Archivi tag: mermaid song

Aileen Duinn, Brown-haired Alan

Leggi in italiano

“Aileen Duinn” is a Scottish Gaelic song from the Hebrides: a widow/sweetheart lament for the sinking of a fishing boat, originally a waulking song in which she invokes her death to share the same seaweed bed with her lover, Alan.
According to the tradition on the island of Lewis Annie Campbell wrote the song in despair over the death of her sweetheart Alan Morrison, a ship captain who in the spring of 1788 left Stornoway to go to Scalpay where he was supposed to marry his Annie, but the ship ran into a storm and the entire crew was shipwrecked and drowned: she too will die a few months later, shocked by grief. His body was found on the beach, near the spot where the sea had returned the body of Ailein Duinn (black-haired Alan).

 The song became famous because inserted into the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy and masterfully interpreted by Karen Matheson (the singer of the Scottish group Capercaillie who appears in the role of a commoner and sings it near the fire)

Here is the soundtrack of the film Rob Roy: Ailein Duinn and Morag’s Lament, (arranged by Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in which the second track is the opening verse followed by the chorus

FIRST VERSION

The text is reduced to a minimum, more evocative than explanatory of a tragic event that it was to be known to all the inhabitants of the island. The woman who sings is marked by immense pain, because her black-haired Alain is drowned at the bottom of the sea, and she wants to share his sleep in the abyss by a macabre blood covenant.

Capercaillie from To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, the voice ‘kissed by God’ switches from the whisper to the cry, in the crashing waves blanding into bagpipes lament.

Meav, from Meav 2000 angelic voice, harp and flute

Annwn from Aeon – 2009 German group founded in 2006 of Folk Mystic; their interpretation is very intense even in the rarefaction of the arrangement, with the limpid and warm voice of Sabine Hornung, the melody carried by the harp, a few echoes of the flute and the lament of the violin: magnificent.

Trobar De Morte  the text reduced to only two verses and extrapolated from the context lends itself to be read as the love song of a mermaid in the surf of the sea (see also Mermaid’s croon)

It is the most reproduced textual version with the most different musical styles, roughly after 2000, also as sound-track in many video games (for example Medieval II Total War)

english translation
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go (1) with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(2)
I would drink(3), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
Scottish Gaelic
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\
shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,

NOTES
1) to die, to follow
2) for the inhabitants of the Hebrides Islands the seals are not simple animals, but magical creatures called selkie, which at night take the form of drowned men and women. Considered a sort of guardians of the Sea or gardeners of the sea bed every night or only on full moon nights, they would abandon their skins to reveal their human form, to sing and dance on the silver cliffs (here)
3) refers to an ancient Celtic ritual, consisting in drinking the blood of a friend as a sign of affection (the covenant of blood), a custom cited by Shakespeare (still practiced by all the friends of the heart who exchange blood with a shallow cut and joining the two cuts; it was also practiced for the handfasting in Scotland: once the handfasting was above all a pact of blood, in which the right wrist of the spouses was engraved with the tip of a dagger until the blood spurts, after which the two wrists were tied in close contact with each other with the “wedlock’s band” (see more.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECOND VERSION

Here is the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) from “Songs of the Hebrides“, see also Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) in his “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake from “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  from “Ships Ahoy !” 2011  

(english translation Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,

Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(scottish gaelic)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn,
o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat

Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart
an talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

Another translation in English with the title “Annie Campbell’s Lament”
Estrange Waters from Songs of the Water, 2016

Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..

THIRD VERSION

The most suggestive and dramatic version is that reported by Flora MacNeil who she has learned  from her mother. Born in 1928 on the Isle of Barra, she is a Scottish singer who owns hundreds of songs in Scottish Gaelic. “Traditional songs tended to run in families and I was fortunate that my mother and her family had a great love for the poetry and the music of the old songs. It was natural for them to sing, whatever they were doing at the time or whatever mood they were in. My aunt Mary, in particular, was always ready, at any time I called on her, to drop whatever she was doing, to discuss a song with me, and perhaps, in this way, long forgotten verses would be recollected. So I learned a great many songs at an early age without any conscious effort. As is to be expected on a small island, so many songs deal with the sea, but, of course, many of them may not originally be Barra songs”

A different story from Flora MacNeil’s family: the woman is married to Alain MacLeann who dies in the shipwreck with all the other men of her family: her father and brothers; the woman turns to the seagull that flies high over the sea and sees everything, as a witness of the misfortune; the last verse traces poetic images of a funeral of the sea, with the bed of seaweed, the stars like candles, the murmur of the waves for the music and the seals as guardians.

Flora MacNeil from  a historical record of 1951.


English translation
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
Scottish Gaelic
Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

NOTES
(1) Tuesday is still the day on which traditionally marriages are celebrated on the Island of Barra

FOURTH VERSION

Still a version set just like a waulking song and yet a different text, this time the ship is a whaler and Allen is shipwrecked near the Isle of Man.

Mac-Talla, from Gaol Is Ceol 1994, only the female voices and the notes of a harp, but what immediacy …

English translation
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi, I would go with thee.
I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

CHORUS
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
Scottish Gaelic
S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm

GRUAGACH-MHARA: A GRUAGACH OR A SELKIE?

Sebbene il termine gaelico Gruagach si traduca con “fanciulla“, il Gruagach del folklore scozzese è diventato più simile ad un folletto tipo Brownie che una fanciulla del Mare.

