Archivi tag: La Lugh

Amhrán Na Bealtaine

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: Amhran Na Bealtaine, Samhradh, Summertime, Thugamur Fein An Samhradh Linn (We Brought The Summer With Us, We Have Brought The Summer In) or Beltane Song
It is a traditional Irish tune sung on May Day (Lá Bealtaine).

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

AMHRAN NA BEALTAINE

A Gaelic Summer song that could date back to the late Middle Ages played in the feast for the landing of James Butler Duke of Ormonde in 1662, the new Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. It is a traditional song in the southeastern part of Ulster (Northern Ireland) and it was sung by young men and women on May Eve, while they carried around the Garland of May.
Most likely this was a begging song to get food or drink in exchange for the May branch, tabranch of hawthorn or blackthorn to be left in front of the door. With this auspicious gesture, the inhabitants are protected from fairies because fairies could not overcome these flowered barriers (see more).

The song is still very popular in Ireland, Oriel area (t included parts of Louth, Monaghan and Armagh) and is performed both in instrumental version and sung.
Edward Bunting states that the song had been played in the Dublin area since 1633.
 TUNE noted by EDWARD BUNTING
The Chieftains (a instrumental version that is a hymn to joy, a song of birds awakening to the call of spring: the Irish flute starts imitating a lark followed in musical canon by some
wind instruments (the Irish flute, the whistle and the uillean pipes) and the violin, great!)

Gloaming  live Samhradh Samhradh (Martin Hayes fiddle)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin from A Stór Is A Stóirín 1994 

English translation*
I
Mayday doll(1),
maiden of Summer
Up every hill
and down every glen,
Beautiful girls,
radiant and shining,
We have brought the Summer in.
CHORUS
Summer, Summer,
milk of the calves(2),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(3) summer
of clear bright daisies,
We have brought the Summer in.
II
We brought it in
from the leafy woods(4),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(3) Summer
from the time of the sunset(5),
We have brought the Summer in.
III
The lark(6) is singing
and swinging around in the skies,
Joy for the day
and the flower on the trees.
The cuckoo and the lark
are singing with pleasure,
We have brought the Summer in.
Irish gaelic
I
Bábóg na Bealtaine,
maighdean an tSamhraidh,
Suas gach cnoc
is síos gach gleann,
Cailíní maiseacha
bán-gheala gléasta,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Sèist
Samhradh, samhradh,
bainne na ngamhna,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí
na nóinín glégeal,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

II
Thugamar linn
é ón gcoill chraobhaigh,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí
ó luí na gréine,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
III
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm
‘sag luascadh sna spéartha,
Áthas do lá
is bláth ar chrann.
Tá an chuach is an fhuiseog
ag seinm le pléisiúr,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

NOTES
* from here
garlan-may-day1) the Bábóg is the spring doll, Brídeóg, the “little Bride”, (Brigit, or Brigantia in Britannia, a trine goddess -Virgin, Mother, Crona) among the most important of the Celtic pantheon, the maiden of wheat made by women in Imbolc (February 1) with the last sheaf of harvest; the young Goddess of Spring, a strong symbol of rebirth in the cycle of death-life in which Nature is perpetuated: in the doll still lives the spirit of the wheat. Brigid’s dolls were also dressed in a white dress, decorated with stones, ribbons and flowers and carried in procession throughout the village.
The doll will reappear in the Victorian celebrations of May in her white-robed, placed between a wreath of flowers and ribbons hanging on a rod and carryed by mayers (see more)
2) milk from cows for calves. The May Day is called na Beal tina or the day of the fire of Beal, then consecrated to the god Bel or Belenos. On the eve large fires were lit and the cattle were passed among them, this celtic custom is still remained in the Irish countryside with the belief that this prevented the Wee Folk to make bad jokes like braiding the tails of the cows or stealing the milk
3) the May flowers were mostly yellow to recall the color and the warmth of the sun. Flowers and green branches were placed on the threshold of the house and window sills to protect the inhabitants from the fairies and as a sign of good fortune. Fairies could not overcome these flowered barriers. This tradition was typical of Northern Ireland. The children mostly went to pick wild flowers to make garlands, especially with yellow flowers.4) the greenwood, the most inviolate and sacred forest of the ancient Celtic rituals

Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson
Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson

5) the youth go into the woods at night of the eve till the morn  (see more)
6) the lark is a sacred bird with solar symbolism (see more)
7) the song of the cuckoo is a harbinger of Spring, also because once the season of love is over (end of May), the cuckoo (male) no longer sings  (see more)

Extra verses 

English translation (*)
Holly and hazel
and elder and rowan,(1)
We have brought the Summer in.
And brightly shining ash
from Bhéal an Átha,(2)
We have brought the Summer in
Irish Gaelic
Cuileann is coll
is trom is cárthain,
Thugamar féin
an samhradh linn
Is fuinseog ghléigeal Bhéal an Átha,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

