Archivi tag: nursery-rhyme

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Don’t You Go A Rushing

Leggi in italiano

The “enigmas” or “riddles” are part of some popular songs in dealing with the supernatural, be it a magical or diabolical creature, and more generally they represent a weapon of defense to avert a danger or obtain a benefit, so in the fairy tales, young people of humble origins obtain advantageous marriages or kingdoms for having been able to solve the enigmas or to have accomplished impossible tasks. However, the risk was very high, even if sometimes they were helped by creatures or magical beings, because the counterpart in case of failure was death (often by beheading). In the ancient courtship ballads the riddles become the surrogate of impossible enterprises, or they are obstacles to overcome to get the bride’s hand, but in the Celtic world there are also many examples of the opposite, it is the girl who has to prove to be a good wife, above all in terms of unquestioned loyalty.

The echo of these ancient forms of courtship, turn into a romantic words to make a declaration of love.

I HAVE A YONG SUSTER

The first text dates back to around 1430 (British Museum – Sloane MS 2593, “I have a yong suster”) and is antecedent or at least contemporary to “The Devil’s Nine Questions” found always transcribed in a manuscript of about 1450.

The ballad is also found in many nineteenth-century Nursery Songs with the titles: “Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie”, “I have four sisters beyond the sea”, “I had Four Brothers Over the Sea”, “My true love lives far from me “, where the overseas sweetheart who sends” enigmatic” gifts is trasformed into the four sisters, the four brothers or the four cousins. In fact, the song lends itself to being a children song, both as a lullaby and as a game – riddle in which the children sing the answers together with their mother.

John Fleagle from Worlds Bliss – Medieval Songs of Love and Death, 2004 

I
I have a yong suster
Fer biyonde the see;
Peri meri dictum domine
Manye be the druries (1)
That she sente me.
Partum quartum pare dicentem,
Peri meri dictum domine (2)

II
She sente me the cherye
Withouten any stoon,
And so she dide the dove
Withouten any boon.
III
She sente me the brere
Withouten any rinde;
She bad me love my lemman (3)
Withoute longinge.
IV
How sholde any cherye
Ben withoute stoon?
And how sholde any dove
Ben withoute boon?
V
How sholde any brere
Ben withoute rinde?
How sholde I love my lemman
Withoute longinge?
VI
Whan the cherye was a flowr,
Thanne hadde it non stoon;
Whan the dove was an ey,
Thanne hadde it non boon.
VII
Whan the brere was unbred,(4)
Thanne hadde it non rinde;
Whan the maiden has that she loveth,
She’s withoute longinge.

NOTES
1) Druries: love-gifts
2) latin words non-sense like perry merry dixie or Pitrum, partrum, paradisi tempore or Piri-miri-dictum Domini
3) Leman: sweetheart
4) Unbred: unborn. in the nursery rhyme “I had four brothers over the sea” they carry: a goose without a bone, a cherry without a stone, a blanket without a thread, a book that no man could read, that is an egg, a cherry tree, a sheep to shear and a typographic matrix to be printed.

I GAVE MY LOVE A CHERRY -Riddle song

The most widespread version in the United States and Canada is a “modernization” of the medieval ballad “I have a yong suster” a romantic turn of words to make a declaration of love!

as a sweet lullady

Doc Watson 1966 (magical voice and amazing guitar)

I
I gave my love a cherry
that had no stone;
I gave my love a chicken
that had no bone;
I gave my love a baby
with no crying,
And told my love a story
that had no end.
II
How can there be a cherry
that has no stone?
How can there be a chicken
that has no bone?
How can there be a baby
with no crying?
How can you tell a story
that has no end?
III
A cherry when it’s blooming,
it has no stone(1);
A chicken when it’s pipping,
there is no bone(2);
A baby when it’s sleeping,
there’s no crying(3),
And when I say I love you,
it has no end(4).
NOTES
1) the cherry blossom is not yet a fruit
2) a freshly fertilized hen’s egg is a hen’s embryo
3) a child who is not yet born is sleeping and therefore can not cry
4) the most beautiful declaration of love ..

GO NO MORE A RUSHING

This song is contained in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (called Queen Elizabeth’s Virginal Book, although in reality Queen Elizabeth never owned the manuscript) a collection of dance music dating back to the early 1600s. It is also found in the Brimington Mummers’ Play script. [Derbyshire, 1862] that the Mummers represented during the Christmas celebrations (see).
With the title “Go no More a-Rushing” the melody was probably already popular at the time of Queen Elizabeth I (composed or arranged by William Byrd) and it is found in various versions in some manuscripts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
The “Riddle song” is superimposed with a prelude (as a warning song) in which young girls are discouraged to go alone in the woods to collect rushes / ferns because they could lose their virginity.
Once ago the rushes were spread on the floors of the houses, they made roofs, beds, chairs, pots and fishing nets, cheese-sieves and much more, even today with the rushes they intertwine baskets, hats are made and Bride’s cross for Imbolc.

Reg Hall Archives Jim Wilson of Sussex 

I
Go no more a-rushing,
maids, in May
Go no more a-rushing,
maids, I pray
Go no more a-rushing,
or you’ll fall a-blushing(1)
Bundle up your rushes
and haste away.
II
You promised me a cherry
without any stone,
You promised me a chicken
without any bone,
You promised me ring
that has no rim at all,
And you promised me a bird
without a gall.
III
How can there be a cherry
without a stone?
How can there be a chicken
without a bone?
How can there be a ring
without a rim at all?
How can there be a bird
that hasn’t got a gall?
IV
When the cherry’s in the flower
it has no stone;
When the chicken’s in the egg
it hasn’t any bone;
When the ring it is a making
it has no rim at all;
And the dove it is a bird
without a gall(2)
NOTES
1) or “to get a brushing” going on the moor or in the woods to collect stalks and grasses could be very dangerous for the girls because they risked encounters with little recommendable elves see more
2) the dove symbol of peace and love was considered a very pure animal. When we speak of a good person we say that it is “without gall as the dove” because this animal is without a gall bladder.

