Archivi tag: John Renbourn Group

(Mer)Maid on the Shore

Leggi in italiano

A fertile vein of the European balladry tradition that has its roots in the Middle Ages, is the so-called “girl on the beach”; Riccardo Venturi summarizes the commonplace “solitary girl who walks on the shores of the sea – coming ship – commander or sailor who calls her on board – girl who embarks on her own will – rethinking and remorse – thoughts at the maternal / conjugal house – drama that takes place (in various ways)
In the “warning ballads” the good girls are warned not to fantasise, to stay in their place (next to the fireplace to crank out delicious treats and children) and not to venture into “male roles”, otherwise they will end dishonored or raped or killed. Better then the more or less golden cage that is already known, rather than free flight.
Every now and then, however, the girl manages to triumph with cunning, over the male cravings, so in the “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” she turns herself into a predator!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

MAIDEN IN THE SHORE

It is a mermaid, which the captain sees on a moonlit night, who is walking along the beach (it is well known that selkies and sirens can walk with human feet on full moon nights). Immediately he falls in love and sends a boat to carry her on his ship (by hook or by crook), but as soon as she sings, she casts a spell on the whole crew.
And here the fantastic and magical theme ends: the girl takes all gold and silver and returns to her beach, far from being a fragile and helpless creature, so also her looting the treasures recalls the topos of the siren that collects the glistening things from ships (after having caused shipwreck and death) to “furnish” his cave!
(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson in his “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifies “Fair Maid on the Shore” as a variant of Broomfield Hill (Child # 43), the ballad was found more rarely in Ireland (where it is assumed to be original) and more widely in America (and in particular in Canada). Thus reports Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3) “More commonly found in the North-eastern United States, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland is a curious marine adaptation of the story in which the knight of the Broomfield Hill is transformed into an amorous sea-captain. The young woman on whom he has designs succeeds in preserving her chastity by singing her would-be lover to sleep.”

A.L. Lloyd sang The Maid on the Shore in his album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) and commented in the notes “As the song comes to us, it is the bouncing ballad of a girl too smart for a lecherous sea captain. But a scrap of the ballad as sung in Ireland hints at something sinister behind the gay recital. For there, the girl is a mermaid or siren.

I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”

NOTES
having transcribed the text directly from listening, there are some words that escape me (and that for a mother-tongue are very clear!) Any additions are welcome !
1)  the verse is used as a refrain on the call and response scheme typical of the sea shanty
2) the captain promises a substantial reward to his sailors
3) in other more explicit versions the cabin boy is sent to show rings and other precious jewels, asking her to get on board to admiring ones more beautiful
4) in a more cruel version the captain threatens to give the girl to his crew, if she will not be nice to him
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) It is missing
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

In the Scandinavian versions of the story the girl is first enticed with flattery on board the ship and then kidnapped, in the French version L ‘Epee Liberatrice she is a princess who gets on the ship because she wants to learn the song sung by the young cabin boy: she falls asleep and when she wakes up she discovers to be on the high seas, she asks a sailor for a sword and kills herself, the Italian version (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) follows a similar story, but it is only the Irish version that dwells on the magic song of the siren.

The ballad has many interpreters mostly in the folk or folk-rock field.

Stan Rogers from Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group from The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy from Rough Music, 2005

The Once from The Once 2009

I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore

NOTES
The textual version of the John Renbourn group differs slightly from Stan’s version
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) or Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) in the version of Renbourn the sentence is clearer, it is the pains of love that the captain tries to alleviate by rape the girl!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas from “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997)

I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”

NOTES
1) the sentence would make more sense if it were instead “to calm his restless mind”
2) the reference to the good weather is not accidental, in fact the sighting of a siren was synonymous with the approach of a storm
3) that is having a good time with a presumably virgin
4) the woman is not just a thief but a fairy creature that steals the health of the sailors

LINK
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp

THE PLAINS OF WATERLOO

Una ballata tradizionale che viene dall’Ottocento e si riferisce alla disfatta di Walterloo dove è crollato il mito di Napoleone (e il nome Waterloo si è stampato nelle memoria collettiva come sinonimo di batosta da cui non ci si risolleva più). La canzone “The Plains of Waterloo” era cantata negli anni 70 in tutti i Folk clubs in America e nelle Isole Britanniche spesso con la sola voce (e June Tabor la registra così nel suo album d’esordio).

APSLEY HOUSE "The Battle of Waterloo, 1815" painted in 1843 by Sir William ALLAN (1782-1850). WM 1539-1948
APSLEY HOUSE “The Battle of Waterloo, 1815” dipinta nel 1843 da Sir William ALLAN (1782-1850). WM 1539-1948