SPIRITO TUTELARE

Khatarine Briggs nel suo “Dizionario di fate, gnomi e folletti” parla dei Gruagach maschi delle Highlands scozzesi paragonandoli ai Brownie, belli e slanciati, elegantemente vestiti di rosso e dotati di capelli biondi, dediti alla sorveglianza del bestiame. La maggior parte però sono brutti e trasandati e come i Brownie aiutano gli uomini nei lavori domestici e agricoli.

Sorta di spirito tutelare della casa e del bestiame la gruagach è considerata un folletto da rabbonire con offerte di latte lasciate nelle coppelle dei massi erratici. Stuart McHardy ritiene tuttavia che la gruagach sia stata una divinità più potente e antica decaduta nel tempo al rango di guardiano. J.A. McCulloch (The religion of the ancient Celts, 1911) had this to say: “Until recently milk was poured on ‘Gruagach stones’ in the Hebrides, as an offering to the Gruagach, a brownie who watched over herds, and who had taken the place of a god”. Evans-Wentz in The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries (1911) also describes the Gruagach, again stressing the link with cattle: “The fairy queen who watches over cows is called Gruagach in the islands, and she is often seen. In pouring libations to her and her fairies, various kinds of stones, usually with hollows in them, are used. In many parts of the Highlands, where the same deity is known, the stone into which women poured the libation is called Leac na Gruagaich, ‘Flag-stone of the Gruagach’. If the libation was omitted in the evening, the best cow in the fold would be found dead in the morning”. (tratto da qui)

LA FANCIULLA DEL MARE

John Gregorson Campbell nel suo “Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland”, 1900 descrive il Gruagach come una fanciulla del mare dai capelli biondi: “A Gruagach haunted the ‘Island House’ (Tigh an Eilein, so called from being at first surrounded with water), the principal residence in the island, from time immemorial till within the present century. She was never called Glaistig, but Gruagach and Gruagach mhara (sea-maid) by the islanders. Tradition represents her as a little woman with long yellow hair, but a sight of her was rarely obtained. She staid in the attics, and the doors of the rooms in which she was heard working were locked at the time. She was heard putting the house in order when strangers were to come, however unexpected otherwise their arrival might be. She pounded the servants when they neglected their work.”

LA DEA DEL MARE

Così nella tradizione la gruagach è associata ad una vacca sacra giunta dal mare e ad una pietra coppellata per le offerte di libagioni (ovvero latte), una creatura soprannaturale in origine sicuramente di genere femminile  guardiana del bestiame di un determinato territorio. Potrebbe essere il ricordo di antichissimi rituali celebrati da sacerdotesse della Dea Madre e in seguito trasformate in creature fatate.

Stuart McHardy prosegue nel suo saggio: ‘Gruagach’ may mean “the long-haired one” and be derived from gruag = a wig, and is a common Gaelic name for a maiden, or a young woman. In A Midsummer Eve’s Dream (1971) Alexander Hope analyses16thC Scots poems by Dunbar. In the poem the Golden Targe Dunbar’s goddesses wear green kirtles under their green mantles and with their long hair hanging loose they are also presented as fairies in their appearance. The belief in a “fairy-cult” which Hope discerns in these and other works is quite clearly a remnant of an earlier pagan religion. .. Gruagach may be related to the Breton words Groac’h or Grac’h, a name given to the Druidesses or Priestesses, who had colleges on the Isle de Sein, off the NW coast of Brittany. These Groac’h were known for being involved in divination, healing and shape-shifting, and P.F.Anson (Fisher Folk Lore, 1965) says of them: “On the intensely Catholic Isle de Sein there used to be the conviction that certain women had what was known as ‘le don de vouer’, i.e. the power of communicating with the Devil or his emissaries, in other words that they were witches. Fishermen alleged that they had seen these women on dark nights launching mysterious boats (bag-sorcérs) to enable them to take part in a witches’ Sabbath or coven known as groach’hed”. (sempre tratto da qui)

Quindi la Gruagach è un altro nome della Cailleach, la dea primigenia della creazione come viene chiamata in Scozia, il cui ricordo ha lasciato una traccia nel folklore celtico e ci parla di un culto primordiale conservatosi pressoché immutato anche durante l’affermarsi del Cristianesimo e praticato soprattutto dalle donne con poteri sciamanici, ben presto demonizzate e declassate al rango di streghe.

La Giumenta Bianca era una delle sembianze di Cailleach, la velata, così come si manifestava la Dea durante l’Inverno la “Vecchia Donna”, lei colpiva con il suo martello la terra e la rendeva dura fino a Imbolc, la festa del risveglio della Primavera.
Questa antichissima Dea Anziana che controlla le forze della natura e plasma la terra con il suo potere ha forse origini lontane dalle Isole Britanniche. Lo storico greco Erodoto nel V° secolo A.C. ci parla di una tribù celtica in Spagna che chiama “Kallaikoi”. L’autore romano Plinio parla del popolo dei Callaeci, tribù da cui deriva il nome Gallaecia (Galizia) e Portus Cale (Portogallo). Il nome Callaeci viene fatto risalire ad “adoratori della Cailleach”. …Numerose sono le leggende [scozzesi] che ci parlano di questa Dea e analizzandole possiamo evidenziare delle caratteristiche ricorrenti: – La Cailleach dà forma alla terra sia in modo volontario che involontario (il suo grembiule carico di pietre ritorna in moltissime leggende celtiche) creando laghi, colline, isole e costruzioni megalitiche. – Una costante associazione con l’acqua attraverso pozzi, laghi e fiumi di cui è spesso guardiana. – L’associazione con la stagione invernale. – La sua mole gigantesca. – La sua antichissima età, essendo fatta risalire a uno dei primi esseri presenti sulla terra. – La sua funzione di guardiana di particolari animali come il cervo e l’airone. – La sua capacità di trasformarsi ed assumere diverse forme come quella di fanciulla, airone e pietra… In Irlanda l’animale sacro alla dea è la mucca. La dea stessa si occupava del suo bestiame e mungeva le sue mucche fatate ricavandone del latte magico che usava per ridare la vita ai morti. La Dea appare quindi sia come signora della morte che della vita. (Claudia Falcone tratto da: ilcerchiodellaluna.it)

