Archivi tag: Lucy Broadwood

Bedfordshire May Day carols

Leggi in italiano

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]
The Lord and the Lady and the Moggers
On 1st May several customs were observed. Children would go garlanding, a garland being, typically, a wooden hoop over which a white cloth was stretched. A looser piece of cloth was fastened at the top which was used to cover the finished garland. Two dolls were fastened in the middle, one large and one small. Ribbons were sewn around the front edge and the rest of the space was filled with flowers. The dolls were supposed to represent the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. The children would stop at each house and ask for money to view the garland.

Another custom, prevalent throughout the county if not the country, was maying. It was done regularly until the outbreak of the First World War and, sporadically, afterwards. Young men would go around at night with may bushes singing May carols. In the morning a may bush was attached to the school flag pole, another would decorate the inn sign at the Crown and others rested against doors, designed to fall in when they were opened. Those maying included a Lord and a Lady, the latter the smallest of the young men with a veil and bonnet. The party also included Moggers or Moggies, a man and a woman with black faces, ragged clothes and carrying besom brushes. (from here)

VIDEO Here is a very significant testimony of Margery “Mum” Johnstone from  Bedforshide collected by Pete Caslte, with two May songs

Maypole dancers dance during May Day celebrations in the village of Elstow, Bedfordshire, in 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

From the testimony of Mrs Margery Johnstone this May Garland or “This Morning Is The 1st of May” was transcribed by Fred Hamer in his “Gay Garners”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017


MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

The carol is known as “The May Day Carol” or “Bedford May Carol” but also “The Kentucky May Carol” (as preserved in the May tradition in the Appalachian Mountains) and was collected in Bedfordshire.
A first version comes from  Hinwick as collected by Lucy Broadwood  (1858 – 1929) and transcribed into “English Traditional Songs and Carols” (London: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton from “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL
I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady, as in Cambridgshire, the contaminations with the creed of the dominant religion are inevitable
2) this sweet and fresh cream in a glass is a typically Elizabethan vintage-style drink-dessert still popular in the Victorian era, the Syllabub. The Mayers once offered “a syllabub of hot milk directly from the cow, sweet cakes and wine” (The James Frazer Gold Branch). And so I went to browse to find the historical recipe: it is a milk shake, wine (or cider or beer) sweetened and perfumed with lemon juice. The lemon juice served to curdle the milk so that it would form a cream on the surface, over time the recipe has become more solid, ie a cream with the whipped cream flavored with liqueur or sweet wine (see recipes) 

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste: in the background a tray full of syllabus glasses

3) the reference to the dew is not accidental, the tradition of May provides a bath in the dew and in the wild waters full of rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew was collected by the girls and kept as a panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!! (see Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002, same tune of Cambridgeshire May Carol (not completely transcribed)

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY CAROL
I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) the hands become those of God and no more than Our Lady..
2) Syllabub (see above)
3) the stanza derives from “The Moon Shine Bright” version published by William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) see

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane from “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 ( I, II, III e IX) with The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
The song is reproposed in the Blog “A Folk song a Week”   edited by Andy Turner himself in which Andy tells us he had learned the song from the collection of Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred collected it from “Chris Marsom and others” – Mr Marsom had by that time emigrated to Canada, but Fred met him on a visit to his native Northill, Bedfordshire. Fred’s notes say “The Day Song is much too long for inclusion here and the Night Song has the same tune. It was used by Vaughan Williams as the tune for No. 638 of the English Hymnal, but he gave it the name of “Southill” because it was sent to him by a Southill man. Chris Marsom who sang this to me had many tales to tell of the reception the Mayers had from some of the ladies who were strangers to the village and became apprehensive at the approach of a body of men to their cottage after midnight on May Eve.”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick from “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (track 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy writes in the sleeve notes “May Song came from a Cynthia Gooding record which I lost 16 years ago, words stuck in my head.” (from II to VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

NOTES
1) according to the previous religion, water received more power from the Beltane sun. Celts made pilgrimages to the sacred springs and with the spring water they sprinkled the fields to favor the rain.

Kerfuffle from “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

KING PHARIM

“The Carnal and the Crane” è un canto natalizio inglese e anche Child ballad (#55) risalente al 1700: una leggendaria conversazione tra la gru e il corvo in merito agli eventi relativi alla Nascita di Gesù. La ballata contiene una trentina di versi e si è frammentata in sotto argomenti di 4-5 strofe di narrazione più circoscritta su Erode e il miracolo del gallo e la fuga della Sacra Famiglia in Egitto. (vedi prima parte)

In alcune versioni tramandate dalle comunità gypsy re Erode diventa Re Faraone. Già nell’Herefordshire troviamo questo scambio dei nomi. (vedi seconda parte) .

ROM/SINTI

L’equivoco nasce dalla tradizione che attribuisce agli Zingari l’origine egiziana. In realtà i sinti sono arrivati in Europa alla fine del Medioevo partendo da Sindh la regione del Pakistan occidentale: L’altro nome con cui essi si definiscono è “Rom” (uomo), ma la loro prima radice è l’India.
Il primo stereotipo che si conosca sulla popolazione nomade detta più genericamente in italiano “gli zingari” è quello dello zingaro maledetto e risale al medioevo. La mentalità dell’uomo medievale europeo accomuna le persone erranti (i nomadi) al senso di peccato e di espiazione di una colpa: sono infatti i pellegrini a muoversi lungo le vie che conducono ai Santuari della Cristianità, per chiedere la remissione di un grave peccato; così gli Zingari diventarono i discendenti di Caino “raminghi e fuggiaschi” o responsabili della mancata ospitalità verso la Sacra Famiglia durante il soggiorno in Egitto; non solo essi spartiscono con gli Ebrei la grave colpa dell’uccisione di Gesù (secondo queste dicerie sono stati gli Zingari e preparare i chiodi della crocefissione).

