Archivi tag: Jean Ritchie

Cambridgeshire & Hertfordshire may day carols

Leggi in italiano

CAMBRIDGESHIRE MAY CAROL
Tune: ARISE, ARISE

The tune is known as “Arise, arise” and the carols of Cambridgeshire and Bedfordshire are very similar, even in the lyrics.

Ruth Barrett & Cyntia Smith from  “Music of the Rolling World” (1982) I really like the processional gait cadenced by the drum

CAMBRIDGE MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maids
And take your May Bush in
For if it is gone before tomorrow morn
You would say we have brought you none.
II
All through the night before daylight
There fell the dew and rain.
It sparkles bright on the May Bush white;
It glistens on the plain.
III
Oh, the hedges and fields are growing so green,
as green as grass can be.
Our Heavenly Mother watereth them
With her heavenly dew so sweet (1).
IV
A branch of May we’ll bring to you
As at your door we stand.
It’s not but a sprout, but ‘tis well budded out,
The work of Our Lady’s hand.
V
Our song is done,
it’s time we were gone
We can no longer stay.
We bless you all, both great and small
And we send you a joyful May.

NOTE
1) This carol lets us glimpse, among the tributes paid to the Virgin Mary, some pre-Christian rituals practiced in May Day: in addition to the May branch also the bath in the dew and in the wild waters rich in rain. The night is the magic of April 30 and the dew collected was a real panacea able to awaken the beauty of women!

Shirley Collins, Cambridgeshire May Carol

I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maids,
And take your May bush in,
For if that is gone before tomorrow morn/ You would say we had brought you none.
II
Oh, the hedges and fields are growing so green,
As green as grass can be;
Our heavenly father watereth them/With his heavenly dew so sweet..
III
I have got a little purse in my pocket
That’s tied with a silken string;
And all that it lacks is a little of your gold
To line it well within.
IV
Now the clock strikes one,
it’s time we are gone,
We can no longer stay;
So please to remember our money, money box
And God send you a joyful May.

draft_lens18966079module155701739photo_1323457372Kate_Greenaway_-_May_day

CAMBRIDGE MAY GARLAND SONG

Collected in 1900 in the Peterborough area
Mary Humphreys

I
Good  morning, lords and ladies,
It is the first of May;
I hope you’ll view the garland,
For it looks so very gay.
(refrain)  
To the greenwood we will go.
II
I’m  very glad to spring as come
The sun is shine so bright
The little birds upon the threes
Are singing with delight
III
The  cuckoo(1) sings in April,
The cuckoo sings in May,
The cuckoo sings in June,
In July she flies away.
IV
The  roads are very dusty
The shoes are very thin
We have a little money-box
To put a money in

SOURCE: Fred Hamer: Garners Gay (1967)
“Mrs. Johnstone [Margery” Mum “Johnstone] learned this carol from her grandmother who came from Carlton and seems to have been popular in some villages close to the Northamptonshire border.The same melody with similar words is spread throughout the south-east of the Midlands ”

Lorraine Nelson Wolf (Bedford carol) 

I
Good   morning lords and ladies
it is the first of May,
We hope you’ll view our garland
it is so bright and gay
REFRAIN
For it is the first of May,
oh it is the first of May,
Remember lords and ladies
it is the first of May.
II
We gathered them this morning
all in the early dew,
And now we bring their beauty
and fragrance all for you
III
The cuckoo comes in April,
it sings its song in May,
In June it changes tune,
in July it flies away
IV
And now you’ve seen our garland
we must be on our way,
So remember lords and ladies
it is the first of May

CHESHIRE MAY-DAY CAROL

Also known under the title “The Sweet Month of May” is a popular song in Cheshire. The text presents many similarities with the Swinton May song to which reference is made for comparison see more

The Wilson Family

I
All on this pleasant morning, together come are we,
To tell you of a blossom that hangs on every tree.
We have stayed up all evening to welcome in the day,
Good people all, both great and small, it is the first of May.
II
Rise up the master of this house, put on your chain of gold,
And turn unto your mistress, so comely to behold.
Rise up the mistress of this house, with gold upon your breast,
And if your body be asleep, we hope your souls are dressed.
III
Oh rise up Mister Wilbraham, all joys to you betide.
Your horse is ready saddled, a-hunting for to ride.
Your saddle is of silver, your bridle of the gold,
Your wife shall ride beside you, so lovely to behold.
IV
Oh rise up Mister Edgerton and take your pen in hand,
For you’re a learned scholar, as we do understand.
Oh rise up Mrs. Stoughton, put on your rich attire,
For every hair upon your head shines like the silver wire.
V
Oh rise up the good housekeeper, put on your gown of silk,
And may you have a husband good, with twenty cows to milk.
And where are all the pretty maids that live next door to you,
Oh they have gone to bathe themselves, all in the morning dew.
VI
God bless your house and arbour, your riches and your store.
We hope the Lord will prosper you, both now and ever more.
So now we’re going to leave you, in peace and plenty here,
We shall not sing this song again, until another year.
Good people all, both great and small, it is the first of May.