Una creatura che si può associare alla Gruagach è il folletto-capra presente sia nel folklore irlandese con il nome di bocánach sia in quello delle Highlands scozzesi con il nome di Glaistig (metà donna e metà capra):  dai lunghi capelli biondi e bellissima nasconde la sua parte inferiore animale sotto una lunga veste verde. Nella sua versione  maligna la fanciulla è una sorta di sirena che attira l’uomo con un canto o una danza e poi si nutre del suo sangue. Al contrario nella sua versione benigna è considerata una protettrici del bestiame e dei pastori, oltre che dei bambini lasciati soli dalle madri per sorvegliare gli animali al pascolo.

La fanciulla del Mare continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/poor-horse.htm
https://listserv.heanet.ie/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9311&L=celtic-l&D=0&P=13250
http://www.goddessalive.co.uk/index.php/issues-21-25/issue-21/gruagach

MY JOLLY SAILOR BOLD: THE MERMAID SONG?

“My Jolly Sailor Bold” ovvero “L’allegro audace Marinaio” nella sua traduzione in italiano è una “sea song” resa popolare dalla saga “I pirati dei Caraibi”.

LA  SIRENA TAMARA

Nel film “Oltre i confini del Mare” (2011) è cantata daTamara, una sirena di Whitecap Bay, catturata, con grande ingegno e un pizzico di magia, dalla ciurma di Barbanera.

Ecco il testo nell’arrangiamento di John DeLuca, Dave Giuli and Matt Sullivan (la melodia riprende la versione di Sandra Kerr in Sweet Thames Flow Softly, 1967)

La versione in italiano

VERSIONE INGLESE NEL FILM
My heart is pierced by Cupid;
I disdain all glittering gold.
There is nothing can console me
But my jolly sailor bold.
Come all ye pretty fair maids
Whoever ye may be
Who love a jolly sailor bold
That plows the raging sea.
My heart is pierced by Cupid;
I disdain all glittering gold.
There is nothing can console me
But my jolly sailor bold.
VERSIONE ITALIANO NEL FILM
Il mio nome è Maria
e il mio è un destino amaro
io volevo farmi amare
ed ho perso il mio denaro.
C’è un’audace marinaio
che attendo dentro al cuore..
Non conosco il suo nome..
Ma ho bisogno del suo amore..
Oh fanciulle innamorate venite tutte qua,
l’allegro audace marinaio un giorno arriverà..
Solo lui può consolare
questo cuore spezzato a metà,
il mio audace marinaio prima o poi arriverà…

TRADUZIONE  LETTERALE
Il mio cuore è trafitto da Cupido e rifiuto tutte le ricchezze che luccicano, nulla mi può consolare tranne che il mio allegro audace marinaio. O belle fanciulle venite qui chiunque voi siate, chi (non) ama un allegro audace marinaio che solca il mare agitato?

LA FANCIULLA MARIA

mercante-veneziaIn origine la sea song “My Jolly Sailor Bold” è cantata da una prosperosa e benestante fanciulla londinese perdutamente innamorata di un marinaio bello, ma povero.
La canzone viene datata con buona approssimazione al 1780-90, ma compare in stampa solo alla fine dell’800 nella raccolta di John Ashton “Real Sailor Songs” (1891) con la dicitura “old sailor songs”. Una copia su broadside si trova anche nella British Library, catalogo # C.116.i.1 “My jolly Sailor Bold Londra c.1850.
Concordo con il blogger di JSBlog – Journal of a Southern Bookreader che osserva “the lyrics recycle a lot of stock folksong and shanty phrases; along with the archaic formalisms, the flavour is of a broadsheet of the late 1700s or early 1800s, as-published rather than filtered through oral tradition.” (tratto da qui)
Non concordo invece con l’attribuzione a “copia inglese” della canzone irlandese “The Bank’s of Claudy” essendo quella una tipica “reily ballad” tema che qui invece è del tutto assente. Tante sono peraltro le canzoni sulla separazione tra innamorati con lui nei panni di marinaio! (vedi)

La storia è una storia d’amore con lei che rinnega la sua famiglia e la sua vita borghese per amore di un povero marinaio partito per mare in cerca di fortuna. La versione per il film “Oltre i confini del Mare” stralcia le ultime due strofe della canzone riportata da Ashton.