Le note di Frank Harte (in “..and Listen to my song”, 1975):
This is a song that lay dormant for years, I heard it first sung at a flead in Ballyfarnon, the singer had heard it in England. I have since discovered that it was found by a collector in Ottawa where it was sung by Mr. O.J. Abbott who is eighty five years of age, he in turn many years ago learned it from a Mrs. O’Malley. The song must be Irish in origin, the air is a version of the older song ‘The Blackbird’ which was the allegorical name for the Young Pretender Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the story is very similar to the song sung by Margaret Barry ‘The Mantle So Green’ where the woman says to her hero (Willie O Reilly and not Willie Smith as in the Canadian version)
‘To the woods I will wander to shun all men’s view,
For the lad that I love fell in famed Waterloo.’
or when he reveals that he is indeed her true love
‘Now Peace is proclaimed and the truth I declare,
Here is your love token the gold ring I wear.’
Later on I came across a reference to it in Sam Henry’s collection Volume Two, where underneath song number 619 The Lakes of Pontchartrain he asks ‘Can any reader supply the complete words of the song beginning’ and he gives only the first verse of this song, for myself I can only be grateful that somebody has at last come up with the rest of the words.” (tratto da qui)

E ancora su Mudcat si citano le note dal ‘The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs’ (a cura di E. Fowke):
“This fine version of the broken ring story seems to be best known in Canada. Dr. Mackenzie, the first to report it (183). suggests that it is a modified version of ‘The Mantle So Green’ (N 38), which in its turn is a modified version of the eighteenth century ‘George Reilly’ (N 36). Creighton found three more versions in Nova Scotia(MFS 56 and Folkways FEE 4307); Greenleaf (172) and Peacock (1014) found it in Newfoundland; Leach in Labrador (172); Creighton in New Brunswick (FSNB 76); and I have two other versions from Ontario.” (tratto da qui)

WILLIE E ANNIE

di Riccardo Venturi
Le ballate popolari autentiche si dividono fondamentalmente in due categorie: quelle che finiscono bene e quelle che finiscono male. Le seconde, va detto, sono in nettissima maggioranza: poiché le composizioni popolari raccontano drammi e catastrofi, l’unhappy end è praticamente ovvio. The Plains of Waterloo, invece, finisce bene; non possiamo che rallegrarcene, anche perché Waterloo fu una carneficina immane, e tornarvi non dev’essere stato per nulla semplice per i poveri soldati che vi combatterono.

The Plains of Waterloo ha, come è logico attendersi, una struttura musicale da marcia militare. Comincia ad essere nota non molto dopo la battaglia (circa dieci anni dopo), segno che il processo di composizione popolare fu parecchio rapido dopo quell’avvenimento che segnò per sempre la storia d’Europa (e del mondo). La storia riprende tutti gli stilemi classici delle ballads: il soldato superstite (dal solito nome convenzionale di Willie) torna, incontra la sua fidanzata (dall’altrettanto convenzionale nome di Annie) che -naturalmente- non lo riconosce e lei gli chiede notizie.
Credete forse che il giovane si butti immediatamente tra le braccia dell’amata? Nelle ballate tradizionali non funziona così. Le ballate sono storie narrate, e le storie hanno bisogno di suspence. Comincia quindi una “tiritera” presente letteralmente in decine di ballate del genere “soldato-che-torna-dalla-guerra”: il giovane, piuttosto crudelmente, finge di essere un altro, le dice che aveva conosciuto bene il suo Willie e le racconta le sue eroiche gesta. Chiaro che alla ragazza non gliene può importare di meno, delle gesta eroiche; quello che vuole è il suo Willie vivo, e questo ci ricorda da vicino certe parole di Fabrizio de André (“ma lei che lo amava aspettava il ritorno di un soldato vivo, di un eroe morto che ne farà?”). E il tizio dice alla ragazza, appunto, che Willie è morto.
Immaginatevi la scena, anche se la cosa ha una sua precisa valenza: il giovane vuole, con questo, anche “controllare” se la ragazza lo ama ancora, osservando la sua reazione alla triste notizia. Per quanto sia difficile da credere, esistono ballate in cui la ragazza, che nel frattempo si è messa con un altro, è tutta contenta di apprendere che il fidanzato è stato fatto a fette in battaglia. Non è il caso della nostra Annie: le sue rosy cheeks impallidiscono e, sicuramente, sta per pigliarle un coccolone, una di quelle morti subitanee tipiche delle ballate.
Verificato l’amore di Annie e temendo che schiànti lì sul posto, Willie finalmente si rivela; appena in tempo. Si fa riconoscere facendo vedere a Annie la metà dell’anello, e tutti vissero -si spera- felici e contenti sotto la Restaurazione. La ballata si chiude infatti con un preciso intento antiwar: mai più Willie combatterà nella piana di Waterloo. Magari da qualche altra parte, ma a Waterloo no.

Sto trattando un po’ a pesci in faccia questa bellissima e venerabile ballata? Ma no; gli è che con le ballads britanniche ho una frequentazione e una consuetudine antiche quasi quanto la battaglia di Waterloo. So come funzionano, e mi permetto a volte di prenderle un po’ in giro perché l’ironia su qualcosa che si ama profondamente è un supremo segno di affetto. Resta il fatto che, quando parlano di guerra e di battaglie, le composizioni popolari sono quanto di meno patriottico e guerrafondaio possa esistere; importa tornare vivi e fare la propria povera vita accanto a chi si ama. Il resto non conta niente; e, in fondo, il ballad commonplace di Willie che non si rivela e che enuncia le gesta eroiche è fatto apposta per istigare in chi ascolta la più assoluta indifferenza verso di esse. Quello che contava, e che conterà sempre, è tornare a casa. E’ questo che la gente voleva sentire, magari anche coloro che un fidanzato, un marito, un padre o un fratello non lo avevano visto tornare affatto.

