Archivi tag: Newfoundland

Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down

Leggi in Italiano

Entitled “Jolly Roving Tar” but more frequently “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” here is a forebitter song that ironizes on the idle occupations of a sailor when he is ashore.
For my money’s gone,” says the sailor who is well liked and fondled by the ladies when his pockets are full, but immediately put aside for another sailor when the money ends!

A similar song (we do not know if original or a traditional version rewriting) was written in New York in 1885 by Ed Harrigan & David Braham for the music hall entitled ‘Old Lavender‘ (text and score here); a version published by John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” was attributed to John Thomas, a Welsh sailor who was on “the Philadelphian” in 1896. (text here), but the main source of the best known variant comes from “Grammy” Fish .

“GRAMMY” FISH

Mrs. Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) spent the first 24 years of her life in Black Brook, NY, not far from the Canadian border. Lena’s main source of songs was her own family, the Bourne; his ancestors were the first settlers of Cape Cod and a lot of songs (with many English and Irish traditional tunes) had passed to the family generations since emigration . As a lumber trader, her father  collected many songs from the people he met in the New England woods in his travels.
Once married, Lena moved to Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Two collectors of traditional songs (Helen Harkness Flanders and Marguerite Olney) interviewed her in 1940 and recorded about 175 songs; the following year Anne and Frank Warner collected a hundred songs in four recording sessions half of which completly new ones.
“Grammy” Fish had taken her role as a witness of the past to heart so as to transcribe the “old songs” in many notebooks to leave them to the new generations.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live

I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…

NOTES
1) grog= drink
2) Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, which the sailors define as” recruiters “, who provide” indifferently lodging and boarding “. They often welcome sailors “on credit”. On the advance received by boarders at the time of enrollment, they recover for food and accommodation, and with the rest they provide them with poor quality clothing and equipment “. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  or “He then will sail aboard some ship
4)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes. (the eight bells were ringed at 4, at 8, at 12, at 16, at 20 and at midnight). An hourglass was used to calculate the time.

Great Big Sea from Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.

I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!

NOTES
3) meaning that he will not offend the innkeeper with a refusal
4) Placentia is a small Canadian city formed by the union of the villages of Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville and Argentia .
5)”When it’s the end” his watch on board is finished as well as his life. On the old vessels the ringing sound of a bell regulated the time, every 4-hour guard duty was signaled by 8 bell strokes.

ENGLISH VERSION

In the nineteenth century there was a completely different version in which poor Susan was distraught because the fine William was still far from the sea, she decided to follow him as a sailor. The version is still popular in Newfoundland. As much as I searched the web at the moment I did not find a video to listen to.
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

Jolly Roving Tar by “Irish Rovers”

The text was written by George Millar the founder of the “Irish Rovers” and although a different song borrows some phrases from “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” other equally famous sea songs on sailors.
The Irish Rover from Another Round 2005: various dances taken from fantasy films and animations

I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

Boston Harbor, a colonial sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

“Boston” o “Boston Harbor” is a forebitter song from the uncertain origin, it may referred to the small port of Boston, Lincolnshire or the larger port in Boston, Massachusetts. Also known as “Big Bow Wow” after a line from the chorus. It comes from Captain Whall’s collection, (Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties ,1910) and was published in Joanna C. Colcord, 1938, “Songs of American Sailormen,”  with music score. Captain W B Whall writes “The origin of the following example is unknown to me. It is evidently the work of a seaman and has, probably, never before appeared in print. I have never met with it. The song goes with a good swing, and was very popular between the years of 1860 and 1870.

Clippership Alert Leaving Boston c. 1835 -Christopher Blossom

Smithsonian Folkways records “Boston Harbor” in the album “Colonial and Revolutionary War Sea Songs and Shanties” which collects the traditional American songs of the sea in the colonial era (1765-1775). Famous the Boston Tea Party of December 16, 1773, when the American colonists to protest the commercial imposition of the British Empire decide to assault a ship full of tea landed in the port of Boston and throw all the cargo at sea. The Boston Tea Party was a significant event in the growth of the American Revolution
Cliff Halsam & John Millar from Colonial and Revolutionary War Sea Songs and Shanties 1975
The Watersons (I, II, III, V) from “New Voices” (1965)

Joe Hickerson,  Jeff Warner, Gerrett Warner &Tony Saletan from Songs & Sounds of the Sea 1973
The Mimi Crew from Songs of the Sea 1988

The Punters Big Bow Wow from Fisherman’s Blues 2003
(Newfoundland version)


I
From Boston Harbour (1) we set sail
When it was blowin’ the devil of a gale,
With the ringtail(2) set all avast (abaft) the mizzen peak (3)
And Rule Britannia (4) ploughin’ up the deep.
Chorus (after each verse):
With a big bow-wow(5)!
Tow-row-row (6)!

