Archivi tag: Johnny Collins

Billy Riley sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

The halyards shanties were very common on nineteenth-century ships (postal, merchant or whaler).

National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
“Blackwall frigate” National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

OLD BILLY RILEY

The song “Billy Riley” is considered one of the first sea shanties, probably born of a cotton-hoosiers song sung by black slaves. The vessels on which it was sung were of the “Blackwall frigate” type, a three-masted ship built between the end of 1830 and the mid-1870s.
The sea shanty “Billy Riley” fits the rhythm of fast pulling and quick breathing.
Stan Hugill writes in his Shanty Bibble “They used Jackscrews to pack the cotton into the holds of vessels, to ram them up tight and so get more in the cargo hold. Lots of negroes were used in this labour, and their chants turned into shanties when the sailors used them for other jobs, often the tune remained and the words were changed to suit Sailor John. Negroes formed a large part of the crew of some vessels, and took their chants to sea with them, and a hell of a lot of ‘white mans shanties’ had negro origins.”

Stevedores (un)loading a ship in the late 19th century. There may have been some steam-driven winches but most of it was brute strength from man and beast using ropes and pulleys. from the Library of Congress collection

THE SARCASM

The shantyman plays on the words and teases Billy the commander of the ship, the degree of “master” is compared to that of a “dancing master”, but certainly captain is a rude and authoritarian kind and certainly not a dandy!
The term “master” is however little used in the sea songs in which the name “Captain” prevails or as in the sea shanty that it’s preferred “Old man”. What about unchaste thoughts that come to mind to the crew, addressed to Billy Riley’s wife (or daughter), while they were loading the ship?

Assassin’s Creed

Johnny Collins

AC Black Flag version
Old Billy Riley was a dancing master(1).
Old Billy Riley, oh, Old Billy Riley!
Old Billy Riley’s master of a drogher(2).
Master of a drogher bound for Antigua.
Old Billy Riley has a nice young daughter(3).
Oh Missy Riley, little Missy Riley.
Had a pretty daughter,
but we can’t get at her.
Screw her up(4) and away we go, boys.
One more pull and then belay, boys
Johnny Collins version
Oh Billy Riley, Mister Billy Riley
Oh Billy Riley oh
Billy Riley, Mister Billy Riley
Oh Billy Riley oh
Old Billy Riley was a dancing master(1).
Oh Billy Riley shipped aboard a droger(2)
Oh Billy Riley wed the skipper’s daughter(3)
Oh Mrs Riley didn’t like sailors
Oh Mrs Riley had a lovely daughter
Oh Missy Riley, pretty Missy Riley
Oh Missy Riley, screw her up to Chile(4)

NOTES
Droger1) it’s referred to the captain in an ironic sense
2) drogher was a slow cargo ship for transport along the West Indies coast, more properly a triangular fishing boat. More generally, the West Indies for Europeans of the fifteenth century were one with the American continent, so even in 1507 Amerigo Vespucci sensed that the Europeans had “discovered” a new continent the term remained in use for many centuries. Thus the drogher is located in the Caribbean and sails to Antigua, the island of the Lesser Antilles, where sugar and cotton are produced. I think the term is used in a derogatory sense always against the commander because his is not really a ship that plows the oceans !!
3) droger- daughter word games for assonance
4) “screw her up to Chile” is probably a modegreen for “screw her up so cheerily”. Cheerily is a typical seafaring expression for “with a will” or “quickly.” The word screw though two-way has the primary meaning of “tighten up” (compress). “Cotton was” “screwed”. Cotton was “screwed” into the hold of a ship using a kind of enormous horizontal jack. Stan Hugill says: “They are used to pack the cotton into the vessels of vessels.”

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Jeff Warner from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

Both Sharp and Terry comment that they have not come across any version other than Short’s – although Fox-Smith and Colcord (who published later) both give versions.  Hugill notes the “remarkable resemblance between Billy Riley and Tiddy High O!” and feels that “it probably originates as a cotton-hoosiers song.” It may be that it was an early shanty that became less and less used, for Fox-Smith states that: “I have come across very few of the younger generation of sailormen who have heard it. All versions seem fairly consistent and what words there are in Short’s text fit the usual pattern and so have been augmented from the other sources.  Sharp’s notes, after the text, say: “and so on, sometimes varying ‘walk him up so cheer’ly’ with ‘screw him up etc”. (from here)

Oh Billy Riley, little Billy Riley
(Oh Billy Riley oh)
Oh  Billy Riley walk her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley, little Billy Riley
Oh  Billy Riley screw her up so cheerily
Oh Mister Riley, oh Missy Riley.
Oh Missy Riley screw her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley was a boardinghouse master
Oh Billy Riley had a lovely daughter
Oh Missy Riley how I love your daughter
Oh Missy Riley I can’t get at her
Oh Missy Riley, little Missy Riley
Oh Missy Riley, screw her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley hauling and hung together
Oh  Billy Riley walk her up so cheerily

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/oldbillyriley.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46593 http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=92

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Sotto la voce Codefish shanty si classifica una serie di canti marinareschi (sea shanty) di cui si conoscono due versioni, una di Capo Cod e l’altra dell’Australia Meridionale: i titoli sono “Cape Code girls“, e “Rolling King” o “Bound for South Australia ” (o più semplicemente “South Australia”).