ESSEX

So many carols have been Christianized, shifting the homage to the ancient deities to God and Our Lady, as in the next examples. These verses were also documented in the newspapers of the time, for example in the parish of Debden and in the village of Saffron Walden in Essex it was sung:
I
‘I been a rambling all this night,
And sometime of this day;
And now returning back again,
I brought you a garland gay.
II
A garland gay I brought you here,
And at your door I stand;
‘Tis nothing but a sprout, but ‘tis well budded out,
The works of our Lord’s hand.
III
So dear, so dear as Christ loved us,
And for our sins was slain,
Christ bids us turn from wickedness,
And turn to the Lord again.’

Each verse was sometimes also interspersed with a refrain::
‘Why don’t you do as we have done,
The very first day of May;
And from my parents I have come,
And would no longer stay.’

Jean Ritchie

I
I’ve been a-wandering all the night
And the best part of the day
Now I’m returning home again
I bring you a branch of May
II
A branch of May,
I’ll bring you my love,
Here at your door I stand
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out
By the work of the Lord’s own hand
III(1)
In my pocket I’ve got a purse
Tied up with a silver string
All that I do need is a bit of silver
To line it well within
IV
My song is done
and I must be gone
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May

NOTE
1) la strofa è a volte preceduta da questa
Take a bible in your hand
And read a chapter through
And when the day of judgment comes
The Lord will think of you

In the “Nooks and Corners of English Life, Past and Present”, John Timbs, 1867: “At Saffron Walden, and in the village of Debden, an old  May-day song is still sung by the little girls, who go about in parties carrying garlands from door to door. The garlands which the girls carry are sometimes large and  handsome, and a doll is usually placed in the middle, dressed  in white, according to certain traditional regulations : this doll represents the Virgin Mary, and is a relic of the ages of Romanism.”

HERTFORDSHIRE

William Hone in his “The Every Day Book”, describes in a letter dated May 1, 1823 the mummers of May Day to Hitchin who cheer the passers-by with their dances: they are “Moll the crazy” and her husband (with the face blackened by smoke and clothes of rags, “she” holding a big ladle and he a broom), “the Lord and the Lady” (dressed in white and decorated with ribbons and gaudy handkerchiefs, with the gentleman holding a sword) and five/six others  couples of dancers and some musicians- they are all men because the ladies were not allowed to mummers mix: they dance grimaces, chase people with the broom and make the audience laugh.

Always William Hone tells us that the Mayers went from house to house to bring May already at the first light of the day (starting at 3 am) singing “Mayer’s Song” and William Chappell in The Ballad Literature and Popular Music of the Olden Time, 1859 also transcribes the melody, more or less the same as “God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman.”

Hitchin May Day Song

I
‘Remember us poor Mayers all,
And thus we do begin
To lead our lives in righteousness,
Or else we die in sin.
II
We have been rambling all this night,
And almost all this day,
And now returned back again,
We have brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It is but a sprout, but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hands.
IV
The hedges and trees they are so green,
As green as any leek,
Our Heavenly Father he watered them
With heavenly dew so sweet.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide,
Our paths are beaten plain,
And, if a man be not too far gone,
He may return again.
VI
The life of man is but a span,
It flourishes like a flower;
We are here to-day, and gone to-morrow,
And we are dead in one hour.
VII
The moon shines bright, and the stars give a light,
A little before it is day;
So God bless you all, both great and small,
And send you a joyful May!’

Sedayne, live The Heavenly Gates (a may carol)

not exactly the same verses, some stanzas are missing
I
We’ve been rambling all the night, the best part of this day,
we are returning here back again to bring you a garland gay.
II
A bunch of May we bare about, before the door it stands;
it is but a sprout but it’s well budded out; it is the work of God’s own hands.
III
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maids, and take the may bush in –
for it will be gone e’er tomorrow morn and you will have none within.
IV
The heavenly gates are open wide to let escape the dew;
it makes no delay, it is here today & it forms on me & you.
V
The life of a man is but a span, he’s cut down like the flower;
he makes no delay, he is here today & he’s vanished all in an hour
VI
And when you are dead & you’re in your grave, all covered with the cold cold clay,
the worms they will eat your flesh good man & your bones they will waste away.
VII
My song is done I must be gone, I can no longer stay;
God bless us all both great & small & wish us a gladsome May.