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017
Conserved through the oral transmission up to the version collected by Cecil Sharp by Mrs. Eliza Ware in Over Stowey, Somerset on January 23, 1907

Don’t You Go A Rushing Maids In May
I
Don’t you go a-rushing, maids in May
Don’t you go a-rushing, maids I say
For if you go a-rushing
They’re sure to get you blushing
They’ll steal your rushes away
II
I went a-rushing it was in May
I went a-rushing maids I say
I went a-rushing
They caught me a-blushing
They stole my rushes away
III
He promised me a chicken without any bone
Promised me a cherry without any stone
He promised me a ring without any rim
He promised me a babe with no squalling
IV
How can there be a chicken without any bone?
How can there be a cherry without any stone?
How can there be a ring without any rim?
How can there be a babe with no squalling?
V
When the chicken’s in the egg it has no bone
When the cherry’s blooming it has no stone
When the ring is melting
It has no rim
When the babe is in the making
There’s no squalling

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/captain-wedderburn.html
http://www.presscom.co.uk/talesparts/tales5.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/597.html
http://www.8notes.com/scores/6048.asp?ftype=gif
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1545
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6899
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9589
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=99125
http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/iwillgivemyloveanapple.html

http://www.1st-stop-county-kerry.com/rushes-in-folklore.html
https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/straw-hay-and-rushes-in-irish-folk-tradition-by-anne-o-dowd-art-and-craft-1.2489692
http://www.fondazioneterradotranto.it/2012/10/19/larte-di-intrecciare-il-giunco-ad-acquarica-del-capo-ii-parte/
https://www.cdsconlus.it/index.php/2016/09/29/cultura-e-tradizioni-in-valle-di-comino-larte-del-costruir-fuscelle/
http://www.contemplator.com/england/rushing.html
http://www.folkplay.info/Texts/86sk47rs.htm
http://www.folktunefinder.com/tune/161727/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/dontyougoarushing.html

Ankou il dio della morte bretone

In Bretagna nelle notti d’Inverno l’Ankou   viaggia in cerca di anime, sul suo carretto cigolante tirato da due neri cavalli macilenti;  lui è l’Accompagnatore, colui che conduce le anime da un mondo  ad un altro. Nei racconti popolari ha l’aspetto di un carrettiere-contadino allampanato e con in testa un grosso cappellaccio che ne oscura il volto, talvolta è accompagnato da due aiutanti anch’essi nero vestiti.
A volte a cavallo a volte come conducente del carretto (le Carrier an Ankou) guida le anime (oppure le attende) alla porta dell’Inferno che in Bretagna si apre nella Yeun Ellez sui Monti d’Arrée (nel centro di Finistère), una depressione paludosa al centro dei Monti, sovrastata dal Mont Saint-Michel de Brasparts su cui è stata costruita (non a caso) la cappella di San Michele.
La torbiera sotto forma di campi lussureggianti nasconde le sue insidie agli incauti viaggiatori che abbandonano i sentieri e finiscono per affogare imprigionati dalla melma.

UNA CARRETTA INELUDIBILE

Nessuna forza riesce a fermare il carretto spesso vuoto oppure pieno di gente, alcuni dicono che sul carro ci stia pure una banda musicale che suona una  nenia soave. Quando il carro si ferma o quando lo si sente passare (e ben per questo le ruote cigolano) la morte, propria, di un congiunto o di un conoscente, è prossima.
E’ lungo sentieri particolari che si può incontrare questo lugubre equipaggio: si tratta solitamente di antiche vie abbandonate dal traffico abituale e tagliate fuori dalla vita quotidiana. Vengono chiamati in bretone henkou ar Maro, i sentieri della Morte; è sconveniente e pericoloso chiuderli, perché si può disturbare il passaggio di Ankou. Nelle zone che costeggiano il litorale, il Maestro, come anche viene chiamato, ama spostarsi per mare servendosi di una barca, la bag-noz o battello della notte. In barca o con il carro, chiunque lo incontri, ritorna a casa per coricarsi e sparire da questo mondo pochi giorni dopo.(tratto da qui)

Nelle raffigurazioni bretoni (per lo più sculture e bassorilievi ma anche dipinti parietali) Ankou è uno scheletro che tiene in mano una freccia, una vanga o una falce missoria, che non sono strumenti d’offesa quanto piuttosto dei simboli,  è infatti una figura pacifica, parte integrante della vita della comunità.
Ankou è assimilabile al Caronte greco e com’egli muto traghettatore delle Anime, ma è anche lo scheletro della Danza Macabra e come scrive Alessio Tanfoglio nel suo saggio “Ankou e la danza macabra di Clusone” (2016)  è “lo scheletro o la raffigurazione della realtà della morte nella sua forma oggettiva, senza inganni o mascherature“.
In alcuni racconti bretoni l’Ankou è di poche parole e fortunatamente le leggende sono tante trascritte da Anatole Le Braz che le raccolse a fine Ottocento dagli ultimi narratori viventi durante le veillées, le veglie notturne nelle isolate fattorie che andava visitando in bicicletta: ‘La leggenda della morte‘, ( ‘La Légende de la Mort chez les Bretons armoricains‘) oltre ad essere in assoluto la sua opera più famosa, è anche l’unica tradotta in italiano.

Marjanig

La figura dell’Ankou è così parte della comunità bretone che è il soggetto principale di una filastrocca per bambini dal titolo “O, lakait ho troadig” (in francese O, mettez votre petit pied) strutturata come una conta progressiva in cui il coro introduce la parola variata che diventa la prima della nuova serie
ASCOLTA Christophe Kergourlay

O, lakait ho troadig, ma dousig Marjanig
O, lakait ho troadig e-kichen va hiniNi vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
O, lakait ho karig, ma dousig Marjanig
O, lakait ho karig e-kichen va hiniNi vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daouNi vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daouNi vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
 

Ni vo jodig hon-daou,
Ni vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou

Ni vo begig hon-daou,
Ni vo jodig hon-daou,
Ni vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou

Traduzione inglese
Chorus
O, put your little foot,
my sweet Mary Jane

O, put your little foot beside mine.
I
We’ll be foot to foot
Until Death
Comes to fetch us
II
We’ll be leg to leg
We’ll be foot to foot
Until Death
Comes to fetch us
We’ll be knee to knee…
We’ll be hand to hand …
We’ll be cheek to cheek …
We’ll be mouth to mouth …
Traduzione italiano
Coro
O metti il tuo piedino
mia dolce Maria Giovanna
O metti il tuo piedino accanto al mio
I
Andremo passo-passo
finchè la Morte
verrà a prenderci
II
Andremo gamba contro gamba
Andremo passo-passo
finchè la Morte
verrà a prenderci
andremo ginocchio contro ginocchio
andremo mano nella mano
andremo guancia a guancia
andremo bocca contro bocca

FONTI
Alessio Tanfoglio: “Quaderno 4. Lo spettacolo della Morte: il cadavere e lo scheletro”, “Ankou e la danza macabra di Clusone” (2016)
http://perstorie-eieten.blogspot.it/2010/09/la-leggenda-dell-ankou-il-rapporto-dei.html
http://per.kentel.pagesperso-orange.fr/o_lakait_ho_troadig1.htm
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=66
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=fs&p=66
http://stq4s52k.es-02.live-paas.net/items/show/42662
http://www.arcadia93.org/bretoni.html

THREE CRAWS

Tra le nursery rhymes della tradizione scozzese la filastrocca sui tre corvi appollaiati sul muretto ovvero ciò che resta della ballata medievale sui corvi e il cadavere di un cavaliere (qui)


Le versioni testuali presentano alcune varianti

ad esempio la I strofa diventa

The first crow couldn’t fly at all,
couldn’t fly at all, couldn’t fly at all,
The first crow couldn’t fly at all,
On a cold and frosty morning.