ASCOLTA June Tabor  in  Airs and Graces 1976
Nelle note scrive “From Ontario; learned from Martin Clarke of Leeds. The broken token ballad seems to me to have been a necessary piece of wishful thinking, an act of faith on the part of both the faraway soldier and the girl he left behind him. Reality, more often than not, was cruelly otherwise.”

ASCOLTA John Renbourn Group in The Enchanted Garden 1977 (con il tema portato da una marcetta di pifferi e tamburi quanto mai appropriata)

ASCOLTA Kate Rusby and Kathryn Roberts (1995)


I
One fine summer’s morning
as I went a-walking
All down by the banks
of some clear-flowing stream
There I spied a fair maiden
making sad lamentation
And I drew myself in ambush
for to hear her sad complaint
Through the woods she marched along, made the valleys to ring oh
While the small feathered songsters
around her head they flew
Saying, The war it is all over
and peace is returning
But my Willie’s not returning
from the plains of Waterloo
II
I approached this young maiden
and I said, My fond creature
May I make enquiry as to
what’s your true love’s name?
For I have been in battle
where the loud cannons rattle
And by his description well
I think I know the same
Willie Reilly’s my love’s name,
he’s a hero of great fame
Although he’s gone and left me
in sorrow now ‘tis true
And no man will me enjoy
but my own darling boy
Although he’s not returning
from the plains of Waterloo
III
If Willie Reilly’s your love’s name
then he’s a hero of great fame
He and I have been in battle
through many a long campaign
Through Italy and Russia,
through Germany and Prussia
He was my loyal comrade
in France and in Spain
But alas there at length
by the French we were surrounded
And like heroes of old
we did them subdue
We fought for three days
till at last we defeated him
That bold Napoleon Boney
on the plains of Waterloo
IV
On the fourteenth of June
it be an end in the battle
Leaving many a gallant hero
in sorrow to complain
Where the drums they do beat
and the loud cannons rattle
‘Twas by a Frenchman’s bullet
your young Willie he was slain
And as I drew near to the spot
where he lay bleeding
Scarcely had I time
for to bid him adieu
And as he lay dying these words
he kept repeating
Farewell my lovely Annie
you are far from Waterloo
V
When this maiden she heard
all this sad declaration
Her red rosy cheeks they grew
pale and woeful wan
And when he heard the sound
of her sad lamentations
He drew her in his arms
and said, I am your loving one
Oh see here is the ring
that between us was broken
In the midst of all danger
it reminded me of you
And now this young couple
well they are reunited
No more will Willie battle
on the plains of Waterloo
TRADUZIONE Riccardo Venturi
I
Una bella mattina d’estate,
mentre passeggiavo
giù sulle rive di un fiume
che scorreva limpido
Vidi una bella fanciulla
che si lamentava tristemente
E allora mi nascosi
per ascoltare i suoi tristi lamenti.
Camminava per i boschi,
faceva risuonar le valli
Con la testa attorniata da uccelletti che cantavano;
E diceva: “La guerra è finita
e la pace sta tornando,
Ma il mio Willie non ritorna dalla piana di Waterloo.”
II
Andai verso la fanciulla
e le dissi: “Mia dolce creatura,
Posso chiederti per caso come si chiama il tuo amore?
Ché son stato alla battaglia
dove i cannoni rombavan forte
E dalla sua descrizione, beh,
penso di conoscerti.”
“Willie Reilly è il suo nome,
è un eroe di grande fama
Però è partito e mi ha lasciata
in gran pena, questo è vero;
E nessun uomo mi avrà
tranne il mio adorato ragazzo
Anche se lui non ritorna
dalla piana di Waterloo.”
III
“Se il tuo amore è Willie Reilly,
è un eroe di grande fama,
Sono stato assieme a lui in battaglia
in molte lunghe campagne
Per l’Italia e per la Russia,
la Germania e poi la Prussia,
Mio compagno fu fedele
anche in Francia ed in Spagna.
Ma, ohimè! A lungo andare
i francesi ci han circondati
E come eroi consumati
noi li abbiamo soggiogati
Combattemmo per tre giorni finché non lo abbiam battuto,
Quel prode Napoleone il Bòna,
sulla piana di Waterloo.”
IV
Il quattordici di giugno (*)
la battaglia terminò
Lasciando molti bravi eroi
a lamentarsi dal dolore;
Là dove i tamburi rullano
e i cannoni romban forte
Una pallottola francese
ha ucciso il tuo giovane Willie.
E io andai là verso dove
lui giaceva insanguinato
E poi ebbi appena il tempo di dargli l’estremo addio;
E giacendo là morente
ripeteva queste parole:
Addio mia amata Annie,
sei lontana da Waterloo.”
V
Quando la fanciulla udì
questa triste narrazione
Le sue guance impallidirono diventando esangui a morte;
E quando lui sentì il suono
dei suoi tristi lamenti
La prese tra le braccia
e disse: “Ma sono io il tuo amore!
Guarda, ecco l’anello
che ce lo siamo spezzato in due,
In mezzo a ogni pericolo
mi faceva pensare a te!”
E ora questa giovane coppia,
beh, è di nuovo insieme
E Willie non combatterà più
sulla piana di Waterloo.