LINK
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/bedford.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32490 http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
http://www.cbladey.com/mayjack/maysong.html http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/ NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm http://folkopedia.efdss.org/images/ 7/73/1908_32_Bedfordshire_May_Day_Carol.pdf
http://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59752
http://piereligion.org/maydaysongs.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Text/Hone/may_day_at_hitchin.htm

http://spellerweb.net/cmindex/Cornish/Valentine.pdf
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110990

Love is pleasing

“Love is pleasing” ma anche “Love is teasing” è una canzone tradizionale diffusa nelle isole britanniche e nel nord-america che era di moda nei folk club degli anni 60-70. Gli studiosi ritengono che i versi siano parte di una serie di “frasi fatte” provenienti dal grande calderone delle ballate tradizionali, così svincolati da una narrazione esprimono comunque un sentimento, quello dell’amore tradito (o dell’amore incostante).
The words of “Love is Teasing” resemble those found in three similar songs, “O Waly, Waly,” “The Water is Wide,” and “Down in the Meadows” and all of these can be traced back to the ballad “Jamie Douglas” (Child 204). In “Jamie Douglas,” a bride has been falsely accused of infidelity and is sent back to her father with an aching heart. All of the shorter songs have whittled away the narrative over time leaving nothing but an emotional core. Various versions journeyed back and forth between Ireland, Britain, and North America, and singers often augment whatever verses they have learned with others from a common stock of associated “floating” verses. (tratto da qui)

VERSIONE AMERICANA

ASCOLTA Jean Ritchie imparò la canzone nel 1946 da Peggy Staunton,  irlandese emigrata a New York

ASCOLTA Rhiannon Giddens in Tomorrow Is My Turn, 2015 che così scrive nelle note “I first heard Peggy Seeger sing this and immediately fell in love with it – as I found earlier recordings I got caught by Jean Ritchie’s version, with her idiosyncratic and hypnotic dulcimer playing. This is the ancient warning from woman to woman about the perfidies of man.


I
Love is teasing, love is pleasing
And love’s a pleasure when first it is new
But as love grows older it still grows colder
And fades away like the morning dew
II
Come all you fair maids, now take a warning
Don’t ever heed what a young man say
He’s like a star on some foggy morning When you think he’s near he is far away
III
I left my father, I left my mother
I left my brothers and sisters too
I left my home and kind relations
I left them all just to follow you.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’amore è un tormento, l’amore è un piacere e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo,
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
II
Venite tutte qui ragazze, e prendete il mio avvertimento: non date mai retta a quello che un giovanotto dice,  lui è come la stella in un mattino nebbioso, quando lo credete vicino, si è allontanato
III
Lasciai mio padre, lasciai mia madre
lasciai le mie sorelle e anche i miei fratelli
lasciai tutti gli amici e la mia fede
li lasciai tutti per seguirti

VERSIONE EMIGRATION SONG

Pur nella standardizzazione del genere il canto si suddivide in due filoni, nel primo una donna (ma anche un uomo) con il cuore a pezzi, rimasta senza punto di riferimento, sceglie di emigrare per l’America.
ASCOLTA The Dubliners

ASCOLTA Marianne Faithfull & Chieftains live


I
I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
I wish I was a youth again
But a youth again I can never be
Till apples grow
on an ivy tree
II
I left me father, I left me mother
I left all my sisters
and brothers too
I left all my friends and me own religion
I left them all for to follow you
III
But the sweetest apple is the soonest rotten
And the hottest love is the soonest cold
And what can’t be cured love
has to be endured love (1)
And now I am bound for America
IV
Oh love is pleasin’ and love is teasin’
And love is a pleasure when first it’s new
But as it grows older sure the love grows colder
And it fades away like the morning dew
V
And love and porter makes a young man older
And love and whiskey makes him old and grey
And what can’t be cured love has to be endured love
And now I am bound for America
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei, vorrei, vorrei ma non posso
vorrei essere di nuovo giovane
ma non potrò mai essere di nuovo giovane finchè le mele cresceranno sull’edera
II
Lasciai mio padre, lasciai mia madre
lasciai le mie sorelle e anche i miei fratelli
lasciai tutti gli amici e la mia fede
li lasciai tutti per seguirti
III
Ma la mela più dolce è quella che per prima marcisce e l’amore più appassionato è il primo che si raffredda, e quello ciò che non può guarire dall’amore, deve essere rafforzato dall’amore e ora sono in partenza per l’America
IV
L’amore è un piacere e l’amore è un tormento e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
V
Amore e birra fanno di un giovane un uomo
e amore e whiskey lo fanno invecchiare e incanutire
e quello ciò che non può guarire dall’amore, deve essere rafforzato dall’amore e ora sono in partena per l’America

NOTA
1) letteralmente: e quello che non può essere amore curato deve essere amore sopportato
VERSIONE DRINKING SONG
La seconda verisone è un lamento più tipicamente femminile.
ASCOLTA Karan Casey live