VERSIONE SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Quale delle due versioni sia nata prima non è certo, possiamo solo rilevare una grande varietà di testi e anche l’abbinamento con melodie diverse. All’inizio probabilmente una “going-away song” ossia una di quelle canzoni che i marinai cantavano solo per le occasioni particolari cioè quando erano in ritta per il viaggio di ritorno, è poi entrata nel circuito folk e quindi standardizzata in due distinte versioni.

“As an original worksong it was sung in a variety of trades, including being used by the wool and later the wheat traders who worked the clipper ships between Australian ports and London. In adapted form, it is now a very popular song among folk music performers that is recorded by many artists and is present in many of today’s song books.In the days of sail, South Australia was a familiar going-away song, sung as the men trudged round the capstan to heave up the heavy anchor. Some say the song originated on wool-clippers, others say it was first heard on the emigrant ships. There is no special evidence to support either belief; it was sung just as readily aboard Western Ocean ships as in those of the Australian run. Laura Smith, a remarkable Victorian Lady, obtained a 14-stanza version of South Australia from a coloured seaman in the Sailors’ Home at Newcastle-on-Tyne, in the early 1880’s. The song’s first appearance in print was in Miss Smith’s Music of the Waters. Later, it was often used as a forebitter, sung off-watch, merely for fun, with any instrumentalist joining in. It is recorded in this latter-day form. The present version was learnt from an old sailing-ship sailor, Ted Howard of Barry, in South Wales. Ted told how he and a number of shellbacks were gathered round the bed of a former shipmate. The dying man remarked: “Blimey, I think I’m slipping my cable. Strike up South Australia, lads, and let me go happy.” (A.L. Lloyd in Across the Western Plains tratto da qui)

Così questo genere di canzoni erano un misto di versi improvvisati e una serie di versi tipici , ma in genere il ritornello del coro era standardizzato e univoco (anche per l’ovvia ragione che doveva essere cantato da marinai provenienti da tutte le parti).
La lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dal tipo di lavoro da svolgere e poteva arrivare a parecchie strofe. La canzone ha poi assunto vita propria come canzone popolare nel repertorio folk.
La sua prima comparsa in raccolte sulle sea shanties risale al 1881.
hulllogo

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem 1962 la versione che ha fatto da modello nell’ambiente folk

Vediamoli anche in una versione piratesca nell’adattamento televisivo dell'”Isola del Tesoro”

ASCOLTA Johnny Collins, in “Shanties & Songs of the Sea” 1996

ASCOLTA The Pogues

ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm in Herding Cats (1999) richiamano nell’arrangiamento la versione dei Pogues. E’ interessante confrontare lo stesso gruppo che si è cimentato anche con l’arrangiamento di Cape Code Girls.


In South Australia(1) I was born!
Heave away! Haul away!
South Australia round Cape Horn(2)!
We’re bound for South Australia!
Heave away, you rolling king(3),
Heave away! Haul away!
All the way you’ll hear me sing
We’re bound for South Australia!
As I walked out one morning fair,
It’s there I met Miss Nancy Blair.
I shook her up, I shook her down,
I shook her round and round the town.
There ain’t but one thing grieves my mind,
It’s to leave Miss Nancy Blair behind.
And as you wallop round Cape Horn,
You’ll wish to God you’d never been born!
I wish I was on Australia’s strand
With a bottle of whiskey in my hand
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
Sono nato in Australia Meridionale(1)
virate, alate,
Australia del Sud via Capo Horn(2)
Siamo diretti verso l’Australia Meridionale
virate re dei mari(3)
virate, alate,
per tutto il tragitto si sente cantare

“Siamo diretti nell’Australia Meridionale!
Mentre camminavo in un bel mattino
là t’incontrai la signorina Nancy Blair.
La strinsi sotto e sopra
la strinsi tondo tondo per la città
e se c’e che una cosa che mi addolora
è lasciare la signorina Nancy Blair.
E mentre sei sbatacchiato a Capo Horn
vorresti per Dio non essere mai nato!
Preferirei essere su una spiaggia in Australia
con una bottiglia di whiskey in mano

NOTE
1) Terra di galantuomini e non di deportati lo stato è considerato una “provincia” della Gran Bretagna
2) le navi all’epoca dei velieri seguivano le rotte oceaniche cioè quelle dei venti e delle correnti: così per andare in Australia partendo dall’America o dall’Europa la situazione non cambiava occorreva doppiare l’Africa, ma che giro bisognava fare!!
Se prendiamo una mappa del globo notiamo subito che una rotta verso l’oriente, partendo dall’Europa, ci obbligherebbe a circumnavigare l’Africa. Lo stesso discorso vale per chi si avventura partendo dalla costa orientale dell’America del nord, a meno di volere circumnavigare l’America del sud e forzare controvento capo Horn!
A nord dell’equatore, nell’Atlantico, questi hanno un senso di rotazione orario. Quindi fin alle Canarie e Capo Verde tutto è facile. Poi, per via della forza di Coriolis, subentra la zona delle calme equatoriali con la loro quasi totale assenza di vento. Ma non basta, superate le calme nell’emisfero australe i venti dominanti hanno rotazione inversa cioè antioraria. Quindi partendo ad esempio dall’Inghilterra la rotta era la seguente : Atlantico fino a Capo Verde poi tutto ad Ovest verso i Caraibi quindi a Sud lungo il Brasile e la costa Argentina fino a riprendere i venti portanti che con rotta di nuovo verso Est portano a passare capo di Suona Speranza in Sud Africa e finalmente quella fetenzia di ostico oceano che è quello Indiano. Approssimativamente 30.000 Km quando in linea d’aria sono solo 8.000! (tratto da qui)