Fol de rol de ri do day!
II
Then up come the skipper(captain)
from down below,
It’s “Look aloft, lads, look alow!” (7)
And it’s “Look alow!” and it’s “Look aloft!”
And “Tie (Coil ) up your ropes, lads, fore and aft!”
III
Then down to his cabin well he quickly crawls (falls),
To his poor old steward (8) bawls,
“Go and mix me a glass that will make me cough (9)
For it’s better weather here than it is on top (up aloft)”

IV
It’s we poor sailors standin’ on the deck,
With the blasted rain pourin’ down our necks;
And not a drop of grog will he to us afford,
And he damns our eyes (10) with every other word.
V
Now there’s one thing that we have to crave:
That the captain meets with a watery grave.
So we’ll throw him down into some dark hole
Where the sharks ‘ll have his body and the devil have his soul.

NOTES
1) the Punters say Bay Bulls, there is also the Yarmouth version
2) the phrase wants to underline the captain’s unskillfulness
because the ringtail is set when there is a slight breeze
3) the Punters say “our ba(f)flin  is in peak”,
4) or Dolphin striker or a Yankee ship
5) bow-wow is the barking of the dog, but in the double meanings of the nineteenth-century musichall’s songs it meant the male sexual organ (like pussy for the female one), in the Passing English of the Victorian bow-wow = mutton (so bad that it might be dog-flesh). From a dictionary Slang and its Analogues Past and Present (1909) bow-wow = A Bostonian: in contempt
6) toe row row – typical arrangement line by line, foot by foot, or side by side (from the British Grenadiers)
7)  W.B. Whall:
And he looks aloft and he looks alow,
And he looks alow and he looks aloft,
8) or cabin boy
9) a very strong drink. Punters say “Go and get me a drink that’ll make me cough”
10) “Damn your eyes!” it’s a curse, “damn you”

In hee A Ship of Solace (1911) Elinor Mordaunt publishes a further lines
VI
Now that old fellow he’s both dead and gone,
But he’s left to us his one and only son.
And if he don’t prove both kind and frank,
So help me, Jimmy, we’ll make him walk the plank.

LINK
https://www.bostonteapartyship.com/the-aftermath
https://folkways.si.edu/cliff-halsam-and-john-millar/colonial-and-revolutionary-war-sea-songs-and-shanties/american-folk-historical-song/music/album/smithsonian
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/bostonharbour.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boston-harbour.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/bostonha.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20991
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15700

Lass of Glanshee

Leggi in italiano

“The Lass of Glanshee” or “The maid of Glashee” or “The Rose of Glanshee” is a Scottish ballad penned by Andrew Sharpe (according to G Malcolm Laws -in American Balladry From Bristish Broadsides, 1957) in the late 1700s ‘Nineteenth century, on the tune “The Road and the Miles to Dundee
Curious character, Andrew Sharpe, cobbler from Perth (Scotland), but also flute player, painter, composer and singer of love songs, yet this song is best known in its version from Celtic Canada, as it was collected by Helen Creighton during her excursions in New Brunswick from 1954 to 1960 and transcribed in “Folksongs from Southern New Brunswick” (1971). The witness Angelo Dornan, lived in Elgin, NB (Eastern Canada) at the time of registration. Most of his repertoire comes from Northern Ireland, the place of origin of his parents.

The ballad is a “pastoral” songs, a very popular song in England, Ireland and Scotland in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: this literary genre is characterized by the love contrast between a shepherdess and a suitor (a shepherd boy, or as in this case , a gentleman of passage) often with an erotic or spicy allusive background. The textual versions are quite similar and describe the same story: while a rustic but very pretty shepherdess is herding her flock, a young man spy and courting her; the song is then developed on the model of a pastoral contrast, with him who trying to seduce her and she escapes, knowing full well that she would never become his bride, because of their social difference. In reality the young maidens who wandered through the countryside and the woods were easy prey (more or less consensual) of the “hunters” men and often these ballads ended with the announcement of unfortunate pregnancies.(see more)

HAPPY END

“The Lass of Glanshee” has a happy ending as in beautiful fairy tales they get married and live happily for ever!