NOTE
(*)La battaglia si svolse in realtà il 18 giugno 1815

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/plainsofwaterloo.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/theeighteenthdayofjune.html

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1263
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=39528

THE MAID ON THE SHORE IS IT A MERMAID?

Read the post in English

Un filone fecondo della tradizione ballatistica europea che affonda le sue radici nel medioevo, è quello cosiddetto della “fanciulla sulla spiaggia”;  Riccardo Venturi riassume il commonplace in modo puntuale  “fanciulla solitaria che passeggia sulle rive del mare – nave che arriva – comandante o marinaio che la richiama a bordo – fanciulla che s’imbarca di spontanea volontà – ripensamento e rimorso – pensieri alla casa materna / coniugale – dramma che si compie (in vari modi)
Nelle “warning ballads” si ammoniscono le brave fanciulle a non mettersi grilli per il capo,  a stare al loro posto (accanto al focolare a sfornare manicaretti e bambini) e a non avventurarsi in “ruoli maschili”, altrimenti finiranno disonorate o stuprate o uccise. Meglio quindi la gabbia più o meno dorata che già si conosce piuttosto che il volo libero.
Ogni tanto però la fanciulla riesce a trionfare con l’astuzia, sulle prepotenti voglie maschili, cosi nella “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” si trasforma lei stessa in predatrice!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

LA SIRENA SULLA SPIAGGIA

E’ una sirena, che il capitano vede in una notte di luna, camminare lungo la spiaggia (è risaputo che selkie e sirene possono camminare con piedi umani nelle notti di luna piena). Subito s’invaghisce e manda una scialuppa per portare la fanciulla sulla sua nave (con le buone o con le cattive), ma appena lei canta, getta un incantesimo su tutto l’equipaggio.
E qui finisce il tema fantastico e magico: la fanciulla si prende tutti gli oggetti di valore e l’oro e l’argento e ritorna alla sua spiaggia, ben lungi dall’essere una creatura fragile e indifesa, così anche il suo depredare i tesori richiama il topos della sirena che raccoglie le cose luccicose dalle navi (dopo averne causato naufragio e  morte) per “arredare” la sua grotta!(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson nel suo “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifica “Fair Maid on the Shore” come una variante di Broomfield Hill (Child #43), la ballata è stata trovata più raramente in Irlanda (dove si presume sia originaria) e più diffusamente in America (e in particolare in Canada). Così riporta Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3): “Più comunemente trovato negli Stati Uniti nord-orientali, Nuova Scozia e Terranova è un curioso adattamento marino della storia in cui il cavaliere di Broomfield Hill viene trasformato in un galante capitano di mare. La giovane donna su cui si è fatto un pensierino, riesce a preservare la sua castità cantando al suo aspirante amante e addormentandolo”

A.L. Lloyd canta The Maid on the Shore nell’album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) e commenta “Così come la canzone arriva a noi, è la ballata  di una ragazza troppo intelligente per un capitano di mare vizioso. Ma una versione della ballata come cantata in Irlanda suggerisce qualcosa di sinistro dietro al racconto scanzonato. Perchè la ragazza è una Sirena o una donna del Mare.”


I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Si narra di un capitano che navigava in alto mare
e i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
e una bellissima fanciulla gli capitò di vedere
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia
II
Quello che vi darò miei marinai
..
se mi porterete quella ragazza a bordo della nave
che cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia, cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia.
III
Così i marinai presero la loro
scialuppa
e verso riva manovrarono-o
dicono “Madama, vi preghiamo di salire a bordo per ammirare un carico di bella merce,
ammirare un carico di bella merce
IV
Con molte chiacchiere la presero a bordo,
i mari erano sereni, calmi e
chiari-o
lei si sedette a  poppa della scialuppa
e indietro verso la nave loro manovrarono,
indietro verso la nave manovrarono.
V
E quando arrivarono al fianco della nave
il capitano ordina il suo tabacco da masticare e dice “Per prima cosa dormirai con me tutta la notte
e forse ti sposerò, cara
forse ti sposerò”
VI
Lei si sedette a  poppa della
nave
i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
lei cantò in modo puro, dolce e perfetto;
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano.
VII
Li derubò dell’argento, li derubò dell’oro,
li derubò della loro preziosa mercanzia
e la luccicante spada del capitano prese come remo
e remò via verso la terra,
remò via verso la terra.
VIII
E quando si svegliò e scoprì che lei se n’era andata
sembrava un uomo disperato
..
“Sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
avendo trascritto il testo direttamente dall’ascolto, ci sono alcune parole che mi sfuggono (e che per un madre-lingua sono invece chiarissime! sono benvenute le integrazioni)
1) il verso è utilizzato come un ritornello sullo schema botta e risposta tipico delle sea shanty
2) il capitano promette una sostanziosa ricompensa ai marinai, ma non capisco la pronuncia
3) in altre versioni più esplicite si manda il giovane mozzo a mostrare alla ragazza anelli e altri gioielli preziosi, chiedendole di salire a bordo per poter ammirarne di ancora più belli
4) in una versione più crudele il capitano minaccia di dare la ragazza in pasto alla sua ciurma, se non sarà carina con lui
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) Manca la strofa in cui la fanciulla tira fuori la sua spavalderia
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

Nelle versioni scandinave della storia la fanciulla viene prima allettata con lusinghe a bordo della nave e quindi rapita, nella versione francese L’ Epee Liberatrice è una principessa che sale sulla nave perchè vuole imparare la canzone cantata dal giovane mozzo: si addormenta e quando si sveglia scopre di essere in alto mare, chiede a un marinaio una spada e si uccide, la versione italiana (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) segue una storia simile, ma è la versione irlandese che si sofferma sul canto magico della sirena.