E solo con il Romanticismo che l’immagine del rom venne rivalutata e diventa quella del gitano libero Gli Zingari sembrano essersi conservati allo stato di natura e appaiono agli occhi di alcuni intellettuali tra il Settecento e l’Ottocento, come gli unici superstiti di un mondo ormai scomparso, in cui gli uomini vivevano felici, liberi dalle convenzioni, dalle cupidigie e dall’ordine della società civile. Il Gitano, spinto dal suo irrinunciabile desiderio di libertà, ha sempre rifiutato di assimilarsi a quella società che, con le sue leggi e le sue regole, imprigiona i sentimenti veri e autentici. I tratti dell’immagine dello Zingaro, in sostanza, restavano gli stessi, ma erano mutati i criteri di giudizio: pertanto la sua incapacità di integrarsi nella società cominciava ad essere considerata rifiuto delle regole e delle convenzioni sociali; il suo nomadismo come indifferenza alla sicurezza e alle comodità; il suo rifiuto del lavoro come superiorità nei confronti dell’ansia del guadagno, dell’ossessione del denaro; la sua resistenza ad ogni forma di educazione e di istruzione come il frutto di un diverso approccio alla vita, più spontaneo e creativo; la passionalità, fino a quel momento considerata come limite e come principio di immoralità, comincia ad essere apprezzata come sensibilità, capacità di sentimenti forti ed autentici, fonte di ispirazione artistica. Poeti, romanzieri, narratori, intellettuali cominciano ad esaltare i figli del vento, il loro amore per la libertà, l’animo nobile e la totale indipendenza.” (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE DEL SURREY

La versione con la sostituzione di King Herod con King Pahrim ovvero il Faraone re dell’Egitto, proviene dalla tradizione dei cantori gypsy ed è stata trascritta da Lucy Broadwood nel suo English Traditional Songs and Carols (1908). Nelle note relative Lucy afferma di aver imparato la canzone da una famiglia gypsy di nome Goby verso il 1893. Fu poi la versione dei Watersons negli anni 60 a farne uno standard.
Due sono i miracoli che vengono “stalciati” dalla kilometrica “The Carnal and the Crane”, il primo avviene durante il banchetto di Erode con il gallo arrostito che tuttavia si mette a cantare, il Gallo servito a tavola è la prefigurazione della morte di Gesù che risorgerà dalla morte nel terzo giorno. Il tema è sviluppato anche in una ballata (riportata dal professor  Child al numero 22) dal titolo “Saint Stephen was a clerk” (vedi)
herod-francken
Il secondo miracolo è quello della semina miracolosa,  una tradizione molto popolare in epoca medievale, nota come “The Miraculous Harvest“: durante la fuga in Egitto la Sacra Famiglia incontra un contadino intento a seminare il suo campo e Gesù lo benedice facendo crescere all’istante il grano pronto per il raccolto. Così quando i soldati, mandati da Erode sulle tracce di Gesù, e arrivati poco dopo, interrogano il contadino, si convincono di essere partiti troppo tardi e rinunciano all’inseguimento.

La semina Miracolosa
La semina Miracolosa

ASCOLTA la melodia con l’organetto

ASCOLTA Andy Turner


I
King Pharim(1) sat a-musing
a-musing all alone.
There came a blessed Saviour
And all to him unknown.
II
Saying “Where did you come from good man (2),
And where did you then pass?”
“It was out of the land of Egypt(3),
Between an ox and ass.”
III
“Well if you come out of Egypt, man,
One thing I fain would know.
Whether a blessed Saviour(4)
Sprang from an Holy Ghost.
IV
For if it is true, is true good man,
What you’ve been telling me,
This roasted cock, that’s in the dish,
Shall crow full fences three.”
V
Well the cock soon feathered and he grew soon well,
By the work of God’s own hand.
Three times that roasted cock did crow
In the dish where he did stand.
VI
Joseph, Jesus, and Mary
Were a-travelling further West
When Mary grew a-tired,
She might sit down and rest.
VII
They travelled further and further,
The weather being so warm,
Until they came upon a husbandman
A-sowing of his corn.
VIII
“Come husbandman,” cried Jesus,
“Throw all your seed away
And carry home your ripened corn,
That you’ve been a-sowing this day.
IX
For to keep your wife and family
From sorrow, grief and pain,
And keep Christ in remembrance
Till the time comes round again.”
X
Then after came King Pharim,
with his train so furiously,
Enquiring of the husbandman
whether Jesus had passed by.
XI
“The truth it must be spoken,
the truth it must be known,
Jesus he passed by this way just
as my seed was sown.
XII
But now my corn is reapen
and some laid on my wain,
Ready to fetch and carry
into my barn again.”
XIII
“Oh back then,” said King Pharim,
“Our labour’s all in vain,
It’s full three-quarters of a year
since he his seed has sown.”
XIV
And so he was deceived
by the work of God’s own hand,
And further he proceeded
then into the Holy Land
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Re Faraone (1) stava meditabondo
e meditava tutto solo, della venuta di un Salvatore Benedetto
a lui del tutto sconosciuto.
II
“Da dove vieni buon uomo (2)
e poi dove andrai?”
“Nacque dalla terra d’Egitto (3)
tra un bue e un asino”
III
“Beh se vieni dall’Egitto, uomo
vorrei proprio sapere una cosa
se un Salvatore Benedetto (4)
è nato dallo Spirito Santo
IV
Perchè se è proprio la verità
che mi hai detto buon’uomo
il gallo arrosto che si trova nel piatto
che allora canti tre volte”
V
E il gallo rivestito di penne si è alzato subito
e per opera di Dio
il gallo arrostito cantò per tre volte
proprio nel piatto in cui era
VI
Giuseppe, Gesù e Maria
andarono verso l’Ovest
quando Maria si sentì stanca
ed ebbe bisogno di riposare.
VII
Viaggiarono ancora
e il clima era così afoso
finchè passarono accanto a un contadino
che seminava il grano
VIII
“Vieni contadino – disse Gesù
che spargi i tuoi semi
riporta a casa il grano maturo
quello che hai seminato questo giorno
IX
Proteggi tua moglie e la tua famiglia
dal dolore, dalle pene e i rimpianti
e tieni Cristo in mente
finchè il tempo (della semina) verrà”
X
Allora venne re Pharim
con grande furia
domandando al contadino
quando è passato Gesù.
XI
“Poiché la verità deve essere detta e
che la verità sia resa nota
che Gesù è passato per questa strada
proprio quando stavo seminando.
XII
Ma adesso il mio grano è falciato
e l’ho caricato sul carro
pronto per essere portato
di nuovo nel mio granaio”.
XIII
“Torniamo indietro – disse re Pharim-
la nostra fatica è del tutto inutile,
sono passati i tre quarti di un anno
da quando ha seminato”.
XIV
Così fu ingannato
per la mano propria di Dio
e non oltre egli procedette
nella Terra Santa.