Altan from Horse With A Heart 1989: with their balanced repertoire based on the traditional music of Donegal and the Scottish influences the Altan spread throughout the world ballads, nursery rhymes and songs in Gaelic. Their version of The Lass of Glanshee, performed on a song originally from Scotland, has become a standard for Irish music groups.
Anuna (I, II,IV,V, VI)

Cara Dillon live

Greenoch interesting version of the Italian duo Cecilia Gonnelli and Roger Taradel

THE LASS OF GLENSHEE
I
One morning in springtime
as day was a-dawning
Bright Phoebus had risen
from over the lea
I spied a fair maiden
as homeward she wandered
From herding her flocks
on the hills of Glenshee
II
I stood in amazement,
says I, “Pretty fair maid
If you will come down
to St. John’s Town (1) with me
There’s ne’er been a lady
set foot in my castle (2)
There’s ne’er been a lady
dressed grander than thee
III
A coach and six horses
to go at your bidding
And all men that speak
shall say “ma’am unto thee
Fine servants to serve you
and go at your bidding”
I’ll make you my bride,
my sweet lass of Glenshee”
IV
“Oh what do I care for
your castles and coaches?
And what do I care
for your gay grandeury (3)?
I’d rather be home at my cot,
at my spinning
Or herding my flocks
on the hills of Glenshee”
V
“Away with such nonsense
and get up beside me
E’er summer comes on
my sweet bride you will be
And then in my arms
I will gently caress thee”
‘Twas then she consented,
I took her with me
VI
Seven years have rolled on
since we were united
There’s many’s a change,
but there’s no change on me
And my love, she’s as fair
as that morn on the mountain
When I plucked me a wild rose (4)
on the hills of Glenshee

NOTES
1) the city of Perth has an ancient church ((St John’s Kirk) and formerly took the name of Saint John’s Toun or St Johnstone.
2) Perthshire is dotted with castles scattered across the beautiful countryside but also close to Perth: Balhousie Castle, Huntingtower Castle, Scone Palace, Elcho Castle, Fingask Castle, Strathallan Castle, Blair Castle (more)
3) the verse follows the popular Raggle Taggle Gypsie
4) they are not limited to holding hands, and the rose is not just a flower

SCOTTISH/CANADIAN VERSION: THE HILLS OF GLENSHEE

The Glenshee Hills are located in the county of Pert, the ‘Fairy hill’ in the center of Scotland, a popular winter ski resort and summer hiking destination.

With the title “The Hills of Glenshee” is the variant spread to Newfoundland.
Harry Hibbs a more country version, from best-known icon for traditional Newfoundland music.

THE HILLS OF GLENSHEE
I
One fine summer’s mornin’
as I went out walkin’,
Just as the grey dawn
flew over the sea,
I happened to spy
a fair haired young damsel,
Attending her flock
by the hills of Glenshee.
II
I said,” pretty fair one,
will you be my dear one,
For I’ll take you over,
my bride for to be;
And this very night
in my arms  I will hold you,
While you tend your flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
III
“Oh no, my dear sir,
you’ll not take me over,
None of your footmen
to wait upon me;
I would rather stay home
in my own homespun clothing,
And attend to my flock
on the hills of Glenshee.”
IV
For twenty long years
we’ve both been together,
Seasons may change
but there’s no change in me;
And if God lets me live
and I have my right senses,
I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
V
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
She’s as pure as the perfume
blows over the sea;
And her cheeks are as pale
as the white rose of summer,
That spreads out its leaves
on the hills of Glenshee.
VI
She’s Mary, my Mary,
my own lovin’ darlin’,
I do love her so
and I know she loves me;
And I’ll never prove false
to my girl where I met her,
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.
No I’ll never prove false
to the girl on Glenshee.

see also
LINK
https://www.mun.ca/folklore/leach/songs/NFLD1/2-10.htm
https://soundcloud.com/catherinecrowe/01-the-rose-of-glenshee?in=catherinecrowe/sets/field-recordings-of-angelo
http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/WiscFolkSong/data/docs/WiscFolkSong/400/000333.pdf
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50613
http://folksongsatlanticcanada.blogspot.it/2012/04/new-brunswick-folk-songs.html
https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/JNBS/article/view/20084/23145
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/26/hills.htm

“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!” about a jolly roving tar

Read the post in English

Intitolata “Jolly Roving Tar” ma più frequentemente “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” ecco una forebitter song che ironizza sulle oziose occupazioni di un marinaio quando si trova sulla terra ferma.
For my money’s gone, ‘tis the same old song” dice il marinaio che è benvoluto e vezzeggiato dalle donnine quando ha le tasche piene, ma messo subito da parte per far posto ad un altro ancora in grana, quando i soldi finiscono!!