I
I never thought my love would leave me
Until that morning when he stepped in
Well, he sat down and I sat beside him
And then our troubles, they did begin
II
Oh love is teasing and love is pleasing
And love is a pleasure when first it’s new
But love grows older and love grows colder
And it fades away like the morning dew
III
There is an alehous in yon town
And it’s there my love goes and he sits down
He takes a strange girl (1) upon his knee
And he tells to her what he once told to me
IV
I wish my father had never whistled(2)
And I wish my mother had never sung
I wish the cradle had never rocked me
And I wish my life, it had not begun
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avrei mai creduto che il mio amore mi avrebbe lasciata
fino a quel mattino quando entrò
beh si sedette e io mi misi accanto a lui
e allora i nostri guai iniziarono.
II
L’amore è un piacere e l’amore è un tormento e l’amore è piacevole quando è appena nuovo,
ma man mano che cresce l’amore si raffredda
e svanisce come rugiada all’alba
III
C’è una birreria in quella città
ed è dove il mio amore va a sedersi,
si prende una puttana sulle ginocchia
e le dice ciò che un tempo diceva a me
IV
Vorrei che mio padre non avesse mai suonato il flauto
e che mia mamma non avesse mai cantato
vorrei che la culla non mi avesse mai cullato
e che la mia vita non fosse mai cominciata

NOTE
1) stange girl non è solo una ragazza strana ma un eufemismo per prostituta
2) i genitori hanno fatto sesso

FONTI
https://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/love-is-teasing
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=9734
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/l/loveteas.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/loveisteasing.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/love.htm

LORD THOMAS & FAIR ELEANOR

Una tra le ballate più popolari nella Balladry anglo-americana (seconda solo a Barbara Allen) è classificata dal professor Child nella sua raccolta al numero 73, con il titolo di “Lord Thomas and Annet“. La bella della storia è però più spesso chiamata Ellinor (Eleanor, Elinor). Si tratta di un triangolo amoroso, con l’uomo che, seguendo il consiglio della famiglia, sposa la donna bruna invece di quella bionda. (vedi prima parte)

VERSIONE INGLESE

La versione della famiglia Ritchie (qui) è quella che più richiama la narrazione diffusa in Inghilterra con il titolo ” Lord Thomas and the Fair Ellender” con molti tratti in comune con la versione americana.
Thomas in questo contesto non si comporta da gentiluomo, è piuttosato un personaggio brutale che si è sposato solo per la dote e non ha nessun rispetto verso la moglie. La bionda Ellender invece di restare a casa a piangere si reca al matrimonio dell’amante ma viene pugnalata dalla sposa!

ASCOLTA Jean Ritchie (testo in Folk Songs of the Southern Appalachians as Sung by Jean Ritchie, 1997)

ASCOLTA Naomi Bedford, 2011


I
“Mother, oh mother, come riddle me down
Come riddle two hearts as one
must I marry fair Ellender
or bring the brown girl home?”
II
“The brown girl she has gold (house) and lands,
fair Ellender she has none;
the only advice I can give you my son,
is (go) bring me the brown girl home”.
III
He rode till he come to fair Ellender’s gate,
he tingled the bell to his came
No one was ready as fair Ellender
herself she arose to let him (to arise and bid him) come in.
IV
‘What news, what news, Lord Thomas?’ she cried,
‘What news have you to me?’
‘I’ve come to ask you to my wedding
now what do you think of me?’
V
“Mother, oh mother, come riddle me down
Come riddle two hearts as one
must I go to Lord Thomas’s wedding,
Or stay at home and mourn?”.
VI
”Oh, the brown girl she’s got buissness there
You know you have got none
the only (best) advice I can give you my girl (daughter)
Is stay at home and mourn.”
VII
She dressed herself in a silk so fine
rode till she came to Thomas’s gate;
no one was  ready as Lord Thomas himself
to arise and let her come in.
VIII
He took her by the lilywhite hand
And led her through the hall,
Saying fifty fair ladies are here today
But here is the flower of all”.
IX
‘Thomas Lord Thomas is this your bride,
she looks so wonderful brown,
you could have married a lady as fair
as ever England shone on”
X
Lord Thomas cried,
‘Despise her not to me,
Despise her not to me.
‘cause do I love your little finger
Than all her whole body.’
XI
The brown girl  had a little pen-knife
it being both keen and sharp.
betwixt the long ribs and the short
she pierced fair Ellender to the heart.
XII (no Naomi)
“O what’s the matter Fair Ellender she cried
you look so pale and wan
you used to have as rosy a color
as ever the sun shone on”
XIII
“Thomas, Lord Thomas Ellender cried,
are you blind that you cannot see?
Do you see my own heart’s blood
Come  down to my knee?’
XIV
Lord Thomas he drew his sword from
his side
As he run (came) through the hall;
He cut off the head of his bonny
brown bride
And kicked it against the wall
XV
Then placing the handle (hilt) against the wall,
The point (blade) against his breast (heart),
Saying, “did you ever see three true lovers meet
that had so soon to part?
XVI
Oh mother, oh mother o dig my grave,
go dig it both wide and deep
And bury fair Ellender in my arms
And the brown girl at my feet”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Madre oh madre risolveresti
un dilemma,
che mi divide il cuore a metà (1),
devo sposare la bionda (2) Ellender
o portare a casa la ragazza mora (3)?