NOTE
1) Erode diventa il Faraone
2) sta interrogando uno dei Magi
3) così il re della Palestina diventa il re dell’Egitto
4) anche come “Son of Mary”

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/herodandthecock.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2014/12/05/week-172-king-pharim/
http://www.contemplator.com/england/pharaoh.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/433.html

Carole di Primavera nel Bedforshide

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow may day songs 
Helston Furry Dance

BEDFORSHIDE

Moggers-Moggies[Z49-685]Il Primo Maggio si seguivano alcune tradizioni. I bambini portavano la ghirlanda del Maggio ossia un cerchio formato con rami decorati con nastri e fiori, nel centro erano appese due bamboline, una grande che rappresentava la Vergine Maria e una più piccola che rappresentava Cristo bambino, un panno bianco era fissato sulla sommità per coprire tutta la ghirlanda. I bambini si fermavano ad ogni casa e chiedevano dei soldi per mostrare la ghirlanda sollevando il panno.
Un’altra tradizione diffusa in tutta la contea era il Maying, si faceva regolarmente fino allo scoppio della prima guerra mondiale e dopo solo sporadicamente: i giovani andavano in giro la notte con i rami del Maggio e cantavano i canti del Maggio, al mattino un ramo del maggio era attaccato al palo portabandiera della scuola, un altro decorava l’insegna della locanda “at the Crown” e altri erano appoggiati contro le porte in modo che finissero in casa quando si aprivano. Questi maggianti includevano un Signore e una Signora (il più giovane dei ragazzi con un velo sul volto e una cuffietta), tra i mummers anche i Moggers o Moggies un uomo e una donna con le facce annerite vestiti di stracci e con le scope 
(tradotto da qui)

VIDEO Ecco una testimonianza molto significativa di Margery “Mum” Johnstone dal Bedforshide raccolta da Pete Caslte, con due canzoni del Maggio

La danza del Palo durante  la festa del Maggio a Elstow, Bedfordshire, nel 1952 (Edward Malindine/Getty)

Ancora dalla testimonianza della signora Margery Johnstone questa May Garland ovvero “This Morning Is The 1st of May” trascritta da Fred Hamer  nel suo  “Garners Gay”

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

MAY GARLAND*
I
This morning is the first of May,
The prime time of the year:
and If I live and tarry here
I’ll call another year
II
The fields and meadows
are so green
so green as any leek
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet
III
A man a man his life’s a span
he flourishes like a flower,
he’s here today and gone tomorrow
he’s gone all in an hour
IV
The clock strikes one, I must be gone,
I can no longer stay;
to come and — my pretty May doll
and look at my brunch of May
V
I have a purse in my pocket
That’s stroll with a silken string;
And all that it lacks
is a little of your money
To line it well within.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Stamattina è il Primo di Maggio
il momento più importante dell’anno
e se vivrò e resterò qui
vi visiterò un altro anno
II
I campi e i prati
sono così verdi
come il tenero porro
il nostro Padre del Cielo li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
III
L’uomo tuttavia è solo un uomo, la sua vita è breve, è molto simile a un fiore
è qui oggi e domani non c’è più,
così tutto finisce nel giro di un ora.
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, devo andare
non posso restare più a lungo
vieni e — la mia bambola del Maggio
e guarda il mio ramo del Maggio
V
Ho una borsa in tasca
che è legata con un nastro di seta
e tutto ciò che le manca
è un po’ del tuo denaro
da infilare dentro

NOTE
* una trascrizione ancora parziale per l’incomprensione della pronuncia di alcune parole

BEDFORDSHIRE MAY DAY CAROL

La carol è conosciuta con il nome più generico di “The May Day Carol” o “Bedford May Carol” ma anche come “The Kentucky May Carol” (come preservata nella tradizione del maggio nei Monti Appalachi) ed è stata raccolta nel Bedfordshire.
Una prima versione ci viene dalla tradizione di Hinwick come collezionata da Lucy Broadwood  (1858 –  1929)  e trascritta in “English Traditional Songs and Carols” ( Londra: Boosey & Co., 1908).