Una canzone simile (non sappiamo se originale oppure riscrittura di una versione tradizionale)  è stata scritta a New York nel 1885 da Ed Harrigan & David Braham per il music hall dal titolo ‘Old Lavender’ (testo e spartito qui); una versione pubblicata da John and Alan Lomax in “American Ballads & Folk Songs” è stata attribuita a John Thomas un marinaio gallese imbarcato sul Philadelphian nel 1896. (testo qui), ma la fonte principale della variante più conosciuta  proviene da “Grammy” Fish.

“GRAMMY” FISH

La signora Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) visse da ragazza a Black Brook, NY, poco lontano dal confine canadese. La principale fonte delle sue canzoni era ovviamente la sua famiglia, i Bourne con il padre e lo zio in testa; i suoi antenati furono i primi coloni di Capo Cod e i canti erano passati alle varie generazioni della famiglia dai tempi dell’emigrazione con molti brani della tradizione inglese e irlandese. Il padre inoltre in qualità di commerciante di legname viaggiava molto e imparò (trasmettendole alla figlia) ulteriori canzoni nei boschi del New England.
Una volta sposata Lena si trasferì a Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Due collezionisti delle canzoni tradizionali la intervistarono nel 1940 e registrarono circa 175 canzoni (Helen Harkness Flanders e Marguerite Olney), l’anno successivo Anne e Frank Warner raccolsero un centinaio di canzoni in quattro sessioni di registrazione la metà delle quali non raccolte nell’anno precedente.
La signora aveva a preso così a cuore il suo ruolo di testimone del passato da trascrivere su numerosi quaderni le “vecchie canzoni” proprio per lasciarle in eredità alle nuove generazioni.

Assassin’s Creed Rogue, Sea Shanty Edition

Bootstrappers live


I
Ships may come and ships may go
as long as the seas do roll
But a sailor lad just like his dad
he loves the flowing bowl
a woman ashore he does adore
a girl who’s plump and round
when your money’s all gone,
it’s the same old song
“Get up, Jack! John, sit down!”
CHORUS
Come along, come along,
me jolly brave boys,
There’s plenty more grog(1) in the jar
We’ll plough the briny ocean line
like a jolly roving tar
II
When Jack’s ashore, he’ll make his way
To some old boarding house(2)
He’s welcomed in with rum and gin,
likewise with pork and scouse
He’ll spend and spend and never offend
Till he lies drunk on the ground
When his money’s all gone…
III
Then Jack will slip(3) on board
some ship bound for India or Japan
and in Asia there, the ladies fair
all love a sailor man
He’ll go ashore and he’ll not scorn
to buy some girl her gown
when his money’s all gone…
IV
When Jack is worn and weatherbeat
too old to cruise about
they’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(4) calls him out
Then he’ll raise hands high
and loud he’ll cry “Thank Christ, I’m homeward bound!”
when his money’s all gone…
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Le navi vanno e vengono
e navigano in lungo e in largo il mare
ma un giovane marinaio proprio come suo padre ama la boccia piena
e una donna a terra adora
una ragazza che sia graziosa e rotondetta, e quando i soldi sono andati è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
Venite avanti
allegri e bravi ragazzi
c’è tanto grog(1) nella bottiglia
solcheremo l’oceano salmastro
come un allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
Quando Jack sbarca si dirigerà
verso una qualche vecchia pensione d’imbarco(2)
dove gli danno il benvenuto con rum e gin
e lo riempiranno con stufato di maiale.
Spenderà e spenderà e mai smetterà
finchè finirà ubriaco steso a terra
quando i soldi sono andati..
III
Jack allora dormirà(3) a bordo
di qualche nave con destinazione India o Giappone e in Asia là, le belle signore
tutte amano un marinaio
Andrà a riva e non disprezzerà
di comprare ad una ragazza un vestito
quando i soldi sono andati…
IV
Quando Jack diventa vecchio e stanco
troppo vecchio per andare in giro
si fermerà in qualche negozio di rum
finchè l’ottavo rintocco (4) lo chiamerà
Allora solleverà gli occhi al cielo
e forte griderò “Grazie Cristo, sono in rotta verso casa”
quando i soldi sono andati…

NOTE
1) qui il termine è da intendersi nel senso generico di liquore e non più propriamente della bevanda mescolata con acqua servita sulle navi ai marinai
2) Le “boarding houses” sono pensioni per marinai, presenti in ogni grande porto di mare. “Sono tenute da procuratori d’imbarco (boarding masters), di dubbia reputazione, che i marinai definiscono «arruolatori», i quali forniscono «indifferentemente alloggio e imbarco». Spesso accolgono i marinai «a credito». Sull’anticipo ricevuto dai pensionanti all’atto dell’arruolamento, si rifanno del vitto e dell’alloggio, e con il resto forniscono loro abbigliamento e attrezzature di scarsa qualità“. (Italo Ottonello)
3)  oppure He then will sail aboard some ship
4) l’espressione è squisitamente nautica sta per “quando arriverà il momento”,  è finito il suo turno di guardia a bordo come pure la sua vita (vedi nota 5)

Great Big Sea in Play 1997. Traditional American Folk Songs from the Anne & Frank Warner Collection, #71.