II
“La ragazza mora ha denaro (case)
e terre

e la bionda Ellender non ne ha;
l’unico consiglio che ti posso dare figlio mio è di portarmi a casa la ragazza mora
III
Egli cavalcò finchè venne al cancello della bionda Ellender
bussò alla porta;
nessuno era a disposizione tranne  la bionda Ellender in persona
che si alzò e lo fece accomodare.
IV
Che novità mi hai portato,
Lord Thomas? -gridò –
Che novità mi hai portato?
Sono venuto a invitarti al mio matrimonio;
così cosa pensi di me ora?
V
O madre, madre, risolveresti
un dilemma
che mi spezza il cuore a metà?

Dovrei andare al matrimonio di Lord Thomas o restare a casa a piangere ?
VI
Questa è l’occasione della ragazza dai capelli neri,
non la tua,

il solo consiglio che ti posso dare  ragazza mia
è di restare a casa a piangere
VII (4)
Si vestì con della bella seta
e cavalcò finchè arrivò al castello di Thomas
e fu Lord Thomas in persona
ad alzarsi e ad accoglierla.
VIII
La prese per la mano bianco giglio
guidandola per la sala (del banchetto)
dicendo “Cinquanta belle dame sono qui oggi, ma ecco il fiore più bello” (5)
IX
Thomas. Lord Thomas è questa la tua sposa?
Sembra così meravigliosamente mora,
non avresti potuto sposare la dama più bionda d’Inghilterra?(6)”
X
Lord Thomas- gridò
Disprezzo su di lei non su di me,
Disprezzo su di lei non su di me,
perchè vale di più il tuo dito mignolo
che tutto il suo corpo“(7)
XI
La ragazza mora aveva uno stiletto (8) aguzzo e tagliente.
tra le costole dello sterno
trafisse la bionda Ellender al cuore
XII
Cosa succede bionda Ellender
-grida lei-
sembri così pallida e debole
tu che di solito hai un colorito roseo
come il sole che brilla
XIII
Thomas, Lord Thomas -Ellender gridò-
sei cieco che non riesci a vedere?
Non vedi il sangue del mio stesso cuore
che mi gocciola fino ai piedi?
XIV
Lord Thomas sguainò la spada che aveva al fianco
e corse per il salone
e tagliò la testa della sua bella moglie mora
e la calciò contro il muro (11)
XV
Poi mise il manico contro
il muro
e la punta rivolta verso il proprio
petto
dicendo “Avete mai visto tre amanti
riuniti,

che si siano separati così velocemente?
XVI
O madre, madre scava la mia tomba
falla larga e profonda
e seppellisci la bionda Ellender tra le mie braccia e la ragazza mora ai miei piedi

NOTE
1) tradotto un po’ liberamente, in senso letterale “vieni a sentenziare per due cuori in uno”
2) in questa ballata preferisco tradurre l’aggettivo nel suo significato primario, mentre in genere lo traduco con bella
3) dai neri capelli
4) Naomi riassume due strofe in una, nella versione di Ritchie è invece
she dressed herself ina a snow-white dress,
her maids she dressed in green
and every town she rode through
they took her to be some queen.
She rode till she came to Lord Thomas’s gate
she pulled all in her reins
no one so  ready as Lord Thomas himself
to arise and bid her come in.
5) oppure
“he seated her down in the highest place
amongst the ladies all” (tradotto:” la fece sedere al posto d’onore tra tutte le dame”)
6) oppure “as ever the sun shone on”. Le intenzioni di Ellender sono così palesate: è andata alle nozze per fare una piazzata e umiliare la sposa (spalleggiata dal comportamento di Thomas, che non sembra curarsi della moglie ma ha occhi solo per la bionda)
7) letteralmente “perchè io amo di più il tuo mignolo che tutto il suo corpo”
scritto anche come “trinkling down to my knee?”
8) l’arma prediletta da assassini (e dalle donne) perché facile da nascondere sotto il mantello o nella manica dell’abito. La descrizione di come viene usato è appropriata in quanto è fatto penetrare con forza nello sterno per trafiggere il cuore.
9) versione Naomi
Lord Thomas he was standing by
With knife ground keen and sharp,
Between the long ribs and the short
He pierced his own bride’s heart.
10) XV
He put the handle to the ground,
the point to his heart.
No sooner did three lovers meet,
No sooner did they part.
11) la versione più splatter e truculenta che ribadisce la brutalità del Lord, la forza della sua ira e del suo disprezzo.