Lisa Knapp & Mary Hampton in “Till April Is Dead – A Garland of May”, 2017


I
I’ve been rambling all the night,
And the best part of the day;
And now I am returning back again,
I have brought you a branch of May.
II
A branch of May, my dear, I say,
Before your door I stand,
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out,
By the work of our Lord’s hand (1).
III
Go down in your dairy and fetch me a cup, A cup of your sweet cream, (2)
And, if I should live to tarry in the town,/I will call on you next year.
IV
The hedges and the fields they are so green,/As green as any leaf,
Our Heavenly Father waters them
With His Heavenly dew so sweet (3).
V
When I am dead and in my grave,
And covered with cold clay,
The nightingale will sit and sing,
And pass the time away.
VI
Take a Bible in your hand,
And read a chapter through,
And, when the day of Judgment comes,
The Lord will think on you.
VII
I have a bag on my right arm,
Draws up with a silken string,
Nothing does it want but a little silver
To line it well within.
VIII
And now my song is almost done,
I can no longer stay,
God bless you all both great and small,
I wish you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e  ora  ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del maggio
II
Lo spino del Maggio mia cara, dico,
è davanti alla tua porta
non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Vai nella dispensa e portami una coppa,
una coppa della tua dolce crema,
e se dovessi restare in città
ritornerò da voi un altro anno.
IV
Le siepi e i campi sono così verdi
e ogni foglia è rifiorita
il Nostro Padre dei Cieli li innaffia
con la sua dolce rugiada celeste
V
E quando sarò morto e nella tomba
e ricoperto dalla fredda terra
l’usignolo si fermerà a cantare
e il tempo trascorrerà via
VI
Prendi la Bibbia in mano
e leggi un capitolo
e quando il giorno del giudizio verrà
il Signore penserà a te
VII
Ho una borsa sul braccio destro
stretta con un nastro di seta
non vuole altro che un po’ d’argento
da infilare dentro
VIII
E ora che la canzone è quasi finita
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio vi benedica, grandi e piccini
e vi auguro un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna, come nella versione del Cambridgshire, inevitabili le contaminazioni con il credo della religione dominante
2) questa crema dolce e fresca in bicchiere è una bevanda-dessert tipicamente inglese d’epoca elisabettiana ancora popolare in epoca vittoriana, il Syllabub. Un tempo ai Mayers si offriva “una syllabub di latte caldo direttamente dalla mucca, torte dolci e vino” (Il ramo d’Oro James Frazer). E così sono andata a curiosare per ritrovare la ricetta storica: si tratta di un  frappè di latte, vino (o sidro o birra) zuccherato e profumato con succo di limone. Il succo di limone serviva a far cagliare il latte in modo che si formasse una crema in superficie,  nel tempo la ricetta è diventata più solida, cioè una crema con la panna montanta aromatizzata con del liquore o vino dolce (vedi ricette)

Philip Mercier (1680-1760) – The Sense of Taste sullo sfondo un vassoio pieno di bicchieri di syllabubs

3) il riferimento alla rugiada non è casuale , la tradizione del maggio prevede il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada veniva raccolta dalle fanciulle e conservata come un toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile! (vedi Beltane)

Shirley Collins  live 2002 la melodia è la stessa della Cambridgeshire May Carol (purtroppo il mio orecchio non riesce a distinguere bene alcune frasi.. lasciate in punteggiatura)


I
A branch of may, so fine and gay
And before your door it stands.
It’s but a sprout, it’s well-budded out, for the work of our Lord’s hand(1).
II
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And take the May Bush in,
For if it is gone before morning come
You’ll say we have never been.
III
I have a little bird(?)
?…
IV
If not a cup of your cold cream (2)
A jug of your stout ale
And if we live to tarry in the town
We’ll call on you another year.
V(3)
For the life of a man it is but a span
he’s cut down like the flower
We’re here today, tomorrow we’re gone,
We’re dead all in one hour.
VI
The moon shine bright,
the stars give a light
A little before this day
so please to remember ….
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un ramo del Maggio, così bello e allegro, sta davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
II
Alzati, bella fanciulla e fai entrare il Maggio perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino, potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
III
?
?
IV
Se non una coppa di crema fredda  (dateci) un boccale di birra scura
e se continueremo a  restare in città
ritorneremo da voi un altro anno.
V
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
siamo qui oggi e domani non ci saremo più
saremo tutti morti nel giro di un ora
VI
La luna brilla luminosa, le stelle si accendono
tra poco sarà giorno
così ricordatevi ..
e vi auguriamo un gioioso Maggio

NOTE
1) le mani diventano quelle di Dio e non più della Madonna.
2) il Syllabub (vedi sopra)
3) la strofa deriva da “The Moon Shine Bright” versione pubblicata da William Sandys in Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern (1833) vedi

NORTHILL MAY SONG

Magpie Lane in “Jack-in-the-Green” 1998 (strofe I, II, III e IX) e a seguire The Cuckoo’s Nest hornpipe (vedi)  
La canzone viene riproposta nel Blog “A Folk song a Week”   curato dallo stesso Andy Turner  in cui Andy ci dice di aver appreso la canzone dalla raccolta di Fred Hamer “Garners Gay”
Fred la collezionò da “Chris Marsom e altri” – Mr Marsom era già emigrato in Canada,ma Fred lo incontrò in visita a Northill, il suo paese natale nel Bedfordshire. Le note di Fred dicono “The Day Song è troppo lunga per essere inclusa qui e la Night Song ha la stessa melodia. E’ stata usata da Vaughan Williams come la melodia No. 638 nell’ English Hymnal, ma con il nome di “Southill” perchè gli era stata mandata da un uomo di Southill. Chris Marsom che me la cantò aveva molte storielle sull’accoglienza delle signore forestiere che vivevano da poco nel villaggio perchè si spaventavano quando i Maggianti si avvicinavano alla loro casa nel cuore della notte alla vigilia del 1° Maggio”

Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick in “Because It’s There” 1995, ♪ (traccia 2 May Song)
Martin Carthy scrive nelle note dell’album “May Song viene dalla registrazione di Cynthia Gooding che ho perso circa 16 anni fa, ma le parole mi sono rimaste in testa.” (strofe da II a VIII)

MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, my pretty fair maids,
And take our May bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been rambling all of the night,
The best(and most) part of this day;
And we are returning here back again
And we’ve brought you a garland gay (brunch of May).
III
A brunch of May we bear about(it does looked gay)
Before the (your) door it stands;
It is but a sprout and it’s all budded out
And it’s the work of God’s own hand.
IV
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maid,
To take the May bush in.
For it will be gone and tomorrow morn
And you will have none within.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide
To let escape the dew(1).
It makes no delay it is here today
And it falls on me and you.
VI
For the life of a man is but a span,
He’s cut down like the flower;
He makes no delay he is here today
And he’s vanished all in an hour.
VII
And when you are dead and you’re in your grave
You’re covered in the cold cold clay.
The worms they will eat your flesh good man
And your bones they will waste away.
VIII
My song is done and I must be gone,
I can no longer stay.
God bless us all both great and small
And wish us a gladsome May.
IX
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati mia graziosa fanciulla
e prendi il nostro spino del Maggio
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte di questo giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti una allegra ghirlanda (il ramo del maggio)
III
Lo spino del Maggio portiamo in giro (porta l’allegria)
e sta davanti alla tua porta non è che un germoglio ma è ben sbocciato per il lavoro di nostro Signore
IV
Alzati bella fanciulla per far entrare il Maggio, perchè se ne andrà prima che venga il mattino e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
V
Le porte del paradiso sono spalancate
per far fuggire la rugiada
è qui oggi, puntuale
e cade su di me e te
VI
Perchè la vita di un uomo è breve
ed è recisa come un fiore
non ci sono proroghe oggi c’è
e poi svanisce nel giro di un’ora
VII
E quando sarai morto
e nella tomba
sarai ricoperto dalla fredda terra
i vermi mangeranno la tua carne, buonuomo
e le tue ossa si consumeranno.
VIII
La canzone è finita ed è tempo di andare, non posso restare più a lungo. Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!
IX
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) secondo la precedente religione l’acqua riceveva maggior potere dal sole di Beltane. Si facevano pellegrinaggio alle sorgenti sacre e con l’acqua della sorgente si aspergevano i campi per favorire la pioggia.

Kerfuffle in “To the Ground”, 2008

ARISE, ARISE (Northill May Song)
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maid
And bring your May Bush in,
For if it is gone by tomorrow, morrow morn,
You’ll say we have brought you none.
II
We have been wandering all this night
And almost all of the day
And now we’re returning back again;
We’ve brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It’s nothing but a sprout but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hand.
IV
The clock strikes one, it’s time to be gone,
We can no longer stay.
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Abbiamo vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e siamo di ritorno ancora qui
per portarti il ramo del maggio
III
Un ramo del Maggio ti abbiamo portato, ed è davanti alla tua porta,
non è in germoglio,
ma è ben sbocciato
per mano di Nostro Signore
IV
L’orologio batte l’una, è tempo di andare
non possiamo restare più a lungo
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

victorian-art-artist-painting-print-by-myles-birket-foster-first-of-may-garland-day

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/cambridgeshiremaycarol.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/moon_shines_bright.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/themoons.html
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/

HARVEST HOME SUPPER: DRINK BOYS, DRINK!

Nella tradizione contadina si svolgeva una grande festa nella domenica più prossima alla Harvest Moon che è la luna piena più vicina all‘equinozio d’autunno; si tratta di una festa andata perduta con il disgregarsi della comunità contadina in seguito al sopravvento nei campi delle macchine e della chimica.

Ancora nel 1800 quando l’ultimo covone di grano era portato alla fattoria si brindava con la birra alla salute del “Maister” e “Dame” (i proprietari della fattoria ), ma solo quando tutto il grano era stato portato nel granaio si concludevano i lavori del raccolto, con una cena offerta dall’agricoltore ai suoi lavoranti, l’Harvest Supper, che in Scozia era detta Kirn o Kirn Supper.
Era ovviamente un classico per il padrone della fattoria, dopo un grande sforzo di lavoro collettivo, dare un pranzo o una cena per i suoi lavoranti e braccianti stagionali che avevano appena concluso il lavoro, per ringraziarli dell’impegno, per sancire un legame fatto anche di condivisione e non solo di sfruttamento. Ma l’harvest supper si distingueva da questi banchetti per la sua abbondanza pari a una festa natalizia continua

DRINK, BOYS, DRINK!

Detta anche “Harvest Supper (or Home) Song” la canzone si si cantava immancabilmente durante la cena offerta dall’agricoltore ai suoi braccianti stagionali, una cena ricca come un pranzo di Natale con grande quantità di cibo e birra a volontà.

autumn-food“Mutton, veal, and bacon, which makes full the meal, With several dishes standing by, As here a custard, there a pie, And here all-tempting frumenty..” (The Hock-cart, or Harvest Home di Robert Herrick tratto da qui).

Lucy Broadwood, che ha raccolto queste canzoni (in “English County Songs” 1893) , dice che la prima strofa e il ritornello dovevano essere cantati più e più volte, finché a tutti i commensali della tavola non fosse stato riempito il bicchiere per il brindisi. Poi il secondo verso sarebbe cantato nello stesso modo. E così via.

