Archivi tag: Luke Kelly

The Bold Princess Royal

Leggi in Italiano

Ahar, me hearties!” or a narration of the legendary naval pursuit between an british merchant ship and a pirate ship. A popular sea song in the British Isles, America and Canada, which tells of an attempt at pirate attack against the “Princess Royal”; some witnesses claimed it was an event that actually happened, but the dates changed, as did the place of departure and arrival of the vessel. In fact, the name “Princess Royal” was widespread at the time of the great sailing ships and so James Laurenson in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais asserts “This song was written in honour of a Shetland captain, Houston of Otterswick in Yell, who outsailed a pirate in his ship Princess Royal around 1840, and became famous on this account” (from here)
Yet already in 1905 George Gardiner had brought back a testimony of the attack between the “Princess Royal” and the French corsair ship “The Adventure” which occurred in 1789 which it was then widely disseminated in numerous boadside between the mid and late 1800s.
At daybreak on 21 June 1789, HM packet Princess Royal, nine days out from Falmouth on her way to New York (other accounts say Halifax) carrying mail, was accosted and pursued by a brig which was later identified as the French privateer Aventurier. At 7 pm the Aventurier hoisted English colours and fired a shot, which the Princess Royal returned. After a further shot, the brig continued the pursuit. It was not until 3.30 am on 22 June that the Aventurier resumed its attack, this time with a broadside and musket fire. The Princess Royal was outmanned, with a crew of thirty-two men and boys with seventeen passengers as opposed to the Aventurier’s 85 men and boys; and out-gunned too, with six cannons against the brig’s sixteen. Nevertheless, the English ship gave a good account of herself, holding the privateer off for two hours; at the end of which time the Aventurier moved away, sustaining further damage to her stern. The French ship was obliged to return to Bordeaux for refitting, while the Princess Royal resumed her course, eventually arriving home on 31 October. (from here)
Combined with different melodies, the standard version of “The Bold Princess Royal” follows a melody collected in South East England by Vaughan Williams that he reported in his “Folk Songs from the Eastern Counties” (1908)
Luke Kelly

Mary Black from General Humbert, 1976  (text here)

Chris Foster from Traces, 1999 (who learned it from the version recorded in 1938 by Velvet Brightwell, a traditional Suffolk singer, born in 1865)

Luke Kelly version
I
On the fifthteenth of February
we sailed from the land
On the bold Princess Royal
bound for Newfoundland.
We had fifhty brave seamen
for ship’s company
as boldly (bound) from the eastward
to the westward sailed we.
II
We had not been sailing
scarce days two or three,
When the man from our masthead
a strange sails he did see.
She came bearing down on us
for to see what we were
And under her mizzen black colours she wore.
III
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“What shall we do now? (1)
Here comes a bold pirate
to rob us, I know.”
“Oh no!” cries the chief mate,
“That never shall be so.
We’ll let out our reef 2), boys,
and from him we’ll go”
IV
Well this so bold pirate,
he hove alongside,
With a loud-speaking trumpet (3),
“Whence come you?” he cried,
Our captain being up, my boys,
he answered him so:
“We come from fair London;
and we’re bound for Peru(4).”
V
“Come, heave up your courses
and bring your ship to (5)
I have a long letter
to send home by you.”
“Oh, I will not heave up my courses
nor bring my ship to
That will be in some harbour,
not alongside of you.”
VI
And he chased us to the windward
to all that long day.
He fired shots after us
but they could not make way.
He fired shots after us
but none could prevail
And the bold Princess Royal
soon show them her tail.
VII
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“Now the pirate is gone,
Go you down to your grog (6), my boys, go down, everyone.
go you down to your grog, my boys,
and be of good cheer,
While the Princess has sea-room,
brave boys, never fear.”

NOTES
1) a sentence typicall from the commedia dell’arte
2) the first rule at sea: if you see a pirate ship, run away quickly. In fact it was the diversionary maneuvers performed by the few sailors on board to save their ship from the boarding! Fear of pirates cruelity played in their favor, many crews preferred to surrender without fighting, hoping to obtain clemency.
3) In the third volume of the series of Monaldi & Sorti entitled “Mysterium” they describes a boarding at the end of 600 by barbarian pirates: the blare of trumpets was a customary signal of the Dutch to greet the other ships at sea. The strange thing in this ballad is that the pirate ship already beat the black flag: it would have been more logical that at first they showed a “camouflage” flag to make sure that the other ship was approached without suspicion and only later replace the first flag with the pirate one.
4) Point of departure and arrival of the vessel changes according to the versions, Mary Black says Callao, Chris Foster says Kero, Luis Killen Peru. But also St. John pheraps Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova, although there is a Caribbean St. John
5) inexistent request to join the ship is a clumsy attempt to approach the ship without resorting to the fire of guns.
6) Grog is a drink introduced in the Royal Navy in 1740: rum after the British conquest of Jamaica had become the favorite drink of sailors, but to avoid problems during navigation, the daily ration of rum was diluted with water. (see more)

Princess Royal tune

Princess Royal is also the title of a melody attributed by collector Edward Bunting to the irish harper O’Carolan, (in The Ancient Music of Ireland, 1840), with the note “composed by Carolan for the daughter of MacDermott Roe, the representative of the old princes of Coolavin.”), the air has become a popular Morris dance

Elisabeth Brogeby



LINK
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-bold-princess-royal-song-lyrics-and-guitar-chords.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/theboldprincessroyal.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/proyal.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/boldprin.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/67959/10
https://www.loc.gov/item/afc1939007_afs02274b/
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118497

https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Princess_Royal_(1)_(The)
https://thesession.org/tunes/7267

Freedom Come All Ye & Battle of the Somme

Leggi in italiano

Freedom Come-All-Ye is a song written by Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) in 1960 for the Peace March in Holy Loch, near Glasgow, it is a song against the war, a cry for freedom against slavery and against the oppression of the working class and ethnic minorities, in the name of social justice. The song is in scots, while the melody is a retreat march for bagpipes from the First World War, arranged by John MacLellan (1875-1949) who titled it “The Bloody Fields of Flanders”; Henderson first heard played on the Anzio beachhead in 1944 (Second World War).The melody however is an old Perthshire aria already known with the title of “Busk Bush Bonnie Lassie

Dick Gaughan

Lorraine McIntosh live –
Luke Kelly

 


I
Roch the wind in the clear day’s dawin
Blaws the cloods heilster-gowdie owre the bay
But there’s mair nor a roch wind blawin (1)
Thro the Great Glen o the warld the day
It’s a thocht that wad gar oor rottans
Aa thae rogues that gang gallus fresh an gay
Tak the road an seek ither loanins
Wi thair ill-ploys tae sport an play
II
Nae mair will our bonnie callants
Merch tae war when oor braggarts crousely craw (2)
Nor wee weans frae pitheid an clachan
Mourn the ships sailin doun the Broomielaw (3)
Broken faimlies in lands we’ve hairriet
Will curse ‘Scotlan the Brave’ nae mair, nae mair
Black an white ane-til-ither mairriet
Mak the vile barracks o thair maisters (4) bare
III
Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom
Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom (5)
In yer hoos aa the bairns o Adam
Will find breid, barley-bree an paintit rooms
When Maclean (6) meets wi’s friens in Springburn (7)
Aa thae roses an geans will turn tae blume (8)
An the black lad frae yont Nyanga (9)
Dings the fell gallows o the burghers doun.
English translation*
I
It’s a rough wind in the clear day’s dawning
Blows the clouds head-over-heels across the bay
But there’s more than a rough wind blowing
Through the Great Glen of the world today
It’s a thought that would make our rodents,
All those rogues who strut and swagger,
Take the road and seek other pastures
To carry out their wicked schemes
II
No more will our fine young men
March to war at the behest of jingoists and imperialists
Nor will young children from mining communities and rural hamlets
Mourn the ships sailing off down the River Clyde
Broken families in lands we’ve helped to oppress
Will never again have reason to curse the sound of advancing Scots
Black and white, united in friendship and marriage,
Will make the slums of the employers bare
III
So come all ye who love freedom
Pay no attention to the prophets of doom
In your house all the children of Adam
Will be welcomed with food, drink and clean bright accommodation
When MacLean returns to his people
All the roses and cherry trees will blossom
And the black guy from Nyanga
Will break the capitalist stranglehold on everyone’s life

NOTES
* from here
1) a wind of change is a metaphor dear to the political world, it is the wind of people protest, who claim their right to live a full and dignified life
2) are those who rant and foment the war to push the sons of the people forward
3) Glasgow’s main thoroughfare adjacent to the river Clyde: it is the pier from which many ships loaded with emigrants have left
4) the reference is to apartheid in South Africa when the blacks were deported to the “homeland of the south” and deprived of all political and civil rights.
5) In those years peace meant to protest against the atomic arms race and the fear of a nuclear conflict: the sign of peace that today belongs to the symbols shared on a global level was created in 1958 by the Englishman Gerald Holtom for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, CND: as he himself declared, the three lines are the superposition of the letters N and D – which stand for Nuclear Disarmament – taken from the semaphore alphabet. The circle, on the other hand, symbolizes the Earth.

6) John Maclean (1879 -1923), Scottish socialist, known for his fierce opposition to the First World War. For this reason, in 1918 he was tried for sedition and imprisoned. There was a popular mobilization in his favor and a few months later he was released. In 1918 he ended up again in prison for obstruction to recruitment and sedition and he was released after 7 months; the months in jail have harmed the health of Maclean who will die at age 45; his communism evolved against the Scottish Labor parties to advocate Scotland’s independence and the return to the old social clan structure but on a communist basis
7) district of the working class of Glasgow. The south of Scotland heavily idustrialized from the second half of the 1800 transform Glasgow and the Clyde into a bulwark of radical socialists and communists so much to get the nickname “Red Clyde”
8) spring is the season of rebirth
-) Nyanga is a city in Cape Town, South Africa. The residents of Nyanga have been very active in protesting the laws of apartheid

The Battle of the Somme

Another bagpipe melody from World War I was composed by piper William Laurie (1881-1916) to commemorate one of the deadliest battles, the Battle of the Somme which began July 1916 with heavy losses from day one; in the end it will result 620.000 losses among the Allies and about 450.000 among the German rows: the melody is in 9/8 and it is considered a retreat march, not necessarily as a specific military maneuver. Laurie (or Lawrie) participated in the battle with the 8th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Lawrie and John MacLellan served in the same band during the war), but severely tried by the wounds and life in the trench fell seriously ill and he was repatriated England where he died in November of the same year.