La ballata  ha molti interpreti per lo più di ambito folk o folk-rock

Stan Rogers in Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group in The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy in Rough Music, 2005 che la restituisce come una sea shanty per sole voci a “chiamata e risposta”

The Once in The Once 2009


I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una giovane fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia- o
e non trovava niente con cui confortare il suo animo,
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia
II
C’era un giovane capitano
che salpò sull’oceano,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire
– gridava il giovane capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
III
Ho tanto argento
ho tanto oro,
ho tante cose preziose
che dividerò, dividerò
con la mia ciurma
se mi porteranno quella fanciulla
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …”
IV
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portarono a bordo
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
la sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
per fargli dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni.
V
La sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
Era così bella e pura,
dolce e ben fatta e
cantò per far addormentare il capitano e i marinai.
VI
Allora lo derubò dell’argento
lo derubò dell’oro
lo derubò delle cose preziose,
usò il suo spadone
come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
VII
“Oh i miei uomini sono furiosi
i miei uomini sono arrabbiati
i miei uomini sono sprofondati nella disperazione più cupa
perchè sei fuggita da una cabina così allegra e hai vogato per ritornare alla spiaggia”.
VIII
“I tuoi uomini han poco da essere furiosi e arrabbiati
I tuoi uomini han poco da essere disperati, ho beffato i tuoi marinai e anche te
e sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
La versione testuale del John Renbourn group differisce di poco dalla versione di Stan
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) oppure Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) nella versione di Renbourn la frase è più chiara, sono le pene d’amore che il capitano cerca di alleviare stuprando la fanciulla!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas in “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997) (la recensione dell’album qui)


I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una bella fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia
e non trovava nessuno con cui placare il suo animo sereno
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia.
II
C’era un coraggioso capitano
che salpò su una bella nave,
e il tempo era stabile e bello
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire* – gridava questo egregio capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia spiaggia,
se non posso avere quella fanciulla ”
III
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portano a bordo,
la fece sedere accanto alla propria sedia e la invitò nella sua cabina,
per dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni
IV
“Ti canterò una canzone ”
– gridò questa bella fanciulla.
Il capitano stava piangendo per la gioia, lei cantò così amabilmente, così dolcemente,
cantò per addormentare il capitano e i marinai, per addormentare il capitano e i marinai
V
Li derubò dei gioielli,
li derubò della salute ,
li derubò del cibo raffinato e costoso, usò lo spadone del capitano come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
e vogò per ritornare sulla spiaggia.
VI
Oh gli uomini divennero pazzi
e gli uomini divennero tristi, sprofondarono nella disperazione più cupa
nel vederla andarsene tutta contenta con la refurtiva,
gli anelli e le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato,
gli anelli le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato.
VII
“Non siate così tristi e affranti dalla disperazione,
avreste dovuto riconoscermi prima, cantai per farvi addormentare e vi rubai la salute
e adesso sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia, spiaggia
di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
1) la frase avrebbe più senso se fosse invece “per placare il suo animo inquieto”
2) il riferimento al bel tempo non è casuale, infatti l’avvistamento di una sirena era sinonimo dell’avvicinarsi di una tempesta
3) ovvero per sollazzarsi con la fanciulla (presumibilmente vergine)
4) la donna non è solo una ladra ma una creatura fatata che ruba la salute dei marinai

FONTI
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp

LADY MARY ANN: THE TREES THEY DO GROW HIGH

daily-growingNella sua versione standard la ballata ha come protagonista Lady Mary Ann la quale è stata data in sposa ad un ragazzino essendo la pratica del matrimonio tra fanciulli e adulti una prassi dei tempi antichi. Più diffusa la casistica di uomini maturi, per non dire vecchi, con spose-bambine, ma non insoliti anche gli abbinamenti all’inverso (con donne comunque ancora in età fertile)
La ballata risale quantomeno al 1600 ed è conosciuta con vari titoli come “Lady Mary Ann“, “The College Boy” oppure “Long-A-Growing“, “Daily Growing” e anche “Bonny Boy is Young (But Growing)“. Forse di origine scozzese potrebbe riferirsi ad una storia vera quella del matrimonio tra il figlio (o il nipote) di Lord John Urquhart di Craighton, Craigston o Craiginstray (morto pochi anni dopo il matrimonio nel novembre del 1634) e Elizabeth Innes. Così scrive A.L. Lloyd: “A ballad common all over the British Isles. Scottish, Irish and English versions resemble each other in text but not always in tune. In Irish sets, the young lovers are of more respectable age. There is a story that the ballad was made after the death in 1634 of the juvenile laird of Craigton who married a girl some years older than himself, and died within a short time. In fact, the song is probably older, and may have originated in the Middle Ages when the joining of two family fortunes by child-marriage was not ununsual.”