3) rolling king: è plausibile si tratti di una sorta di incitazione rivolta ai marinai a spremere tutte le loro energie.. Da Mucat varie spiegazioni: la prima è che i marinai abbiano dato un vezzeggiativo alla nave battezzandola “the Rolling King” non solo per il suo “balletto” durante il mare agitato o in tempesta ma anche perchè si comporta in modo volubile. Nonostante in inglese la nave sia una “she”, molte navi sono state battezzate con nomi al maschile così “Rolling King” potrebbero essere i marinai della nave battezzata “Rolling King” (l’equipaggio di una nave prendeva il nome della nave).
Un’altra spiegazione ragionevole sempre riportata nella discussione su Mudcat “The chanteyman seems to be calling the sailors rolling kings rather that refering to any piece of equipment. And given that “rolling” seems to be a common metaphor for “sailing” (cf. Rolling down to old Maui, Roll the woodpile down, Roll the old chariot along, etc.) I would guess that he is calling them “sailing kings” i.e. great sailors. There are a number of chanteys which have lines expressing the idea of “What a great crew we are.” and I think this falls into that category.” (tratto da qui)
Del resto ogni marinaio fantasticava sul significato della parola,  ad esempio Russel Slye scrive ” When I was in Perth (about 1970) I met an old sailor in a bar. I found he had sailed on the Moshulu (4 masted barque moored in Philly now) during the grain trade. I asked him about Rolling Kings. His reply (abridged): “We went ashore in India and other places, and heard about a wheel-rolling-king who was a big boss of everything. Well, when the crew was working hauling, those who wasn’t pulling too hard were called rolling kings because they was acting high and mighty.” So, it is a derogatory term for slackers. (tratto da qui).
E tuttavia senza andare a scomodare fantomatici Re (sulla scia del mito medievale di Re Giovanni e la fontana dell’eterna giovinezza) la parola potrebbe benissimo essere una corruzione di “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”.
Tra le tante esilaranti ipotesi anche questa (per burla) di Charley Noble: si potrebbe trattare di un riferimento ad Elvis Prisley!!

C’è anche una versione MORRIS DANCE a conferma della popolarità della canzone

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

RANDY DANDY-O

Il titolo di questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty ) è facilmente traducibile. Sappiamo che dandy è il damerino azzimato, il modaiolo tutto in tiro (più o meno in senso positivo, a volte come simbolo di eleganza a volte come simbolo di depravatezza) e randy ha una connotazione di eccitamento sessuale equivalente come assonanza all’italiano “arrapato”. Per stare un po’ più sul soft si potrebbe tradurre come “damerino allegro” rinforzato da quel “rollicking che gli sta accanto..  Italo Ottonello traduce come “bellimbusti senza cervello” ovviamente la qualifica è riferita ai marinai della ciurma alle prese con le manovre per salpare! Lo shantyman li sta esortando a “muovere le manine” ..

Scrive Italo Ottonello “Si tratta di un tipico shanty all’argano: questi, non dovendosi eseguire alcun alaggio, e diversamente dagli altri, oltre ai versi di domanda-e-risposta di frequente hanno un intero coro“.

La versione testuale di Stan Hugill in “Shanties from the Seven Seas”


Now we are ready
to head for the Horn,
Way, ay, roll an’ go!(1)
Our boots an’ our clothes boys
are all in the pawn(2),
To be rollickin’
Randy Dandy-Oh(3)
CHORUS:
Heave a pawl(4), oh, heave away,
Way, ay, roll an’ go!
The anchor’s on board
an’ the cable’s all stored,

To be rollickin’
Randy Dandy-Oh
Soon we’ll be warping(5) her
out through the locks(6),
Where the pretty young gals
all come down in their flocks.
Heave a pawl, oh, heave away,
The anchor’s on board
an’ the cable’s all stored.
Come breast the bars (7), bullies,
an’ heave her away,
Soon we’ll be rollin’ her
‘way down the Bay.
Sing goodbye to Sally
an’ goodbye to Sue,
For we are the boy-os
who can kick ‘er through.
Oh, man the stout caps’n (8)
an’ heave with a will,
Soon we’ll be drivin’ her
‘way down the hill.
Heave away, bullies,
ye parish-rigged bums (9),
Take yer hands from yer pockets
and don’t suck yer thumbs.
Roust ‘er up, bullies,
the wind’s drawin’ free,
Let’s get the glad-rags on
an’ drive ‘er to sea.
We’re outward bound for Vallipo Bay(10),
Get crackin’, m’ lads,
‘tis a hell o’ a way!
Traduzione italiano Italo Ottonello
Siamo pronti
a far vela per l’Horn
Way, ay, salpate e via 
Stivali e vestiti sono
ancora da pagare
Seguite me,
scriteriati bellimbusti senza cervello.
CORO:
Passa la castagna, oh, e dopo vira
Way, ay, salpate e via
L’ancora è a bordo
e le gomene tutte stivate
Seguite me, scriteriati
bellimbusti senza cervello
Presto la tonneggeremo
fuori dalle chiuse
Dove tutte le ragazze vengono
con i loro bei vestiti
Passa la castagna, oh, e dopo vira
L’ancora è a bordo
e le gomene tutte stivate
Petto sulle aspe, sbruffoni,
e spostate la nave
presto deve rollare
giù nella Baia,
Cantate un saluto a Sally
e uno a Sue,
ché siamo noi i maschioni
che le fanno divertire.
Oh, armate il robusto argano
e virate con forza,
Presto la sposteremo
fuori dal bacino.
Virate sbruffoni,
barboni vagabondi,
via le mani dalle tasche
e basta girare i pollici.
Portiamola fuori, sbruffoni,
ché il vento è quello giusto
piuttosto teniamoci gli stracci
e portiamola in mare.
Stiamo partendo per la Baia di Valparaiso,
Dateci dentro, ragazzi,
ché quella è una rotta infernale!