NOTES
1) The hawthorn is a fairy plant like holly, hazel, elderberry and rowan, protective and auspicious (probably due to the very sharp thorns). The May tradition places the branch of hawthorn outside the house (hanging on the windows and next to the entrance) because if it is brought into home, especially when it is flowered, brings bad luck. This negative meaning dates back to the Middle Ages when the branches of hawthorn were used as amulets against the evil eye, witches and demons; it might be traced back to the vague rotting smell of the branches, but it is certainly linked to the Church’s attempt to assimilate pre-Christian rites to satanic practices.
2) Bhéal an Átha literally the mouth of the ford is also a place known today as Ballina a city on the river Moy in the Mayo counts. However, the settlement is relatively recent (late 15th century). Na Bealtaine is more likely to refer to a toponym Beulteine as it was called the place of the Beltane festival on the border between the county of Armagh and that of Louth, in Kilcurry, today there are only a small mound with the ruins of an old church. All versions collected in the area describe a radius around this location of about twenty miles

Bábóg na Bealtaine, Other Tunes

La Lugh (Eithne Ní Uallacháin & Gerry O’Connor) from Brighid’s Kiss 1995. Tune composed by Eithne Ní Uallacháin (I, III,IV, V, VI)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin has reinterpreted the song, previously published on the tune transcribed by Edward Bunting, on the tune and text as transcribed by Séamus Ennis from the testimony of Mick McKeown, Lough Ross recorded on a wax cylinder (I, II, III, IV, V , VII)

English translation*
I (CHORUS)
Golden Summer of the white daisies,
we bring the Summer with us,
from village to village
and home again,
and we bring the Summer with us.
I Mick McKeown version
Golden summer, lying in the meadows,
we brought the summer with us;
Golden summer, spring and winter,
and we brought the summer with us.

II
Young maidens, gentle and lovely,
we brought the summer with us;
Lads who are clever, sturdy and agile,
and we brought the summer with us.
III
Beltaine dolls,
Summer maidens
Up hill and down glens
Girls adorned
in pure white,
and we bring the Summer with us.
IV
The lark making music
and sky dancing
the blossomed trees laden with bees
the cuckoo and the birds
singing with joy
and we bring the Summer with us.
V
The hare nests on the edge of the cliff
the heron nests
in the branches
the doves are cooing,
honey on stems
and we bring the Summer with us.
VI
The shining sun is lighting the darkness
the silvery sea shines like a mirror
the dogs are barking,
the cattle lowing
and we bring the Summer with us.
VII
Golden summer, lying in the meadow,
we brought the summer with us;
From home to home and to Lisdoonan of pleasure,
and we brought the summer with us.
Irish Gaelic
I
Samhradh buí na nóiníní gléigeal,
thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn,
Ó bhaile go baile is chun ár mbaile ’na dhiaidh sin,/’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
(Mick McKeown version
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins na léanaí,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Samhradh buí, earrach is geimhreadh
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.)
II
Cailíní óga, mómhar sciamhach,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Buachaillí glice, teann is lúfar,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
III
Bábóg na Bealtaine,
maighdean an tsamhraidh
suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann
cailíní maiseacha, bángheala gléasta,/’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
IV
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm is ag luasadh sna spéartha,
beacha is cuileoga is bláth ar na crainn,
tá’n chuach’s na héanlaith ag seinm le pléisiúr,/’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
V
Tá nead ag an ghiorria ar imeall na haille,
is nead ag an chorr éisc i ngéaga an chrainn,
tá mil ar na cuiseoga is na coilm ag béiceadh,/’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VI
Tá an ghrian ag loinnriú`s ag lasadh na dtabhartas,
tá an fharraige mar scathán ag gháirí don ghlinn,
tá na madaí ag peithreadh is an t-eallach ag géimni
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
VII
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins a’ léana,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Ó bhaile go baile is go Lios Dúnáin a’ phléisiúir,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.

* from here and here

 

Amhrán na Craoibhe (The Garland Song)

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltane-la-festa-celtica-del-maggio.html
http://songsinirish.com/samhradh-samhradh-lyrics/
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/ThugamarFeinAnSamhradhLinn.html

https://thesession.org/tunes/10447

https://www.orielarts.com/songs/thugamar-fein-an-samhradh-linn/

Emigrant Farewell

Leggi in italiano

“Farewell My Love and Remebre Me” also with the title “Our Ship Is Ready”, “The Ship Is Ready To Sail Away” or “My Heart is True”, but also “Emigrant Farewell” is the transposition in the Irish folk song of a broadside ballad entitled “Remember Me”, published in Dublin c.1867 (in the “Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads”).

The theme is that of the emigrant’s farewell  who is forced to separate from his true love; he leaves his heart in Ireland so his woman and his country become one in the memory.