The youths and maidens dance their country dances, as an old writer, who lived in the reign of Charles II., tells us:—”The lad and the lass will have no lead on their heels. O, ‘tis the merry time wherein honest neighbours make good cheer, and God is glorified in His blessings on the earth.” When the feast is over, the company retire to some near hillock, and make the welkin ring with their shouts, “Holla, holla, holla, largess!”—largess being the presents of money and good things which the farmer had bestowed. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA John Kirkpatrick in God Speed The Plough – 2011 (strofe da I a IV)


I
Here’s an health unto the master,
he’s the founder of the feast
We hope to God with all our hearts
that his soul in heaven do rest
Here’s hoping that he prospers,
whatever he takes in hand
For we are all his servants
and all at his command.
Chorus:
So drink boys, drink,
and see that you do not spill
If you do you shall drink two,
for that is our master’s will.
II
Here’s an health unto the master
and all upon this farm
and all who live in … (1)
to keep his corn from home
.. oats and barley  and every kind of brain
.. a harvest plenty to drink and all again
III
And now we’ve drunk to the master’s health,
why shouldn’t the Missus go free
Why shouldn’t she go up to heaven,
up to heaven as well as he
she is a good provider,
abroad as well as at home
So fill your cup and drink it up,
for ‘tis our harvest-home.
IV
Now harvest it is ended
and  we brought it home at last
so it’s a health of .. all in a flowing glass,
to all in our good company,
we wish you all good cheer
come one come all .. ,
and bravely drink  your beer.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Ecco alla salute del padrone
che è il patrocinatore della festa
speriamo in Dio con tutti i nostri cuori
che la sua anima riposi in pace,
speriamo che lui abbia successo,
in qualunque impresa si accinga
perchè siamo tutti suoi servitori
al suo comando
CORO
Così bevete ragazzi, bevete,
attenti a non versare
se lo fate dovrete bere due volte
che questo e il volere del padrone
II
Ecco alla salute del nostro padrone
e di tutto su questa fattoria
e di tutti coloro che vivono in..
per riportare il grano a casa
.. avena e orzo e ogni tipo di cereale
.. l’abbondanza del raccolto beviamo tutti di nuovo
III
E ora che abbiamo bevuto alla salute del padrone
perchè non si dovrebbe farlo per la signora?
Perchè non dovrebbe andare in cielo
dritta in cielo come lui?
Lei è una buona lavoratrice,
sia fuori che dentro casa
così riempite la vostra coppa e bevete
perchè è la nostra festa del raccolto
IV
Ora il raccolto è finito
e lo abbiamo portato a casa finalmente
quindi alla salute di .. un bicchiere bello pieno,
e tutti nella nostra buona compagnia
vi auguriamo ogni bene
venite tutti ..
e bevete forza la vostra birra

NOTE
1) dice il nome di una località
al momento non sono riuscita a trovare il testo cantato da  John Kirkpatrick perciò ho riportato ad orecchio quanto ascoltato nella II e IV strofa, qualcuno è in grado di completare il testo?

harvest-home

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/equinozio-autunno.htm
http://piereligion.org/hslyrics.html
http://piereligion.org/harvestsongs.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Harvest-Supper_Song.htm
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/sept/24.htm
http://www.fullbooks.com/Ancient-Poems-Ballads-and-Songs-of-England4.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/sheepshearing.html http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1721 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2525 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=121538
http://sniff.numachi.com/~rickheit/dtrad/pages/ttHRVSTAWA.html

SOULING SONG

Souling songs sono le canzoni di questua che i poveri (per lo più bambini) cantavano andando di casa in casa a durante le sere tra la fine di ottobre e i primi di novembre in occorrenza della celebrazione di Tutti i Santi (All Hallows Day = All-Souls’ eve) e della Festa dei Morti.

IL BANCHETTO DEI MORTI

Halloween è una pallida eco di Samahin (Samain o Samhain), che in gaelico significa “Fine dell’Estate”, ovvero il capodanno celtico, una magica notte in cui si chiedeva protezione agli dei per l’arrivo dell’inverno. continua
Anticamente era consuetudine passare di casa in casa durante le celebrazioni della Vigilia di Ognissanti con una piccola processione di persone mascherate guidate dall’”ambasciatore dei defunti” per chiedere la donazione di cibo rituale per il banchetto dei Morti e per il banchetto con cui tutta la comunità avrebbe festeggiato la ricorrenza.

Nel Medioevo in Irlanda e Gran Bretagna si sviluppò l’usanza di preparare un dolce dei morti di forma rotonda, come offerta per saziare la fame dei defunti che si credeva visitassero i vivi durante Samain: per tenerli buoni per tutto l’anno a venire, le massaie preparavano dei dolcetti speciali, che ben presto finirono per saziare gli appetiti molto più terreni e voraci dei poveri! Erano distribuiti in beneficenza oppure dati ai soulers.
Anche in certe regioni d’Italia (Emilia Romagna, o la Sardegna e più in generale nel Sud Italia) era diffusa tra i poveri e i bambini l’usanza della questua del cibo: “Ceci cotti per l’anima dei morti”, cantavano armati di cucchiai e scodelle, davanti alle case dei signorotti. Consuetudini tra cibo e commemorazioni dei morti consolidate da antiche tradizioni più in generale del Mondo Mediterraneo oltre che Nordico.

SOULING

La tradizione del “a-souling” oppure “a-soalin” è identica al wassailing e al caroling natalizio (vedi): qui però in cambio delle torte, spesso chiamate anime (in inglese soul), i questuanti promettevano di recitare delle preghiere per i defunti. Più prosaicamente si diceva che ogni torta mangiata rappresentava un’anima che si liberava dal Purgatorio. L’usanza è spesso vista come l’origine della moderna “Trick or Treating” (in italiano “dolcetto o scherzetto”) dei bambini mascherati da fantasmi o mostri che suonano alle porte delle case chiedendo dei “dolcetti buoni da mangiare”. Già alla fine del 1800 la tradizione di preparare il dolce si era affievolita, e dove ancora sopravviveva l’usanza della questua, si dava ai bambini delle mele o delle monetine: in genere i bambini facevano la questua di giorno.