NOTE di Italo Ottonello (*)
1) Italo Ottonello nel suo “Le vecchie canzoni dei giorni dei velieri” osserva che “durante il lavoro all’argano i marinai riprendono slancio battendo il piede a certe parole, da qui “stamp and go” pesta e vai“. “Roll” o “Row” sono intercambiabili.  [roll and go: non è un termine propriamente nautico, Stan Hugill lo descrive come “stamp (roll) and go” anche detto “runaway” il movimento che fanno i marinai quando devono tirare una lunga cima in uno spazio più corto: alcuni uomini all’estremità mantengono la presa, mentre gli altri ritornano in coda alla linea di uomini per trovare un’altra presa sulla cima. Ma probabilmente il termine viene genericamente utilizzato dai marinai per dire molte cose]
2)* All’atto della firma del contratto d’arruolamento per i viaggi di lungo corso, i marinai ricevevano un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga che, a garanzia del rispetto del contratto, era erogato in forma di pagherò, esigibile tre giorni dopo che la nave aveva lasciato il porto, “sempre che detto marinaio sia salpato con detta nave”. Tutti, invariabilmente, correvano a cercare qualche ‘squalo’ compiacente che comprasse il loro pagherò ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura. Gli acquirenti, procuratori d’imbarco e procacciatori vari, – gli ‘arruolatori’, com’erano soprannominati – erano indotti a ‘sequestrare’ i marinai e portarli a bordo, ubriachi o drogati, con poco o niente vestiario oltre quello che avevano indosso, e sperperare o rubare loro tutto l’anticipo. In questo senso, fino a quando non avevano restituito l’anticipo ricevuto, essi avevano tutto “impegnato” (all in the pawn).
3) secondo Stan Hugill era in origine “Timme Rollickin’ Randy Dandy-O”; più probabile una corruzione di “To me”, ossia l’incitamento dello shantyman affinche i marinai iniziassero a cantare in coro son lui
4)* Pawl ( castagna): specie di arpione mobile che impediva all’argano di girare in senso inverso inserendosi in una serie di fori alla sua base. Per consentire la rotazione in senso contrario c’era una seconda castagna con forma diversa.

Capstan
L’argano per il sollevamento dell’ancora: nella stampa la struttura si può notare la castagna (in inglese pawl) si trova tra il piede del marinaio seduto sul ponte e il ginocchio di quello più vicino. Si può notare la maniglia per avvicinare o allontanare la castagna. Erano più recenti castagne costituite da una specie di nottolino che s’impegnava su una corona a cremagliera fissata sulla coperta

5)* Warp : spostare una nave da un punto ad un altro per mezzo di cavi = Tonneggiare.
6) Lock: la darsena  A construction for navigating between different water levels on rivers and canals using controlled changes in water levels to float the boat to its new level. Per ovviare al problema delle maree nelle città portuali presso i fiumi, ben presto si sviluppò un sistema di bacini isolati da chiuse, di modo che all’interno di ogni bacino il livello dell’acqua restasse costante: erano così semplificate le operazioni di carico e scarico delle navi. Onde, burrasche, colpi di vento non hanno accesso a queste darsene che si possono considerare a ben vedere come degli spicchi di mare o di fiume che isolano porzioni di rada attraversate e percorse da navi
7) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars. [L’immagine, a mio avviso, gioca anche sul pensiero delle belle ragazze che poco prima stavano abbracciate ai marinai..]
8) caps’n= capstan
9)* Parish-rigged: “The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea” ne dà la seguente definizione: “The seaman’s term, in the days of square-rigged ships, for a vessel which, through the parsimony of its owner, had worn or bad gear aloft and meagre victuals below“. Detto di nave fornita di attrezzature inadeguate e scarsi viveri, qui scherzosamente detto di uomini inadeguati e scarsi.
10) un abbreviazione per Vall-i-paraiso = Valparaiso, rinomato porto del Cile