The Dubliners often with “Freedom Come-All-Ye”

The Malinky with Jimmy Waddel (at 3:39)

It was Dave Swarbrick who brought the piece to the Fireport Convention group after learning it from his friend and teacher Beryl Marriott

Albion Country Band

THE DANCE

A Scottish dance entitled The Scottish Lilt was composed shortly after 1746 to be practiced by ladies of good family who wished to court or entertain the gentlemen seducing them with their grace. It’s a Scottish National Dances traditionally matched with the melody The Battle of the Somme: the dance moves are inspired by the classical ballet


the steps in detail

LINK
http://unionsong.com/u597.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=13463
http://www.andreagaddini.it/FreedomCamAllYe.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/f/freedomc.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4996
https://www.wired.it/play/cultura/2014/02/21/nascita-simbolo-pace/
http://thebattleofthefield.tripod.com/id11.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/2923

Freedom Come All Ye

Read the post in English

Scritta nel 1960 da Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) per la Marcia della Pace a Holy Loch, presso Glasgow, “Freedom Come-All-Ye”  è una canzone contro la guerra, un grido di libertà contro la schiavitù e contro l’oppressione della classe lavoratrice e delle minoranze etniche, in nome della giustizia sociale. La canzone è in scots, mentre la melodia è una marcia da ritirata per cornamusa della prima guerra mondiale, arrangiata da John MacLellan (1875-1949) che la intitolò “The Bloody Fields of Flanders”;  Henderson ebbe modo di ascoltarla nel 1944 durante la seconda guerra mondiale mentre combatteva ad Anzio. La melodia tuttavia è una vecchia aria del Perthshire già nota con il titolo di “Busk Bush Bonnie Lassie

Dick Gaughan

Lorraine McIntosh live –
Luke Kelly

 


I
Roch the wind in the clear day’s dawin
Blaws the cloods heilster-gowdie owre the bay
But there’s mair nor a roch wind blawin (1)
Thro the Great Glen o the warld the day
It’s a thocht that wad gar oor rottans
Aa thae rogues that gang gallus fresh an gay
Tak the road an seek ither loanins
Wi thair ill-ploys tae sport an play
II
Nae mair will our bonnie callants
Merch tae war when oor braggarts crousely craw (2)
Nor wee weans frae pitheid an clachan
Mourn the ships sailin doun the Broomielaw (3)
Broken faimlies in lands we’ve hairriet
Will curse ‘Scotlan the Brave’ nae mair, nae mair
Black an white ane-til-ither mairriet
Mak the vile barracks o thair maisters (4) bare
III
Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom
Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom (5)
In yer hoos aa the bairns o Adam
Will find breid, barley-bree an paintit rooms
When Maclean (6) meets wi’s friens in Springburn (7)
Aa thae roses an geans will turn tae blume (8)
An the black lad frae yont Nyanga (9)
Dings the fell gallows o the burghers doun.
Traduzione italiana di Carla Sassi*
I
Forte il vento nell’alba del giorno chiaro/Sovverte le nuvole via per la baia,
Ma non v’è più il vento forte che soffiava
Attraverso la grande valle del mondo.
E’ un pensiero che invoglia i nostri ratti,/I briganti che infieriscono felici e intatti,
A prendere il cammino, in cerca di luoghi nuovi/Dove godere e giocare malvagi inganni.
II
Mai più la dolce gioventù dovrà
Marciare in guerra mentre i pavidi si vantano rauchi
Né i piccoli figli della miniera e del villaggio
Piangeranno le navi che salpano via dal Broomielaw.
Famiglie divise in terre da noi razziate
Non malediranno la Scozia guerriera, mai più;
Il nero e il bianco, l’uno all’altro uniti nell’amore,
Lasceranno deserte le vili caserme dei padroni.
III
Qui venite tutti, alla casa della libertà,
Non ascoltate i corvi che invocano rauchi la fine
Nella tua casa ogni figlio di Adamo
Troverà pane e birra e mura imbiancate.
E quando John MacLean si unirà ai compagni di Springburn
Tutte le rose ed i ciliegi fioriranno,
E un fanciullo nero dal lontano Nyanga
Frantumerà le forche feroci della città.

NOTE
* (dal libro “Poeti della Scozia contemporanea” a cura di Carla Sassi e Marco Fazzini, Supernova Editore, Venezia 1992)
1) il vento del cambiamente una metafora cara al mondo politico, è il vento di protesta del popolo che rivendita il suo diritto a vivere una vita piena e dignitosa
2) sono quelli che sbraitano e fomentano la guerra a mandare avanti in prima linea i figli del popolo
3) principale arteria di Glasgow adiacente al fiume Clyde: è il molo da cui sono partite tante navi carichi di emigranti
4) il riferimento è all’apartheid in Sud Africa quando i neri vennero deportati nelle “homeland del sud” e privati di ogni diritto politico e civile.
5) Non dimentichiamo che in quegli anni la pace voleva dire protestare contro la corsa all’armamento atomico e la paura di un conflitto nucleare: il segno di pace che oggi appartiene ai simboli condivisi a livello globale fu creato nel 1958 dall’inglese Gerald Holtom per La Campagna per il disarmo nucleare (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, CND) : come dichiarò lui stesso, le tre linee sono la sovrapposizione delle lettere N e D – che stanno per Nuclear Disarmament – prese dall’ alfabeto semaforico. Il cerchio, invece, simboleggia la Terra.

6) John Maclean (1879 –1923), socialista scozzese, noto per la sua fiera opposizione alla prima guerra mondiale. Per questo nel 1918 fu processato per sedizione e imprigionato. Ci fu una mobilitazione popolare in suo favore e qualche mese dopo venne scarcerato. Ancora nel 1918 finì di nuovo in prigione per ostruzione al reclutamento e sedizione e di nuovo scarcerato dopo 7 mesi; i mesi in carcere hanno nuociuto alla salute di Maclean che morirà a 45 anni; il suo comunismo finì per discostarsi dai partiti laburisti scozzesi per propugnare l’indipendenza della Scozia e il ritorno all’antica struttura sociale dei clan ma su base comunista
6) quartiere della classe lavoratrice di Glasgow. Il sud della Scozia pesantemente idustrializzato a partire dalla seconda metà del 1800 trasformano Glasgow e il Clyde in un baluardo di socialisti radicali e comunisti tanto da ottenere il soprannome di “Clyde Rosso”
7) è la primavera la stagione della rinascita
8) Nyanga è una città a Città del Capo , in Sud Africa . I residenti di Nyanga sono stati molto attivi nella protesta contro le leggi dell’apartheid

The Battle of the Somme

Un’altra melodia per cornamusa sempre riconducibile alla I Guerra Mondiale, fu composta dal piper William Laurie (1881-1916) per commemorare una delle battaglie più letali, la battaglia della Somme (The Battle of the Somme) che iniziò il1 luglio 1916 con pesanti perdite fin dal primo giorno; alla fine risulteranno 620.000 perdite tra gli Alleati e circa 450.000 tra le file tedesche: la melodia è in 9/8 ed è considerata una marcia da ritirata, non necessariamente come specifica manovra militare. Laurie (o Lawrie) partecipò alla battaglia con l’8° Battaglione Argyll e Sutherland Highlanders (Lawrie e John MacLellan prestarono servizio nella stessa banda durante la guerra), ma duramente provato dalle ferite e dalla vita in trincea si ammalò gravemente e venne rimpatriato in Inghilterra dove morì nel novembre dello stesso anno.

I Dubliners spesso abbinata a “Freedom Come-All-Ye”

I Malinky la abbinano a Jimmy Waddel (inizia a 3:39)

Fu Dave Swarbrick a portare il pezzo nel gruppo Fireport Convention dopo averlo imparato dal suo amico e insegnante Beryl Marriott

Albion Country Band

LA DANZA

Una danza scozzese dal titolo The Scottish Lilt fu composta poco dopo il 1746 per essere praticata dalle madamigelle di buona famiglia che desideravano corteggiare o intrattenere i membri della nobiltà seducendoli con la loro grazia. E’ una Scottish  National Dances abbinata tradizionalmente  alla melodia The Battle of the Somme: i passi di danza sono ispirati al balletto classico

anche con due uomini

i passi nel dettaglio

FONTI
http://unionsong.com/u597.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=13463
http://www.andreagaddini.it/FreedomCamAllYe.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/f/freedomc.html
https://www.scotslanguage.com/articles/view/id/4996
https://www.wired.it/play/cultura/2014/02/21/nascita-simbolo-pace/
http://thebattleofthefield.tripod.com/id11.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/2923

Banks of the Sweet Primroses

Leggi in italiano

It is the 50-60 years of folk revival when the first recordings of “The Banks of Sweet Primroses” begin to circulate; the Fairport Convention record the ballad on several occasions, as well as the folk revival of the years 70 re-proposes it with the names of great interpreters; the textual variations are minimal, the melody is substantially the same.

THE INCOSTANT LOVER

“The Banks of Sweet Primroses” is widespread in the English countryside of the South collected by the Copper family, printed in the nineteenth century as a broadside ballad.
Our beautiful gallant meets a maiden for the countryside and jumped on her; unfortunately he had not noticed that the girl was of his knowledge and that therefore she knowing already the boy: even on a desert island she would prefer the company of the birds rather than him.
The versions are sometimes only four stanzas but the last stanza handed down in the Copper family is comforting: the young man will surely find another girl who will be well disposed towards him!