FONTI
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/19-lord-thomas-and-fair-annet-.aspx
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/159.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/lordthomasandfaireleanor.html

WILD HOG IN THE WOODS

Child ballad # 18
TITOLI: “Sir Lionell”,  “Sir Eglamore”, “Sir Egrabell”, “Bold Sir Rylas”, “The Jovial Hunter (of Bromsgrove)”, “Horn the Hunter”, “Wild Boar”, “Wild Hog (in the Woods)”, “Old(e) Bangum”, “Bangum and the Boar”, The Wild Boar and Sir Eglamore, “Old Baggum”, “Crazy Sal and Her Pig”, “Isaac-a-Bell and Hugh the Graeme”, “Quilo Quay”, “Rury Bain”, “Rackabello”, “The Old Man and hisThree Sons”

La storia del prode cavaliere che sconfigge il male è stata narrata sia nel romance dal titolo Sir Eglamour of Artois  (circa 1350) che nella ballata Sir Lionel riportata dal professor Child e conosciuta con vari titoli.
Il romance è una storia intricata e piena di colpi di scena in cui il prode cavaliere per ottenere la mano della figlia del re, combatte contro un un gigante, un cinghiale e un drago e poi ritrova la sua amata dopo molte peripezie, ciò che resta dell’eroica ballata (vedi) è diventata invece una canzoncina per bambini

ASCOLTA The Furrow Collective in Wild hog 2016 (Alasdair Roberts voce e chitarra ) video musicale illustrato da un buffissimo e allucinato cartoon – quel suono etereo in sottofondo non è prodotto dal theremin ma dalla sega musicale

I
There is a wild hog in the woods,
diddle-oh down, diddle-oh day;
There is a wild hog in the woods,
diddle-oh;
There is a wild hog in the woods,
Kills a man and drinks his blood,
Cam o-kay, cut him down, 
Kill him if you can.
II
I wish I could that wild hog see,
And see if he’d have a fight with me.
III
There he comes through yonders marsh,
He splits his way through oak and ash.
IV
Bangum drew his wooden knife,
To rob that wild hog of his life.
V
They fought four hours of the day,
At length that wild hog stole away.
VI
They followed that wild hog to his den,
And there found the bones of a thousand men.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Cè un cinghiale nel bosco
diddle-oh down, diddle-oh day;
C’è un cinghiale nel bosco
diddle-oh;
C’è un cinghiale nel bosco
uccise un uomo e bevve il suo sangue
vieni e abbattilo,  uccidilo se ci riesci
II
Vorrei poter vedere quel cinghiale
e vedere se avrebbe lottato con me
III
Là viene da quelle paludi
si taglia la strada tra la quercia e il frassino
IV
Bangum tirò fuori il suo coltello di legno per togliere la vita al cinghiale
V
Lottarono per 4 ore del giorno
e alla fine quel cinghiale fuggì
VI
Seguirono quel cinghiale nella sua tana
e là trovarono le ossa di mille uomini

ASCOLTA Jean Ritchie in Olde Bangum la versione per bambini raccontata come una fiaba

FONTI
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/OLDBANGM.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-WildHog.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boldsirrylas.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50640

Carole di Primavera nel Cambridgeshire & Hertfordshire

Read the post in English

CAMBRIDGESHIRE MAY CAROL
MELODIA: ARISE, ARISE

La melodia è conosciuta come “Arise, arise” e le carols di Cambridgeshire e Bedfordshire sono molto simili, anche nei testi.

Ruth Barrett & Cyntia Smith in   “Music of the Rolling World” (1982) mi piace molto l’incedere processionale cadenzato dal tamburo

CAMBRIDGE MAY SONG
I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maids
And take your May Bush in
For if it is gone before tomorrow morn
You would say we have brought you none.
II
All through the night before daylight
There fell the dew and rain.
It sparkles bright on the May Bush white;
It glistens on the plain.
III
Oh, the hedges and fields are growing so green,
as green as grass can be.
Our Heavenly Mother watereth them
With her heavenly dew so sweet (1).
IV
A branch of May we’ll bring to you
As at your door we stand.
It’s not but a sprout, but ‘tis well budded out,
The work of Our Lady’s hand.
V
Our song is done,
it’s time we were gone
We can no longer stay.
We bless you all, both great and small
And we send you a joyful May.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Per tutta la notte prima dell’alba,
cade la rugiada e la pioggia.
Brilla luminosa sul bianco dello Spino di Maggio,
luccica sulla piana.
III
Siepi e campi stanno diventano così verdi
come verde deve essere l’erba.
Nostra Signora li innaffia con la dolce rugiada dei Cieli.
IV
Un ramo del Maggio vi porteremo, appena passiamo davanti alla vostra porta,
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato per mano della Nostra Signora.
V
La canzone è finita
ed è tempo di andare,
non possiamo restare più a lungo.
Siate benedetti, grandi e piccini
e vi auguriamo un felice Maggio!