CHORUS

Soul! soul! for a soul-cake;
Pray, good mistress, for a soul-cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Them who made us all.
Soul! soul! for an apple or two;
If you’ve got no apples, pears will do.
Up with your kettle, and down with your pan;
Give me a good big one, and I’ll be gone.
An apple or pear, a plum or a cherry,
Is a very good thing to make us merry.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Anime, Anime un dolce per i defunti
 Buona signora, per favore una torta dell’anima! Una per Pietro, due per Paolo, e tre per Colui che ci ha creato.
Anime, Anime! Con una mela o due;
se non avete mele, le pere andranno bene.
aprite la porta e sbloccate la serratura,
datemi una fetta grande e io me ne andrò. Una mela o una pera, una susina o una ciliegia, sono buone cose che ci fanno contenti

Un’altra canzone dei Soulers è stata trascritta da John Brand nel suo “Popular Antiquities” (1777) presa direttamente dalle labbra di “the merry pack, who sing them from door to door, on the eve of All – Soul’s Day, in Cheshire“.


Chorus

“Soul day, soul day, Saul
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Him who made us all.
Put your hand in your pocket and pull out your keys,
Go down into the cellar, bring up what you please;
A glass of your wine, or a cup of your beer,
And we’ll never come souling till this time next year.
We are a pack of merry boys, all in a mind,
We are come a souling for what we can find,
Soul, soul, sole of my shoe,
If you have no apples, money will do;
Up with your kettle and down with your pan,
Give us an answer and let us be gone
An apple, a pear, a plum or a cherry,
Any good thing that will make us all merry.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
Il giorno dei Morti
Una per Pietro, due per Paolo, e tre per Colui che ci ha creato.
Mettetevi le mani in tasca e tirate fuori le chiavi
e andate giù in cantina e riportate su quello che volete;
un bicchiere di vino o una tazza di birra
e non ritorneremo per la questua
fino al Natale del prossimo anno.
Siamo un gruppetto di ragazzotti ben determinati
siamo venuti per la questua di quello che riusciamo a trovare
Anime, anime suole delle mie scarpe
se non avete mele, dei soldini andranno bene;
aprite la porta e sbloccate la serratura
dateci una risposta e lasciateci andare.
Una mela o una pera, una susina o una ciliegia
delle buone cose che ci faranno tutti contenti

SOUL CAKE

La canzone “Soul cake” nota anche come “A Soalin”, “Souling Song Cheshire” “Hey ho, nobody home” è stata pubblicata (testo e melodia) da Lucy Broadwood e J. A. Fuller Maitland nell’English County Songs nel 1893, riportando la tradizione ancora viva nel Cheshire e nel Shropshire (Midlands Occidentali) del “souling”: la trascrizione era di qualche anno prima per mano del Rev. MP Holme di Tattenhall, Cheshire così come l’aveva sentita da una bambina delle scuole locali. Nel 1963, il gruppo folk americano Peter, Paul e Mary hanno registrato una versione di questa canzone tradizionale, dal titolo “A ‘Soalin” rielaborando la canzone risalente all’epoca elisabettiana “Hey ho, nobody home”.
Durante il regno della regina Elisabetta a seconda della contea o dalle abitudini locali la questua veniva fatta dai più poveri la sera di Santo Stefano o della vigilia di Natale ed era un cattivo auspicio mandare via a mani vuote i questuanti.

HEY HO, NOBODY HOME

Sung As a Round (XVI sec): un canto in canone dal medioevo


Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2 : Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 2: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 3: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 1: Hey, ho, nobody home;
Voice 2: Yet wiIll be merry.
Voice 3: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 1: Meat nor drink nor money have I none,
Voice 2: Yet will I be merry.
Voice 1: Yet will be merry.

ASCOLTA Peter, Paul & Mary in  “A Holiday Celebration” 1988, molto natalizia la versione innesta un popolarissimo carol nella strofa finale

ASCOLTA Sting live (strofe da II a IV)
ancora Sting in If on a Winter’s Night 2009 la versione più patinata

ASCOLTA Lothlorien


I
Hey ho, nobody home,
meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
hey ho, nobody home
Meat nor drink nor money have I none
Yet shall we be merry,
Hey ho, nobody home

CHORUS
A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry,
any good thing to make us all merry,

A soul, a soul cake,
please good missus a soul cake.
One for Peter, two for Paul,
three for Him who made us all.
II
God bless the master of this house,
and the mistress also.
And all the little children
that round your table grow.
The cattle in your stable
and the dog by your front door.
And all that dwell within your gates
we wish you ten times more.
III
Go down into the cellar
and see what you can find.
If the barrels are not empty
we hope you will be kind.
We hope you will be kind
with your apple and strawber’
For we’ll come no more a ‘soalin’
till Xmas time next year.
IV
The streets are very dirty,
my shoes are very thin
I have a little pocket
to put a penny in
If you haven’t got a penny,
a ha’ penny will do
If you haven’t got a ha’ penny
then God bless you
V(4)
Now to the Lord sing praises all you within this place
And with true love and brotherhood
each other now embrace
This holy tide of Christmas,
of beauty and of grace
Oh tidings of comfort and joy

