che i tuoi occhi abbiano visto mai.
Ci sono tutto l’anno frutti sugli
alberi,
e tutto l’anno i boccioli sono
in fiore.
Gocciolano di miele selvatico gli alberi della foresta;
le scorte di vino e idromele non mancheranno mai.
Né dolore né malattia conosce colui che vi dimora,
la morte e la vecchiaia non lo toccheranno mai più.
Delle feste e della caccia non ci si stanca,
né la musica smetterà di risuonare per la sala;
l’oro e gioielli della Terra della Giovinezza
oscurano tutti gli splendori mai sognati dall’uomo.
Avrai cavalli della razza
fatata
avrai segugi che corrono più veloci del vento;
un centinaio di capi ti seguiranno in guerra,
un centinaio di fanciulle canteranno per te che dormi.
Una corona di re porterai
alla fronte,
e il tuo fianco con una lama magica cingerai,
e tu sarai signore di tutta la Terra della Giovinezza,
e signore di Niamh dai capelli d’oro. “

In un’altra descrizione l’Altro Mondo è chiamato Grande Pianura.

ASCOLTA Maire Brennan in Marie, 1992

Il brano è stato composta da Máire Brennan & Tim Jarvis: il coro in gaelico irlandese è l’invocazione incantatrice della Fata che sul suo cavallo magico ha cavalcato le onde del mare. Il testo in inglese è invece il consenso di Oisin che accetta di seguire la fanciulla.

Oisin a caccia incontra Niamh sul suo bianco cavallo
Oisin a caccia incontra Niamh sul suo bianco cavallo

CHORUS
Is gra geal mo chroi thu
Fan liom i gconai
Is gra geal mo chroi thu
Beith mise dilis
Is gra geal mo chroi thu
Tusa mo mhuirin
Is gra geal mo chroi thu
Fan ag mo thaobh sa
I
Beauty and grace with golden hair
Eyes like pearls
Came from the sea
Wherever you will go I will go
Wherever you will turn I’ll follow so
Take me to the Land of Youth
Three hundred years
II
Carried away on impulse
Followed my heart to the Land of Youth
Three hundred years and time stood still
Campanions calling
There’s a warning
III
Three hundred years
Fallen to earth the thunder sound
Years overtake him
A grey old man
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
CORO
“Tu sei l’amore lucente del mio cuore
resta sempre con me
Tu sei l’amore lucente del mio cuore
restami fedele
Tu sei l’amore lucente del mio cuore
sei il mio innamorato
Tu sei l’amore lucente del mio cuore
restami accanto”
I
Bellezza e grazia dai capelli dorati
occhi come perle
che vengono dal mare.
Ovunque tu andrai io andrò
ovunque tu ti volti, io ti seguirò ancora
portami nella Terra dei Giovani
300 anni
II
Rapito dall’impulso
seguii il mio cuore nella Terra dei Giovani
300 anni e il tempo si è fermato
i compagni avvisano che
c’è un pericolo
III
300 anni
caduto a terra al suono del tuono
gli anni lo raggiunsero
un vecchio uomo grigio

DONNA DI LUCE: MIDIR E ETAIN

Anche le donne erano rapite dalle fate (soprattutto le più belle e spesso proprio nel giorno del loro matrimonio!!) così Etain è rapita dal dio Midir e la lirica è stata messa in forma di canzone da Angelo Branduardi nel suo “Donna di Luce”.  Il mito è tratto dal ciclo irlandese del libro delle Invasioni (Leabhar Gabhala): i due si incontrano in segreto e Midir promette alla donna che un giorno la condurrà nel suo Mondo.

Angelo Branduardi in Altro e Altrove 2003. Testo di Luisa Zappa

Con me vieni, Donna di luce
la dove nascono le stelle…
sono foglie i tuoi capelli,
il tuo corpo è neve.
Bianchi i tuoi denti,
nere le ciglia,
gioia per gli occhi
le tue guance di rosa.
E’ desolata la piana di Fal
per chi ha visto la Grande Pianura.

Con me vieni, Donna di luce
là dove nascono le stelle
la mia gente cammina fiera
ed il vino scorre a fiumi.

Avrai sul capo una corona
e carne e birra
e latte e miele.
Magica terra…
Là nessuno muore
prima d’essere ormai vecchio.

Midir-EtainEtain acconsente di seguire il dio, ma essendo già sposata con Eochaid, re di Tara, non voleva lasciare il marito senza avere ottenuto il suo permesso. Così Midir attese un anno e poi si presentò al castello di Eochaid per sfidarlo nel gioco del fidchell (una sorta di gioco degli scacchi). All’inizio il premio del vincitore erano cavalli e barche e spade e sempre Midir perdeva contro il nobile irlandese. Alla terza partita però astutamente il dio esclamò “Quello che il vincitore chiederà sarà suo”, così questa volta Midir vinse e chiese come premio un bacio da Etain. Il marito per non perdere l’onore acconsentì, e il dio prese la donna tra le braccia poi, trasformati in cigni, la portò via in volo, fino alla sua Terra.

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/otherworld.htm
http://www.luminarium.org/mythology/ireland/oisinyouth.htm
http://guide.supereva.it/musica_celtica_/interventi/2003/12/146119.shtml