ASCOLTA: Gemma Ward nel testo originario


I
Upon one summer’s morning, I carelessly did stray,
Down by the Walls of Wapping(1), where I met a sailor gay,
Conversing with a bouncing(2) lass, who seem’d to be in pain,
Saying, “William, when you go, I fear you will ne’er return again”.
II
His hair it does in ringlets hang, his eyes as black as sloes,
May happiness attend him wherever he goes,
From Tower Hill, down to Blackwall(3), I will wander, weep and moan,
All for my jolly sailor bold, until he does return.
III
My father is a merchant—the truth I now will tell,
And in great London City in opulence doth dwell,
His fortune doth exceed £300,000 in gold,
And he frowns upon his daughter, ‘cause she loves a sailor bold.
IV
A fig for his riches, his merchandize, and gold,
True love is grafted in my heart; give me my sailor bold:
Should he return in poverty, from o’er the ocean far,
To my tender bosom, I’ll fondly press my jolly tar(4).
V
My sailor is as smiling as the pleasant month of May,
And oft we have wandered through Ratcliflfe Highway(5),
Where many a pretty blooming girl we happy did behold,
Reclining on the bosom of her jolly sailor bold.
VI
Come all you pretty fair maids, whoever you may be,
Who love a jolly sailor bold that ploughs the raging sea,
While up aloft, in storm or gale, from me his absence mourn,
And firmly pray, arrive the day, he home will safe return.
VII
My name it is Maria, a merchant’s daughter fair,
And I have left my parents and three thousand pounds a year,
My heart is pierced by Cupid, I disdain all glittering gold,
There is nothing can console me but my jolly sailor bold.
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Una mattina d’estate mentre vagavo senza meta dalle parti delle Walls of Wapping (1), 
incontrai un allegro marinaio che conversava con una ragazza prosperosa(2) che mi sembrava preoccupata
e diceva: “William se tu andrai, temo che non ritornerai mai più da me.”
II
Con i capelli riccioluti e gli occhi neri come prugnole
possa la felicità accompagnarlo ovunque lui vada;
da Tower Hill fino a Blackwall(3) vagherò piangendo
e lamentandomi per il mio allegro audace marinaio finchè egli non farà ritorno.
III
Mio padre è un mercante -la verità vi dirò –
e nella grande Londra vive nel benessere,
la sua fortuna supera 300.000 sterline in oro
ed è preoccupato per sua figlia
perchè lei ama un audace marinaio.
IV
Le sue ricchezze, merci e oro non valgono un fico secco,
il vero amore è impresso nel mio cuore, datemi il mio allegro audace Marinaio: se anche dovesse ritornare povero dai mari lontani,
con affetto stringerò il mio allegro marinaio(4) al mio tenero seno.
V
Il mio marinaio è sorridente come il piacevole mese di Maggio
e spesso abbiamo passeggiato per la Ratcliffe Highway,(5)
dove abbiamo osservato con piacere più di una graziosa ragazza in fiore
appoggiarsi al petto del suo allegro audace Marinaio.
VI
O belle fanciulle venite qui
chiunque voi siate
chi (non) ama un allegro audace marinaio che solca il mare mosso? Mentre su nel cielo, con tempesta o burrasca, la sua mancanza piango
e con forza prego perchè arrivi il giorno in cui lui farà ritorno sano e salvo.
VII
Mi chiamo Maria la bella figlia di un mercante
e ho lasciato i miei genitori e 3000 sterline all’anno,
il mio cuore è trafitto da Cupido e rifiuto tutte le ricchezze che luccicano, nulla mi può consolare tranne che il mio allegro audace marinaio.

NOTE
1) Walls of Wapping è una strada dell’ East End di Londra, che corre parallela al Tamigi, un tempo sede del Dock, brulicante di vita e imbarcazioni
2) bouncing si traduce sia con vivace, che in salute, robusta
3) Blackwall era il porto di Londra da cui partivano le navi dirette verso l’oceano. Per più di quattro secoli, fino al 1987, Blackwall è stato cantiere dove si costruivano e riparavano navi. Sulla collina di Tower Hill si tenevano le pubbliche impiccagioni (o decapitazioni) riguardanti per lo più personaggi di una certa agiatezza sociale o famose.
4) tar è un termine usato a volte in senso spregiativo per indicare un marinaio: probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame, pece o resina, con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro.
5) una strada dell’East End di Londra famigerata per le attività criminali, l’ubriachezza molesta e i comportamenti indecenti dei suoi frequentatori. Ancora agli inizi del Novecento la strada era piena di pubs e “singing saloons” per marinai. Ratcliffe Highway è così l’equivalente della Paradise street di Liverpool. E non poteva essere altrimenti per una strada che fiancheggiava le banchine della British East India Company!

FONTI
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20111023004258AABJrdZ
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=2166
http://jsbookreader.blogspot.it/2011/10/my-jolly-sailor-bold-1891.html
http://ewan-maccoll.info/AlbumInfo.aspx?ID=54

THE MAID ON THE SHORE IS IT A MERMAID?

Un filone fecondo della tradizione ballatistica europea che affonda le sue radici nel medioevo è quello cosiddetto della “fanciulla sulla spiaggia”;  Riccardo Venturi riassume il commonplace in modo puntuale  “fanciulla solitaria che passeggia sulle rive del mare – nave che arriva – comandante o marinaio che la richiama a bordo – fanciulla che s’imbarca di spontanea volontà – ripensamento e rimorso – pensieri alla casa materna / coniugale – dramma che si compie (in vari modi)
Nelle “warning ballads” si ammoniscono le brave fanciulle di non mettersi grilli per il capo,  di stare al loro posto (accanto al focolare a sfornare manicaretti e bambini) e di non avventurarsi in “ruoli maschili”, altrimenti finiranno disonorate o stuprate o uccise. Meglio quindi la gabbia più o meno dorata che già si conosce che il volo libero.
Ogni tanto però la fanciulla riesce a trionfare con l’astuzia sulle prepotenti voglie maschili, cosi nella  “Fair Maid on the Shore” la fanciulla potrebbe essere lei stessa la predatrice!