June Tabor from At the Wood’s Heart 2005 (I, III, IV, V, VI)

Luke Kelly (I, III, IV, V)

Josienne Clarke & Ben Walker from digital download album “fRoots 53” 2015 (I, III, IV, V, VI)

I
As I roved out one midsummer (1)’s morning
To view the fields and to take the air
‘Twas down by the banks of the sweet primroses (2)
There I beheld a most lovely fair
II
Three long steps I stepped up to her,
Not knowing her as she passed me by,
I stepped up to her thinking for to view her,
She appeared to me like some virtuous bride.
III
Says I: “Fair maid, where can you be a going
And what’s the occasion of all your grief?
I will make you as happy as any lady
If you will grant me once more a leave. (3)”
IV
Stand up, stand up, you false deceiver
You are a false deceitful man, ‘tis plain
‘Tis you that is causing my poor heart to wander
And to give me comfort ‘tis all in vain
V
Now I’ll go down to some lonesome valley
Where no man on earth shall e’er me find
Where the pretty small birds do change their voices
And every moment blows blusterous winds (4)
VI
Come all young men (5) that go a-courting,
Pray pay attention to what I say.
There is many a dark and a cloudy morning
Turns out to be a sun-shiny day.

NOTES
1) Midsummer is the day of the summer solstice, equivalent to the day of St. John
2) the primrose which blooms in summer is a variety of primrose called common cowslip (scientific name primula veris), The common name cowslip may derive from the old English for cow dung, probably because the plant was often found growing amongst the manure in cow pastures.
3) Luke Kelly’s line” If you will grant me one small relief” , the sentences clearly allude to a second chance request to flirt
4) Luke Kelly ‘s line “And ev’ry moment blows blustrous wild”, it is probably a mistake in the oral transmission blustrous = blusterous windy stormy, wild=wind
5) in other versions a sentence for young girls: even if today they cry tomorrow they will find a man to marry!

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/banksofthesweetprimroses.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/s_prim.htm
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/week-53-banks-of-the-sweet-primroses/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/451.html

http://www.fairylandtrust.org/how-to-see-fairies-part-one/

 

I pendii delle belle primule odorose

Read the post in English  

Sono gli anni 50-60 del folk revival quando iniziano a circolare le prime registrazioni di “The Banks of Sweet Primroses“, Shirley Collins la intitola “The Sweet Primeroses” e i Fairport Convention la registrano in più occasioni, così anche il folk revival degli anni 70 la ripropone con i nomi di grandi interpreti, le varizioni testuali sono minime, la melodia è sostanzialmente la stessa.

L’AMANTE INCOSTANTE

E’ una ballad diffusa nella campagna inglese del Sud tra i canti della famiglia Copper circolata in stampa nell’Ottocento come broadside ballad.
Il nostro bel galante incontra una donzella tutta sola per la campagna e le zompa subito addosso; ahimè non si era accorto che la fanciulla era già stata una sua preda e che quindi conoscendo già il tipo anche su un isola deserta preferirebbe la compagnia degli uccelli piuttosto che la sua.
Le versioni sono talvolta di sole 4 strofe ma l’utlima strofa tramandata nella famiglia Copper è consolatoria: il giovanotto sicuramente troverà un’altra fanciulla che sarà ben disposta nei suoi confronti!

June Tabor in At the Wood’s Heart 2005 (strofe I, III, IV, V, VI)

Luke Kelly (strofe I, III, IV, V)

Josienne Clarke & Ben Walker in digital download album “fRoots 53” 2015 (strofe I, III, IV, V, VI)


I
As I roved out one midsummer (1)’s morning
To view the fields and to take the air
‘Twas down by the banks of the sweet primroses (2)
There I beheld a most lovely fair
II
Three long steps I stepped up to her,
Not knowing her as she passed me by,
I stepped up to her thinking for to view her,
She appeared to me like some virtuous bride.
III
Says I: “Fair maid, where can you be a going
And what’s the occasion of all your grief?
I will make you as happy as any lady
If you will grant me once more a leave. (3)”
IV
Stand up, stand up, you false deceiver
You are a false deceitful man, ‘tis plain
‘Tis you that is causing my poor heart to wander
And to give me comfort ‘tis all in vain
V
Now I’ll go down to some lonesome valley
Where no man on earth shall e’er me find
Where the pretty small birds do change their voices
And every moment blows blusterous winds (4)
VI
Come all young men (5) that go a-courting,
Pray pay attention to what I say.
There is many a dark and a cloudy morning
Turns out to be a sun-shiny day.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo in una bella mattina di mezza estate per guardare i campi e prendere il fresco,
fu sui pendii (le rive) delle primule odorose
dove vidi la fanciulla  più bella.
II
Con tre balzi mi avvicinai a lei,
non avendola riconosciuta mentre mi passava accanto;
le andai vicino pensando di guardarla bene,
mi apparviva come una moglie ideale
III
Dico io “Bella donzella, dove state andando
e qual’è il motivo di tutto il vostro dolore?
Vi farò felice più di ogni altra madama
se mi darete soltanto un po’ di speranza”
IV
“State lontano voi falso imbroglione,
è chiaro che voi siete un traditore,
è per colpa vostra che mi si è spezzato il cuore
ed è inutile che mi confortiate ora!
V
Andrò in qualche valle
solitaria
dove nessun uomo sulla terra mi troverà
dove i piccoli uccellini si scambiano i richiami
e ogni momento soffiano venti impetuosi.”
VI
Venite voi giovanotti che andate ad amoreggiare
siete pregati di fare attenzione a quello che vi dico:
ci sono molte mattinate buie e nuvolose
che si trasformano in un giorno soleggaito

NOTE
1) Midsummer è il giorno del solstizio d’estate, equivalente al giorno di San Giovanni
2) la primula che fiorisce d’estate è una varietà di primula sempe spontanea detta primula odorosa (nome scientifico primula veris), rispetto alla primula comune che fiorisce da febbraio a marzo, la primula odorosa spunta nei boschi e nei prati da aprile a giugno, si differenzia per i fiori più piccoli e dal giallo brillante che crescono ad ombrella sorrette da un lungo stelo.
In Italia la primula viene anche detta Primavera, Primavera odorosa, Orecchio d’orso giallo, Fior d’cuch, Trombete, Filadora, ed anche Occhio di Civetta.
3) letteralemnte la frase dice “se mi concederete ancora una volta il permesso“, Luke Kelly dice” If you will grant me one small relief” (se mi concederete un po’ di sollievo) le frasi alludono chiaramente a una richiesta di seconda occasione per amoreggiare
4) Luke Kelly dice “And ev’ry moment blows blustrous wild” e si tratta probabilmente di un errore nella trasmissione orale blustrous =blusterous ventoso burrascoso, wild = vento
5) in altre versioni si cerca di confortare le giovani fanciulle: anche se oggi piangono domani troveranno un uomo che le sposi!

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/banksofthesweetprimroses.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/s_prim.htm
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/week-53-banks-of-the-sweet-primroses/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/451.html

http://www.fairylandtrust.org/how-to-see-fairies-part-one/

 

THE BOLD PRINCESS ROYAL

Read the post in English

“All’arrembaggio!” ovvero la narrazione dello scontro leggendario tra una nave mercantile inglese e una nave pirata. Una sea song popolare nelle Isole Britanniche, America e Canada, che narra di un tentativo di arrembaggio piratesco ai danni della “Princess Royal”; alcuni testimoni  asserivano si trattasse di un evento realmente accaduto, ma le date mutano,  così come il luogo di partenza e d’arrivo del vascello.  In effetti il nome “Princess Royal” era molto diffuso all’epoca dei grandi velieri e così James Laurenson negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais asserisce “Questa canzone è stata scritta in onore di un capitano delle Shetland, Houston di Otterswick in Yell, che ha seminato un pirata con la sua nave Princess Royal intorno al 1840, e divenne famoso per questo motivo” (tratto da qui)
Eppure già nel 1905 George Gardiner  aveva riportato una testimonianza dello scontro tra la “Princess Royal” e la nave corsara francese “The Adventure” avvenuto nel 1789 che poi è stato divulgato ampiamente in numerosi boadside tra la metà e la fine del 1800.

All’alba del 21 giugno 1789, la nave mercantile “HM Princess Royal”, partita da nove giorni da Falmouth diretta a New York (altre versioni dicono Halifax) che trasportava posta, fu avvicinata e inseguita da un brigantino che in seguito venne identificato come il corsaro francese “The Aventurier”. Alle 7 di sera l’Avventuriere ha issato i colori inglesi e ha sparato un colpo, che la Principessa Reale ha restituito. Dopo un ulteriore colpo, il brigantino continuò l’inseguimento. Il 22 giugno, alle 3.30 del mattino, l’Avventuriere ha ripreso l’attacco, questa volta con borbate leterali e colpi di moschetto. La Principessa Reale era in svantaggio numerico, con un equipaggio di trentadue uomini e ragazzi e diciassette passeggeri contro agli 85 uomini e ragazzi dell’Avventuriere; e anche anche con meno cannoni, a sei cannoni contro i sedici anni del brigantino. Tuttavia, la nave inglese ha dato una buona prova, disimpagnando la nave corsara per due ore; alla fine  l’Avventuriero si è allontanato, subendo ulteriori danni a poppa. La nave francese fu costretta a tornare a Bordeaux per le riparazioni, mentre la “Princess Royal” riprendeva la sua rotta, arrivando infine a casa il 31 ottobre . (tratto da qui)
Abbinata a diverse melodie, la versione standard di “The Bold Princess Royal” segue la melodia raccolta nel Sud-Est dell’Inghilterra da Vaughan Williams e riportata nel suo “Folk Songs from the Eastern Counties (1908)
Luke Kelly

Mary Black in General Humbert, 1976  (testo qui)

Chris Foster in Traces, 1999 (che l’ha imparata dalla versione registrata nel 1938 di Velvet Brightwell, un cantante tradizionale del Suffolk, nato nel 1865)