In “Ulster Ballad Singer (1968)” Sarah Makem is noted: “Sarah’s melody is used quite often for songs of farewell in much the same way as the air “The Pretty Lasses of Loughrea” was used allover the country for lamentations or execution songs, (see Joyce’s Old Irish Folk Music and Song, pp 219-211). The two best-known printed versions of Sarah’s air are “Fare you well, sweet Cootehill Town” (Joyce, O.I.F.M.S., p 192) and “The Parting Glass” (Irish Street Ballads. p 69). But until such time as a system of notation is invented to record the true intervals of a folksinger’s interpretation, Sarah Makem’s version of this air must remain for study on disc or tape.”

The Boys of the Lough in Farewell and Rember Me, 1987 ( I, III, I)

Pauline Scanlon in Hush 2006 (I, III)
 La Lugh in Senex Puer 1999 (on Spotify): sad and gloomy tune on the piano with a few hints to the cello

I
Our ship is ready to bear(sail) away
Come comrades o’er the stormy seas
Her snow-white wings they are unfurled
And soon she will swim in a watery world
(chorus)
Ah, do not forget, love, do not grieve
For my heart is true and can’t deceive
My hand and heart, I will give to thee
So farewell my love and remember me
II
Farewell to Dublin’s hills and braes
To Killarney’s lakes and silvery seas
‘Twas many the long bright summer’s day/When we passed those hours of joy away(1)
III (3)
Farewell to you, my precious pearl
It’s my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
And when I’m on the stormy seas
When you think on Ireland, remember me
III (The Boys of the Lough )
Farewell my love as bright as pearl
my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
and when I am seal in the stormy seas
I’ll hope in Ireland, you’ll think on me
IV
Oh, Erin dear, it grieves my heart
To think that I so soon must part
And friends so ever dear and kind
In sorrow I must leave behind
Extra Rhymes La Lugh
V
It’s now I must bid a long adieu
To Wicklow and its beauties too
Avoca’s braes where lovers meet
There to discourse in absence sweet
VI
Farewell sweet Deviney, likewise the glen
The Dargle waterfall and then
The lovely scene surrounding Bray
Shall be my thoughts when far away
NOTES
1) or
Where’s many the fine long summer’s day/We loitered hours of joy away

second part:  “Old Cross of Ardboe”

http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/ready.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22322

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

Con lo stesso titolo si identificano due diverse melodie, la prima è quella più comunemente nota come “Shamrock shore” (vedi) per il titolo del testo a cui è abbinata

ERIN SHORE O LOUGH ERIN SHORE

ASCOLTA The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995)

ASCOLTA The Corrs in “Unplugged” 1999

oppure la versione live The Corrs & The Chieftains 2008

LOUGH ERNE SHORE

angelabetta3La seconda è una Irish pastoral love song probabilmente una “Ulster Hedge School ballad” del 1700 o 1800. Per il soggetto ricorda un’altra ballata dal titolo “The Pretty Girl Milking the Cow” (vedi). La melodia è una slow air tipica delle aisling song (rêverie song) ossia un genere letterario della poesia irlandese (per lo più in gaelico) proprio del 1600-1700 in cui il protagonista (spesso un poeta) ha la visione in sogno di una bella fanciulla che rappresenta l’Irlanda. Questa in particolare sebbene non sia pervenuta nella sua versione in gaelico si ritiene provenga dal un maestro di scuola (hedge-school) del Fermanagh

ASCOLTA Paddy Tunney (vedi scheda)
ASCOLTA Paul Brady & Andy Irvine  in “Andy Irvine and Paul Brady” (1976).
ASCOLTA La Lugh

Old Blind Dogs in Wherever Yet May Be 2010 (Jonny Hardie violino, Aaron Stone voce e chitarra, Ali Hutton  border pipes, Fraser Stone percussioni)

VERSIONE PADDY TUNNEY da “The Stone Fiddle”
I
One morning as I went a-fowlin’,
bright Phoebus(1) adorned the plain.
It was down by the shades of Lough Erne(2),
I met with this wonderful dame.
II
Her voice was so sweet and so pleasing;
these beautiful notes she did sing.
And the innocent fowl of the forest,
their love unto her they did bring.
III
Well, it being the first time I met her,
my heart, it did lep with surprise.
And I thought that she could be no mortal,
but an angel that fell from the skies.
IV
Her hair it resembled gold tresses;
her skin was as white as the snow.
And her lips were as red as the roses
that bloom around Lough Erne shore.
V
When I heard that my love was eloping,
these words unto her I did say:
“Oh, take me to your habitation,
for Cupid(1) has led me astray.”
VI
“For ever I’ll keep the commandments;
they say that it is the best plan.
Fair maids who do yield to men’s pleasures,
the scriptures do say they are wrong.”
VII
“Oh, Mary, don’t accuse me of weakness,
for treachery I do disown.
I will make you a lady of the splendour
if with me, this night, you’ll come home.”
VIII
Oh, had I the lamp of great Al-addin(3),
his rings and his genie that’s more,
I would part with them all for to gain you,
and live around Lough Erne shore.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Una mattina mentre ero a passeggio, il luminoso Febo(1) soleggiava la pianura così mi addentrai nei boschetti del Lago Erne (2) e incontrai una bella dama.
II
La sua voce era così dolce e armoniosa,
le belle note che cantava gli innocenti uccelli del bosco (ri)portavano con l’amore a lei.
III
Essendo la prima volta che la incontravo il mio cuore fece un balzo per la sorpresa e pensai che lei non potesse essere una mortale, ma un angelo caduto dal cielo.
IV
I capelli sembravano trecce d’oro, la pelle bianca come la neve, e le labbra rosse come le rose
in fiore lungo le rive del Lago Erne.
V
Quando mi accorsi che mi ero innamorato,
le dissi queste parole
“Oh portatemi alla vostra dimora, che Cupido(1) mi ha colpito”.
VI
“Osserverò i comandamenti per sempre, dicono che sia il miglior proposito. Le scritture dicono che sono in errore le belle fanciulle che soggiacciono ai voleri degli uomini”
VII
“Oh Maria non accusarmi di debolezza
perchè io rinnego il tradimento,
ti farò una signora ricca se con me, questa notte, verrai!
VIII
Avessi la lampada del grande Aladino(3)
e in più i suoi anelli e il genio,
li condividerei tutti con te per vivere sulla riva del Lago Erne”