LA SIRENA SULLA SPIAGGIA

sirena-naveLa fanciulla potrebbe essere una sirena, che il capitano ha visto in una notte di luna camminare lungo la spiaggia e di cui si è invaghito (è risaputo che donne foche e sirene possono camminare con piedi umani nelle notti di luna piena). Manda una scialuppa a prenderla per portarla sulla nave, e lei si mette a cantare gettando un incantesimo sugli uomini della nave.
E qui finisce il tema fantastico e magico: la fanciulla si prende tutti gli oggetti di valore e l’oro e l’argento e ritorna alla sua spiaggia. Così la fanciulla invece di essere una creatura fragile e indifesa si rivela essere una sorta di pirata del mare! Ma a ben vedere anche il suo depredare i tesori richiama il topos della sirena che raccoglie le cose luccicose dalle navi (dopo averne causato il  naufragio) per “arredare” la sua grotta!

Bertrand Bronson nel suo “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifica “Fair Maid on the Shore” come una variante di Broomfield Hill (Child #43), la ballata è stata trovata più raramente in Irlanda (dove si presume sia originaria) e più diffusamente in America (e in particolare in Canada). Così riporta Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3): “More commonly found in the North-eastern United States, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland is a curious marine adaptation of the story in which the knight of the Broomfield Hill is transformed into an amorous sea-captain. The young woman on whom he has designs succeeds in preserving her chastity by singing her would-be lover to sleep: a magic just as potent as that employed by the maid in the land-locked versions of the ballad.”

Il brano ha molti interpreti per lo più di ambito folk o folk-rock

ASCOLTA Stan Rogers in Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
ASCOLTA John Renbourn group in The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)


I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (5)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (6)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (7)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’era una giovane fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia- o
e non trovava niente con cui confortare il suo animo,
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia
II
C’era un giovane capitano
che salpò sull’oceano,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire
– gridava il giovane capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
III
Ho tanto argento
ho tanto oro,
ho tante cose preziose
che dividerò, dividerò
con la mia ciurma
se mi portano quella fanciulla
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …”
IV
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portano a bordo
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
la sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
per fargli dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni.
V
La sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
Era così bella e pura,
dolce e ben fatta e
cantò per far addormentare il capitano e i marinai.
VI
Allora lo derubò dell’argento
lo derubò dell’oro
lo derubò delle cose preziose,
usò il suo spadone
come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
VII
“Oh i miei uomini sono furiosi
i miei uomini sono arrabbiati
i miei uomini sono sprofondati nella disperazione più cupa
perchè sei fuggita da una cabina così allegra e hai vogato per ritornare alla spiaggia”.
VIII
“I tuoi uomini han poco da essere furiosi e arrabbiati
I tuoi uomini han poco da essere disperati, ho beffato i tuoi marinai e anche te
e sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
La versione testuale del John Renbourn group differisce di poco dalla versione di Stan
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) oppure Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
6) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
7) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

ASCOLTA Solas in “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997) (la recensione dell’album qui)


I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair
“I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VI
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’era una bella fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia
e non trovava nessuno con cui placare il suo animo sereno (1)
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia.
II
C’era un coraggioso capitano
che salpò su una bella nave,
e il tempo era stabile e bello (2)
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire* – gridava questo egregio capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia spiaggia,
se non posso avere quella fanciulla ”
III
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portano a bordo
la fece sedere accanto alla propria sedia e la invitò nella sua cabina,
per dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni (3).
IV
“Ti canterò una canzone ”
– gridò questa bella fanciulla.
Il capitano stava piangendo per la gioia, lei cantò così amabilmente, così dolcemente,
cantò per addormentare il capitano e i marinai, per addormentare il capitano e i marinai
V
Li derubò dei gioielli,
li derubò della salute (4),
li derubò del cibo raffinato e costoso, usò lo spadone del capitano come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
e vogò per ritornare sulla spiaggia.
VI
Oh gli uomini divennero pazzi
e gli uomini divennero tristi, sprofondarono nella disperazione più cupa
nel vederla andarsene tutta contenta con la refurtiva,
gli anelli e le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato,
gli anelli le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato.
VI
“Non siate così tristi affranti dalla disperazione,
avreste dovuto riconoscermi prima, cantai per farvi addormentare e vi rubai la salute
e adesso sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia, spiaggia
di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
1) la frase avrebbe più senso se fosse invece “per placare il suo animo inquieto”
2) il riferimento al bel tempo non è casuale, infatti l’avvistamento di una sirena era sinonimo dell’avvicinarsi di una tempesta
3) ovvero per sollazzarsi con la fanciulla (presumibilmente vergine)
4) la donna non è solo una ladra ma una creatura fatata che ruba la salute dei marinai

FONTI
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://phillipkay.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/explorations-in-irish-music/

Alan dai capelli neri

Read the post in English

Aileen Duinn, un canto, in gaelico scozzese, originario delle Isole Ebridi : un lament per il naufragio di una barca di pescatori, in origine una waulking song  in cui la donna invoca la morte per condividere lo stesso letto d’alghe del suo amore, Alan dai capelli neri. Secondo la tradizione sull’isola di Lewis è stata Annie Campbell ad aver scritto la canzone nella disperazione per la morte del suo fidanzato Alan Morrison, il capitano della nave che nella primavera del 1788 lasciò Stornoway per andare a Scalpay dove avrebbe dovuto sposarsi con la sua Annie, ma la nave incappò in una tempesta ed fece naufragio e l’intero equipaggio affogò: anche lei morirà qualche mese più tardi, sconvolta dal dolore. Il suo corpo è stato trovato sulla spiaggia, nei pressi del punto in cui il mare aveva riconsegnato il corpo di Ailein Duinn (Alan dai capelli neri).