Versione Luke Kelly
I
On the fifthteenth of February
we sailed from the land
On the bold Princess Royal
bound for Newfoundland.
We had fifhty brave seamen
for ship’s company
as boldly (bound) from the eastward
to the westward sailed we.
II
We had not been sailing
scarce days two or three,
When the man from our masthead
a strange sails he did see.
She came bearing down on us
for to see what we were
And under her mizzen black colours she wore.
III
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“What shall we do now? (1)
Here comes a bold pirate
to rob us, I know.”
“Oh no!” cries the chief mate,
“That never shall be so.
We’ll let out our reef 2), boys,
and from him we’ll go”
IV
Well this so bold pirate,
he hove alongside,
With a loud-speaking trumpet (3),
“Whence come you?” he cried,
Our captain being up, my boys,
he answered him so:
“We come from fair London;
and we’re bound for Peru (4).”
V
“Come, heave up your courses
and bring your ship to (5)
I have a long letter
to send home by you.”
“Oh, I will not heave up my courses
nor bring my ship to
That will be in some harbour,
not alongside of you.”
VI
And he chased us to the windward
to all that long day.
He fired shots all after us
but they could not make way.
He fired shots after us
but none could prevail
And the bold Princess Royal
soon show them her tail.
VII
“Oh Lord!” cries our captain,
“Now the pirate is gone,
Go you down to your grog (6), my boys, go down, everyone.
go you down to your grog, my boys,
and be of good cheer,
While the Princess has sea-room,
brave boys, never fear.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Il 15 di Febbraio
lasciammo la terra
sulla prode “Princesse Royal”
diretti a Terranova.
Avevamo 50 marinai coraggiosi
nell’equipaggio della nave
mentre arditamente da Est
verso Ovest navigavamo.
II
Eravamo in viaggio
da appena due o tre giorni
quando l’uomo di vedetta
vide delle strane vele.
Arrivava virando verso di noi
per vedere cosa fossimo,
e portava all’albero di mezzana il vessillo nero.
III
“Oddio * grida il capitano
“Che facciamo adesso?
Temo sia arrivato un audace pirata per derubarci!”
“Oh no” grida il primo ufficiale
“Che non sia mai,
lasceremo una mano di terzarolo, ragazzi  e ci allontaneremo da lui”
IV
Beh questo audace pirata
ci accostò sul fianco
con una buccina dal suono acuto
“Da dove venite?” gridò.
Il nostro capitano subito pronto, ragazzi, gli rispose così
“Veniamo dalla bella Londra
e siamo diretti in Perù.”
V
“Venite, cambiate rotta
e affiancate la vostra nave
perchè ho una lunga lettera
mandata da casa per voi”
“Oh non cambierò rotta
per affiancare la mia nave;
lo farò in un porto,
non certo accanto a voi”
VI
E ci inseguì sopravento
per tutta la durata del giorno.
Ci sparò contro
ma non riuscivano a farsi strada,
ci sparò contro
ma nessuno prevaleva,
e la prode Princesse Royal
presto mostrò loro la scia.
VII
“Oddio” – grida il capitano
“Ora il pirata è andato,
sotto con il grog, ragazzi
sotto per tutti.
Sotto con il grog, ragazzi
e siate di buon umore,
mentre la Princess è in mare
bravi ragazzi non abbiate mai paura”

NOTE
1) una frase da commedia dell’arte
2) la prima regola in mare se si avvista una nave pirata è quella di scappare velocemente . In effetti furono le manovre diversive eseguite dai pochi marinai a bordo a salvare la nave dall’arrembaggio! La paura degli atti di crudeltà dei pirati e corsari giocava a loro favore, molti equipaggi preferivano arrendersi senza combattere sperando di ottenere clemenza.
3) sto leggendo il terzo tomo della serie di Monaldi &Sorti intitolato “Mysterium” in cui si descrive un arrembaggio di fine 600 ad opera dei corsari barbareschi: lo squillo di trombe era un segnale consueto degli olandesi per salutare le altre navi in mare. La cosa strana è che la nave della nostra ballata battesse già bandiera nera: sarebbe stato più logico che in un primo momento mostrasse una bandiera “di camuffamento” per far si che l’altra nave si lasciasse avvicinare senza sospetti e solo in un secondo momento sostituisse la prima bandiera con quella pirata.
4) il luogo di partenza e d’arrivo del vascello cambiano a secondo delle versioni, Mary Black dice Callao, Chris Foster dice Kero, Luis Killen Peru. oppure St. John forse Saint John’s, conosciuta in italiano come San Giovanni di Terranova, anche se esiste una St. John caraibica
5) l’inistente richiesta di affiancarsi alla nave è un tentativo maldestro per abbordare la nave senza ricorrere al fuoco dei cannoni.  La manovra di abbordaggio era di solito la mossa conclusiva dello scontro tra due unità navali. Infatti inizialmente le navi si fronteggiavano col fuoco dei cannoni e solo dopo aver ridotto la possibilità di manovra dell’imbarcazione nemica, magari distruggendo le velature e gli alberi che le sostenevano, ci si affiancava ad essa, ricorrendo anche, come ausilio, a cime con appositi rampini con le quali agganciare l’altra nave. Un’altra tecnica consisteva nel far impigliare il bompresso nel sartiame della nave da abbordare ed usarlo poi come un ponte. Similmente, nella guerra di corsa, in cui uno degli scopi del corsaro era anche l’arricchimento personale, l’abbordaggio era pratica molto diffusa in quanto permetteva di entrare in possesso della nave predata integra e di poterla quindi derubare delle merci trasportate. (da wikipedia)
6)  Il grog è una bevanda introdotta nella Royal Navy nel 1740: il rum dopo la conquista britannica della Giamaica era diventata la bevanda preferita dai marinai, ma per evitare problemi durante la navigazione, la razione giornaliera di rum era  diluita con l’acqua. (vedi)

LA MELODIA Princess Royal

Princess Royal è anche il titolo di una melodia attribuita dal collezionista Edward Bunting a O’Carolan, (in The Ancient Music of Ireland , 1840), con la nota “composta da Carolan per la figlia di MacDermott Roe, il rappresentante dei vecchi principi di Coolavin.”), come sia la melodia è diventata una popolare Morris dance

Elisabeth Brogeby



Fonti
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-bold-princess-royal-song-lyrics-and-guitar-chords.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/theboldprincessroyal.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/proyal.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/boldprin.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/67959/10
https://www.loc.gov/item/afc1939007_afs02274b/
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118497

https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Princess_Royal_(1)_(The)
https://thesession.org/tunes/7267

JOIN THE BRITISH ARMY

Charles Green: la ragazza lasciata indietro 1880 Soldati che si imbarcano per le guerre napoleoniche
Charles Green: la ragazza lasciata indietro 1880
Soldati che si imbarcano per le guerre napoleoniche

Tra le irish rebel song di non precisata data che viene fatta risalire all’epoca vittoriana e alle barrak songs (i canti da caserma) “Join the British Army”, lungi dall’essere un’esortazione all’arruolamento, è stata riportata in auge nel canto folk di protesta degli anni 60 da Ewan McColl, il quale ne fece una popolare versione ripresa dagli interpreti successivi.
La canzone è irriverente e accosta i bravi soldatini inglesi a tante scimmie ammaestrate
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano le scimmie dello zoo…

E ognuno che la canta ci mette del suo..

La melodia è ripresa  da un titolo scozzese “The Lass O’ Killiecrankie” con la quale condivide  la prima strofa e parte del ritornello
La Lass O’ Killiecrankie inizia con:
When I was young I used to be
As fine as a lad as you could see
the Prince of Wales invited me
To come and join his army
Il ritornello però non fa menzione delle scimmie allo zoo
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo
She’s as sweet as honeydew
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo
The Lass from Killiecrankie

Il testo prosegue poi con tutte altre amenità rivolte alla bella in questione. Da ascoltare in una versione che più vintage non si può Harry Lauder – The Lass O’ Killiecrankie (1904)

Ma ritorniamo alla irish rebel song , volendo tracciare un percorso possiamo considerarla il contro altare della canzone “Over the Hills and Far Away” pubblicata da Thomas D’Urfey nella sua raccolta “Pills to Purge Melancholy” (1706) (canzone che circolava già alla fine del 1600..) e di strada ne ha fatta parecchia per finire rimaneggiata anche ai giorni nostri.. con il titolo US ARMY

THE BRITISH ARMY

ASCOLTA Ronnie Drew


I
When I was young I used to be
As fine a man as ever you’d see
Til the Prince of Wales he said to me:
“Come and join the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up at the zoo
And I: “If I had a face like you,
I’d join the British army”
II
Sarah Conlon baked a cake,
‘twas all for poor oul Slattery’s sake
She threw herself into the lake,
pretending she was barmy
III
Corporal Daly went away,
his wife got in the family way
And the only thing that she could say,
was: “BIP the British army”
IV
Corporal Kelly’s a terrible drought,
just give him a couple of jars of stout
And he’ll beat the enemy with his mouth and save the British army
V
Kilted soldiers wear no drawers,
won’t you kindly lend them yours
The rich must always help the poor
to save the British army
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto, come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse:
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’Esercito inglese’
CORO
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano le scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’Esercito inglese!”.