I
Ships may come and ships may go
As long as the sea does roll.
Each sailor lad just like his dad,
He loves the flowing bowl.
A trip on shore he does adore
With a girl who’s nice and round.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
[Chorus]
Come along, come along,
You jolly brave boys,
There’s lots of grog(1) in the jar.
We’ll plough the briny ocean
With the jolly roving tar.
II
When Jack comes in, it’s then he’ll steer
To some old boarding house(2).
They’ll welcome him with rum and gin,
And feed him on pork scouse.
He’ll lend, spend and he’ll not offend (3) Till he’s lyin’ drunk on the ground
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
III
Jack, he then, oh then he’ll sail
Bound down for Newfoundland.
All the ladies fair in Placentia(4) there
They love that sailor man
He’ll go to shore out on a tear
And he’ll buy some girl a gown.
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
IV
When Jack gets old and weather beat,
Too old to roam about,
They’ll let him stop in some rum shop
Till eight bells(5) calls him out.
Then he’ll raise his eyes up to the skies,
Sayin’ “Boys, we’re homeward bound.”
When the money’s gone
It’s the same old song,
“Get up Jack! John, sit down!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Le navi vanno e vengono e navigano in lungo e in largo il mare,
ogni giovane marinaio proprio come suo padre, ama la boccia piena.
Un giro a terra adora fare
con una ragazza che sia graziosa e rotondetta,
ma quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
Venite avanti
allegri e bravi ragazzi
c’è tanto grog nella bottiglia
solcheremo l’oceano salmastro
con l’allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
Quando Jack arriva, allora si fionderà verso una vecchia pensione d’imbarco(2)
dove lo accoglieranno con rum e gin
e lo riempiranno con stufato di maiale
Presterà, spenderà e non rifiuterà (3)
finchè finirà ubriaco steso a terra
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
III
Jack allora oh allora farà vela,
destinazione Terranova;
tutte le belle signore di Placentia (4) là
amano quel marinaio
Andrà a riva con una lacrima
e comprerà ad una ragazza un vestito
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”
IV
Quando Jack diventa vecchio e stanco
troppo vecchio per andare in giro
si fermerà in qualche negozio di rum
finchè l’ottavo rintocco (5) lo chiamerà
Allora solleverà gli occhi al cielo
dicendo “Ragazzi, siamo in rotta verso casa”
quando i soldi sono andati
è sempre la stessa vecchia storia
“Alzati Jack! John siediti”

NOTE
1) vedi nota sopra
2) vedi nota sopra
3) nel senso che non offenderà l’oste con un rifiuto
4) la strofa è una variante locale di Terranova, Placentia è una piccola città canadese costituita dall’unione dei villaggi di Jerseyside, Townside, Freshwater, Dunville e Argentia..
5) sui vascelli il suono squillante di una campana regolava il tempo, ogni turno di guardia di 4 ore era segnalato da 8 rintocchi. (gli otto rintocchi di campana erano suonati alle 4, alle 8, alle 12, alle 16, alle 20 e a mezzanotte). Per calcolare il tempo si usava una clessidra. “Otto campane in marina indicava anche un cambiamento, un passaggio da una situazione ad un’altra, un “taglio” quindi tra il vecchio e il nuovo.
Al proposito ricordo che mio padre, maresciallo della Regia Marina, usava la frase “Sono suonate le otto campane” per significare che per un Marinaio era finita… finito il suo turno di guardia a bordo come pure la sua vita; sì era un modo di dire anzi un eufemismo per affermare che si poteva dargli l’estremo saluto!” (Marino Miccoli, tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Sempre nell’Ottocento circolava una versione completamente diversa in cui la povera Susan era affranta perché il bel William stava ancora lontano per mare, decide di seguirlo nei panni di marinaio, imbarcandosi su una nave nientemeno che del padre. La versione è ancora popolare a Terranova. Per quanto abbia cercato nel web al momento non ho trovato un video da ascoltare. Rimandando ad altri tempi un approfondimento..
It was in the town of Liverpool, all in the month of May,
I overheard a damsel, alone as she did stray,
She did appear like Venus or some sweet, lovely star,
As she walked toward the beach, lamenting for her jolly, roving Tar.