ASCOLTA Johnny Collins

Now we are ready
to head for the Horn,
Way, ay, roll an’ go!(1)
Our boots an’ our clothes boys
are all in the pawn(2),
To be rollickin’
Randy Dandy-Oh(3)
CHORUS:
Heave a pawl(4), oh, heave away,
Way, ay, roll an’ go!
The anchor’s on board
an’ the cable’s all stored,

To be rollickin’
Randy Dandy-Oh

Oh, man the stout caps’n(8)
an’ heave with a will,
Soon we’ll be drivin’ her
‘way up the hill(11).
Heave away, bullies,
ye parish-rigged(9), bums
Take yer hands from yer pockets and don’t suck yer thumbs.
We’re outward bound for Vallipo Bay(10),
Get crackin’, m’ lads, ‘tis a hell o’ a way!
Traduzione italiano Italo Ottonello
Siamo pronti
a far vela per l’Horn
Way, ay, salpate e via(1)
Stivali e vestiti sono ancora da pagare(2)
Seguite me, scriteriati bellimbusti senza cervello.(3)
CORO:
Passa la castagna(4), oh, e dopo vira
Way, ay, salpate e via
L’ancora è a bordo
e le gomene tutte stivate
Seguite me, scriteriati bellimbusti senza cervello.

Oh, armate il robusto argano e virate con forza,
Presto la sposteremo fuori dal bacino.
Virate sbruffoni,
barboni vagabondi,
via le mani dalle tasche
e basta girare i pollici.
Stiamo partendo per la Baia di Valparaiso,
Dateci dentro, ragazzi, ché quella è una rotta infernale!

NOTE
11) equivalente alla frase “Soon we’ll be warping(5) her out through the locks(6)”
ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed

ovvero  The Dreadnoughts in Polka’s Not Dead 2010 (proprio tosti ‘sti canadesi!)


Now we are ready to sail for the Horn,
Weigh hey, roll and go!(1)
Our boots and our clothes, boys,
are all in the pawn(2),
To be rollicking
randy dandy-O!(3)

(Chorus)
Heave a pawl(4), O heave away!
Weigh hey, roll and go!
The anchor’s on board
and the cable’s all stored,
To be rollicking
randy dandy-O!

Soon we’ll be warping(5) her out through the locks(6),
Where the pretty young girls all come down in their frocks
Come breast the bars(7), bullies, heave her away,
Soon we’ll be rolling her down through the Bay
traduzione italiano Italo Ottonello
Siamo pronti a far vela per l’Horn
Way, ay, salpate e via 
Stivali e vestiti ragazzi,
sono ancora da pagare
Seguite me, scriteriati bellimbusti senza cervello.
CORO:
Passa la castagna, oh, e dopo vira
Way, ay, salpate e via
L’ancora è a bordo
e le gomene tutte stivate
Seguite me, scriteriati bellimbusti senza cervello.

Presto la tonneggeremo  fuori dalle chiuse
Dove tutte le ragazze vengono con i loro bei vestiti
Petto sulle aspe, sbruffoni,
e spostate la nave
presto deve rollare
giù nella Baia

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/randy_dandy/hugill.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/randy-dandy-o.html
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/randy_dandy.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10241
https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/randydandyo.html
https://eddyodwyer.bandcamp.com/track/rollickin-randy-dandy-o
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/498.html

ELIZA LEE

Questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) detta anche “Clear the track”, “Let the Bulgine Run”, oppure” Margaret (Margot) Evans” era secondo Stan Hugill una capstan shanty. Secondo John Short si tratta di una variante della canzone tradizionale irlandese “Shule Agra”: così argomenta Johana Colcord The probability is that some Irish sailor, ashore on liberty in Mobile, sang “Shule Agra” in a water-front saloon. It pleased the ear of the negroes hanging about outside; and the next day they sang what they could remember while screwing home the great bales of cotton in some Liverpool ship’s hold. Negro fashion, they put in the rattling sucession of 16th notes, and added “bulgine” for good measure. The crew of the ship heard and liked it, perhaps without recognizing its origin; and took it back with them to Liverpool. There the crew of the Margaret Evans, a well known American packet-ship, lying in the Clarence or the Waterloo Dock, picked it up and fitted in the name of their ship, and took it back to New York, with Liza Lee and the bulgine still in close conjunction with the low-backed car, to the puzzlement of future folk-lorists!” (Colcord, Johana C. 1924. Roll and Go)

Secondo Wikipedia la Margaret Evans era un postale che faceva la spola tra Londra e New York, è stata varata nel 1846 e ha continuato i suoi viaggi fino al 1860. “She was 899 tons, built 1846 in New York by Westervelt & MacKay and owned by E.E. Morgan. She continued sailing into the 1860s.”