NOTE
1) l’autore da sfoggio delle sue conoscenze classiche citando a Febo (ovvero Apollo) il dio del sole  e Cupido il dio dell’amore
2) Il Lough Erne è un complesso di due laghi situati nelle Midlands d’Irlanda: Lower e Upper. “Senza alcuna fretta di raggiungere il mare, il fiume Erne serpeggia da una parte all’altra dell’acquosa e boscosa contea Fermanagh. Scorre fino a formare un lago composto di due bacini, Lower e Upper Lough Erne, nel cui centro si trova l’isoletta su cui sorge il capoluogo di contea, Enniskillen. Paradiso per uccelli, fiori e piante selvatiche e pescatori, Lough Erne è un corso d’acqua meraviglioso, ideale per crocere e gite in barca. ” (tratto da qui)
3) il verso si ritrova anche in una canzone dallo stesso tema “The Pretty Maid Milking her Cow

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19864
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11428
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28342
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lough_Erne’s_Shore

DOMHNALL (BLACK DONALD)

Black Donald, Domnall Dubh, Donal Dubh, Mor A’Cheannaich sono titoli simili per un antica melodia scozzese proveniente dalle Isole Ebridi: la stessa melodia è anche interpretata come mouth music (puirt a beul) con un testo simile pur nelle varie versioni: il matrimonio di Donald e Morag.  Ho già trovato parte della storia in una canzone famosa su Rathlin Island (Donal agus Morag vedi) in cui si celebrava un matrimonio in terra irlandese (o meglio su  un isoletta a metà strada tra la costa settentrionale irlandese e la Scozia) e anche in questa versione scozzese sembra si parli sempre degli stessi due sposi: Donald MacDonald dai capelli neri che chiede in sposa Morag la figlia di un mercante (di certo molto facoltoso).
Resta il dubbio su chi sia Donald, non certo il diavolo anche se in Scozia Black Donald (in gaelico scozzese: Domhnall Dubh o Domnuill-dhu) è appunto un eufemismo per il diavolo, più probabilmente  un personaggio importante del Clan MacDonald.

highland-wedding

STRATHSPEY MELODIA E DANZA DELLA SCOZIA

Si tratta di uno Strathspey ossia una melodia per danza tipicamente scozzese che sembra sia originaria dalle valli del fiume Spey. Si tratta di un reel molto più lento (per semplificare si potrebbe dire che lo strathspey sta al reel come il valzer lento sta al valzer)

ASCOLTA La Lugh in “Senex Puer” – 1998

“La strathspey è una danza in 4/4, piuttosto vivace e caratterizzata dal ripetersi di una nota breve seguita da una nota puntata : questo viene chiamato Scotch snap (curiosamente è detto anche ritmo lombardo!) e tradizionalmente viene suonato esagerando il ritmo per enfatizzare l’espressione musicale. L’esempio più famoso è nella melodia Auld Lang Syne che spesso si sente cantare in occasione del Capodanno o in molte manifestazioni musicali scozzesi.
Di solito questa danza è molto veloce, anche se è più solenne di altre danze scozzesi come le hornpipes o le gighe, ed è quasi sempre abbinata ad un reel, che è in 2/2 e rilascia la tensione ritmica creata durante la strathspey.
Secondo un’ipotesi affascinante il ritmo di questa danza riproduce il ritmo della lingua Gaelica scozzese. Quando alla melodia era abbinato il testo si tramandava anche lo stile del canto: anche qui il ritmo ha la precedenza e costringe ad un alternarsi di sillabe corte seguite da sillabe lunghe che è quasi innaturale, ma deve essere esattamente così perchè la danza funzioni.
Queste danze furono originariamente composte per essere suonate col violino, che con una tecnica particolare dell’archetto può riprodurre lo “Scotch snap”; in seguito molte strathspey piu’ recenti furono composte nel XVIII e nel XIX secolo da William Marshall e James Scott Skinner” (tratto da qui)

COS’È LO SCOTCH SNAP?