LA VERSIONE IRISH ROVER Jolly Roving Tar

Il testo è stato scritto da George Millar il fondatore degli Irish Rover (irlandesi trapiantati in Canada per chi non li conoscesse) e pur essendo una diversa canzone prende in prestito alcune frasi sia da “Get Up, Jack! John, Sit Down” che da altre altrettanto famose sea song sui marinai.
The Irish Rover in Another Round 2005:il video è una simpatica sincronizzazione con varie danze prese da spezzoni di film fantasy e animazioni


I
Well here we are, we’re back again
Safe upon the shore
In Belfast town we’d like to stay
And go to sea no more
We’ll go into a public house
And drink till we’re content
For the lassies they will love us
Till our money is all spent
CORO
So pass the flowin’ bowl
Boys there’s whiskey in the jar
And we’ll drink to all the lassies
And the jolly roving tar
II
Oh Johnny did you miss me
When the nights were long and cold
Or did you find another love
In your arms to hold
Says he I thought of only you
While on the sea afar
So come up the stairs and cuddle
With your jolly roving tar
III
Well in each other’s arms they rolled
Till the break of day
When the sailor rose
and said farewell
I must be on me way
Ah don’t you leave me Johnny lad
I thought you’d marry my
Says he I can’t be married
For I’m married to the sea
IV
Well come all you bonnie lasses
And a warning take by me
And never trust an Irishman
An inch above your knee
He’ll tease you and he’ll squeeze you
And when he’s had his fun
He’ll leave you in the morning
With a daughter or a son
traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Eccoci qui, siamo di ritorno
al sicuro sulla terra, nella città di Belfast preferiremmo restare
e non andare più per mare.
Andremo nel pub
e berremo fino a essere pieni
perché le ragazze ci amano
fino a quando tutti i soldi spendiamo
CORO
Così passa la boccia piena
ragazzi c’è il whisky nel bicchiere
berremo a tutte le ragazze
e all’allegro marinaio vagabondo
II
“Oh Johnny mi sei mancato
quando le notti erano lunghe e fredde
o hai trovato un altro amore
da tenere tra le braccia?”
Dice lui “Pensavo solo a te
mentre ero lontano per mare
così sali le scale e stringiti
al tuo allegro marinaio vagabondo”
III
Tra le braccia uno dell’altra si cullarono
fino al sorgere dell’alba
quando il marinaio si alzò
e disse “addio devo andare via”
“Oh non mi lasciare mio giovane marinaio
credevo che mi sposassi”
dice lui “Non posso sposarmi
perché sono sposato con il mare”
IV
Venite tutte voi, belle ragazze
e prendete questo avviso da me
non concedete mai a un irlandese
un pollice sopra al ginocchio
vi stuzzicherà e stringerà
e quando avrà preso il suo piacere
vi lascerà al mattino
con una figlia o un figlio

continua
FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/jolly-roving-tar.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/JollyRovinTar/lomax.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/07/jolly.htm
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/GETUPJAC.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/08/getup.htm
http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/catalog/levy:072.028
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=338
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96587
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96582
http://adirondackmusic.org/subpages/69/9/6/lena-bourne-fish

SURROUNDED BY WATER

Decisamente una irish folk song collocabile tra le Rebel Ballads, rimasta a lungo nella classifica tra i dischi più venduti in Irlanda quando fu interpretata da The Ludlow trio (ossia The Ludlows) nel 1966 (con la voce di Jim McCann)

THE SEA AROUND US

Il testo di “The sea around us” è stato scritto da Dominic Behan su una vecchia melodia popolare dal titolo ” ‘S faigamid siud mar a ta se”, suonata però  come un walzer.
1962_cosmoDominic Behan (1928 – 1989) fu scrittore, cantante e non ultimo attivista politico. Il suo approccio verso la canzone popolare è quella del cantastorie che rinnova le vecchie melodie, per esprimere con le parole del momento, ma più “urbane”, gli umori del popolo.

Dominic dice in merito al testo di “The sea around us”:”I got the line from my Mother which a friend of hers, Mick Byrne, wrote, together with about forty verses he couldn’t remember. The line I got was ‘Thank God we’re surrounded by water’, and I thought it far too good to lose.” Ovviamente solo un grande autore come lui, partendo da una sola frase, poteva far uscire dal cilindro una canzone così umoristica, eppure venata di “irish pride”: si può a buona ragione ritenere una parodia degli “inni” del secolo precedente e dei canti nostalgici, pieni di stereotipi “rurali” sulla amata vecchia Irlanda..