II
Sara Conlon preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
che si gettò nel lago
immaginando di essere impazzita
III
Caporale Daly (1) se ne andò
sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era “BIP l’Esercito inglese”
IV
Caporale Kelly ha una sete terribile
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
e sconfiggerà il nemico a morsi
per salvare l’Esercito inglese
V
I soldati in kilt non hanno le mutande
vorreste gentilmente prestargli le vostre?
I ricchi devono sempre aiutare i poveri
per salvare l’esercito inglese

NOTE
1) i soldati che la cantavano mettevano i nomi dei loro sottoufficiali da prendere in giro
2) espressione idiomatica

COME AND JOIN THE BRITISH ARMY

ASCOLTA i Dubliners (voce Luke Kelly) in More of the Hard Stuff 1967 con delle strofe leggermente diverse


I
When I was young I used to be
As fine a man as ever you’d see
Til the Prince of Wales he said to me:
“Come and join the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up at the zoo
“If I had a face like you,
I’d join the British army”

II
Sarah Comden baked a cake,
‘twas all for poor oul Slattery’s sake
She threw meself into the lake,
pretending I was barmy
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo
What make me mind up what to do?
Now I’ll work me ticket home to you
And …. the British army

III
Sergent Heeley went away,
his wife got in the family way
And the only words that she could say,
was: “Blame the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo
Me curse upon the Labour too (blu) (3)
That took me darling boy from me
To join the British army
IV
Corporal Sheen’s a turn o’ the ‘bout,
just give him a couple of jars of stout
He’ll bake the enemy with his mouth
and save the British army
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse:
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’esercito inglese’
CORO
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’Esercito inglese!”.
II
Sara Comden preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
lei mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che ero impazzito
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo

che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito inglese
III
Il Sergente Heeley (1) se ne andò
sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era “E’ colpa dell’esercito inglese”
CHORUS
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti (3)
hanno portato via il mio amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito inglese
IV
Caporale Sheen si fa due passi (4)
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
farà del nemico un sol boccone (5)
per salvare l’esercito inglese

NOTE
3) “Labour-broo” anche scritto come brew o blu o too nelle note di MacColl “The reference to the “Labour-broo” (the Unemployment Exchange) in the refrain of the third stanza suggests that the song continued to grow during the 1920s.”
4) potrebbe anche voler dire “si guarda intorno”
5) l’unica frase sensata per una traduzione

FUCK THE BRITISH ARMY

Mentre i Dubliners la bippano gli Irish Rovers se ne infischiano altamente
ASCOLTA Irish Rovers

la versione testuale riportata è solo una parte di quanto cantato.


I
When I was young I used to be
as fine a man as ever you’d see;
The Prince of Wales, he said to me,
“Come and join the British army.”
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up in the zoo “
If I had a face like you,
I would join the British army.
II
Sarah Camdon baked a cake;
it was all for poor old Slattery’s sake.
I threw meself into the lake,
pretending I was balmy.
III
Corporal Duff’s got such a drought,
just give him a couple of jars of stout;
He’ll kill the enemy with his mouth
and save the British Army.
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
Me curse is on the Labour crew 
They took your darling boy from you
to join the British army.
……
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’esercito inglese’
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’esercito inglese!”.
II
Sara Camdon preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che fossi pazzo
III
Caporale Duff ha una sete terribile
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
e sconfiggerà il nemico a morsi
per salvare l’esercito inglese
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti
hanno portato via il vostro amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito inglese

US ARMY

I Booze Brothers ne hanno fatto una versione USA con il titolo “US Army” attualizzata, modificando ovviamente i personaggi ed ecco che il Principe del Galles diventa il presidente Bush e viene tirata in ballo Sarah Palin.

I
When I was young I used to be,
A finer man who e’er ya see,
Then President Bush came up to me,
Join the US Army
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
They’re lookin for monkeys up the zoo,
Says I if Id have a face like you,
I’d join the US Army
II
Sarah Conner baked a cake,
It’s all for poor slattery’s sake,
She threw meself into the lake,
Pretendin’ I was barmy,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’ve made me mind with what to do,
I’ll work me ticket home to you,
And f*ck The US Army,
III
When I lived on to fight away,
Her wife got in the family way,
The only thing that she could say,
Was blame the US Army,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
Me curse upon the labour blue,
That took my darlin boy from me,
To join the US Army,
IV
Sarah Palin(7) buy her way,
……………….
……………………
To save the US Army
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’d made up me mind on what to do,
I’ll work my ticket home to you,
And f*ck the US Army,
V
When I was young I had a twist,
For punchin raqi’s with me fist,
Though I thought I might enlist,
And join the US Army,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’d made up me mind on what to do,
I’ll work my ticket home to you,
And f*ck the US Army,
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il presidente Bush venne da me:
‘Unisciti all’esercito americano’
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’esercito americano!”.
II
Sara Conner preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero Slattery,
mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che fossi pazzo
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano
III
Allora continuavo a combattere
e sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era maledire l’esercito americano
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti
hanno portato via mio amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito americano
IV
Sarah Palin si comprò la salvezza
……………….
………………….
per salvare l’esercito americano
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano
V
Quando ero giovane avevo
la smania di tirare cazzotti (6)
e pensai che potevo iscrivermi
e arruolarmi nell’esercito americano
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano

NOTE
6) uno che faceva a pugni fin da ragazzino
7) Sarah Louise Heath coniugata Palin diventata governatrice dell’Alaska nel 2006 (Wiki)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=618
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=31758
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-british-army-chords-and-lyrics.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/britishar.html
http://www.metrolyrics.com/join-the-british-army-lyrics-dubliners.html
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Booze-Brothers/Us-Army
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Join_the_British_Army.htm

TRAMPS AND HAWKERS

“Summer walkers” o più comunemente “traivellers” (irish o highland travellers) o in senso spregiativo “tinkers” (dal gaelico stagnai) sono una popolazione nomade discendente forse dalla popolazione autoctona di lingua gaelica; vivevano come calderai (che riparavano pentole e padelle), venditori ambulanti e commercianti di cavalli; erano anche lavoranti stagionali nelle aziende agricole o pescatori, che si spostavano a seconda della disponibilità di lavoro. Alcuni erano organizzati in gruppi o comunità, ma spesso viaggiavano soli o con il proprio nucleo famigliare. Spesso musicisti ambulanti, “conta storie” erano i depositari dei canti e delle musiche della tradizione popolare delle Isole Britanniche e si sono diffusi in Irlanda, Gran Bretagna e seguendo i flussi migratori anche negli Stati Uniti.
Sono i raminghi, le vestigia d’una cultura che non si è mai adattata alla vita stanziale, un tempo benedetti dagli dei.

IRISH TRAVELLERS

Più comunemente detti gli zingari irlandesi anche se non sono di etnia rom, sono i viaggiatori irlandesi una popolazione nomade dalle caratteristiche somatiche tipicamente irlandesi (capelli rossi e lentiggini comprese) parlante una lingua detta gammon o cant – un po’ gaelico e un po’ hiberno-english. L’analisi del DNA compiuta con un approccio scientifico nei più recenti anni ha evidenziato che i Pavee sono una distinta minoranza etnica divisasi dalla comunità irlandese stanziale da almeno 800-1000 anni.
Finalmente gli studiosi di folklore hanno incominciato a prenderli seriamente in considerazione e così nel  Department of Irish Folklore dell’University College di Dublino si stanno catalogando e custodendo le storie, le favole e le antiche canzoni celtiche tramandate dai Travellers.
Anche se oggi non viaggiano più nei carri a botte trainati dai cavalli ma nei caravan traggono ancora dall’allevamento dei cavalli la loro principale fonte di sostentamento. Alla lunga anche loro sono stati “domicilati” in qualche sobborgo popolare o nei centri di accoglienza istituzionali, eppure un buon 30% vive ancora in sistemazioni “autogestite” ai bordi delle strade: meglio la libertà anche se si rinuncia all’acqua corrente e al riscaldamento per finire inscatolati tra le quattro pareti di un condominio.
Vivono in famiglie patriarcali molto grandi, preferiscono vivere nei caravan e tendono ad avere un nomadismo non raggruppato ma sparpagliato anche se occasionalmente abitano in case in muratura e comunque sempre mantenendo una mentalità nomade anche quando sono stanziati; la casa viene considerata come un luogo di sosta del loro tragitto, sia che la sosta duri 20 giorni o 20 anni!
Si stima che siano 21.000 i Travellers attualmente residenti nella Repubblica d’Irlanda (lo 0,5% della popolazione), dove la metà di loro non ha accesso a strutture igieniche, elettricità, raccolta rifiuti e acqua. In passato i Pavee immancabilmente si spostavano ma la politica governativa a partire dal 1960 in poi ha persuaso molti di loro a stabilirsi in abitazioni fisse, una politica che è sempre più in discussione perché ha minato il loro stile di vita e i valori tipici. In qualsiasi caso, per i Travellers è quasi impossibile integrarsi nella società in cui vivono, a causa delle discriminazioni e del loro stile di vita molto diverso. Per un Pavee, integrarsi, significherebbe separarsi dal suo ambiente, rinunciare alla sua lingua e alla sua cultura. Per questo i loro bambini crescono al di fuori del sistema educativo tradizionale, anche se più recentemente sono state fatti molti sforzi per il loro inserimento scolastico.
Tradizionalmente, per mantenersi, svolgevano le più svariate attività: erano fabbri, venditori ambulanti, commercianti di cavalli e di merci usate di ogni genere e inoltre fornivano servizi dove e quando c’erano lacune nel mercato. Ma recentemente, essendo stati persuasi a vivere in case e quindi con una conseguente perdita della mobilità necessaria per continuare a gestire i loro commerci, molti Travellers oggigiorno vivono di assistenza statale.
Alcuni di loro sono allevatori di cani di razza come i levrieri o i lurcher e hanno una lunga reputazione nell’allevamento dei cavalli. Ogni anno organizzano importanti fiere equine in molte città, tra le quali: Ballinasloe (presso Galway), Puck (Kerry), Ballabuidhe (Cork), la fiera mensile di Smithfield a Dublino e quella di Appleby in Inghilterra.
Spesso si occupano del riciclo di rifiuti in metallo (per esempio il 60% del materiale grezzo usato per produrre l’acciaio in Irlanda arriva da materiali di recupero).(tratto da qui)