La III strofa diventa
‘i second craw wiz greetin for is da
greetin for is da
greetin for is da-a-a-aa
‘i second craw wiz greetin for is da
on a cal an frosty mornin’

e ovviamente nonostante che nel titolo ci siano solo tre corvi ne spunta un quarto (anche se non c’è)
The fourth craw he wisnae there at a’
Wisnae there at a’, wisnae there at a’
The fourth craw he wisnae there at a’
On a cold and frosty morning.


I
Three craws sat upon a wa’,
Sat upon a wa’, sat upon a wa’,
Three craws sat upon a wa’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
II
The first craw was greetin’ for his maw,
Greetin’ for his maw, greetin’ for his maw,
The first craw was greetin’ for his maw,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
III
The second craw fell and broke his jaw,
Fell and broke his jaw, fell and broke his jaw,
The second craw fell and broke his jaw,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
IV
The third craw, couldnae caw at a’,
Couldnae caw at a’, couldnae caw at a’,
The third craw, couldnae caw at a’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
V
An that’s a’, absolutely a’,
Absolutely a’, absolutely a’,
An that’s a’, absolutely a’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
Traduzione italiano
I
Tre corvi in fila sul muro
in fila sul muro in fila sul muro
tre corvi in fila sul muro
in una fredda e gelida mattina
III
Il primo corvo si lamentava per la mamma, si lamentava per la mamma, per la mamma, Il primo corvo si lamentava per la mamma
in una fredda e gelida mattina
III
Il secondo corvo cadde e si ruppe la mascella(1), cadde e si ruppe la mascella,
e si ruppe la mascella, Il secondo corvo cadde e si ruppe la mascella,
in una fredda e gelida mattina
IV
Il terzo corvo non sapeva gracchiare affatto, non sapeva gracchiare,
Il terzo corvo non sapeva gracchiare affatto, in una fredda e gelida mattina
V
E questo è tutto assolutamente tutto
assolutamente tutto, assolutamente tutto, questo è tutto
in una fredda e gelida mattina

NOTE
1) ossia il becco
FONTI
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/ThreeCraws.html
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_craws.htm

HENRY MY SON

La ballata di Lord Randall parte con buona probabilità dall’Italia (vedi versione italiana), passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche.
La ballata raccolta dal professor Child al numero 12 è ampiamente diffusa presso la tradizione popolare e si conoscono numerosissime varianti testuali abbinate ad altrettante numerose melodie. (prima parte)

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

Versione tratta dal libretto “100 Irish Songs” con spartito musicale, Soodlum, vol. 2 cantata come una nursery rhyme

ASCOLTA Sons of Erin


ASCOLTA in versione “music hall”
ASCOLTA Pete Seeger che compara le due versioni


I
Where have you been all day,
Henry my son?
Where have you been all day,
my beloved one?
Away in the meadow,
away in the meadow
Make my head I’ve a pain in my head
and I want to lie down
.
II
And what did you have to eat,
What did you have to eat?
Poison beans, poison beans
III
And what colour were them beans,
What colour were them beans,?
Green and yellow, green and yellow (1)
IV
And what will you leave your mother,
What will you leave your mother?
A woollen blanket, a woollen blanket
V
And what will you leave your children,
What will you leave your children?
The keys of heaven, the keys of heaven
VI
And waht will you leave your sweetheart,
What will you leave your sweetheart?
A rope to hang her, a rope to hang her..(2)
Tradotto da Giordano Dall’Armellina
I
“Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
Enrico figlio mio?
Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
mio amato?»
«Via nei prati,
via nei prati.
Fammi il letto, ho mal di testa
e voglio stendermi.»
II
«E che cosa avesti da mangiare?
che cosa avesti da mangiare?»
«Fagioli avvelenati.»
III
«E di che colore erano quelli fagioli?
di che colore erano quelli fagioli?»
«Verdi e gialli (1).»
IV
«Che cosa lascerai a tua madre
cosa lascerai a tua madre?»
«Una coperta di lana.»
V
«Che cosa lascerai ai tuoi figli
cosa lascerai ai tuoi figli?»
«Le chiavi del paradiso.»
VI
«Che cosa lascerai al tuo amore
cosa lascerai al tuo amore?»
«Una corda per impiccarla (2).»

NOTE
1) È probabile che le anguille non fossero molto conosciute in Irlanda. Così sono i fagioli ad essere velenosi (Dall’Armellina traduce beans come “palline”). Significativa è la scelta della colorazione di questi strani fagioli: il verde e il giallo sono i colori del tradimento e questa credenza arriva dai dipinti del Medioevo. L’oro nel XIII secolo era il colore della luminosità trascendente, cornice ideale delle figure sacre, il giallo invece ne era la brutta imitazione, privo delle qualità materiali e morali dell’oro. Così il giallo era percepito come colore negativo e la coppia cromatica giallo/verde indicava la follia. Di giallo sono dipinti i traditori come Giuda o più in generale gli ebrei e i musulmani (in molte città italiane durante il rinascimento le prostitute erano obbligate a vestirsi di giallo e a Venezia gli ebrei dovevano cucire un cerchio giallo sul vestito)
2) il lascito di Enrico è ben misero forse a rispecchiare una diffusa povertà all’epoca in cui la ballata era cantata. Anche nelle versioni regionali italiane alla dama viene lasciata la corda perchè venisse impiccata.

FONTI
http://www.as-it-was.co.uk/SupaNames/Ballads/henry.htm

LITTLE BOY BILLY

Una canzone del mare umoristica (del tipo caustico)  intitolata anche “Three Sailors from Bristol City” o “Little Billie”, che tratta un argomento inquietante per la nostra civiltà, ma sempre dietro l’angolo: il cannibalismo!
Il mare è un luogo d’insidie e di scherzi del fato, una tempesta ti può portare fuori rotta, su una barcaccia di fortuna o una zattera, senza cibo e acqua, un tema trattato anche nella grande pittura ( Theodore Gericault, La zattera della Medusa vedi): la vita umana in bilico tra speranza e disperazione. Così nelle canzoni marinaresche si finisce per esprimere le paure più grandi con una bella risata!

Il brano nasce nel 1863 come parodia scritta da William Thackeray di una canzone marinaresca francese dal titolo “La Courte Paille” (=la paglia corta)– diventata in seguito “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) e finita nelle canzoncine per bambini.

Dalle note del “Penguin Book” (1959):
The Portugese Ballad  A Nau Caterineta  and the French ballad  La Courte Paille  tell much the same story.  The ship has been long at sea, and food has given out.  Lots are drawn to see who shall be eaten, and the captain is left with the shortest straw.  The cabin boy offers to be sacrificed in his stead, but begs first to be allowed to keep lookout till the next day.  In the nick of time he sees land (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) and the men are saved.  Thackeray burlesqued this song in his  Little Billee.  It is likely that the French ballad gave rise to The Ship in Distress, which appeared on 19th. century broadsides.  George Butterworth obtained four versions in Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [issue 17] pp.320-2) and Sharp printed one from James Bishop of Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) with “in many respects the grandest air” which he had found in that county.  The text comes partly from Mr. Bishop’s version, and partly from a broadside.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Secondo Stan Hugill “Little Boy Billy” era una sea shanty per il lavoro alle pompe, un lavoro noioso e monotono che poteva senz’altro essere rallegrato da questa canzoncina!