ASCOLTA Dominic Behan in Ireland sings (1965)

ASCOLTA The Dubliners


I
They say that the lakes of Killarney are fair
No stream like the Liffey could ever compare,
If its water you want, you’ll get nothing more rare
Than the stuff they make down by the ocean(1).
Chorus:
The sea, oh the sea is the gradh geal mo croide(2)
Long may it stay between England and me/It’s a sure guarantee that some hour we’ll be free
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
II
Tom Moore made his “Waters” meet fame and renown
A great lover of anything dressed in a crown(3)
In brandy the bandy auld Saxon(4) he’d drown
But throw ne’er a one in the ocean.
III
The Danes(5) came to Ireland with nothing to do
But dream of the plundered auld Irish they’d slew,
“Yeh will in yer Vikings” said Brian Boru(6)
And threw them back into the ocean.
IV
The Scots have their Whisky(7),
the Welsh have their speech
Their poets are paid about ten pence a week
Provided no hard words of England they speak
Oh Lord, what a price for devotion.
V
Two foreign old monarchs in battle did join(8)
Each wanting his head on the back of a coin
If the Irish had sense they’d drowned both in the Boyne
And partition thrown into the ocean.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Si dice che i laghi di Killarney siano belli,
e che nessun fiume si possa paragonale al Liffey,
se è l’acqua che vuoi, non avrai niente di meglio
di quella roba che confluisce nell’oceano(1).
Coro
Il mare, oh il mare è “la gioia più grande del mio cuore”(2),
che a lungo resti tra l’Inghilterra e me, perchè è una sicura garanzia che prima o poi saremo liberi, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dalle acque!
II
Tom Moore scrivendo le sue “Waters” (3) andò incontro alla fama e alla notorietà- un grande amante di ogni cosa che indossasse una corona!
Nel brandy i vecchi Sassoni invasori(4) sarebbero annegati, ma non se n’è mai gettato uno nell’oceano.
III
I Danesi(5) vennero in Irlanda senza nient’altro da fare
che sognare di saccheggiare i vecchi Irlandesi che avevano ucciso
“Ora tocca a voi Vichinghi” disse Brian Boru(6)
e li gettò di nuovo nell’oceano.
IV
Gli Scozzesi avevano il loro whisky(7),
i Gallesi la loro parlantina,
i loro poeti erano pagati dieci penny alla settimana
guardandosi bene dal dire dure parole sull’Inghilterra, oh Signore, che prezzo per la devozione!
V
Due vecchi re stranieri(8) si unirono per la battaglia
ognuno voleva la sua testa sul retro di una moneta,
se gli Irlandesi avessero avuto il buonsenso li avrebbero affogati entrambi nel Boyne
e gettato la divisione nell’oceano

NOTE
1) Dominic dice di non guardare ai laghi e ai fiumi dell’isola ma al mare che circonda e circoscrive l’intera isola, implicitamente dice che non si deve guardare l’isola per contee, ma nella sua interezza, non divisibile cioè in due territori come quelli odierni.  Ricordiamo che la canzone è stata scritta nel 1965, quando la repubblica d’Irlanda ancora rivendicava in Costituzione le contee del Nord
2) Gradh geal mo croide = great joy of my heart; è un classico per gli autori delle canzoni popolari inserire qualche frase in gaelico e questa è la più gettonata
3) Thomas Moore scrisse nel 1807 una canzone dal titolo “The meeting of the waters” un punto ben preciso del territorio irlandese in cui il fiume Avonmore si incontra con il fiume Avonbeg per formare l’Avoca (contea di Wicklow). Considerato un poeta alla moda nell’Ottocento Moore è stato criticato nel secolo successivo: qui è visto come un irlandese “da salotto” ossequioso degli Inglesi, per questo è un “grande amante della corona”
4) con Sassoni Dominic intende gli Inglesi. I Sassoni erano tribù germaniche che migrarono in Inghilterra (ovvero la Britannia) con gli Angli ed altre tribù minori per diventare gli anglo-sassoni cioè gli Inghlesi. Il termine bandy che fa rima con brandy non ha una chiara (per me traduzione)
5) i primi invasori dell’Irlanda (dopo i Celti) furono i Vichinghi (VIII-IX secolo) e anche se vengono definiti comunemente  Danesi; in realtà  i primi vichinghi a compiere incursioni sulle coste furono i Norvegesi (sono i Danesi che diventano Normanni stabilendosi nella regione della Francia che da loro prende il nome, la Normandia). Furono i Vichinghi norvegesi, che si definivano Ostiani perchè erano gli Uomini dell’Est, a fondare Dublino.
6) in realtà quando Brian Borù vinse la battaglia di Clontarf il problema vichingo non esisteva più da una sessantina d’anni, ma per gli Irlandese è il re supremo d’Irlanda che scaccia i Vichinghi!! (XI secolo) l’ironia qui è marcata, nell’Irlanda medievale ogni capo con uno straccio di terra e di potere si proclamava re, e i re d’Irlanda continuavano a rubarsi il bestiame l’un con l’altro e a praticare il loro divertimento preferito: scannarsi tra loro.
7) ovviamente gli irlandesi hanno il whiskey (vedi)
8) i due re sono Guglielmo d’Orange (diventato Guglielmo III d’Inghilterra, Guglielmo II di Scozia e Guglielmo I d’Irlanda) e Giacomo II Stuart (il deposto re di Inghilterra e Scozia -e anche d’Irlanda- di confessione cattolica) e la battaglia del Boyne fu combattuta nel 1690.