clipper-coulter

I CLIPPER

Navi dallo scafo basso e affusolato, un dispiegamento di superficie velica imponente, i clipper sfrecciavano sui mari a velocità mai viste prima (un Clipper poteva raggiungere la velocità di 9 nodi (16 km/h), con punte di 20 nodi (37 km/h), mentre la velocità massima delle altre navi era di 5 nodi (9 km/h) scarsi).
I primi vascelli di questo tipo ad essere varati sono stati i piccoli Clipper di Baltimora che vennero realizzati negli USA durante la guerra del 1812. Inizialmente la principale rotta sulla quale furono utilizzati i Clipper fu la New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, che restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia. Grazie ad essi questa linea era in servizio continuo, dato che per le navi precedenti risultava troppo pericoloso il passaggio continuo per Capo Horn. L’epoca d’oro dei Clipper durò dal 1840 al 1870 circa. Nel 1852 i cantiere americani vararono ben 61 Clipper, nel 1853, invece, furono 125. In questo periodo, i Clipper furono le navi preferite per il trasporto di carichi poco ingombranti e molto redditizi come le spezie, la seta, la lana o il tè. Con queste cifre in gioco si sviluppò una feroce competizione, molto popolare e seguita da tutti i giornali inglesi dell’epoca, tra i diversi equipaggi e le diverse compagnie di navigazione che diede origine a quella che venne chiamata la Great Tea Race. Questa competizione avveniva sulla rotta di 15.000 miglia (27.780 km) tra Shanghai e la Gran Bretagna. Veniva vinta dalla prima nave che giungeva in porto in Inghilterra. Inizialmente il record era di 113 giorni di traversata che successivamente, nel 1866, venne portato a 90. Una grande gara, che durò per vari anni, coinvolse in particolare due Clipper: il Thermopylae e il Cutty Sark. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Alan Mills in Songs of the Sea 1957


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Cross Line(3).
So clear the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
Tibby Hey rig a jig in a jaunting car(5).
(Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
With Lizer Lee(6) all on my knee.
So clear the track, let the Bullgine run.)
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Cross Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
Oh the gels are walking on the pier
And I’ll  soon be home to you, my dear.
Oh when I come home across the sea,
It’s Lizer you will marry me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(e via hai quasi finito)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Cross Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4), hey Tommy fatti un giro sul calesse(5), e via hai quasi finito
con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore

La Margaret Evan della compagnia “Blu Cross”
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
Oh le ragazze stanno camminando sul molo e presto sarò a casa da te, tesoro, oh quando ritornerò a casa dal mare è Liza che mi sposerà!

NOTE
1) Agli inizi Ottocento si richiedono sempre più navi veloci e non più “armate” come nel secolo precedente (epoca di galeoni, vascelli e fregate): si richiedono navi per il trasporto delle merci, senza tanti fronzoli e con più vele, nasce così il “Clipper”. Sono gli ultimi modelli delle navi a vela, l’apogeo dell’età della vela poi a breve subentreranno i motori..
2) In altre versioni è la Rosalind della Black Ball line
3) Più che il nome di una compagnia navale (riportato variamente come Blue Cross Line, Blue Star line o una ancora più improbabile blue sky line) ci si riferisce alla bandiera con una stella o una croce blu al centro.Throughout the various changes of management the Black Ball liners carried a crimson swallowtail flag with a black ball in the centre; the Dramatic liners, blue above white with a white L in blue and a black L in white for the Liverpool ships, and a red swallowtail with white ball and black L in the centre for the New Orleans ships; the Union Line to Havre, a white field with black U in the centre; John Griswold’s London Line, red swallowtail with black X in centre; the Swallowtail Line, red before white, swallowtail for the London ships, and blue before white, swallowtail for the Liverpool ships; Robert Kermit’s Liverpool Line, blue swallowtail with red star in the centre; Spofford & Tillotson’s Liverpool Line, yellow field, blue cross with white S. T. in the centre. These flags disappeared from the sea many years ago. (tratto da qui). Ci fu una Blue star line, una compagnia navale inglese ma venne fondata solo nel 1911.
4) bullgine (bulgine) è un termine slang per engine, ma anche il termine degli afro-americani per dire locomotiva (La John Bull fu una locomotiva americana che iniziò la sua corsa nel 1831 circa) Si tratta ovviamente di una gara tra il clipper e il trasporto via treno: la rotta  New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia.
5) anche “Timme Hey, Rig-a-jig, and a jaunting run!” E’ scritto anche low-backed (back) car(cart) ovvero il caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote: letteralmente “balla una giga sul calesse” ma il doppio senso è implicito
6) è il nome della ragazza a dare più spesso il titolo alla canzone

ASCOLTA Johnny Collins in Shanties & Songs of the Sea 1998 il testo apporta delle piccole variazioni alla versione precedente e aggiunge ulteriori strofe.


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Star Line(3).
Clear away the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
To my aye rig a jig in a junting car(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, clear away the track and let the bulgine run.
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Star Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
And when we’re outward bound in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
When we’ve stowed our freight at the West Street Pier
We’ll ahead get back to Liverpool pier,
Oh I thought I heard the old man say
“We’ll keep the brig three points away.”
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(Ho eh, ho ah, hai finito?)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Star Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4),
fatti un giro sul calesse(5) con me,
e via hai quasi finito?
Con ELiza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)

La Margaret Evan della Blu Star
Line
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
E quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in cerchio con quelle vivaci ragazze
e quando avremo stivato il nostro carico al Molo di West Street
andremo dritti verso il molo di Liverpool.
Mi è sembrato di sentire dire dal capitano “Terremo il brigantino a tre punti di distanza”
E quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

ASCOLTA The Dreadnoughts in Victory Square 2009 (un rimake della versione di Johnny Collins con dei mix testuali tra le due versioni precedenti)


The smartest clipper you can find is,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Shes’s the Margaret Evans on a Blue Star line(3)!
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run(4).
To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh, we’re outward bound for the West creek pier
We’ll go ashore at Liverpool pier,
And when we’re over in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
Oh the Margaret Tenans on the blue star line(3),
Shes never a day behind the time,
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper più tosto che tu possa trovare è, Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
E’ la Margaret Evan della Blu Star Line(3)
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)
Con me balla una giga sul calesse (5)
Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
Con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore.