Tutto chiaro no?

ASCOLTA Capercailliein “The Blood is Strong” 1995 con il titolo di  Domhnall

GAELICO SCOZZESE
I (x2)
Domhnall dubh an Domnallaich
A nochd an tòir air Mór a’ Cheannaich
Domhnall dubh an Domnallaich
A nochd an tòir air Móraig
CHORUS
bhi à bhi
Sìn do làmh a Mhór a’Cheannaich
I bhi a bhi ù bhi à bhi
Sìn do làmh a Mhórag
I bhi a bhi ù bhi à bhi
Sìn do làmh a Mhór a’Cheannaich
Domhnall dubh an Domnallaich
A nochd an tòir air Móraig
II (x2)
Tha ru’bheag u dhìth orm
A dh’fheumainn fhìn mun dèanainn banais
Tha ru’bheag u dhìth orm
A dh’fheumainn fhìn mu’m pòsainn
III (x2)
Dhannsainn is ruidhleadh mi
Air oidhche banais Mór a’Cheannaich
Dhannsainn is ruidhleadh mi
Air oidhche banais Mórag

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
Black-haired Donald MacDonald
Is tonight chasing after
the merchant’s daughter
CHORUS
I bhi a bhi ù bhi à bhi
Give me your hand,
daughter of the merchant
II
Black-haired Donald MacDonald
Is tonight chasing after Morag
There are many things which I need
Before I can have a wedding feast
There are many things which I need
Before I can get married
III
I danced and reeled
On the night of the merchant’s daughter’s wedding
I danced and reeled
On the night of Morag’s wedding
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Donald MacDonald dai capelli neri stasera corteggia
la figlia del mercante,
CORO
Vocaboli non-sense
Sposami
figlia del mercante!
II
Donald MacDonald dai capelli neri stasera corteggia Morag
Ci sono molte cose di cui ho bisogno prima che ci possa essere la festa di nozze, ci sono molte cose di cui ho bisogno prima che io possa sposarmi.
III
Ho ballato gighe e reel
nella notte del matrimonio della figlia del mercante,
ho ballato gige e reel
nella notte delle nozze di Morag

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/domhnall.htm https://thesession.org/tunes/2679

FAREWELL MY LOVE AND REMEMBER ME

Read the post in English

“Farewell My Love and Remebre Me” anche con il titolo “Our Ship Is Ready”, “The Ship Is Ready To Sail Away” o “My Heart is True”, ma anche semplicemente “Emigrant Farewell” è la trasposizione nella tradizione popolare irlandese di una broadside ballad dal titolo Remember Me, pubblicata a Dublino c.1867, e archiviata nelle “Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads”.

Il tema è quello dell’addio dell’emigrante  che è costretto a separarsi dalla sua fidanzata; lui lascia il suo cuore in Irlanda e la donna e il paese diventano tutt’uno nello straziante ricordo.

Nelle note dell’album di Sarah Makem, “Ulster Ballad Singer” 1968 è scritto in  merito alla canzone: “la melodia di Sara è frequentemente usata per i canti dell’addio prorpio come la melodia The Pretty Lasses of Loughrea era usata in tutto il paese per i lament o i canti dei condannati  [canzoni della forca]. Le due versioni stampate più famose della melodia di Sarah sono  “Fare you well, sweet Cootehill Town” (Joyce, O.I.F.M.S., p 192) e “The Parting Glass” (Irish Street Ballads. p 69). Ma finchè non sarà inventato un sistema di notazione per riportare gli intervalli di tempo nell’interpretazione di un cantante folk, la versione di questa melodia su disco è basilare per lo studio”

ASCOLTA The Boys of the Lough in Farewell and Rember Me, 1987 (strofe I, III variante, I)

Un arrangiamento un po’ swing
Pauline Scanlon in Hush 2006 (strofe I, III)
ASCOLTA La Lugh in Senex Puer 1999 (su Spotify)
melodia triste e cupa al piano con pochi accenni al violoncello