La canzone è diventata famosa perché inserita nella colonna sonora del film Rob Roy e interpretata magistralmente da Karen Matheson (la cantante del gruppo scozzese i Capercaillie che compare nei panni di una popolana e la canta vicino al fuoco accompagnata da leggeri tocchi sull’arpa)

Ecco  la sound track del film Rob Roy : per la verità le tracce sono due Ailein Duinn  e Morag’s Lament, (arrangiate dai Capercaillie & Carter Burwelle) in cui la seconda è il verso d’apertura seguito dal coro

PRIMA VERSIONE
Il testo è ridotto al minimo, più evocativo che esplicativo di un tragico evento che doveva essere noto a tutti gli abitanti dell’Isola. La donna che canta è segnata da un dolore immenso, il suo Alain dai capelli neri è annegato in fondo al mare, e lei vaneggia di voler condividerne il sonno negli abissi stipulando un macabro patto di sangue.

Capercaillie nel Cd To the Moon – 1995: Keren Matheson, la voce ‘kissed by God’ passa dal sussurro al grido, ripreso dalla cornamusa in un frangersi di onde del mare.

Meav, in Meav 2000 voce angelica, arpa e flauto

Annwn nel Cd Aeon – 2009 gruppo tedesco fondato nel 2006 che si definisce Folk Mystic; molto intensa anche questa interpretazione pur nella rarefazione dell’arrangiamento, con la voce limpida e calda di Sabine Hornung, la melodia portata dall’arpa, pochi echi del flauto e il lamento del violino, magnifico.


Trobar De Morte
il testo ridotto a sole due strofe ed estrapolato dal contesto si presta ad essere letto come il canto d’amore di una sirena nella risacca del mare (vedi anche Mermaid’s croon)

E’ la versione testuale più riprodotta con gli stili musicali più disparati grossomodo dopo il 2000  anche come sound-track in molti video giochi vedasi per tutti  Medieval II Total War

Gaelico scozzese
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh,
Sèist
O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat.
Ma `s e cluasag dhut a’ ghainneamh,
Ma `s e leabaidh dhut an fheamainn,
Ma `s e `n t-iasg do choinnlean geala,
Ma `s e na ròin do luchd-faire,
Dh’olainn deoch ge boil   le cach e,
De dh’fhuil do choim `s tu `n   deidh dobhathadh,
traduzione inglese
How sorrowful I am
Early in the morning rising
Chorus
Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan, ò hì,
I would go with thee
If it is thy pillow the sand
If it is thy bed the seaweed
If it is the fish thy candles bright
If it is the seals thy watchmen(1)
I would drink(2), though all would abhor it
Of thy heart’s blood after thy drowning
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Che dolore senza fine,
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino.
CORO
Oh hi vorrei morire con te,
Alan dai capelli neri,
salve, vorrei morire con te.
Se ti è cuscino la sabbia,
sul letto d’alghe,
se i pesci ti sono luce di candela ,
e le foche sentinelle(1),
io vorrei bere(2), sebbene ciò mi faccia orrore,
il sangue del tuo cuore dopo il tuo annegamento

NOTE
1) per gli abitanti delle Isole Ebridi le foche non sono dei semplici animali, bensì creature magiche chiamate selkie, che di notte prendono la forma di uomini e donne annegati. Ritenuti una sorta di guardiani del Mare o giardinieri del fondale marino (la leggenda più diffusa è quella che le foche siano le anime degli annegati in mare) ogni notte o solo nelle notti di luna piena, abbandonerebbero le loro pelli per rivelare sembianze umane, per cantare e danzare sulle scogliere d’argento  (qui)
2) allude ad un antico rituale celtico, consistente nel bere il sangue di un amico in segno di affetto (il patto di sangue), usanza citata da Shakespeare (ancora praticata da tutti gli amici del cuore che si scambiano il sangue con un taglietto superficiale unendo i due tagli, così era anche praticato l’handfasting in Scozia: un tempo l’handfasting era soprattutto un patto di sangue, in cui si incideva con la punta di un pugnale il polso destro degli sposi fino a far sgorgare il sangue, dopodiché i due polsi erano legati a stretto contatto tra di loro con la “wedlock’s band” ovvero una lunga striscia di stoffa continua.)

by liga-marta tratto da qui

SECONDA VERSIONE

Ecco l’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) da “Songs of the Hebrides“, brano citato anche da Alexander Carmichael (1832-1912) lo scrittore dei “Carmina Gadelica”.

Alison Pearce & Susan Drake in “A Harris love lament”  
Quadriga Consort  in “Ships Ahoy ! 2011”  

(Gaelico scozzese)
Gura mise tha fo éislean,
Moch `s a’ mhadainn is mi `g eirigh
Sèist
Ailein duinn,

O\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ ru bhi\,
Hi\ ri bho\ ho\ rionn o ho,
Ailein duinn, o\ hi\ shiu\bhlainn leat
Cha’n e bàs a’ chruidh ‘s a’ chéitein
Ach a fhichead ‘s tha do leine.
Ged bu leam-sa buaile spréidhe
‘s ann an diugh bu bheag mo spéis dith.
Ailein duinn a laoigh mo chéille
an deach thu air tir an Eirinn?
Cha b’e sid mo rogha céin-thir
ach an t-àit’ an ruigeadh m’ éigh thu.
Ailein duinn mo ghis ‘s mo ghàire
‘s truagh, a Righ, nach mi bha làmh riut.
Ge b’e eilb no òb an tràigh thu
ge b’e tiurr am fàg an làn thu.
Dh’ òlainn deoch ge b’ oil le càch e,
cha b’ ann a dh’ fhion dearg na Spàinne.
Fuil do chuim, a ghraidh, a b’ fhearr leam,
an fhuil tha nuas o lag do bhràghad.
O gu’n drùchdadh Dia air t’ anam
na fhuair mi de d’ bhrìodal tairis.
Na fhuair mi de d’ chòmhradh falaich,
na fhuair mi de d’ phògan meala.
M’ achan-sa, a Righ na Cathrach,
gun mi dhol an ùir no ‘n anart.
An talamh-toll no ‘n àite-falaich
ach ‘s an roc an deachaidh Ailean