HIGHLAND TRAVELLERS

There is no question that Highland Travellers have played an essential role in the preservation of traditional Gaelic culture. Apart from trading in goods and services, the Travellers’ outstanding contribution to Highland life has been as custodians of an ancient and vital singing, storytelling and folklore tradition of great importance.
The Travellers’ linguistic heritage includes a fascinating pigeon-Gaelic ‘cover-tongue’ called Beurla-reagaird. It was used, just as Gypsies used the Romany tongue, as a way of keeping their business secret from strangers – and is related to the Irish Traveller dialect known as Shelta.
Pressure to conform to a modern society has led to a decline in the traditional way of life. Employment, medical and social security opportunities all demand a fixed address. Most families stopped travelling in the 1950s, and the majority of those who have not entered the settled population now live in caravans on special council-owned campsites. Metalworkers have entered the scrap-metal business; horse-dealers have moved into road haulage. Today it is estimated there are no more than 2,000 Travellers and Gypsies still living ‘on the road’ in Scotland (tratto da qui)

TRAMPS & HAWKERS

travellersSourceMain

Ci sono diversi testi sulla stessa melodia, ma la versione scozzese è intitolata Come All Ye Tramps and Hawkers ed è attribuita a ‘Besom Jimmy’ (Jimmy Henderson) un venditore ambulante di fine Ottocento che la diffuse tra la comunità di travellers; Jimmy MacBeath, bracciante itinerante per Scozia e Irlanda nonchè musicista, la cantò al People’s Festival di Edimburgo nel 1951 aggiungendo di suo.
Il titolo si traduce come “vagabondi e girovaghi” (hawkers ha un significato più specifico di mercante girovago, venditore ambulante) e il canto è un elogio alla vita libera dei travellers ottocenteschi (vedi).

Prima di tutto la melodia che come già detto è la base di moltissime canzoni sia in Irlanda che Scozia. Ricorda vagamente “the Lakes of Pontchartrain”:
ASCOLTA tin whistle

ASCOLTA Andrew Boyle bellissimo il video con le immagini di travellers e braccianti e anche molto evocativo l’arrangiamento (strofe I, IIIA, IVA, IIA, I)

Old Blind Dogs in Fit? 2001 i quali prendono la prima strofa come coro (strofe VI, IIC, IVC, IIIB, VI, VII, VIII)

ASCOLTA The Dubliners (voce Luke Kelly) (strofe I, IIB, IIIB, IVB) sostanzialmente si segue il testo della versione scozzese

Ho unito tutte le varianti delle strofe in un unico collage tenendo conto che gli Old Blind Dogs riprendono solo in parte le strofe considerate “standard”

I
O come all you tramps and hawkes, come all you tramps and hawkes you gaitherers o blaw(1)
That tramp the country round and round come listen one and all.
I’ll tell to you a roving tale of the sights that I have seen.
It’s far into the snowy north and south by Gretna Green(2)
I
Com all ye tramps an the hawkers lads
An gaitherers o blaw(1)
That tramps the contrie rownd an rownd Com lissen an an a’
A’ll tell tae ye a rovin tale O sites that A hae seen
It’s far intae the snawy north An sooth bi Greetna Green
IIA
Sometimes I laugh unto my self while trudging on the road. My bag of meal(1) slung o’er my back, my face as brown as a toad(3).
With lumps(4) of cheese and tatty scones(5), with bread and braxie(6) ham. Never giving a thought to where I’ve been and less to where I’m going.
IIB
Aft tyms A’ve laufd intae mysel’ When A trudged on the road My tor rags rownd my blister’t feet My face as brown as toad’s(3) Wi lums(4) o cake an tattie scons(5) Wi whangs o braxie(6) ham
No gien the thocht frae whaur A’ve com An lest frae whaur A’m gaun
IIC
Oft hae I laughed intae myself when trudgin’ on the road Wi’ a bag o’ bla’(1) upon by back, my face as brown’s a toad(3)
Wi’ lumps(4) o’ cake and tatties cones (5) and cheese and braxie(6) ham
Nae thinking where I’m comin’ frae or where I’m goin’ tae gang
IIIA
Oh I’ve done my share of loading ships with dockers on the Clyde
I laboured hard wi trawlermen pulling herring over the side
I helped to build the michty bridge(8) that spans the busy forth And with many an Angus farmer’s plough I broke the bonny earth.
IIIB
A’ve don my share o humpin(7) wi The dockers on the Clyde I’ve helped in Buckie trawlers haul The herrin o’er the side
A help tae build The Michty Bridge(8) That spans the busy Forth An wi mony an Angus fairmer’s trig(9) A’ve plooedthe bonnie earth
IVA
Oh I’m happy in the summertime beneath the bright blue sky. Never thinking in the morning where at night I’ll have to lie.
In barn or byre or anywhere dossing(15) out among the hay. And if the weather treats me right I’m happy ev’ry day.
IVB
A’m happy in the summertime Beneath the bricht blue sky
No thinkin in the mornin whaur At nicht A’ll hae tae lie
In barn or byre or anywhaur Dossin(15) oot amang the hay
An if the weather treats me richt A’m happy every day.
IVC
I’m happy in the summer time beneath the bricht blue sky
Nae thinkin’ in the mornin’ at nicht where I’m to lie Barns or byres or anywhere, or oot among the hay
And if the weather does permit, I’m happy every day
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite vagabondi e girovaghi voi canne al vento(1) che girate il paese in lungo e in largo, venite ad ascoltare un po’.
Vi racconto una storia di giramondo dei posti che ho visto, dal Nord innevato fino al sud di Gretna Green(2)
II
Spesso ho riso tra me e me quando faticavo per la strada con la sacca sulle spalle la mia pelle scura come la volpe con pezzi di dolce e tortini di patate(5) e formaggio e prosciutto di pecora(6),
senza pensare da dove sono venuto o dove sto andando
III
Ho fatto la mia parte di lavoro con gli scaricatori portuali di Clyde, ho lavorato con i pescatori nel tirare su le aringhe, ho aiutato a costruire il Ponte Michty che attraversa il Forth affollato e con molte paia di cavalli di una fattoria ho arato la buona terra
IV
Sono felice d’estate sotto il luminoso cielo blu senza preoccuparmi al mattino di dove andrò a dormire la notte, nel fienile o nella stalla o ovunque per dormire all’aperto tra il fieno, e se il tempo mi tratta bene sono felice tutto il giorno
V
I’ve seen the high Ben Nevis
a-towerin’ tae the moon
I’ve been by Crieff and Callander
and roun’ by Bonny Doon
And by the Nethy’s silvery tide
and places ill tae ken(10)
Far up intae the stormy north lies Urquhart’s fairy glen(11)
VI
Loch Katrine and Loch Lomond have a’ been kent by me
The Dee, the Don, the Deveron that rushes tae the sea
Dunrobin Castle by the way, I nearly hae forgot
And aye, the rickle o’ cairn(12) marks at the house o’ John o’ Groats(13)
VII
I’m often ‘roon by Gallowa’
and doon about Stranraer
My business leads me onywhere,
I travel near and far
I’ve got a rovin’ notion,
there’s nothing that I loss(14)
And a’ my days my daily fare and what’ll pay my doss(15)
VIII
I think I’ll go to Paddy’s land(16),
I’m makkin’ up my mind
For Scotland’s greatly altered now,
I canna raise the wind(17)
But I will trust in Providence,
if Providence proves true,
And I will sing o’ Erin’s isle(18) ‘ere I get back to you
V
Ho visto il grande Ben Nevis
svettare alla luna
sono stato a Crieff e Callander
e nei pressi del bel Doon
e dalla marea argentata del Nethy
e in altri posti simili
Fino al nord tempestoso dove sta la bruma fatata di Urquhart
VI
Ho attraversato i Loch Katrine e Loch Lomond
Il Dee, il Don e il Deveron che corre verso il mare,
ah quasi dimenticavo
il Dunrobin Castle
e si, il tumulo di pietre che segna la tomba di “John O’Groats”(13)
VII
Sono spesso nei dintorni di Galloway
e giù per Stranrare
i miei affari mi portano ovunque,
vado in lungo e in largo,
ho una mente vagabonda
non c’è niente che mi manca
e tutti i giorni ho il mio pane quotidiano e un posto per dormire(15)
VIII
Penso che andrò in Irlanda,
ci sto pensando seriamente,
perchè in Scozia sono tempi difficili
e non riesco ad tirare su dei soldi(17) ma confido nella Provvidenza,
se la Provvidenza esiste,
canterò dell’Isola di Erin da dove ritornerò a voi