I
Our ship is ready to bear(1) away
Come comrades o’er the stormy seas
Her snow-white wings they are unfurled
And soon she will swim in a watery world
(chorus)
Ah, do not forget, love, do not grieve
For my heart is true and can’t deceive
My hand and heart, I will give to thee
So farewell my love and remember me
II
Farewell to Dublin’s hills and braes
To Killarney’s lakes and silvery seas
‘Twas many the long bright summer’s day/When we passed those hours of joy away(2)
III (3)
Farewell to you, my precious pearl
It’s my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
And when I’m on the stormy seas
When you think on Ireland, remember me
IV
Oh, Erin dear, it grieves my heart
To think that I so soon must part
And friends so ever dear and kind
In sorrow I must leave behind
Extra Rhymes La Lugh
V
It’s now I must bid a long adieu
To Wicklow and its beauties too
Avoca’s braes where lovers meet
There to discourse in absence sweet
VI
Farewell sweet Deviney, likewise the glen
The Dargle waterfall and then
The lovely scene surrounding Bray
Shall be my thoughts when far away
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La nave è pronta a salpare, venite, compagni, sul mare in tempesta;
le sue ali bianche come la neve sono spiegate,
e presto navigheremo sul mondo delle acque.
Coro
Non piangere, amore, non ti rattristare,
perchè il cuore è sincero e non mente;
ti darò la mia mano e il mio cuore,
così, addio amore mio e ricordati di me.
II
Addio alle colline di Dublino e alle valli,
fino ai laghi argentei di Killarney;
dove delle molte lunghe giornate estive,
abbiamo speso le ore in allegrezza.
III
Addio a te, mia perla preziosa
sei la mia amata ragazza dai capelli scuri e occhi azzurri
e quando sono sugli oceani in tempesta
e quando tu ripensi all’Irlanda, ricordami
IV
Oh amata Irlanda, il mio cuore piange,
a pensare che così presto io devo partire;
e gli amici mai così cari e gentili,
nel dolore devo lasciare alle spalle.
V
E ora devo dare l’addio
a Wicklow e anche alle sue bellezze
le colline di Avoca dove si incontrano gli amanti
per parlare in dolce solitudine
VI
Addio dolce Deviney, e valle
la cascata di Dargle e poi
il bel paesaggio che circonda Bray
sarete nei miei pensieri quando sarò lontano

NOTE
1) anche scritto come “sail away”
2) oppure
Where’s many the fine long summer’s day
We loitered hours of joy away
3)The Boys of the Lough variante strofa
Farewell my love as bright as pearl
my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
and when I am seal in the stormy seas
I’ll hope in Ireland, you’ll think on me
( in italiano:
addio amore mio luminosa come una perla
la mia bella dai capelli neri e gli occhi azzurri
e quando navigo nel mare in tempersta
spererò che tu in Irlanda penserai a me)

continua: “Old Cross of Ardboe”

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/ready.htm
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/eire/fareyewe.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22322

Il Maggio in Irlanda: il canto di Beltane

Read the post in English

Il canto ha molti titoli: Amhran Na Bealtaine, Samhradh, Summertime, Thugamur Fein An Samhradh Linn (We Brought The Summer With Us, We Have Brought The Summer In). Oggi viene comunemente chiamata Beltane Song

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

AMHRAN NA BEALTAINE

Il brano potrebbe risalire al tardo Medioevo e la sua prima traccia si trova nei festeggiamenti  popolari per lo sbarco di James Butler Duca di Ormonde nel 1662, nominato Lord Luogotenente d’Irlanda. E’ un canto tradizionale nella parte sud-est dell’Ulster (Irlanda del Nord) ed era cantato da gruppi di giovani che andavano di casa in casa a portare il ramo di Maggio (mummers, mayers- vedi).
Molto probabilmente questo era un canto di questua per ottenere   del cibo o bevande in cambio del ramo di biancospino o del prugnolo  da lasciare davanti alla porta . Con questo gesto benaugurale si proteggono gli abitanti dalle fate. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. continua

Il brano è ancora molto popolare in Irlanda  in particolare nella regione di Oriel (che include parti delle contee di Louth, Monaghan e Armagh) ed è eseguito sia in versione strumentale che cantato.
Edward Bunting afferma che il brano era suonata nell’area di Dublino fin dal 1633.
MELODIA TRASCRITTA DA EDWARD BUNTING


The Chieftains , questa versione strumentale è un inno alla gioia, un canto di uccelli che si risvegliano al richiamo della primavera: inizia il flauto irlandese appoggiandosi all’arpa, che trilla nel crescendo (a imitazione del canto dell’allodola) ripreso in canone dai vari strumenti a fiato (il flauto irlandese, il whistle e la uillean pipes) e dal violino, grandioso!

ASCOLTA  Gloaming  2012 con il titolo di Samhradh Samhradh (al violino Martin Hayes)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin in A Stór Is A Stóirín 1994 

Gelico irlandese
I
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tSamhraidh,
Suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann,
Cailíní maiseacha bán-gheala gléasta,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Sèist
Samhradh, samhradh, bainne na ngamhna,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí na nóinín glégeal,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