ASCOLTA Ralph Steadman in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.”
“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(1)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(2) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (3)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre uomini di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare.
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e anche il giovane Billy.
Rubarono una lattina di biscotti al capitano
e una grande bottiglia di whisky.
Ma quando raggiunsero il mare aperto
non era avanzato che un pisello
secco.
Disse Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Non abbiamo niente da mangiare così ti mangerò”
disse Jimmy il Trinca “Sono vecchio e rinsecchito,
è meglio mangiare il giovane Billy”
“Oh Giovane Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti
così sbottona il primo bottone della tua piccola blusa”
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti come la mia cara mamma mi ha raccomandato?”
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e poi si inginocchiò (sulla crocetta).
Ma quando arrivò all’11° comandamento (2)
gridò “Yo Ho! Terra”.
“Vedo Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
Vedo la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B. (3)”
Impiccarono Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
ma fecero ammiraglio il Giovane Billy.

NOTE
1) scritto anche come top fore-gallant
2) i suoi compagni non dovevano essere molto ferrati con la Bibbia (e probabilmente Billy ne avrebbe inventati di nuovi se non avesse avvistato una nave!)
3) sigle di “Knight Commander of the Bath” = Cavaliere Commendatore del Bagno, l’ordine militare cavalleresco fondato da Giorgio I nel 1725

E per corollario ecco la versione francese “Un Petit Navire”

continua

FONTI
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY: TOM THE PIPER

Un bellissima melodia riportata da Thomas D’Urfey nel suo “Pills to Purge Melancholy” ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv Sharpe’s Rifles. Già all’epoca quella che era una melodia romantica per una storia d’amore, era diventata una melodia accattivante e pro arruolamento per le guerre napoleoniche. (vedi prima parte)

LA VERSIONE Jocky met with Jenny fair

La versione riportata da Thomas D’Urfey è una storia di corteggiamento un po’ tormentato; in verità tutto il canto segue un po’ il topos dell’amante tenuto sulle spine che si dispera e supplica mercede, per ottenere i favori della bella. Ma il nostro  Jock non doveva essere poi così disperato se alla fine conclude
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play

VERSIONE INGLESE O SCOZZESE?

La questione dibattuta già nel Settecento, fin dalla pubblicazione di questa song nello “Scots Musical Museum”, sulla sua attribuzione, non si è ancora risolta
There was debate at the time of this song’s publication as to whether it was an English song composed about 1700 or whether it was an earlier Scots song which was adopted in England. Unfortunately, there is still no conclusive evidence to answer this question although Burns was very specific about only including Scots songs. There is an alternative melody for these verses which is called, ‘My plaid away’, composed about 1710.” (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

ASCOLTA Connie Dover  in “Somebody la quale riprende il testo antico (senza poi modificarlo troppo) e scrive una melodia sua.


I
Jocky met with Jenny fair
Between the dawning and the day
But Jocky now is full of care
Since Jenny stole his heart away
II
Although she promised to be true
She proven has, alack, unkind
The which does make poor Jocky rue
That e’er he loved a fickle mind
III
Jocky was a bonny lad
That e’er was born in Scotland fair
But now poor lad he does run mad
Since Jenny
IV
Young Jocky was a piper’s son
He fell in love when he was young
And all the tunes that he could play
Was O’er the Hills and Far Away
Chorus
And it’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far
The wind has blown my plaid away
V
He sang when my first my Jenny’s face
I saw she seemed so full of grace
With mickle joy my heart was filled
That’s now alas with sorrow killed
VI
Oh were she but as true as fair
‘T would put an end to my despair
Instead of that she is unkind
And waivers like the winter wind
VII
Hard was my hap to fall in love
With one that does so faithless prove
Hard my fate to court a maid
Who has my constant heart betrayed
VIII
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Jock conobbe la bella Jenny
allo spuntar dell’alba
e ora Jock è preoccupato
da quanto Jenny gli ha rapito il cuore
II
Sebbene lei promise di essere sincera
si rivelò ahimè scortese
il che fece rimpiangere il povero Jock
di essersi innamorato di una mente volubile
III
Jock era un (il più) bel ragazzo
che mai sia nato nella Scozia bella,
ma ora povero ragazzo è impazzito
per colpa di Jenny
IV
Il giovane Jocky era figlio di un pifferaio (1)
e si innamorò quando era giovane
e l’unica melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano sulle colline”
CORO
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
il vento ha soffiato via la mia coperta (2)
V
Cantava “Quando per la prima volta il viso della mia Jenny vidi, sembrava così piena di grazia,
di molta gioia il mio cuore si colmò
ma ora ahimè dal dolore è ucciso”
VI
Oh se solo lei fosse fedele quanto è bella
potrebbe mettere fine alla mia disperazione
invece di essere scortese
e gelida (3) come il vento d’inverno
VII
Amara sorte d’innamorarmi
di una che così infedele si mostra,
amaro il mio fato di corteggiare una fanciulla
che ha tradito il mio cuore fedele
VIII
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente.

NOTE
1) piper si traduce sia come pifferaio (colui che suona il piffero o flauto) ma anche come zampognaro (colui che suona la cornamusa)
2) il termine è un eufemismo, la coperta copre il pudore della donna e viene soffiata o gettata via = deflorazione
3)  ho tradotto il termine a senso anche se il verbo waiver ha altro significato

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: OWER THE HILLS AND FAUR AWA’

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers in Arnish Light 2006 su Spotify.
Esilarante come al solito il commento allegato “Here’s an old poem, which has been set to this nifty little melody by the extremely talented Connie Dover. A song about a piper who can play but one tune, “ower the hills and faur awa, and probably has the cheek to wonder why the girl left him. It is amazing how many pipers are actually asked if they can play “ower the hills and faur awa’”, but it is even more amazing how many of them take it as a request for the melody and not the more obvious request for them to take a hike.
It reminds us of the old story about the regimental piper going over the top with his colleagues at the Battle of the Somme. It has for many years been the tradition that Scottish regiments are piped into battle; a tradition that is still honoured. Picture the scene, there he is blowing away furiously, right there in the thick of the battle. Bullets and shells are flashing past him and his fellow soldiers, bombs are exploding all around him, things are whizzing and whooshing all over the place. Suddenly out of the confusion of the battle the unmistakable loud voice of his sergeant major rings out. “For @#%$+* sake Angus, play something they like!” (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN GRAY: WERE I LAID ON GREENLAND’S COAST

La versione riportata da John Gay per “The Beggar’s Opera” è un duetto tra i due protagonisti (Air XVI, cantato da Macheath e Polly) con musica adattata da Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).
ASCOLTA

Ancora l’Air XVI interpretato da Laurence Olivier e Dorothy Tutin nella versione cinematografica del lavoro di Gay, diretta da Peter Brook nel 1953.