LA MELODIA: ‘S faigamid siud mar a ta se

ASCOLTA Paul O’Shaughnessy al violino che la suona come una jig

THANK GOD WE’RE SURROUNDED BY WATER

La versione canadese è stata invece scritta da Tom Cahill sulla falsariga di quella irlandese

ASCOLTA Dick Nolan


I
I’ll sing you a song about Newfoundland dear,
We haven’t got money nor riches to spare;
But we should be thankful for one small affair,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
The sea, oh the sea, the wonderful sea,
Long may she roam between nations and me; And everyone here should go down on one knee,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
II
The French in Quebec want a separate state,
Along with our own Labrador, just you wait;
They’re down to Bell Isle (1) but they can’t walk the Strait,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
III
My mother-in-law wrote from Boston, the dear,
She wanted to visit for our “Come Home Year” (2);
The Carson (3) was full with no planes in the air,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
IV
Some visitors tasted our Newfoundland screech (4),
Tipped up the old bottle, drank six ounces each;
They let out a yell as they ran for the beach,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
V
Now Joey (5) is God, say the Liberal bunch,
One day on the harbour he stepped after lunch;
But he couldn’t manage the Galilee stunt,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
VI
Now Betsy Jane Kemp (6) took her horse for a ride,
Ripped up her old bloomers all down the left side;
She hid them away on the beach at low tide,
Thank God we’re surrounded by water.
 
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ti canterò una canzone sulla cara Terranova,
non abbiamo denaro né ricchezza da spartire;
ma dovremmo essere grati per una piccola circostabza, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua!
Il mare, oh il mare, il mare meraviglioso,
che a lungo resti tra tra le Nazioni e me;
e tutti quanti qui dovremmo inginocchiarci
grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua!
II
I francesi in Quebec vogliono uno stato separato,
insieme al nostro Labrador, aspetta e vedrai; ma sono rimasti a Bell Isle perchè non possono camminare sullo Stretto, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua.
III
Mia suocera ha scritto da Boston, che cara,
voleva venire in visita per la “Festa dell’Emigrante”;
il “Carson” era pieno e non c’erano aerei in aria, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua.
IV
Alcuni visitatori hanno assaggiato il nostro screech di Terranova,
sollevato la vecchia bottiglia e bevuto sei once ciascuno:
poi lanciarono un grido mentre correvano verso la spiaggia, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua.
V
“Ora Joey è Dio”, dice il gruppo liberale,
un giorno, nel porto, ci finì sopra dopo pranzo;
ma non poteva fare la controfigura del galileo, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua.
VI
Ora Betsy Jane Kemp prese il suo cavallo per una cavalcata,
si strappò i vecchi calzoncini lungo tutto il fianco sinistro;
li nascose sulla spiaggia con la bassa marea, grazie a Dio siamo circondati dall’acqua.

NOTE
1) Lo stretto di Belle Isle o Stretto del Labrodor separa la penisola del Labrador dall’isola di Terranova
2) celebrazione canadese equivalente alla nostra festa dell’emigrante durante la quale molti parenti ritornano a visitare le loro comunità d’origine
3) il traghetto rompighiaccio The Carson (dedicato al politico William Carson) una delle più grandi navi costruite nel 1955, affondato per colpa di un iceberg nel 1977
4) una marca locale di rum
5) Joseph Roberts “Joey” Smallwood politico canadese
6) ?

FONTI
“Irony in Action: Anthropology, Practice, and the Moral Imaginatio”, James Fernandez,Mary Taylor Huber http://www.theballadeers.com/ire/db_d1965_npl18134_ire_sing.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151415
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/01/thank.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/34/thank.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/2611