II
Thugamar linn é ón gcoill chraobhaigh,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí ó luí na gréine,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
III
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm ‘sag luascadh sna spéartha,
Áthas do lá is bláth ar chrann.
Tá an chuach is an fhuiseog ag seinm le pléisiúr,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
I
Mayday doll(1),
maiden of Summer (2)
Up every hill
and down every glen,
Beautiful girls,
radiant and shining,
We have brought the Summer in.
CHORUS
Summer, Summer,
milk of the calves(3),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(4) summer
of clear bright daisies,
We have brought the Summer in.
II
We brought it in
from the leafy woods(5),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(6) Summer
from the time of the sunset(7),
We have brought the Summer in.
III
The lark(8) is singing
and swinging around in the skies,
Joy for the day
and the flower on the trees.
The cuckoo and the lark
are singing with pleasure,
We have brought the Summer in.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La Fanciulla del Maggio
fanciulla dell’Estate
su per ogni collina
e giù per ogni valle
(noi) Belle Ragazze,
solari e splendenti
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
CORO
Estate, estate,
il latte dei vitelli
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
di chiare e luminose margherite
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
L’abbiamo portata
dai boschi frondosi,
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
a partire dal tramonto
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
III
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
Gioia per il giorno
e gli alberi in fiore
Il cuculo e l’allodola
cantano con gioia
Abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* da qui
garlan-may-day1) la Bábóg è la bambola (fanciulla) di Primavera. Brídeóg era la “piccola Bride“, (Brigit, o Brigantia in Britannia, una dea trina -Vergine, Madre, Crona) tra le più importanti del pantheon celtico, la fanciulla del grano confezionata dalle donne a Imbolc (il primo febbraio) con il grano avanzato dall’ultimo covone della mietitura dell’anno passato, ossia la giovane Dea della Primavera, un forte simbolo di rinascita nel ciclo di morte-vita in cui si perpetua la Natura: nella bambolina si era trasferito lo spirito del grano che non moriva con la mietitura. Le bamboline di Brigid venivano anche vestite con un abito bianco o decorate con pietre, nastri e fiori e portate in processione per tutto il paese affinchè ciascuno lasciasse un dono alla piccola Bride.
La bambolina ricomparirà nelle celebrazioni vittoriane del Maggio, questa volta come vera a propria bambola biancovestita posta tra una corona di fiori e nastri appesa ad un asta e portata in giro per il paese dai Mayers (i maggiolanti). continua
2) samhradh nel contesto è il nome dato alla ghirlanda fiorita portata di casa in casa con l’effige della Bábóg
3)  il latte delle mucche per i vitellini. Il giorno del Maggio è chiamato  na Beal tina ossia il giorno del fuoco di Beal, consacrato quindi al dio Bel o Belenos. Alla vigilia si accendevano grandi fuochi e si faceva passare il bestiame tra di essi – come era l’antica usanza dei Celti – usanza conservata ancora nelle campagne irlandesi con la convinzione che ciò impedisse al Piccolo Popolo- in particolare ai folletti molto ghiotti di latte – di fare brutti scherzi come intrecciare le code delle mucche o rubare il latte
4) i fiori che venivano raccolti erano per lo più gialli per richiamare il colore e il calore del sole. Fiori e rami fioriti erano posti sulla soglia di casa e ai davanzali delle finestre per proteggere gli abitanti dalle fate e come auspicio di buona sorte. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. Tale tradizione era tipica dell’Irlanda del Nord. I bambini soprattutto andavano a raccogliere i fiori selvatici per preparare delle ghirlande, specialmente con fiori dal colore giallo.
5) il greenwood, il bosco più inviolato e sacro sede degli antichi rituali celtici dal quale le ragazze hanno tagliato i rami del Maggio (in altre versioni testuali indicati come branches of the forest) ossia i rami di biancospino o di prugnolo

Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson
Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson

6) i giovani si recano nel bosco nella notte della vigilia del 1 Maggio al tramonto del sole e quindi sul far del giorno iniziano la loro questua processionale per far entrare il Maggio nel paese (continua)
7) l’allodola è un uccello sacro dal simbolismo solare (vedi simbolismo)
8) il canto del cuculo è foriero di Primavera, anche perchè una volta terminata la stagione dell’amore (fine maggio), il cuculo (maschio) non canta più (continua)

In un’altra versione testuale (vedi)

Cuileann is coll is trom is cárthain,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Is fuinseog ghléigeal Bhéal an Átha,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduziopne inglese
Holly and hazel
and elder and rowan,(1)
We have brought the Summer in.
And brightly shining ash
from Bhéal an Átha,(2)
We have brought the Summer in
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
L’agrifoglio, il nocciolo,
il sambuco e il sorbo

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
e il bianco frassino
dalla Bocca del Guado,

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

1) Il biancospino è una pianta delle fate come l’agrifoglio, il nocciolo, il sambuco e il sorbo, protettiva e benaugurale (probabilmente a causa delle spine molto acuminate). La tradizione del Maggio vuole in particolare che il ramo  di biancospino sia posto fuori dalla casa (appeso alle finestre e accanto all’ingresso) perché se portato in casa, soprattutto quando è fiorito, porta sfortuna. Questa accezione negativa risale al Medioevo quando i rami di biancospino erano usati come amuleti contro il malocchio, le streghe e i demoni e forse si può far risalire al vago odore putrescente dei rami, ma sicuramente è legata al tentativo della Chiesa di assimilare i riti precristiani a pratiche sataniche.  vedi
2) Bhéal an Átha letteralmente la bocca del guado è anche una località oggi nota come Ballina una città sul fiume Moy nella conta di Mayo. L’insediamento è però relativamente recente (fine XV secolo)
Na Bealtaine è più probabile che si riferisca a un toponimo Beulteine così come era chiamato il luogo della festa di Beltane al confine tra la contea di Armagh e quella di Louth, a Kilcurry, oggi ci sono solo un piccolo tumulo con le rovine di una vecchia chiesa. Tutte le versioni raccolte nell’area descrivono un raggio intorno a questa località di circa venti miglia