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
Non ho (non porto) cibo nè bevande,
nè denaro
tuttavia ci accontenteremo.
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
Non ho cibo nè bevande,
nè denaro
tuttavia ci accontenteremo
Ehi, oh c’è nessuno in casa?
CORO
Anima, una torta dell’anima!
Buona signora, per favore, una torta dell’anima! Con mele, pere, susine, ciliegie, ogni cosa buona per renderci tutti più allegri, anima, una torta dell’anima! Buona signora, per favore una torta dell’anima! Una (torta o fetta) per Pietro, due per Paolo (1), e tre per colui che ha fatto tutti noi.
II
Dio benedica il capo famiglia
e anche sua moglie
e tutti i piccoli bambini
che crescono intorno alla vostra tavola.
Il bestiame nella stalla ed il cane davanti alla porta (2), e tutti ciò che risiede tra le vostre mura
ve ne auguriamo 10 volte tanto.
III
Andate nella cantina
e guardate cosa trovate.
Se i barili non sono vuoti
siamo certi che sarete generosi.
Speriamo che siate generosi
con le vostre mele e birra forte (3)
Poichè non ritorneremo per la questua
fino al Natale del prossimo anno.
IV
Le strade sono molto sporche,
e le scarpe sono molto sottili.
Ho una piccola tasca
dove mettere un penny.
Se non avete un penny da dare,
un mezzo penny andrà bene
Se non avete un mezzo penny da dare
allora che Dio vi benedica
V (4)
Ora cantate lodi al Signore voi tutti in questo posto e in vero segno di amore
e fratellanza abbracciatevi ora gli uni agli altri, questo santo periodo del Natale, di beltà e grazia;
O, novella di conforto e gioia!

NOTE
1) Pietro e Paolo sono i santi della Chiesa romana: Pietro, l’apostolo indicato nei Vangeli canonico come la pietra su cui si fonda la Chiesa e Paolo, che ha diffuso il cattolicesimo tra i gentili
2) strofa alternativa “Likewise young men and maidens, Your cattle and your store”
3) la strofa originaria diceva “With your apples and strong beer” storpiata in strawber’ che ovviamente non sta a indicare le fragole, che non sono di stagione d’inverno e nemmeno si candiscono come le ciliegie o si fanno seccare come la maggior parte della frutta che si consuma d’inverno. La birra forte veniva richiesta da “soulers” adulti.
4) la strofa aggiunta da Paul Stookey proviene dalla Carol “God rest you Merry Gentlemen” (la cui melodia si intreccia con quella di Soul Cake) vedi

LA RICETTA

Con il nome di Soul Cake si indicano molte varianti di dolcetti tradizionali che vanno dal panino dolce alla torta di frutta secca.

SoulCakes_zps3429dfc5

Una ricetta che arriva dall’America è come piace a me, con le quantità ad occhio! (tradotto da http://www.greenchronicle.com/recipes/soul_cake_recipe.htm)

3/4 tazze di burro a temperatura ambiente
3/4 zucchero a velo
4 tazze di farina, setacciata
3 tuorli d’uovo
1 cucchiaino di spezie miste (ovvero la Pumpkin Pie Spice già pronta: cannella, macis, zenzero, noce moscata e chiodi di garofano)
1 cucchiaino di pepe della Giamaica
3 cucchiai di uva passa
un po’ di latte

LAVORAZIONE
Lavorare il burro a crema con lo zucchero fino a quando diventa soffice, incorporare i tuorli d’uovo sbattuti, la farina e le spezie e tanto latte quanto basta per ottenere un impasto morbido. Alla fine aggiungere l’uvetta.
Nella ricetta non è chiaro se l’impasto è da stendere e quindi ritagliare in forma tonda o se distribuire a cucchiaiate, come sia non deve risultare troppo morbido perchè deve poter essere inciso con una croce a partire dal centro. Ovviamente la teglia deve essere imburrata o si deve mettere la carta-forno. Cuocere in forno caldo fino a doratura.

Un dolce tipico nel Lancashire e nello Yorkshire è il Parkin cake, un tipico gingerbread (torta di zenzero) della tradizione anglosassone. Potrebbe sembrare un brownie ma è composto da fiocchi d’avena e melassa (golden syrup o black treacle)
Soul-mass Cake
https://crumpetsandco.wordpress.com/2013/11/05/parkin-per-la-notte-dei-falo-parkin-for-bonfire-night/​
http://oakden.co.uk/harcake-soul-mass-cake/
http://oakden.co.uk/yorkshire-parkin/

1172_0In Italia la tradizione è basata principalmente sui biscotti che ricordano vagamente le ossa dei morti o le dita delle mani. In Piemonte sono gli “ossa d’mort“, a base di mandorle, tra la meringa e l’amaretto, ma possono anche essere una variante delle offelle con fichi secchi, mandorle e uva sultanina (Lombardia e Toscana) o dalla forma di cavalli (Trentino Alto-Adige).

La tradizione del Sud è un’esplosione di colori e di sapori: il torrone napoletano, il marzapane siciliano, la colva o colua pugliese con grano bollito, cioccolato, noci e mandorle, melograno e vino cotto. Anche la consistenza di questi dolci può essere diversissima da morbidi a croccanti o spacca denti.

Assolutamente da provare
FAVE E OSSA D’MORT:
http://www.lericettedellavale.com/biscotti-ossa-di-morto-1657.html
http://cookingbreakdown.blogspot.it/2011/10/ognissanti-e-il-nostro-halloween-fave.html
PANE DEI MORTI:
http://www.ricettemania.it/ricetta-pane-dei-morti-443.html

 

La festa di Samain (il Capodanno dei Celti) si concludeva l’11 novembre una festa pagana ancora sentita nell’Alto Medioevo, a cui la Chiesa sovrappose il culto cristiano di San Martino. continua seconda parte

APPROFONDIMENTO
Samahin: http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/samain.htm

FONTI
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/antica/
http://www.taccuinistorici.it/ita/news/moderna/feste-e-tradizioni/santi-e-morti-e-le-fave-nere.htmlusi—curiosita/Cibo-per-i-morti.html

http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/216.html
http://www.mayflowerchorus.org/pdf/A%20Soalin.pdf
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/hey_ho_nobody_home.htm
http://paulbommer.blogspot.it/2010/12/advent-calendar-22nd-mari-lwyd.html
http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/cy/279/