I
Were I laid on Greenland’s Coast,
And in my Arms embrac’d my Lass;
Warm amidst eternal Frost,
Too soon the Half Year’s Night would pass.
II
Were I sold on Indian Soil,
Soon as the burning Day was clos’d,
I could mock the sultry Toil
When on my Charmer’s Breast repos’d.
III
And I would love you all the Day,
Every Night would kiss and play,
If with me you’d fondly stray
Over the Hills and far away
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I (lui)
Se fossi sulle coste delle Groenlandia
e abbracciassi la mia ragazza,
al caldo tra il ghiaccio eterno
troppo presto la notte polare passerebbe(1)
III (lei)
Se fossi sul suolo indiano (2)
appena il giorno cocente fosse finito
irriderei la fatica amara(3)
per riposare sul petto del mio innamorato
III (alternati)
Ti amerei tutto il giorno
ogni notte a baciarci e amarci
se con me appassionatamente vorresti girovagare
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) letteralmente la notte del mezzo anno
2) americano
3) si riferisce al lavoro di schiavitù dei deportati

tom_10939_md

LA VERSIONE NURSERY RHYMES: Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son

Nella versione lullaby Jock diventa Tom il figlio del piper che conosce una sola melodia “Lontano oltre le colline” ed è per l’appunto in questa versione a diventare una popolare canzone per bambini.
Ma Tom è il Matto nelle commedie dei Mummer, da qui l’idea che la storia sia una variante medievale del pifferaio magico.

Ma se proprio vogliamo chiudere il cerchio di questo susseguirsi di versioni possiamo incidentalmente notare che il protagonista della versione di George Farquard si chiamava sempre Tom e così è prorpio lui che è partito per la guerra e a suonare il suo piffero (o la sua cornamusa) nell’esercito britannico.

ASCOLTA Hilary James & Simon Mayer in: “Lullabies with Mandolins” il testo è quello di Tim Hart e presenta alcune variazioni rispetto alla filastrocca per bambini.


I
Tom, he was a piper’s son,
He learned to play when he was young,
the only tune that he could play
Was, “Over the hills and far away,”
CHORUS
Over the hills, and a long way off,
The wind shall blow my top-knot off.
II
Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they did dance when he did play
“Over the hills and far away.”
III
Now Tom did play with such a skill
That those nearby could not stand still
And all who heard him they did dance
Down through England, Spain and France
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Tom era il figlio del pifferaio
imparò a suonare quando era giovane
e la sola melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano oltre le colline”
CORO
Oltre le colline e lontano
il vento  scompiglierà il mio chignon  (1)
II
Ora Tom con il suo piffero faceva un tale baccano
che piaceva sia alle ragazze che ai ragazzi
e danzavano quando lui suonava
“Lontano oltre le colline”
III
Ora Tom suonava con tale abilità
che coloro che gli erano vicini non potevano stare fermi e tutti quelli che lo sentivano, danzavano
per l’Inghilterra, la Spagna e la Francia

NOTE
1) più propriamente nastro annodato a fiocco come fermaglio sulla cima dei capelli delle signore nel XVII e XVIII secolo

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/faraway.html
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-062,-pages-62-and-63-oer-the-hills,-and-far-away.aspx
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiOVRHILL4;ttOVERHILL.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=95039
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1226lyr7.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom,_Tom,_the_Piper%27s_Son
https://clamarcap.com/tag/johann-christoph-pepusch/
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1524
http://www.anonymousmorris.co.uk/dances/valiant.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/10900/10939/tom_10939.htm

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA

“Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” è una canzone in gaelico scozzese scritta da John Cameron di Ballachulish (Iain Camshroin) nel 1856.
Il titolo iniziale della canzone era” Duil ri Baile Chaolais Fhaicinn” (Hoping to see Ballachulish), la sua pubblicazione nella raccolta “The Gaelic Songster” (An t-Oranaiche) di Archibald Sinclair, -Glasgow 1879 (il formato digitale qui) ci permette di cogliere le differenze testuali con la versione “O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna” diventata poi standard. Ballachulish (Highlands Scozia nord-occidentale) è un paesino alla foce del Loch Leven con le montagne che offrono delle viste spettacolari.

Vista da Sgorr na Ciche verso Loch Leven

DUIL RI BAILE CHAOLAIS FHAICINN
Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na cor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na coireachan(5) 

Chi mi na sgoraibh fo cheò.
I*
Chi mi gun dàil an t-àit’ ‘s d’ rugadh mi,
Cuirear orm fàilt’ ‘s a’ chainnt a thuigeas mi ;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh a’s gràdh ‘n uair ruigeam
Nach reicinn air tunnachan òir.
II
Chi mi a’ ghrian an liath nam flaitheanas,
Chi mi ‘s an iar a ciar ‘n uair luidheas i ;
Cha ‘n ionnan ‘s mar tha i ghnàth ‘s a’ bhaile so
N deatach a’ falach a glòir.
III
Gheibh mi ann ceòl bho eòin na Duthaige,
Ged a tha ‘n t-àm thar àm na cuthaige,
Tha smeoraichean ann is annsa guth leam
Na plob, no fiodhal mar cheòL
IV
Gheibh mi le lìontan iasgach sgadain ann,
Gheibh mi le iarraidh bric a’s bradain ann ;
Na’m faighinn mo mhiann ‘s ann ann a stadainn.
S ann ann is fhaid’ bhithinn beò.
V*
Chi mi ann coilltean, rhi ini ann doireachan,
Clii nii ann màghan bàn’ is torraiche.
Chi mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan do cheò.

NOTE
* coro e strofe presenti nella versione standard

TRADUZIONE INGLESE J. Mark Sugars 1998
I
I shall see without delay the place where I was born,
I shall receive a welcome in the language that I understand;
I shall get there a smile and love when I arrive
That I would not trade for tons of gold(1).
II
I shall see the sun grow pale in the sky
I shall see the dusk in the west when it sets;
It won’t be like it always is in this town(2),
The smoke hiding its glory.
III
There I shall get music from the birds of my Homeland,
Although the time is after the time of the cuckoo,(3)
Mavises are there and their sound is dearer to me
Than pipe or fiddle for music.
IV
I shall get herring with fishing-nets there,
I shall get trout and salmon by asking there;
If I were to get my desire it’s there I would stay,
And it’s there I would live the longest.
V
There I shall see woods, there I shall see oak groves(4),
There I shall see fair and fertile fields,
I shall see the deer on the floor of the corries,
Veiled by a shroud of mist.
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò il sole diventare pallido nel cielo
e vedrò il tramonto ad ovest quando cala
non sarà sempre come in questa città(2)
con l’inquinamento che nasconde il suo splendore
III
Là sentirò la musica degli uccelli della mia terra
anche se è passata la stagione del cuculo(3)
ci sono i tordi e il loro canto mi è più caro
del suono del flauto o del violino
IV
Pescherò le aringhe con le reti là
prenderò trote e salmoni a volontà là
se dipendesse da me e là dove vorrei stare
e dove vorrei vivere a lungo
V
Vedrò i boschi, i boschi di querce(4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia

NOTE
1) l’espressione idiomatica in italiano preferisce “quintali d’oro” anche se letteralmente in inglese si dice “una tonnellata”
2) Glasgow
3) la poesia è stata scritta agli inizi dell’autunno (del 1856), quando il cuculo è già emigrato verso le terre più calde
4) i boschetti di querce sono il greennwood, ovvero il  nemeton, il bosco sacro; doireachan è tradotto altrove come thickets
5) corrie (coire) è un anfiteatro morenico nel dizionario inglese si legge “is a circular dip or bowl-shaped geographical feature in a Scottish or Irish highland mountain or hillside formed by glaciation.” Le montagne vengono descritte non genericamente ma con preciso riferimento alla morfologia del territorio intorno a Ballachulish

Glen-coe Taken near Ballachulish null William Daniell 1769-1837 Presented by Tate Gallery Publications 1979 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
Glen-coe vista da Ballachulish (Tate Gallery Publications 1979)

Nel settimanale  della contea di Argyll “The Oban Times”  (8 Aprile 1882) vennero pubblicate anche le altre strofe della canzone intitolata questa volta “Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” 

VERSIONE IN GAELICO SCOZZESE

Il testo è stato scritto in gaelico scozzese ed è incentrato sulla nostalgia per le amate montagne, la melodia è lenta con l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.

ASCOLTA The Rankin Family 1989

ASCOLTA Solas

ASCOLTA Quadriga Consort live

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA (versione standard)
O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na còrrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na coireachan,
Chì mi na sgoran fo cheò.
I
Chì mi gun dàil an t-àite ‘san d’ rugadh mi;
Cuirear orm fàilte ‘sa chànan a thuigeas mi;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh agus gràdh nuair ruigeam,
Nach reicinn air thunnachan òir.
II
Chì mi ann coilltean; chi mi ann doireachan;
Chì mi ann màghan bàna is toraiche;
Chì mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan de cheò.
III
Beanntaichean àrda is àillidh leacainnean
Sluagh ann an còmhnuidh is còire cleachdainnean
‘S aotrom mo cheum a’ leum g’am faicinn
Is fanaidh mi tacan le deòin
IV
Fàilt’ air na gorm-mheallaibh, tholmach, thulachnach;
Fàilt air na còrr-bheannaibh mòra, mulanach;
Fàilt’ air na coilltean, is fàilt’ air na h-uile –
O! ‘s sona bhith fuireach ‘nan còir.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
O, I will see, I will see the great mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the lofty mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the corries(5),
I’ll see the mist covered peaks.
I
I will soon see the place of my birth.
They’ll welcome me in a language I’ll understand.
I’ll receive attention and love when I get there,
which I wouldn’t sell for tons of gold(1).
II
There I’ll see forests, there I’ll see groves.
There I’ll see fair, fruitful meadows.
I’ll see deer at the foot of the corries,
hidden in the mantles of mist.
III
High mountains and beautiful ledges,
folk there always kind by custom,
light is my step as I go bounding to see them,
and I’ll willingly stay a long while.
IV
Hail to the blue-green, grassy, hilly,
hail to the hummocky, high-peaked mountains.
Hail to the forests, hail to all there;
o, contentedly would I live there forever.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Vedrò le grandi montagne
Oh vedrò le alte montagne
vedrò le conche (5)
vedrò le cime coperte dalla nebbia
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò le foreste, vedrò il bosco antico (4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia.
III
Alte montagne e splendidi pendii
genti che sono sempre di modi gentili
leggero il passo quando vado a trovarli
e volentieri resterei là per molto tempo.
IV
Salve alle colline d’erba verde scuro
salve ai monti corrugati in alti picchi
salve alle foreste, salve a tutto,
contento vorrei vivere là per sempre.

VERSIONE IN INGLESE:The Mist Covered Mountains

Il testo è stato adattato anche in inglese da Malcolm MacFarlane (secondo il gusto romantico di fine ottocento) e pubblicato in “The ministrelsy of the scottish highlands ” di Alfred Moffat, 1907 (vedi). Così è con questo titolo che il brano viene chiamato anche solo nella sua versione strumentale. Molti gli artisti di fama che lo hanno riprodotto.

ASCOLTA Ryan’s fancy 1979


CHORUS
Oh ho soon shall I see them,
Oh he ho see them, oh see them;
Oh ho ro soon shall I see them,
The mist covered mountains of home.
I
There I shall visit the place of my birth,
And they’ll give me a welcome
to the warmest on earth;
All so loving and kind, full of music and mirth,
In the sweet sounding language of home.
II
There I shall gaze on the mountains again,
On the fields and the woods
and the burns and the glens;
And away ‘mong the corries beyond human ken,
In the haunts of the deer I shall roam.
III
Hail to the mountains with summits of blue,
To the glens with their meadows
of sunshine and dew;
To the women and men ever constant and true,
Ever ready to welcome one home.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Oh presto le rivedrò
le rivedrò, le rivedrò
Oh presto le rivedrò
le montagne natie coperte dalla nebbia
I
Là visiterò i posti in cui sono nato
che mi daranno il benvenuto
il più caloroso della terra,
tutto è così amorevole e gentile, pieno di musica e allegria
nel dolce suono della lingua di casa.
II
Là guarderò di nuovo i monti
i campi e i boschi
i ruscelli e le valli
e lontano tra le conche al di sopra delle case degli uomini, dove si trovano i cervi andrò
III
Salve alle montagne dalle cime blu
alle valli con i loro prati
di sole e rugiada
alle donne e agli uomini sempre fedeli e sinceri
sempre pronti ad accogliere uno in casa.

LA MELODIA

Per gli scozzesi SAW YE JOHNNY COMIN, per gli inglesi JOHNNY BYDES LANG AT THE FAIR
La filastrocca “What Can the Matter Be?”(anche “Johnny’s So Long at the Fair.”) che a sua volta deriva dalla ballata Johnny bydes lang at the fair.. (qui)  nel The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes  viene datata tra il 1770 e il 1780.
In America ne venne fatta una parodia con il titolo  “Seven Old Ladies Locked in the Lavatory”,
“The Society for Creative Anachronism doesn’t feel it’s a valid Medieval song because the rendition we all know today comes from a collection of sheet music in the 1770’s or so. But truth is it dates farther back from that, coming from a really old ditty entitled “Saw Ye Johnny Comin’”. It’s English in origin, although there is at least one recorded Anglo-Scot rendition.” (tratto da qui)

In Mudcat Malcom Douglas scrive ” The tunes are fundamentally the same, though they have grown apart with the years.  According to  The Fiddler’s Companion, Oh Dear What Can the Matter Be (a.k.a. Johnny’s So Long at the Fair) was first published in the British Lyre for 1792, and “was sung as a famous duet between Samuel Harrison and his wife, the soprano Miss Cantelo, at Harrison’s Concerts, periodic events which he began in 1776”.  It became, as a consequence, widely-known, and turns up in England, Scotland and Ireland in various forms, and, as was mentioned above, the Scottish variant under discussion was used by Junior Crehan as the basis for his jig Misty Mountain.”(qui)

ASCOLTA Fuzzy Felt Folk 2006 la versione come poteva essere cantata all’epoca

Nell’adattamento di John Cameron diventa una melodia dolce ma malinconica a metà tra il lament e una slow march, e da allora che viene eseguita spesso nelle commemorazioni funebri.