NOTE
1) “gaitherers o blaw“: si sono avanzate molte ipotesi in merito al significato del verso che io ho tradotto in italiano come “canne al vento” nel triplice significato di “gente che vive all’aria aperta” “suonatori di cornamuse” e anche “coloro che diffondono storie” (con una sfumatura però dispregiativa nel senso di vane chiacchiere -blether-, sciocchezze); ‘gie yer rigs a bla,’ sono le bagpipes, e ‘Gie yer airs a bla,’ sono le melodie suonate dalle pive. Il verso è spesso cantato dai travellers “gie yer ‘airs’ a blaw.”o anche “gie yer ‘rigs’ a bla,” ( to give your set of bagpipes a bla). Questo significato mi sembra anche più in sintonia con la strofa d’apertura tipica di ogni cantastorie che si rispetti, che richiama la gente perchè si raduni ad ascoltare quello che ha da dire.
Un secondo significato completamente diverso è quello che traduce blaw con oatmeal (o meglio a mixture of oatmeal and animal fat) quindi la traduzione in italiano è: raccoglitori di farina d’avena o grano (wheat, corn).
Alcuni più poeticamente credono che blae sia il diminutivo di Blaeberrie e così la parola vuole sottolineare il nomadismo dei travellers che si nutrono di bacche che crescono spontanee. Questa seconda scuola di pensiero si rafforza in considerazione della II strofa in cui di descrivono varie provviste da viaggio
2) Greetna Green è il primo paese che si incontra dopo il confine inglese famoso per i suoi matrimoni lampo 
3) Tod pronunciato “toad” or “toäd” (Scozia e Nord Inghilterra) si traduce come rospo, ma nel dialetto significa volpe
4) lums = pieces
5) tattie = potato; gli scones sono una ricetta tipica della Scozia e quelli di patate sono serviti come una focaccina di patate e farina cotta alla piastra o come mini panini molto morbidi cotti nel forno.
6) braxy infezione batterica delle pecore che porta alla morte ma che non danneggia la carne, la quale risulta ancora commestibile
7) humping =working?
8) Michty Bridge: Forth Railway Bridge vicino ad Edimburgo
9) Trig= Pair of animals for ploughing.
10) places ilk y’ken = “other places you know”, ilk = like = similar; altri erroneamente vedono l’aggettivo “ill” in senso negativo (evil, unwholesome, harsh, severe, troublesome, unfriendly) cioè come posti in cui i travellers non sono i benvenuti, ma questo perchè traducono la parola dall’inglese e non dallo scozzese
11) Urquhart Castle è sul Loch Ness (Inverness)
12) Cairn: landmark heap of stones (Rickle : tumulo) vedi
13) John o Groat/Groats: si intende non la casa ma la tomba di John O’Groats
14) Loss: lose, miss
15)”And a’ I need’s my daily fare and whit’ll pey my doss. “For It’s my daily fare an’ as much’ll pay my doss.”: tutto quello di cui ha bisogno è solo abbastanza cibo e un posto per dormire; doss: alloggio a buon mercato (costo del posto letto)
16) Paddy’s Land: Ireland
17) letteralmente “non posso alzare il vento” ci sono due traduzioni per questa frase in una wind= money e quindi il protagonista è in difficoltà a trovare lavoro oppure come al punto 1) il protagonista vuole intendere che non può cantare, suonare
18) Erin’s Isle: Irlanda

continua SMUGGLING THE TIN

FONTI
http://www.scatolepiene.it/gli-irish-travellers-i-nomadi-irlandesi/
http://altrairlanda.freeforumzone.com/discussione.aspx?idd=2560306
http://www.martinazuliani.eu/it/chi-sono-traveller-irlandesi/
http://sangstories.webs.com/trampsandhawkers.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/c/comeally.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=96122
http://thesession.org/tunes/7091
http://paleotool.com/2014/03/04/travellers-7/

THE BARNYARDS OF DELGATY

The Barnyards o’ Delgaty è tra le più famose vecchie “bothy ballads” della Scozia: un giovane bracciante (molto probabilmente un aratore o più genericamente un cavallante) si reca al mercato di Turra per cercare lavoro, e un ricco fattore di Delgaty lo convince ad andare a lavorare per lui, in cambio di una buona paga e di un buon trattamento; in realtà il trattamento è pessimo e i cavalli sono dei ronzini.
Risalente a fine Ottocento è stata registrata solo nel 1930. Interpretata negli anni 60 dai migliori gruppi di musica irlandese come i Clancy Brothers e i Dubliners, per il suo tono allegro e “macho”  (una canzone ammiccante, con letture a doppio senso) è una canzone che spopola ancora oggi  come drinking song.

Melodia “Linton Lowrie” ‘Lilten Lowren’, ‘Linten Lowrin’.

Prima due versioni più “moderne”
ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm in Hearding Cats 1999

Old Blind Dogs live: Ian F. Benzie – voce e chitarra, Jonny Hardie – violino, Davy Cattanach – percussioni, Buzzby McMillan – basso

E poi due versioni più datate
ASCOLTA Andy Stewart nella versione più tradizionale

ASCOLTA The Dubliners (voce Luke Kelly)


I
As I came in by Turra Market
Turra Market for tae fee(1)
I met up wi’ awealthy fairmer
The Barnyards o’ Delgaty(2)
Lin-tin-addy, too-rin-addy
Lin-tin-addy, too-rin-ee
Lin-tin-lowrin-lowrin-lowrin
The Barnyards of Delgaty
II
He promised me the ae best pair (3),
that ever I laid my eyes upon,
when I got to the barnyards, there was nothin’ there but skin and bone!
III
Well, the old grey horse sat on his rump
the old white mare sat on her whine(4)
when it came to the “Whup” and crack they shouldn’t rise at yokin’ time (5).
IV
Meg McPherson maks my brose(6)
An her an me we canna gree
First a mote and syne a knot
An aye the ither jilp o’ bree
V
When I go to the kirk on Sunday
many’s the bonny lass I see
sittin’ by her father’s side
and winkin’ o’er the pews at me!
VI
And I can drink and not get drunk,
I can fight and not be slain
I can sleep with another man’s wife (7)
and still be welcome to my ayn.
VII
Now my candle(8) is burnt out
my snotter’s(9) fairly on the wane
fare the well ye Barnyards,
you’ll never catch me here again!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Appena andai al mercato di Turra
al mercato di Turra per il lavoro (1)
incontrai un agricoltore benestante della fattoria di Delgaty (2)
Lin-Tin-Addy, Too-Rin-Addy
Lin-Tin-Addy, Too-Rin-Ee
Lin-Tin-Lowrin-Lowrin-Lowrin
La fattoria di Delgaty
II
Mi promise il miglior paio
che io avessi mai visto,
ma quando arrivai alla fattoria,
non erano altro che pelle e ossa!
III
Il vecchio cavallo grigio steso sulla groppa, la vecchia cavalla bianca stesa sul  ventre per quanto avessi potuto gridare “Hup” non si sarebbero mai alzati per metterli al giogo!
IV
Med McPherson mi fa la farinata (6),
ma non andiamo d’accordo, prima mi da un piccolo pezzo e poi un grumo
e  un altro cucchiaio di liquido
V
Quando vado in chiesa di Domenica
sono molte le belle ragazze che vedo
sedute al fianco del padre, che mi fanno l’occhiolino da sopra i banchi!
VI
Posso bere e non ubriacarmi, lottare e non essere ucciso, posso dormire con la ragazza di un altro uomo, ed essere ancora il benvenuto.
VII
Ora la mia candela (8) è bruciata
il mio stoppino è agli sgoccioli
addio Fattoria
non mi prenderai di nuovo!.

NOTE
1) il lavoro dell’aratore era stagionale e durava dai tre ai sei mesi. La fiere e i grandi mercati dove si assumevano i braccianti si svolgevano in Scozia ogni 3 mesi (i cosiddetti Old Scottish term days): Candelora (2 febbraio), Whitsunday (domenica di Pentecoste legislativamente fissato a questo scopo il 15 maggio), Lammas (1 agosto) San Martino (11 novembre).
2) la tenuta Delgaty è a nord-est di Turriff, nel Nord-Est della Scozia
3) twa best horse
4) oppure “The auld grey mare sat on her hunkers,
The auld dun horse lay in the grime”
5) oppure “For aa that I would ‘hup’ and cry,
They wouldna rise at yokin time.”
6) il brose è una farinata d’avena e acqua calda. A volte si aggiunge il latte o un pezzo di burro, ma fondamentalmente è un piatto ancora più povero del porridge (per gli scozzesi è il modo “giusto” di preparare il porridge! Ai braccianti veniva servito come colazione e anche come cena! Evidentemente Meg la servetta, non doveva avere in simpatia il protagonista perchè gli porge solo la parte più liquida del brose piuttosto che un bel cucchiaio di pappa. Oppure l’osservazione va ad aggiungersi alle lamentele che il lavorante ha da fare nei confronti del proprietario anche nei riguardi del vitto. Inevitabile pensare alla canzoncina dal titolo”Brose&Butter” di Robert Burns
7) oppure I can coort anither man’s lass,
8) la candela arrivata alla fine è un eufemismo per indicare l’impotenza della tarda età, come anche lo stoppino comsumato
9) Snotter, snodder: the burnt wick of a candle, the drip on the end of the nose (stoppino)

C’è ancora un’altra strofa di lamentele che però non è riportata nelle versioni selezionate per l’ascolto che riguarda le condizioni dei pagliericci:
Its lang Jean Scott that maks ma bed
(Tall Jean Scott makes my bed)
You can see the marks upon my shins
For she’s the coorse ill-trickit Jaud
(She’s a bad and very naughty and worthless woman)
That fills my bed wi Prickly whins
(She fills my bed with sprigs of gorse bushes)
[traduzione italiano: Jean Scott la lunga mi fa il letto, e si possono ancora vedere i segni sulla mia pelle, lei è una donna cattiva, pettegola e inutile, che riempie il mio letto con rametti di ginestra.]
Sui rametti di ginestra ho già ampiamente parlato qui

FONTI
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/about/songs/ballads/bothyballads/index.asp http://www.nefa.net/archive/songmusicdance/bothy/ http://www.nefa.net/nefajnr/archive/peopleandlife/land/bothylife.htm http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/primary/genericcontent_tcm4554484.asp
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9515

THE UNQUIET GRAVE

Non sono molte le canzoni popolari che trattano il tema dell’amore oltre la morte, “The Unquiet Grave” anche conosciuta con il titolo “Cold blows the wind” forse giunge dal Medioevo o quantomeno è risalente al 1600, ed è stata collezionata dal professor  Child al numero 78
La ballata è la testimonianza di una credenza popolare molto antica: i morti devono essere lasciati in pace!

UN TEMPO PER PIANGERE

Dopo il lutto di un anno in cui chi è rimasto si prende il tempo per il pianto e il dolore, la vita deve continuare altrimenti il fantasma del defunto viene strappato dalla tomba, ed è costretto a vagare per la terra: è uno spettro che tormenta però, solo la persona che lo ama, e solo durante la notte, perchè allo spuntar dell’alba ritorna nel sepolcro; eppure la sua presenza è così dolorosa che il vivo finisce per morire: nella canzone il fantasma ammonisce che lo scambio di un bacio è il sigillo della morte. A volte è il vivo a chiedere il bacio al morto, altre volte è il morto a pretenderlo dal vivo, quasi sempre il fantasma cerca di consolare il vivente.