Bábóg na Bealtaine, altre melodie

La Lugh (Eithne Ní Uallacháin & Gerry O’Connor) in Brighid’s Kiss 1995. Questa versione con il titolo Bábóg na Bealtaine mantiene il testo originale, ma la melodia è composta da Eithne Ní Uallacháin
(strofe I, III,IV, V, VI)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin ha reinterpraetato la canzone, già precedentemte pubblicata sulla melodia trascritta da Edward Bunting,  sulla melodia e testo come trascritti da Séamus Ennis dalla testimonianza di Mick McKeown, Lough Ross registrato su cilindo a cera (I, II, III, IV, V, VII)


I
Samhradh buí na nóiníní gléigeal,
thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn,
Ó bhaile go baile is chun ár mbaile ’na dhiaidh sin,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
(Mick McKeown version
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins na léanaí,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Samhradh buí, earrach is geimhreadh
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.)
II
Cailíní óga, mómhar sciamhach,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Buachaillí glice, teann is lúfar,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
III
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tsamhraidh
suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann
cailíní maiseacha, bángheala gléasta,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
IV
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm is ag luasadh sna spéartha,
beacha is cuileoga is bláth ar na crainn,
tá’n chuach’s na héanlaith ag seinm le pléisiúr,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
V
Tá nead ag an ghiorria ar imeall na haille,
is nead ag an chorr éisc i ngéaga an chrainn,
tá mil ar na cuiseoga is na coilm ag béiceadh,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VI
Tá an ghrian ag loinnriú`s ag lasadh na dtabhartas,
tá an fharraige mar scathán ag gháirí don ghlinn,
tá na madaí ag peithreadh is an t-eallach ag géimni
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VII
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins a’ léana,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Ó bhaile go baile is go Lios Dúnáin a’ phléisiúir,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
CHORUS
Golden Summer of the white daisies,
we bring the Summer with us,
from village to village
and home again,
and we bring the Summer with us.
I Mick McKeown version
Golden summer, lying in the meadows,
we brought the summer with us;
Golden summer, spring and winter,
and we brought the summer with us.
II
Young maidens, gentle and lovely,
we brought the summer with us;
Lads who are clever, sturdy and agile,
and we brought the summer with us.
III
Beltaine dolls,
Summer maidens
Up hill and down glens
Girls adorned in pure white,
and we bring the Summer with us.
IV
The lark making music
and sky dancing
the blossomed trees laden with bees
the cuckoo and the birds
singing with joy
and we bring the Summer with us.
V
The hare nests on the edge of the cliff
the heron nests in the branches
the doves are cooing, honey on stems
and we bring the Summer with us.
VI
The shining sun is lighting the darkness
the silvery sea shines like a mirror
the dogs are barking, the cattle lowing
and we bring the Summer with us.
VII
Golden summer, lying in the meadow,
we brought the summer with us;
From home to home and to Lisdoonan of pleasure,
and we brought the summer with us.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Estate dorata delle bianche margherite
 portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
di villaggio in villaggio
e in ogni casa
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
I Versione Mick McKeown
Estate dorata tra i prati
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
estate dorata, primavera e inverno
e abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
Giovani fanciulle, gentili e amabili
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
con giovani svegli, robusti  agili,
per portare l’arrivo dell’estate
III
Le Fanciulle di Beltane,
fanciulle dell’Estate
su per ogni collina e giù per ogni valle
ragazze vestite di candido bianco,
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
IV
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
gli alberi in fiore carichi di api
Il cuculo e gli uccelli
cantano con gioia
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
V
La lepre fa il nido sul limitare della scogliera, l’airone nei cespugli
le colombe tubano, miele sui rami
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VI
Il sole splendente illumina l’oscurità
il mare argentato brilla come specchio, i cani abbaiano, il bestiame muggisce portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VII
Estate dorata nel prato
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
do casa in casa alla Lisdoonan  del piacere
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* tratta da qui e qui

APPROFONDIMENTO
Amhrán na Craoibhe (The Garland Song)
LA TRADIZIONE DEL MAGGIO IN IRLANDA

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltane-la-festa-celtica-del-maggio.html
http://songsinirish.com/samhradh-samhradh-lyrics/
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/ThugamarFeinAnSamhradhLinn.html

https://thesession.org/tunes/10447

https://www.orielarts.com/songs/thugamar-fein-an-samhradh-linn/