Oh, dobbiamo partire dal Molo di West Creek
e sbarcheremo sul Molo di Liverpool
e quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in tondo con quelle vivaci ragazze
Oh la Margaret Tenans della Blue Star Line(3)
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo
e quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool
mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

NOTE
5) scritto impropriamente gun per fare rima con run. Si tratta in realtà  del caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: The Bull John Run

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


I wish I was a fancy man
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
I wish I was a fancy man
So clear the track,
let the Bullgine run.

As I walked out one morning fair
I met Miss Liza I declare
The day was fine and the wind was free
with Lize Lee all on my knee.
I said “My dear when you’ll be mine,
I’ll dress you up in silk so fine”
I wish I was in London Town
it was there I saw the gals all around
The london judies hung around
and then my Lize will be fine
You’ll ever be in New York, New York
is there you’ll see those girls fly around
and Marigold I love so dear
with there .. away some golden air (*)
I’ll take another girl on my knee
and leave behind my Lize Lee
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car
I wish I was a shantyman
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car

* non riesco a capire la pronuncia dele parole

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Ho eh, ah ah hai quasi finito?
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Così, sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore
.
Mentre ero a passeggio in un bel mattino incontrai Miss Liza, dico.
Il giorno era bello e non c’era vento
con Lize Lee sulle mie ginocchia.
dissi “Mio caro quando sarai mia
ti vestirò con seta tanto bella”.
Vorrei essere a Londra, era lì che ho visto le ragazze tutt’intorno.
Le ragazze londinesi erano in giro
così la mia Lize andrà bene.
Se sarai a New York, New York
è lì vedrai quelle ragazze volare in giro
e Marigold amo così tanto
???
Prenderò un’altra ragazza sulle mie ginocchia
e lascerò da parte la mia Lize Lee
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse
Vorrei essere uno shantyman
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse

FONTI
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Clear_the_track_let_the_Bullgine_run
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/898.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Song_about_the_Margaret_Evans
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/elizalee.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1208
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8629
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3864
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8578
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/letthebulginerun.html

Billy Riley sea shanty

Read the post in English

I canti alle drizze per alare le vele erano molto comuni sulle navi ottocentesche (postali, mercantili o baleniere) ..

National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
“Blackwall frigate” National Maritime Museum; (The Public Catalogue Foundation)

OLD BILLY RILEY

Il canto è considerato uno dei primi sea shanties, nato probabilmente da una cotton-hoosiers song cantata dagli schiavi neri. I vascelli su cui veniva cantata erano del tipo “Blackwall frigate” una nave a tre alberi costruita tra la fine del 1830 e la metà degli anni 1870.
La sea shanty “Billy Riley” imprime un ritmo di lavoro molto veloce un ritmo per i momenti d’emergenza o per sollevare delle vele più leggere.
Stan Hugill scrive nella sua Shanty Bibble “Si usavano i martinetti per comprimere il cotone nelle stive delle navi, per pigiarle ben strette e quindi metterne di più nella stiva. Un sacco di negri venivano usati in questo lavoro, e i loro canti si trasformavano in sea shanties quando i marinai li usavano per altri lavori, spesso rimaneva la melodia e le parole venivano cambiate per adattarsi alla vita del marinaio. I negri formavano gran parte dell’equipaggio di alcune navi, e portavano i loro canti in mare, e un sacco di ‘white mans shanties’ avevano origini dagli afro-americani. “

Stivatori che caricano una nave alla fine del XIX secolo. Potrebbero esserci stati degli argani a vapore, ma la maggior parte del lavoro era affidato alla forza dell’uomo e dei cavalli da traino usando corde e carrucole. (dalla collezione della Biblioteca del Congresso)

IL SARCASMO

Lo shantyman gioca sulle parole e prende in giro Billy il comandante della nave, il grado di “master” è accostato a quello di un “dancing master“, ma sicuramente capitano è un tipaccio rude e autoritario e non certo un damerino!
Il termine “master” è tuttavia poco usato nelle sea songs nelle quali prevale il nome di “Captain” o come nelle sea shanty quello più colloquiale di “Old man“. Che dire poi dei poco casti pensieri che vengono in mente all’equipaggio, rivolti alla moglie (o figlia) di Billy Riley, mentre stivano il carico nella nave ?

Assassin’s Creed


Old Billy Riley was a dancing master(1).
Old Billy Riley, oh, Old Billy Riley!
Old Billy Riley’s master of a drogher(2).
Master of a drogher bound for Antigua.
Old Billy Riley has a nice young daughter(3).
Oh Missy Riley, little Missy Riley.
Had a pretty daughter,
but we can’t get at her.
Screw her up(4) and away we go, boys.
One more pull and then belay, boys
Traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
Il vecchio Billy Riley era un insegnante di ballo(1)
(vecchio Billy Riley, vecchio Billy Riley!)
Il vecchio Billy Riley è il capitano di un drogher(2)
Capitano di un drogher in partenza per Antigua.
Il vecchio Billy Riley ha una bella e giovane figlia(3).
Oh Signorina Riley, Signorinella Riley.
Ha una bella figlia, ma noi non possiamo avvicinarci.
Stiviamola(4) e poi andiamocene
Ancora un tiro e poi lasciate, ragazzi.