Il tema dell’amore oltre la morte che un tempo e anche oggi non esitiamo a definire malsano, divenne invece per i poeti romantici il non plus ultra del sentimento, parallelamente al tema della “sepoltura lacrimata“, cioè la speranza di essere compianto, ed è proprio nelle lacrime che bagnano il sepolcro, che si perpetua il legame con il mondo dei vivi. continua

LE VARIANTI DI “THE UNQUIET GRAVE”

Child ha raccolto una decina di varianti della stessa ballata, ma nella tradizione orale se ne contano molte di più (Cecil Sharp ne ha riportate 17 – Collection Of English Folk Songs 1994) , e anche le melodie sono numerose e diverse tra loro (vedi con partiture).
La ballata è ancora molto popolare in Inghilterra, anche se meno diffusa in Scozia e piuttosto rara in America. Alcune versioni sono state registrate sul campo da Cecil Sharp nel 1907 e riportate in Ralph Vaughan Williams Manuscript Collection (vedi) ma anche in George Gardiner Manuscript Collection (vedi) e in Henry Hammond Manuscript Collection (vedi)
Alcune versioni sono quasi una ninna-nanna, appena velata di tristezza. con il fantasma che parla all’amante rimasto (più spesso un uomo), non con l’intenzione di incutere timore, ma con dolcezza e affetto; è come se il morto volesse dare l’ultimo saluto alla vita, accompagnato da una promessa di rinascita in un Altrove, in cui l’amore sarà nuovamente possibile: così come nell’eterno ciclo della natura ritorna a sbocciare la primavera dopo l’inverno.

VERSIONE A

The Dubliners (voce di Luke Kelly). L’interpretazione più irlandese tra tutte


I

The Wind doth blow today my love,
A few small drops the rain.
Never have I had but one true love,
In cold clay she is lain.
II
I’ll do as much for my true love,
As any young man may.
I’ll sit and mourn all on her grave,
A twelve month and a day.
III
The twelve month and a day been gone,/A voice spoke from the deep.
“Who is it sits all on my grave.
And will not let me sleep? (1)”
IV
“Tis I Tis I thine own true love,
Who site upon your grave,
For I crave one kiss from your sweet lips,
And that is all I seek.”
V
“You crave one kiss from my clay cold lips,
But my breath is earthy strong.
Had you one kiss from my clay cold lips,/You’re time would not be long.”
V (bis) (2)
“My time be long, my time be short,
Tomorrow or today,
May God in heaven have all my soul
But I’ll kiss you lips of clay.”
VI (3)
“See down in yonder garden green.
Love where we used to walk.
The sweetest flower that ever grew.
Is withered to the stalk.
VII
“The stalk is withered dry sweetheart,
So will our hearts decay.
So make yourself content, my love,
‘Til death calls you away.”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oggi il vento mormora amore mio
e la pioggia cade lieve,
non ho mai avuto che un solo vero amore e giace nella fredda terra.
II
Farò di tutto per il mio amore, come ogni giovane innamorato farebbe. Starò a piangere sulla sua tomba
per dodici mesi e un giorno.
III
Il dodicesimo mese e un giorno erano passati e una voce parlò da sottoterra “Chi è che si trova sulla mia tomba e non mi lascia dormire?
IV
Sono io, sono io, il tuo vero amore,
che si trova sulla tua tomba
per chiedere un bacio dalle tue dolci labbra e questo è tutto quello di cui ho bisogno

V
Reclami un bacio dalle mie labbra fredde come la terra,
ma il mio respiro è il soffio della morte
e se tu dovessi baciare le mie labbra,
il tuo tempo non durerà a lungo.
V (bis)

Che i miei giorni siano lunghi o brevi, domani od oggi,  possa Dio accogliere la mia anima in cielo, ma io bacerò le tue labbra di terra
VI
Guarda quel giardino verde, caro amore, dove eravamo soliti andare.
Il fiore più profumato che sia mai spuntato, è appassito sullo stelo.
VII
E’ appassito sullo stelo, amore mio
come i nostri cuori marciranno

stai sereno dunque, amore mio,
finchè la morte ti chiamerà.”

NOTE
1) Dopo il lutto di un anno in cui chi è rimasto si prende il tempo per il pianto e il dolore, la vita deve continuare altrimenti il fantasma del defunto viene strappato dalla tomba, ed è costretto a vagare per la terra
2) versetto integrato da Luke e riportato in “English Folk-Songs for Schools” S Baring Gould e Cecil J. Sharp  
3) In genere la frase è detta dal defunto: il fiore più profumato o più bello è quello che cresce nel giardino di Cupido a simboleggiare  l’amore sbocciato tre i due innamorati. Adesso però il fiore è appassito ed è morto, ovvero i morti non possono più provare sentimenti per i vivi che hanno lasciato, così l’amore non più alimentato non potrà più rinascere. Il fantasma molto pragmaticamente spiega al vivo che si deve rassegnare e rasserenare. Solo nella morte potranno ricongiungersi.

VERSIONE B

Stessa melodia della versione irlandese
Solas in “SunnyvSpells and Scattered Showers” 1997


I

Cold blows the wind upon my true love
Soft falls the gentle rain
I never had but one true love
And in Greenwood she lies slain
II
I’d lose much for my true love
As any young man may
I’ll sit and I’ll mourn all on your grave
For twelve months and a day
III
When the twelfth month and a day had passed,
The ghost   began to speak
“Who is it that sits all on my grave
And will not let me sleep?”
IV
“‘Tis I, ‘tis I,   thine own true love
That sits all on your grave
I ask of one kiss from your sweet lips
And that is all that I crave”
V
“My lips, they are as clay, my love
My breath is earthy strong
And if you should kiss my clay-cold lips
Your time, ‘twould not be long”
VI A
“Look down in   the yonder garden fair/Love, where we used to walk
The fairest flower that ever bloomed / Has withered and too the stalk”
VII A
“The stalk, it has withered and dried, my love,/So will our hearts decay/So make yourself content, my love/’Til death calls you away”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Soffia un vento freddo sul mio amore
e la pioggia cade lieve
non ho avuto che un solo vero amore
e giace uccisa  nel folto del bosco
II
Avrei fatto di tutto per il mio vero amore, come ogni innamorato farebbe.
Starò a piangere sulla sua tomba
per dodici mesi e un giorno
III
Quando il dodicesimo mese e un giorno furono trascorsi
il fantasma parlò
“Chi è che si trova sulla mia tomba e non mi lascia dormire?”
IV
“Sono io, sono io, il tuo vero amore, che si trova sulla tua tomba per chiedere un bacio dalle tue dolci labbra e questo è tutto quello di cui ho bisogno ”
V
“Le mie labbra sono fredde come la terra, amore mio, il mio respiro è il soffio della morte e se tu dovessi baciare le mie labbra fredde come la terra, non vivrai a lungo.
VI A
Guarda quel bel giardino lontano, caro amore, dove eravamo soliti andare.
Il fiore più bello che sia mai fiorito, è appassito sullo stelo.
VII A
E’ appassito sullo stelo, amore mio così i nostri cuori marciranno
così rallegrati, amore mio
finchè la morte ti chiamerà.”


Faith and The Muse in Elyria 1994. La versione testuale è simile alla precedente ma cambia la melodia


I
The wind doth howl today m’love
And a winter’s worth of rain
I never had but one true love
In cold grave she was lain
II
Oh I adored my sweetest love
As any young man may
So I’ll sit and weep upon her grave
For twelve-month and a day.
(1)
One true love is eternity for two
Three four nevermore
Will I see my love true
III
The twelve-month and a day foregone
The dead began to speak
“Oh who sits weeping on my grave
And will not let me sleep?”
IV
“‘Tis I, m’love, upon thy grave
Who will not let you sleep
For I crave one kiss of your lips
And that is all I seek”
V
“You crave one kiss of my cold lips
But I am one year gone
If you have one kiss of my lips
Your time will not be long
(1)
Let me remind thee, dearest one
A patient heart to keep
For we professed eternal love
That lives though I may sleep”
VI
There down in yonder garden grove
Love, where we once did walk
The finest flower that ever was seen
Has withered to a stalk
VII
The stalk is withered dry, my love
Though our hearts shan’t decay
So make yourself content, my love
Till god calls you away”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oggi il vento mormora amore mio
e c’è una pioggerellina invernale
non ho avuto che un solo vero amore e giace nella fredda tomba
II
Adoravo la mia innamorata
come ogni giovane farebbe,
così starò a piangere sulla sua tomba per dodici mesi e un giorno.
(1) versi extra
il vero amore è eterno per due,
tre, quattro, mai più potrò
vedere il mio amore
III
Il dodicesimo mese e un giorno erano passati e la morta iniziò a parlare
Chi è che si trova sulla mia tomba e non mi lascia dormire?
IV
Sono io, amore mio, sulla tua tomba
che non ti lascia dormire
per chiedere un bacio dalle tue labbra e questo è tutto quello di cui ho bisogno

V
Reclami un bacio dalle mie fredde labbra, ma è un anno che sono morta
e se tu dovessi baciare le mie labbra,
il tuo tempo non durerà a lungo.
(1)
Vorrei ricordarti, amore mio,
di pazientare il tuo cuore
anche se noi da vivi professammo eterno amore , e io possa dormire”
VI
Guarda in quel boschetto verde,
amore, dove eravamo soliti andare.
Il fiore più profumato che sia mai spuntato, è appassito sullo stelo.
VII
E’ appassito sullo stelo,
amore mio
ma i nostri cuori mai marciranno
così rallegrati, amore mio
finchè la morte ti chiamerà.”

NOTE
1) versi extra rispetto alla versione A di Child

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/suffolk-miracle.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_78
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch078.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1706
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/165.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theunquietgrave.html
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=13723
http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2013/may/13/
poem-of-the-week-the-unquiet-grave

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://www.italymagazine.com/news/lovers-caught-having-sex-next-grave-womans-husband
https://medium.com/this-happened-to-me/9239d7a5ac7f