ASCOLTA John Renbourn in The Black Ballon, 1979 con il titolo di The Mist Covered Mountains of Home (seguono The Orphan, Tarboulton)

ASCOLTA con le cornamuse

Qui suonata quasi come un walzer lento

e qui suonata come jig
ASCOLTA De Dannan 1980

FONTI
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/pageturner.cfm?id=76643345&mode=transcription
http://ingeb.org/songs/mistcovd.html
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_mist.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mouthmusic/chi.htm
http://apocalypsewriters.com/blog/tag/saw-ye-him-coming/
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/chimi.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/3411
https://thesession.org/tunes/470
https://thesession.org/tunes/256
http://ericdentinger.com/themistcoveredmountains_en.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/ohdearwhatcanthematterbe.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1393

COMIN THRO’ THE RYE

“Camminando in un campo di segale” è una nursery rhyme che nasce però come canzone a doppio senso (e della quale esistono versioni decisamente sconce).
Il testo oggi fa sorridere ma all’epoca in cui circolava (sicuramente il settecento ma potrebbe anche essere antecedente) era decisamente sconveniente: un tempo nei campi non solo si lavorava, ma ci si scambiavano effusioni più o meno spinte, e solo i due interessati potevano sapere fino a che punto si fossero fermati (o a quale conclusione fossero addivenuti).

LA MELODIA

Per i fans di Diana Gabaldon e la serie televisiva Outlander che ha debuttato negli States nel 2014 (la prima Tv in Italia risale all’estate 2015)
ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) ascolta su Spotify (qui)

Coming Through The Rye  è anche un Scottish country dance

LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS (1796)

W. Napier scrive a proposito : “The original words of “Comin’ thro’ the rye” cannot be satisfactorily traced. There are many different versions of the song. The version which is now to be found in the Works of Burns is the one given in Johnson’s Museum, which passed through the hands of Burns; but the song itself, in some form or other, was known long before Burns” (Napier 1876 in Notes and Queries)
Nello “Scots Musical Museum” Volume V ci sono due versioni del testo, il primo (#417) è attribuito a Robert Burns il secondo (#418) non ha attribuzioni.

Se la donna non grida “al lupo” nessuno può sapere quello che accade tra la segale, ma l’autore aggiunge: il fatto non deve essere di pubblico dominio bensì è una faccenda personale; è implicita la polemica verso i pettegolezzi e i giudizi dei puritani (o bigotti) sempre pronti a condannare come immorali le pulsioni sessuali che la Natura richiama.

ASCOLTA Ian Bruce

Scots Museum vol V # 417
Robert Burns
I
O Jenny’s a’ weet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry:
She draigl’t(1) a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye(2)!
II
Comin thro’ the rye, poor body,
Comin thro’ the rye,
She draigl’t a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye!
III
Gin(3) a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the rye,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry(4)?
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the glen,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need the warld(5) ken(6)?
V (strofa aggiuntiva)
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the grain,
Gin a body kiss a body,
The thing’s a body’s ain(7).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oh Jenny è tutta bagnata poverina
Jenny sta raramente all’asciutto
sta inzuppando (infangando) le sue sottovesti venendo attraverso la segale
II
Venendo attraverso la segale, poverina
venendo attraverso la segale
sta infangando le sue sottovesti
venendo attraverso la segale
III
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la segale
se una persona bacia una persona
deve una persona piangere?
IV
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la valle
se una persona bacia una persona
lo debbono sapere tutti?
V (strofa aggiuntiva non in Burns)
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso il grano
se una persona bacia una persona
sono affari suoi

NOTE
1) draigl’t – draggled: ‘covered with mud’ o ‘drenched’.
2) rye è la segale, ma un’altra interpretazione, pubblicata nel Glasgow Herald del 1867 suggerisce che il Rye è un fiume dell’Ayrshire e che la canzone si riferisce ad un guado  a nord di Drakemyre (non lontano dalla confluenza del fiume Rye con il River Garnock).
3) gin – if, should
4) cry – call out [for help] nel senso di chiedere aiuto
5) warld – world
6) ken – know
7) ain – own; tradotto letteralmente: la cosa riguarda la persona stessa

Traduzione Inglese
di Michael R. Burch
I
Oh, Jenny’s all wet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry;
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
II
Comin’ through the rye, poor body,
Comin’ through the rye.
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
III
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the rye,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need anybody cry?
IV
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the glen,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need all the world know, then?
V
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the grain,
Should a body kiss a body,
The thing is a body’s own

Ma la canzone ha molte varianti tramandati dalla tradizione orale, come questa

ASCOLTA Blialam

I
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the rye
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body cry?
Chorus
Ilka lassie has her laddie
Nane, they say, hae I
Yet aa the lads they smile at me
When comin through the rye
II
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the toon,
Gin a body greet a body
Need a body froon?
III
Amang the train there is a swain
I dearly loe masel
But what’s his name
an where’s his hame
I dinna care to tell
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin frae the well
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body tell?

Nelle versioni americane Jenny diventa Sally, una melodia old-time
ASCOLTA The Ephemeral Stringband
La versione cantata dai The Real McKenzies aggiunge ulteriori variazioni

 
CHORUS
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the rye,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body cry!
Ilka lassie ha’e ha laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I,
When all the lassies smile at me,
We’re comin’ thro’ the rye!
I
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the town,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body frown!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la segale
se una persona incontra una persona
deve una persona piangere?
Ogni ragazza ha il suo ragazzo
ma io non ne ho nessuno, dicono
quando tutte le ragazze mi sorridono
arriviamo dalla segale
I
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene per la città
se una persona incontra una persona
nessuno deve disapprovare!
E infine la versione come nursery rhymes
I
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the rye;
If a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry?
II
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!
III
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the town;
If a body greet a body,
Need a body frown?
IV
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!