(traduzione inglese Kennet Macleod)
I am the one under sorrow
in the early morn and I arising.
Chorus
Brown-haired Alan,

Ò hì, I would go with thee
Brown-haired Alan,
 I would go with thee
‘Tis not the death of the kine in May-month
but the wetness of thy winding-sheet./Though mine were a fold of cattle, sure, little my care for them today./Ailein duinn, calf of my heart,
art thou adrift on Erin’s shore?
That not my choice of a stranger-land,
but a place where my cry would reach thee.
Ailein duinn, my spell and my laughter,/would, o King, that I were near thee/on what so bank or creek thou art stranded,
on what so beach the tide has left thee.
I would drink a drink, gainsay it who might,
but not of the glowing wine of Spain
The blood of the thy body, o love,
I would rather,/the blood that comes from thy throat-hollow.
O may God bedew thy soul
with what I got of thy sweet caresses,
with what I got of thy secret-speech
with what I got of thy honey-kisses.
My prayer to thee, o King of the Throne
that I go not in earth nor in linen
That I go not in hole-ground nor hidden-place
but in the tangle where lies my Allan
(Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto)
Sono colei che soffre
appena mi alzo al sorgere del mattino
Coro
Alan dai capelli neri

Vorrei morire con te
Alan dai capelli neri
vorrei morire con te
Non è per la morte del bestiame nel mese di maggio
ma per il tuo sudario bagnato,
sebbene le bestie fossero di certo mie, oggi poco mi importa di esse.
Ailein duinn vitello del mio cuore
sei tu alla deriva sulla costa d’Erin?
Che non vorrei fossi in una terra straniera,
ma in un posto dove il mio lamento ti possa raggiungere.
Ailein duinn, mio incanto e riso
vorrei per Dio essere vicina a te
su quella riva o  fiume su cui sei abbandonato,
su quella spiaggia su cui la marea ti ha lasciato.
Vorrei bere una bevanda, chi potrebbe negarlo,
ma non lo scarlatto vino di Spagna,
il sangue del tuo corpo, amore
vorrei piuttosto bere, il sangue che viene dall’incavo della tua gola.
Possa Dio irrorare la tua anima
con quello che ho delle tue dolci carezze,
con quello che ho del tuo parlare
con quello che ho dei tuoi dolci baci.
La mia preghiera a te, o Re del Trono
che io non vada nè in terra nè in cielo
che io non vada nè in paradiso nè all’inferno
ma nel letto d’alghe dove giace il mio Alan

Un’altra traduzione in inglese con il titolo  “Annie Campbell’s Lament” è quella degli Estrange Waters in Songs of the Water, 2016


Chorus
Dark Alan my love,
oh I would follow you

Far beneath the great sea,
deep into the abyss

Dark Alan, oh I would follow you
I
Today my heart swells with sorrow
My lover’s ship sank deep in the ocean
I would follow you..
II
I ache to think of your features
Your white limbs
and shirt ripped and torn asunder
I would follow you..
III
I wish I could be beside you
On whichever rock or shore where you’re sleeping
I would follow you..
IV
Seaweed shall be as our blanket
And we’ll lay our heads on soft beds made of sand
I would follow you..
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Alan il nero, amore mio
vorrei seguirti
lontano sotto all’oceano
nei profondi abissi 
Alan il nero, vorrei seguirti
I
Oggi il mio cuore è pieno di dolore
la nave del mio amore è affondata nell’oceano
vorrei seguirti..
II
Soffro nel pensare alla tua figura
le tue bianche membra
e la camicia strappata e fatta a pezzi
vorrei seguirti..
III
Vorrei poter esserti accanto
su qualche scoglio o spiaggia dove stai dormendo
vorrei seguirti..
IV
Le alghe saranno la nostra coperta
e appoggeremo le nostre teste su soffici letti di sabbia
vorrei seguirti..

TERZA VERSIONE

Ma la versione più suggestiva e drammatica è quella riportata da Flora MacNeil che l’ha imparata dalla madre. Nata nel 1928 sull’Isola di Barra è una cantante scozzese depositaria di centinaia di canzoni in gaelico scozzese. “Le canzoni tradizionali erano trasmesse in famiglia e io sono stata molto fortunata ad avere mia madre e la sua famiglia come cultori dei testi e delle melodie delle vecchie canzoni. Era molto spontaneo per loro cantarle qualunque cosa facessero o di qualunque umore fossero. Mia zia Mary in particolare era sempre pronta ogni volta che glielo chiedevo, di interrompere qualunqua cosa facesse per discutere una canzone con me, e forse così facendo si ricordava di lunghe strofe dimenticate. Così ho imparato fin dalla tenera età moltissime canzoni senza sforzo. Come ci si può aspettare da una piccola isola, tante canzoni trattano del mare, ma, naturalmente, molte di esse potrebbero non essere  originarie di Barra”

La storia è diversa da quella maggiormente citata, qui la donna è sposata ad Alain MacLeann  che nel naufragio muore con tutti gli altri uomini della famiglia di lei: il padre e i fratelli; la donna si rivolge al gabbiano che vola in alto sul mare e tutto vede, per chiedere conferma della disgrazia; l’ultima strofa traccia immagini poetiche di un funerale del mare, con il letto di alghe, le stelle come candele, il mormorio delle onde per la musica e le foche come guardiani. Funerale e lamento ricorrono spesso nei canti delle donne rimaste sole con il dolore.