THE TREES GROW HIGH

La bellezza e la complessità della storia narrata risiede nei continui “flash-back” tra una strofa e l’altra in cui la protagonista davanti alla tomba del marito, mentre anno dopo anno osserva crescere gli alberi: ricorda di come un tempo si fosse opposta al loro matrimonio spaventata dalla troppo giovane età di lui, ma avesse ceduto all’amore per il suo sposo fanciullo. L’amarezza del ricordo e la solitudine della donna si stemperano nella visione del nuovo bambino che sta crescendo al posto del padre!

VERSIONE SCOZZESE: LADY MARY ANN

Robert Burns prese dalla collezione di ballate scozzesi di David Herd le prime due strofe e ci scrisse una canzone intitolandola “Lady Mary Ann” (SMM 1792). Per l’ascolto ho selezionato la melodia abbinata da Robert Burns nello “Scots Music Museum” e quella dalla tradizione orale raccolta sul campo

ASCOLTA Billy Ross

ASCOLTA Lizzie Ann Higgins. Lizzie spiega nella registrazione che ha imparato il testo dalla zia di suo padre, ma la melodia è stata abbinata su suggerimento del padre Donald Higgins suonatore di cornamusa, con un brano dal titolo ‘Mrs MacDonald of Dunacht’ composto un centinaio d’anni prima da J.R. McColl di Oban


I
O, Lady Mary Ann looks o’er the Castle wa’,
She saw three bonie boys playing at the ba’,
The youngest he was the flower amang them a’
My bonie laddie’s young, but he’s growin yet!
II
‘ O father, O father, an ye think it fit,
We’ll send him a year to the college yet;
We’ll sew a green ribbon round about his hat,
And that will let them ken he’s to marry yet!’
III
Lady Mary Ann was a flower in the dew,/Sweet was its smell and bonie was its hue,
And the longer it blossom’d the sweeter it grew,/For the lily in the bud will be bonier yet.
IV
Young Charlie Cochran was the sprout of an aik;
Bonie and bloomin and straucht was its make;
The sun took delight to shine for its sake,/And it will be the brag o’ the forest yet.
V
The simmer is gane when the leaves they were green,
And the days are awa that we hae seen;
But far better days I trust will come again./For my bonie laddie’s young, but he’s growin yet.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Oh, Lady Mary Ann guarda dalle mura del castello (1)
e vede tre bei fanciulli giocare a palla (2),
il più giovane era il più bel fiore tra di loro
“Il mio bel ragazzo è giovane, ma crescerà”
II
“Oh padre, padre, se credi sia opportuno,
lo manderemo un anno all’Università (3);
cuciremo un nastro verde sul suo cappello (4)
per far sapere a tutti che è fidanzato”
III
Lady Mary Ann era un fiore turgido,
dolce era il suo profumo e bello era il suo colorito,
e più sbocciava più bella diventava,
come un giglio in boccio sarà più bello in fiore.
IV
Il giovane Charlie Cochran era il germoglio di una quercia,
b
ello, florido e dritto si faceva,
il sole si compiaceva di brillare per il suo bene,
e sarebbe stato il vanto di tutta la foresta
V
“L’estate è passata da quando le foglie erano verdi
e i giorni che sono stati sono lontani,
ma giorni di gran lunga migliori sono certa verranno
perchè il mio bel ragazzo (5) è giovane, ma crescerà”

NOTE
1) La tenuta di Craystoun o Craigston è stata acquisita da John Urquhart di Craigston Castle, Turriff, Aberdeenshire che costruì il castello nel 1604-1607
2) il gioco della palla è un commonplace delle ballate britanniche continua
3) il college poteva essere il King’s College di Aberdeen, università fondata nel 1495 (la terza di Scozia dopo Glasgow e St Andrews, Fife)
4) un’usanza prematrimoniale tipica in Gran Bretagna: con il codice dei corori si indicava il promesso sposo, e tuttavia i nastri variano colore a seconda delle versioni della ballata sono blu, verdi o bianchi
5) in questa versione di Burns non è esplicitamente menzionata la morte del giovane marito. Lady Mary Ann potrà vedere il marito diventare l’uomo atteso e sognato nel figlio che cresce giorno dopo giorno.

VERSIONE INGLESE: THE TREES THEY DO GROW HIGH

La versione è stata ripresa nel folk revival degli anni 60 da molti artisti tra cui Joan Baez che ha fatto scuola per le versioni successive. Per l’ascolto ho selezionato interpretazioni che girano sostanzialmente sulla stessa melodia. Ma le versioni melodiche e testuali della ballata sono molteplici, così come tantissimi gli artisti di grosso calibro che l’hanno registrata!