Johnny Collins


Oh Billy Riley, Mister Billy Riley
Oh Billy Riley oh
Billy Riley, Mister Billy Riley
Oh Billy Riley oh
Old Billy Riley was a dancing master(1).
Oh Billy Riley shipped aboard a droger(2)
Oh Billy Riley wed the skipper’s daughter(3)
Oh Mrs Riley didn’t like sailors
Oh Mrs Riley had a lovely daughter
Oh Missy Riley, pretty Missy Riley
Oh Missy Riley, screw her up to Chile(4)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Oh Billy Riley, Signor Billy Riley
(Oh Billy Riley oh)
Oh Billy Riley, Signor Billy Riley
(Oh Billy Riley oh)

Il vecchio Billy Riley era un insegnante di ballo(1)
Il vecchio Billy Riley si imbarcò su di un drogher(2)
Oh Billy Riley si sposò la figlia del capitano(3).
Oh la Signora Riley non ama i marinai
Oh la Signora Riley aveva una bella figlia,
Oh signorina Riley, bella signorina Riley.
Oh signorina Riley, stiviamola(4) in fretta

NOTE
Droger1) riferito al capitano in senso ironico
2) drogher era un’imbarcazione lenta da carico per trasporti lungo la costa delle Indie Occidentali, più propriamente una barca da pesca a vela triangolare. Più in generale le Indie Occidentali per gli europei del XV secolo erano un tutt’uno con il continente americano perchè si supponeva che viaggiando verso occidente si raggiungesse India e Cina, così anche se nel 1507 Amerigo Vespucci intuì che gli Europei avevano “scoperto” un nuovo continente il termine rimase in uso per molti secoli. Così il drogher del testo si trova nei Caraibi e salpa per Antigua isola delle Piccole Antille dove si produce canna da zucchero e cotone. Credo che il termine sia usato in senso dispregiativo sempre nei confronti del comandante perchè la sua non è propriamente una nave che solca gli oceani!!
3) droger- daughter giochi di parole per assonanza che si perdono nella traduzione in italiano
4) “screw her up to Chile” un modegreen per “screw her up so cheerily”? Cheerily è una tipica espressione marinaresca per “with a will” o “quickly.” La parola screw sebbene a doppio senso ha il significato primario di “stivare”, con il significato di “tighten up” (comprimere). Si usavano degli enormi martinetti orizzontali.  Stan Hugill dice: “”Si usavano i martinetti per comprimere il cotone nelle stive delle navi, per pigiarle ben strette e quindi metterne di più nella stiva.”

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

Sia Sharp che Terry commentano di non aver trovato nessuna versione diversa da quella di Short – sebbene Fox-Smith e Colcord (che hanno pubblicato in seguito) danno entrambe le versioni. Hugill nota la “notevole somiglianza tra Billy Riley e Tiddy High O!” E ritiene che “probabilmente nasce come una cotton-hoosiers song”. Forse era una vecchia sea shanty sempre meno usata, perchè Fox-Smith afferma: “Mi sono imbattuto in pochissime generazioni di marinai più giovani che l’hanno ascoltata.” Tutte le versioni sembrano abbastanza coerenti e le parole che ci sono nel testo di Short si adattano al solito schema e sono state estese dalle altre fonti. Gli appunti di Sharp, dopo il testo, dicono: “e così via, a volte variando ’walk him up so cheer’ly’ con ‘screw him up ecc.” (da qui)


Oh Billy Riley, little Billy Riley
(Oh Billy Riley oh)
Oh  Billy Riley walk her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley, little Billy Riley
Oh  Billy Riley screw her up so cheerily
Oh Mister Riley, oh Missy Riley.
Oh Missy Riley screw her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley was a boardinghouse master
Oh Billy Riley had a lovely daughter
Oh Missy Riley how I love your daughter
Oh Missy Riley I can’t get at her
Oh Missy Riley, little Missy Riley
Oh Missy Riley, screw her up so cheerily
Oh Billy Riley hauling and hung together
Oh  Billy Riley walk her up so cheerily
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Oh Billy Riley, piccolo Billy Riley
Oh Billy Riley oh
Oh Billy Riley si avvicina a lei in fretta
Oh Billy Riley, piccolo Billy Riley
Oh  Billy Riley stiviamola in fretta
Oh Signor Riley  e Signorina Riley
Oh Signorina Riley stiviamola in fretta
Oh Billy Riley era tenutario della casa del marinaio
Oh Billy Riley aveva una bella figlia,
Oh Signorina Riley quanto amo vostra figlia
Oh Signorina Riley non mi ci posso avvicinare.
Oh Signorina Riley, signorinella Riley
Oh Signorina Riley stiviamola in fretta
Oh Billy Riley tiriamo e appendiamoci insieme
Oh Billy Riley si avvicina a lei in fretta

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/oldbillyriley.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46593 http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=92