Flora MacNeil in una storica registrazione del 1951

Sèist:
O na hi hoireann o ho
Hi na hi i ri u hu o
S’ goirt ‘s gur daor a phaigh mi mal dhut
Cha chrodh laoigh ‘s cha chaoraich bhana
Ach an luchd a thaom am bata
Bha m’athair oirre ‘s mo thriuir bhraithrean
Chan e sin gu leir a chraidh mi
Ach am fear a ghlac air laimh mi
Leathanach a’ bhroillich bhainghil
A thug o ‘n chlachan Di-mairt mi
Fhaoileag bheag thu, fhaoileag mhar’ thu
Cait a d’fhag thu na fir gheala
Dh’fhag mi iad ‘san eilean mhara
Cul ri cul is iad gun anail

Traduzione inglese
Endless grief the price it cost me
‘Twas neither sheep or cattle
But the load the ship took with her
My father and my three brothers
As if this wasn’t all my burden
The one to whom I gave my hand
MacLean of the fair skin
Who took me from the church on Tuesday(1)
“Little seagull, seagull of the ocean
Where did you leave the fair men?”
“I left them in the island of the sea
Back to back, no longer breathing”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Un dolore senza fine mi è costato quel naufragio, non erano pecore, né  mucche, ma il carico che la nave ha portato via con se erano mio padre, i miei tre fratelli, e come se non fosse abbastanza, colui a cui diedi la mia mano: il mio MacLean, con la pelle candida, che mi prese in chiesa di martedì.(1)
“Gabbiano, gabbiano dell’oceano
dove hai lasciato i miei cari?”
“Lasciati soli, circondati dal mare schiena contro schiena, senza più respirare. “

NOTE
(1) il martedì è ancora il giorno in cui si celebrano tradizionalmente i matrimoni nell’Isola di Barra

QUARTA VERSIONE

Ancora una versione impostata proprio come una waulking song e ancora un testo diverso, questa volta la nave è una baleniera e Allen è naufragato nei pressi dell’Isola di Man.

Mac-Talla, in Gaol Is Ceol 1994 (fortunatamente nel video pubblicato su you tube c’è anche il testo con traduzione) solo le voci femminili e le note di un’arpa, ma che immediatezza…

S gura mise th’air mo sgaradh
Chan eil sugradh nochd air m’aire
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chaneil sugradh nochd air m’air’
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat~Ailein.
Ach fuaim nan siantan ‘s miad na gaillinn
Dh’fhuadaicheadh na fir bho’n chaladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh nan leannan
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Chuala mi gun deach thu thairis
Air a’ bhata chaol dhubh dharaich
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S gun deach thu air tir am Manainn
Cha b’e siod mo rogha caladh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a luaidh mo cheile
Gura h-og a thug mi speis dhut
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S ann a nochd as truagh mo sgeula
‘S cha n-e bas a’ chruidh ‘san fheithe
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ach cho fliuch ‘s a tha do leine
Muca mara bhith ‘gad reubach
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Ailein Duinn a chiall ‘s a naire
Chuala mi gun deach do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
‘S truagh a Righ nach mi bha laimh riut
Ge be tiurr an dh’fhag an lan thu
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat
Dh’olainn deoch, ge b’oil le cach e
A dh’fhuil do chuim ‘s tu ‘n deidh do bhathadh
Ailein Duinn o hi shiubhlainn leat

Traduzione inglese
I am tormented/I have no thought for merriment tonight
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

I have no thought for merriment tonight/But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Brown-haired Allen o hi,
I would go with thee.

Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi, I would go with thee
But for the sound of the elements and the strength of the gales
Which would drive the men from the harbor
Brown-haired Allen, my darling sweetheart
I heard you had gone across the sea
On the slender, black boat of oak
And that you have gone ashore on the Isle of Man
That was not the harbor I would have chosen
Brown-haired Allen, darling of my heart
I was young when I fell in love with you
Tonight my tale is wretched
It’s not a tale of the death of cattle in the bog
But of the wetness of your shirt
And of how you are being torn by whales
Brown-haired Allen, my dear beloved
I heard you had been drowned
Alas, oh God, that I was not beside you
Whatever tide-mark the flood will leave you
I would take a drink, in spite of everyone
Of your heart’s blood,
after you had been drowned
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sono tormentata
e non penso al matrimonio stanotte
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei  
morire con te
non penso al matrimonio stanotte,
ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza
delle tempeste
Allen dai neri capelli, o hi
vorrei
morire con te
Hi riri riri ri hu o, horan o o, o hi le bho
Duinn o hi vorrei morire con te

Ma al fragore degli elementi
e alla forza delle tempeste
che dovrebbero guidare gli uomini nel porto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ho saputo che hai attraversato il mare
su un’esile barca di scura quercia
e che sei sbarcato sull’Isola
di Man
che non è il porto che avrei
scelto
Allen dai neri capelli, caro amore
mio
ero giovane quando mi sono innamorata di te
stasera il mio racconto è triste
non ti parlo di una mandria morta nella palude
ma della tua camicia bagnata
e di come sei circondato
dalle balene.
Allen dai neri capelli, mio caro amore
ho sentito che sei annegato
ma ahimè Dio, non ero accanto
a te
ovunque la marea ti abbia
rilasciato
vorrei bere, a dispetto
di tutti,
il sangue del tuo cuore
dopo che sei annegato

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/murray/ailean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/ailein.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8239
http://folktrax-archive.org/menus/cassprogs/001scotsgaelic.htm