ASCOLTA Pentangle in Sweet Child, 1968 altra versione diventata standard

ASCOLTA Donovan live “Young but growing” la stessa melodia cantata con un pizzico di swing: la trovo una interpretazione molto intensa per nella sua essenzialità

ASCOLTA Alan Stivell in “A L’Olympia” 1971; in duo Alan Stivell (che canta in inglese) e Angelo Branduardi (che canta in francese) Les arbres ont grandi (per il testo qui) per l’album in francese “Confession d’un malandrin” (1981)

ASCOLTA John Renbourn Group in ‘The John Renbourn Group Live In America‘ 2005

ASCOLTA Altan Daily Growing in “The Blue Idol” 2002 con Mairéad che canta in duetto con  Paul Brady, una versione perfetta

ASCOLTA Shannon 2013 interessante arrangiamento vocale che riprende la versione di Donovan


ASCOLTA Simon Fowler in Merrymouth 2012 con una seconda melodia più “moderna” (strofe I, II, VII con lievi variazioni nei versi)


I
The trees they grow high,and the leaves they do grow green
Many is the time my true love I’ve seen
Many an hour I have watched him all alone
He’s young, but he’s daily growing
II
Father, dear father, you’ve done me great wrong
You have married me to a boy who is too young
I’m twice twelve and he is but fourteen
III
Daughter, dear daughter, I’ve done you no wrong
I have married you to a great lord’s son
He’ll be a man for you when I am dead and gone
IV
Father, dear father, if you see fit
We’ll send my love to college for another year yet
I’ll tie blue ribbons all around his head
To let the ladies know that he’s married
V
One day I was looking o’er my father’s castle wall
I spied all the boys playing at the ball
My own true love was the flower of them all
[VI
And so early in the morning at the dawning of the day
They went into a hayfield for to have some sport and play
And what they did there she never would declare/But she never more complained of his growing]
VII
At the age of fourteen, he was a married man
At the age of fifteen, the father of a son
At the age of sixteen, on his grave the grass was green
Cruel death had put an end to his growing
VIII
I’ll make my love a shroud of holland so fine
Every stitch I put in it the tears come trickling down
Once I had a true love but now I’ve ne’er one
But I’ll watch o’er his son while he’s growing..
Traduzione Alberto Truffi*
I
Gli alberi sono alti e le foglie crescono verdi, tanto tempo [è passato] da quando ho visto il mio vero amore, tante le ore da quando sono stata da sola con lui (1) è giovane, ma sta crescendo giorno dopo giorno
II
“Padre, caro padre mi hai fatto un grande torto
mi hai fatto sposare un ragazzo troppo giovane, io ho ventiquattro anni e lui ne ha appena quattordici (2)”
III
“Figlia, mia cara figlia non ti ho fatto alcun torto
ti ho fatto sposare il figlio di un gran signore, lui sarà per te è un uomo quando io sarò morto e sepolto”
IV
“Padre, caro padre, se lo ritieni giusto
manderemo il mio amore a scuola un altro anno ancora, io legherò nastri blu attorno al suo capo per far sapere alle signore che lui è sposato (3)”
V
Un giorno stavo guardando oltre
il muro di cinta del castello di mio padre, spiavo i ragazzi che giocavano alla palla(4), il mio vero amore era un fiore (che spiccava) tra tutti
[VI (Strofa solo in Altan)
E così all’alba e al tramonto del giorno
andavano in un campo di fieno per divertirsi e giocare
e ciò che facevano là lei non volle mai dirlo
ma non si lamentò più della sua crescita]
VII
All’età di quattordici anni, era un uomo sposato
all’età di quindici anni, il padre di un bambino, all’età di sedici anni, l’erba era verde sulla sua tomba
Una morte crudele aveva posto fine alla sua vita
VIII
Farò per il mio amore un velo di tessuto di fiandra così bello (5)
Ad ogni punto che cucio mi scendono le lacrime
Un tempo avevo un vero amore, ma ora non ne ho nessuno
Ma io lo guarderò in suo figlio, mentre crescerà ..

NOTE
* tratto da Musica&Memoria tranne la VI strofa
1) Letteralmente “ho guardato lui da solo
giovane-16002) Letteralmente “due volte dodici“, il numero dodici è alla base del sistema numerico inglese tradizionale. L’età da marito del ragazzo in alcune versioni è di 13 anni, in altre (quelle irlandesi) di 17.
3) In altre versioni invece di “ladies”, è scritto “maiden”, termine che sta a indicare le ragazze da sposa.
4) probabilmente si riferisce al gioco del calcio che fin dal medioevo veniva genericamente detto “ball play” o “playing at ball”; importato dai Romani nella loro conquista della Gran Bretagna (che a loro volta lo avevano appreso dai Greci) il gioco si radica a tal punto sull’isola da diventare estremamente popolare nel Medioevo. Già nel 1400 si utilizzava la parola fote-ball (o fute-ball in Scozia) per indicare il gioco della palla praticato con i piedi per distinguerlo dalla pallamano; i numerosi divieti della pratica di questo sport (a causa della sua violenza) in tutte le epoche ne attestano il successo e la diffusione! Per tutto il Seicento fu il gioco più diffuso nelle università d’Inghilterra e Scozia.
5) Quest’ultima strofa, omessa nella versione della Baez, è quella che varia maggiormente nelle varie trascrizioni. Qui è riportata come cantata da Jacqui McShee. la versione di Altan dice “I’ll buy my love some flannel, I’ll make my love a shroud”