FONTI
http://musicofyesterday.com/sheet-music-c/comin-thro-rye-burns/
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-417,-page-430-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-418,-page-431-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555472.asp
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/CominThroughTheRye.html
http://milwburnsclub.virtualimprint.com/songs/throrye.htm
https://daeandwrite.wordpress.com/tag/catcher-in-the-rye-book-club-menu/
http://discoveryholden.blogspot.it/2010/03/catcher-in-rye-cosa-si-nasconde-dietro.html
http://stooryduster.co.uk/draiglet/

WEILA WAILE OR “THE IRISH CRUEL MOTHER”

Cruel Mother” è il titolo di una murder ballad, una oscura ballata probabilmente proveniente dalla tradizione norrena, che Child raccoglie al numero 20. Si presume sia di origine scozzese, ma è diffusa ampiamente in Inghilterra e Irlanda e anche nelle Americhe in una grande varietà di testi e melodie. (vedi inizio qui)

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: WEILA WAILE

380x285-cz5t-500-x-500La ballata “The Cruel Mother” si è conservata e tramandata come Nursery Rhyme ben nota ai bambini irlandesi e di Liverpool e in particolare ai travellers con il titolo di “Weila Waile” o “The River Saile”.

Non è insolito che delle truculente ballate di omicidio finiscano nelle canzoncine per bambini  hanno lo stesso ruolo delle “fiabe paurose” che aiutano il bambino  nella crescita.

La canzoncina è vista come una parodia e la donna che uccide il bambino con un coltello, non è più identificata come la madre bensì è una “old woman” che vive nel bosco. E’ l’uomo nero delle fiabe, la strega di Hansel e Gretel, l’orco che uccide i bambini “cattivi” per mangiarli. Ecco che la giustizia fa il suo corso e la donna viene catturata e fatta penzolare sulla forca.
Nella tradizione orale si tramanda la storia che la donna era disperata a causa della Grande carestia di metà ottocento e che piuttosto di vedere morire di stenti il figlio abbia preferito ucciderlo.

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem

ASCOLTA Dubliners nella storia illustrata da Francesco Guiotto


There was an old woman who lived in the wood, Weela weela wallia(1);
There was an old woman who lived in the wood, Down by the river Sallia(2).
She had a baby six (3) months old,
She had a penknife three foot long (4),
She stuck the knife in the baby’s head (5),
The more she stabbed it, the more it bled.
Three big knocks (6) came a-knocking at the door,
Two policeman and a man (7),
“Are you the woman what killed the child?”
“I am the woman what killed the child.”
(They took her away and they put her in the jail
They put a rope around her neck, -8)
The rope got chucked and she got hung (9) The moral of this story is,
Don’t stick knives in baby’s heads
(And that was the end of the woman in the woods,
And that was the end of the baby too -10.)
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
C’era una vecchia che viveva nel bosco, weile weile waile(1).
C’era una vecchia che viveva nel bosco,  vicino al fiume Saile(2).
Aveva un bambino di 6 mesi
e aveva un coltello lungo tre piedi
e ficcò il coltello nella testa del bambino
e più lo affondava più si macchiava di sangue.
Con tre grandi colpi vennero a bussare alla porta
due poliziotti e un boia
“Siete voi la donna che uccise il bambino?” “Sono io la donna che uccise il bambino”
(la portarono via e la gettarono in prigione,
le misero un cappio intorno al collo)
La corda calò e lei restò appesa
La morale della favola è:
non ficcate coltelli intesta ai bambini
(E questa fu la fine della donna del bosco
e anche la fine del bambino)

NOTE
1) “Weile Weile waile” potrebbe derivare dall’inglese antico “wailowai”, “weilewei”, per indicare un’esclamazione di dolore
2) alcuni identificano il Saile con il fiume Poddle che in irlandese è detto Salach “sporco”; altri che sia il “Sawyer”; altri credono che la parola derivi da “sallow” nel significato di “willow”; altri ancora che sia un passaggio da “river-side, la” a “river sigh-la” e quindi “River Saile”
3) oppure three
4) oppure long and sharp
5) oppure heart
6) oppure  three loud knocks
7)  modificato a volte  in “Special Branch man” per indicare la polizia irlandese istituita nel 1922 come Gardaí (i guardiani della pace) in cui lo Special Branch era utilizzato per questioni di sicurezza nazionale, in senso più specifico invece del generico uomo si intende probabilmente il boia
8) versi aggiuntivi
9) oppure They pulled the rope and she got hung
10) finale alternativo cantato dai Dubliners

THE LADY DRESSED IN GREEN

Come ci racconta Al LLoyd “..folklorist saw the game being played in a Lancashire orphanage in 1915. The children called it The Lady Drest in Green. The song describes how the lady kills her baby with a pen-knife, tries to wash off the blood, goes home to lie down, is aroused by three “bobbies” at the door, who extract a confession from her and rush her off to prison, and “That was the end of Mrs. Green”. It is a ring game. Two children in the middle impersonate Mrs. Green and the baby, following the action of the song. The children in the ring dance round, singing the refrains, until the “bobbies” rush in and seize the mother, when the ring breaks up. In his “London Street Games” (1931 ed.), Norman Douglas prints a corrupt version current in East and South-East London during the First World War”.

ASCOLTA John Wesley Harding in “Songs of Misfortune”

There was a lady dressed in green, Fare a lair a lido
There was a lady dressed in green Down by the greenwood sideShe had a baby in her arms
She had a penknife long and sharp
She stuck it in the baby’s heart
She went to the well to wash it off
The more she washed, the more it bled
There came a knocking on the door
There came three bobbies rushing in
They asked her what she did last night
She said I killed my only son

La versione diffusa a Liverpool e interpretata dagli Spinners si intitola “Old Mother Lee”: “The girls of Kirkdale, Liverpool, whose brothers at Major Street school gave this to [Spinner] Tony Davis, had certainly not heard of Professor Child. However, their skipping is unmistakeably based on the [‘Cruel Mother] ballad substituting the grim realities of ‘forty police’, ‘the magistrate’ and capital punishment for the ghostly children and the ‘fires of hell’ of the older form of the story”. (note in ‘The Spinners at the London Palladium’)

ASCOLTA OLD MOTHER LEE

There was an old woman called old Mother Lee
Old Mother Lee, old Mother Lee
There was an old woman called old Mother Lee
Down by the walnut tree(1)She had a baby in her arms
She had a penknife long and sharp
She stabbed te baby through the heart
The next-door neighbours saw the blood
They rang up for the forty police
The forty police came running (skipping) out
They took her to the magistrate
The magistrate said she must die
They hung her to the walnut tree
And that was the end of old Mother Lee

NOTE
1) il noce è un tipico albero sotto cui le streghe si radunano per i loro sabba

ALL ROUND THE LONEY O

Per completezza si riporta anche questa versione “edulcorata” in cui la donna uccide il bambino e poi se stessa spinta dalla disperazione  (e dall’ottundimento della coscienza dovuta alle privazioni della fame e alla debilitazione causata dalle “febbri”)  durante la Grande Carestia.

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers

There were two sisters going to school All round the Loney O
They spied a woman at a pool Down by the greenwood sidey O

She held a baby on her knee
A cruel penknife they could see
She held the baby to her heart
She cried “My Dear, we both must part”
She held the baby to her breast
She said “my dear we’ll both find rest”
There is a river running deep
It’s there both baby and mother sleep

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6876