NOTE
1) Questa carol lascia intravedere, tra gli omaggi tributati alla Vergine Maria, alcuni rituali pre-cristiani praticati a Calendimaggio: oltre al ramo del Maggio anche il bagno nella rugiada e nelle acque selvatiche ricche di pioggia. La notte è quella magica del 30 aprile e la rugiada raccolta costituiva un vero e proprio toccasana in grado di risvegliare la bellezza femminile!

Shirley Collins, Cambridgeshire May Carol


I
Arise, arise, you pretty fair maids,
And take your May bush in,
For if that is gone before tomorrow morn/ You would say we had brought you none.
II
Oh, the hedges and fields are growing so green,
As green as grass can be;
Our heavenly father watereth them/With his heavenly dew so sweet..
III
I have got a little purse in my pocket
That’s tied with a silken string;
And all that it lacks is a little of your gold
To line it well within.
IV
Now the clock strikes one,
it’s time we are gone,
We can no longer stay;
So please to remember our money, money box
And God send you a joyful May.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Alzati, dolce fanciulla,
a prendere lo Spino del Maggio,
che all’alba di domani tutto finisce
e potresti dire che non te lo abbiamo portato.
II
Siepi e campi stanno diventano così verdi
come verde deve essere l’erba.
Nostro Signore(2) li innaffia
con la dolce rugiada dei Cieli.
IV
Ho una borsello in tasca
chiuso da una corda di seta
e quello che gli manca è un po’ del tuo oro
da far tintinnare all’interno
IV
Ora l’orologio batte l’una
ed è tempo di andare,
non possiamo restare più a lungo
così vi preghiamo di ricordarvi della nostra scarsella dei soldi
e che Dio vi mandi un felice Maggio

draft_lens18966079module155701739photo_1323457372Kate_Greenaway_-_May_day

CAMBRIDGE MAY GARLAND SONG

Raccolta nel 1900 nella zona di  Peterborough
Mary Humphreys


I
Good  morning, lords and ladies,
It is the first of May;
I hope you’ll view the garland,
For it looks so very gay.
(refrain)  
To the greenwood we will go.
II
I’m  very glad to spring as come
The sun is shine so bright
The little birds upon the threes
Are singing with delight
III
The  cuckoo(1) sings in April,
The cuckoo sings in May,
The cuckoo sings in June,
In July she flies away.
IV
The  roads are very dusty
The shoes are very thin
We have a little money-box
To put a money in
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Buon giorno signori e signore
è il primo di Maggio
spero darete un’occhiata alla ghirlanda
perchè sembra proprio così allegra
Ritornello
Nel bosco andremo
II
Sono molto contento che la primavera sia giunta, il sole brilla così luminoso
gli uccellini sugli alberi
stanno cantando con allegria
III
Il cuculo canta ad Aprile
il cuculo canta a Maggio
il cuculo canta a Giugno
e a Luglio vola via.
IV
Le strade sono molto polverose
e le scarpe leggere
abbiamo una piccola scatola
per metterci i soldi

FONTE: Fred Hamer: Garners Gay (1967)
“La Signora Johnstone [Margery “Mum” Johnstone] ha imparato questa carol da sua nonna che proveniva da Carlton e sembra sia stata  popolare in alcuni villaggi vicini al Northamptonshire border. La stessa melodia con parole simili è diffusa in tutto il sud-est del Midlands

Lorraine Nelson Wolf (Bedford carol) 


I
Good   morning lords and ladies
it is the first of May,
We hope you’ll view our garland
it is so bright and gay
REFRAIN
For it is the first of May,
oh it is the first of May,
Remember lords and ladies
it is the first of May.
II
We gathered them this morning
all in the early dew,
And now we bring their beauty
and fragrance all for you
III
The cuckoo comes in April,
it sings its song in May,
In June it changes tune,
in July it flies away
IV
And now you’ve seen our garland
we must be on our way,
So remember lords and ladies
it is the first of May
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Buon giorno signori e signore
è il primo di Maggio
spero darete un’occhiata alla nostra ghirlanda
perchè sembra così bella e allegra
Ritornello
Perchè è il primo di Maggio
ricordate signori e signore
che è il primo di Maggio
II
Li abbiamo raccolti questa mattina
ancora umidi di rugiada
e ora portiamo la loro bellezza
e tutta la loro fragranza a voi
III
Il cuculo arriva ad Aprile
e canta la sua canzone a Maggio
a Giugno cambia la sua melodia
e a Luglio vola via.
IV
E adesso che avete visto la nostra ghirlanda
dobbiamo andare per la nostra strada
così ricordate signori e signore
che è il primo Maggio

CHESHIRE MAY-DAY CAROL

Anche conosciuta con il titolo “The Sweet Month of May” è una canzone diffusa nel Cheshire. Il testo presenta molte analogie con la Swinton May song alla quale si rimanda per il confronto vedi