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span in “Now we are six” 1974. La melodia è sempre di tradizione popolare


I
As I was walking by yonder church wall/ I saw four and twenty young men a-playing at the ball/I asked for my own true love but they wouldn’t let him come/ for they said the boy was young but a-growing.
II
Father dear father you’ve done me much wrong.
you’ve tied me to a boy when you know he is too young.
but he will make a lord for you to wait upon.
and a lady you will be while he’s growing.
III
We’ll send him to college for one year or two./and maybe in time the boy will do for you.
I’ll buy you white ribbons to tie around his waist.
for to let the ladies know that he’s married.
IV
The trees they do grow high and the leaves they do grow green.
the day is passed and gone my love that you and I have seen.
it’s on a cold winter’s night that I must lie alone.
for the bonny boy is young but a-growing.
V
At the age of sixteen he was a married man./and at the age of seventeen the father to a son.
and at the age of eighteen his grave it did grow green./cruel dead had put an end to his growing.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo verso quella chiesa
vidi 24 giovani giocare al pallone,
domandai del mio vero amore, ma non lo lasciarono venire
perchè dissero che il ragazzo era giovane, ma sarebbe cresciuto
II
“Padre, caro padre mi hai fatto un grande torto
mi hai fatto sposare un ragazzo, anche se sapevi che era troppo giovane”
“Ma diventerà un Signore per te che lo aspetterai
e una Donna tu diventerai mentre lui crescerà.
III
Lo manderemo  all’Università per un anno o due
e per dargli il tempo di crescere,
ti comprerò dei nastri bianchi da
legare ai suoi fianchi
per far sapere alle signore che è sposato”
IV
Gli alberi sono diventati alti e le foglie sono diventate verdi,
tu ed io abbiamo visto passare e andare molti giorni,
è in una fredda notte d’inverno che devo stare da sola,
perchè il bel fanciullo è giovane ma crescerà.
V
All’età di 16 anni era un uomo sposato
e all’età di 17 il padre di un bambino,
all’età di 18 l’erba era verde sulla sua tomba
la morte crudele ha messo fine alla sua crescita

LA VERSIONE ITALIANA: GLI ALBERI SONO ALTI

La versione di Angelo Branduardi parte dal 1975 con il suo album d’esordio dal titolo “La luna“, ben presto andato esaurito e “rifatto” con un’altra etichetta cinque anni più tardi:  riprende l’arrangiamento di Joan Baez, ampliandolo con interessanti abbellimenti sia con la chitarra che con l’armonica; anche in questa versione la canzone gioca sul ricordo evocativo della donna che nel giovane figlio che cresce rivede il giovane sposo morto prematuramente: il testo nella sua vaghezza si presta ad una interpretazione ambigua, di un tempo circolare e ciclico in cui il figlio ricalca le orme del padre; nel ricordo della madre-moglie le due figure si fondono così il ragazzo della I strofa potrebbe benissimo essere sia il figlio che il marito della donna.

ASCOLTA Angelo Branduardi in Gulliver la luna e altri disegni 1980

I
Gli alberi sono alti, le foglie crescon verdi (1)
Da quanto tempo non vedevi il tuo amore,
da tanto, ed oggi è tornato tutto solo:
è giovane ma crescerà.
II (2)
Padre, o padre, mi hai fatto un grave torto
mi hai dato in moglie a chi è poco più di un bimbo,
ha quindici anni ed io già quasi venti:
è giovane ma crescerà.
III
Figlia, o figlia, non ti ho mai fatto torto,
ti ho dato in moglie al figlio di un signore,
il tuo bambino (3) sarà ricco e rispettato:
è giovane ma crescerà.
IV
Padre, o padre, domani sarò sola,
lo manderanno lontano un anno ancora,
e al suo ritorno avrà un figlio a lui straniero:
è giovane ma crescerà.
V (4)
Ieri al mattino seduta al tuo balcone
spiavi i ragazzi giocare per la strada,
il tuo vero amore di loro era il più bello:
è giovane ma crescerà.
VI
Un anno dopo aveva preso moglie,
il tempo passa ed è padre di un bambino,
il tempo corre ed il tuo fior sulla sua tomba:
è giovane ma crescerà.

NOTE
1) Branduardi ci dice che la donna rivede il suo amore in estate, è ritornato tutto solo, cioè morto
2)  inizia il primo flash back della donna che ricorda il dialogo avuto con il padre quando era stata costretta a sposarsi con un ragazzo, in un tipico matrimonio d’interesse,
3) concepito con il marito-bambino in una brevissima notte d’amore (il matrimonio per essere valido doveva essere consumato)
4) nelle ultime due strofe nasce l’ambiguità il ragazzo evocato è  il marito diventato padre e morto poco dopo, ma che il figlio che crescendo morirà prima della madre.

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thetreestheygrowsohigh.html
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_sweet_child.htm
http://www.folksongsyouneversang.com/essays/170-2/
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/lady_mary_ann.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/ladymaryann.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/66005/1
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LO35.html
http://www.golftoday.co.uk/history/golf_the_true_history_1.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/92.html