The Wilson Family


I
All on this pleasant morning, together come are we,
To tell you of a blossom that hangs on every tree.
We have stayed up all evening to welcome in the day,
Good people all, both great and small, it is the first of May.
II
Rise up the master of this house, put on your chain of gold,
And turn unto your mistress, so comely to behold.
Rise up the mistress of this house, with gold upon your breast,
And if your body be asleep, we hope your souls are dressed.
III
Oh rise up Mister Wilbraham, all joys to you betide.
Your horse is ready saddled, a-hunting for to ride.
Your saddle is of silver, your bridle of the gold,
Your wife shall ride beside you, so lovely to behold.
IV
Oh rise up Mister Edgerton and take your pen in hand,
For you’re a learned scholar, as we do understand.
Oh rise up Mrs. Stoughton, put on your rich attire,
For every hair upon your head shines like the silver wire.
V
Oh rise up the good housekeeper, put on your gown of silk,
And may you have a husband good, with twenty cows to milk.
And where are all the pretty maids that live next door to you?
Oh they have gone to bathe themselves, all in the morning dew.
VI
God bless your house and arbour, your riches and your store.
We hope the Lord will prosper you, both now and ever more.
So now we’re going to leave you,
in peace and plenty here,
We shall not sing this song again, until another year.
Good people all, both great and small, it is the first of May.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
In questa piacevole giornata tutti insieme siamo venuti
per dirvi dei boccioli che pendono su ogni albero,
siamo restati svegli tutta la notte per salutare il giorno
brava gente, grandi e piccini
è il primo di Maggio
II
Alzatevi, padrone di questa casa mettetevi la catena d’oro,
e voltatevi verso la vostra signora così piacevole da vedersi
Alzatevi, padrona di questa casa con la spilla d’oro al petto, e se il vostro corpo è addormentato speriamo che la vostre anime siano vestite
III
Alzatevi Mister Wilbraham che la gioia sia con voi
il vostro cavallo è ben sellato pronto per andare a caccia
la vostra sella è d’argento e le briglie sono dorate
vostra moglie cavalcherà al vostro fianco così piacevole da vedersi
IV
Alzatevi Mister Edgerton e prendete in mano la penna
perchè voi siete un erudito, come ben sappiamo
alzatevi signora Stoughton indossate i vostri ricchi abiti perchè ogni capello sul vostro capo brilla come un filo d’argento
V
Alzatevi buona massaia, mettetevi il vostro abito di seta
che possiate avere un buon marito con una ventina di mucche da latte.
E dove sono tutte le belle fanciulle che vivono nella porta accanto?
Sono andate a prendere il bagno nella rugiada del mattino
VI
Dio benedica questa casa e il pergolato,
i vostri beni e il negozio
che il Signore vi dia prosperità adesso e per sempre.
Cpsì adesso vi lasciamo,
in pace e abbondanza
non canteremo il Maggio fino al prossimo anno,
brava gente, grandi e piccini,
è il primo di maggio

ESSEX

Così molte carols sono state cristianizzate, spostando l’omaggio alle divinità antiche verso Dio e la Madonna, come nei prossimi esempi. Questi versi sono stati anche documentati sui giornali dell’epoca, ad esempio nella parrocchia di Debden e nel villaggio di Saffron Walden in Essex si cantava:
I
‘I been a rambling all this night,
And sometime of this day;
And now returning back again,
I brought you a garland gay.
II
A garland gay I brought you here,
And at your door I stand;
‘Tis nothing but a sprout, but ‘tis well budded out,
The works of our Lord’s hand.
III
So dear, so dear as Christ loved us,
And for our sins was slain,
Christ bids us turn from wickedness,
And turn to the Lord again.’

Ogni verso a volte era intervallato anche da un ritornello:
‘Why don’t you do as we have done,
The very first day of May;
And from my parents I have come,
And would no longer stay.’

Jean Ritchie

I
I’ve been a-wandering all the night
And the best part of the day
Now I’m returning home again
I bring you a branch of May
II
A branch of May,
I’ll bring you my love,
Here at your door I stand
It’s nothing but a sprout, but it’s well budded out
By the work of the Lord’s own hand
III(1)
In my pocket I’ve got a purse
Tied up with a silver string
All that I do need is a bit of silver
To line it well within
IV
My song is done
and I must be gone
I can no longer stay
God bless you all both great and small
And send you a joyful May
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Ho vagato per tutta la notte
e per buona parte del giorno
e sono di ritorno ancora qui
per portarvi il ramo del Maggio
II
Un ramo del Maggio,
vi porterò il mio affetto
sono qui alla vostra porta
non è in germoglio, ma è ben sbocciato
per il lavoro di nostro Signore
III
Ho una borsello in tasca
chiuso da una corda d’argento
e quello che gli manca è un po’ d’argento
da far tintinnare all’interno
IV
La canzone è finita
ed è tempo di andare,
non posso restare più a lungo
Dio benedica grandi e piccini
e vi mandi un felice Maggio

NOTE
1) la strofa è a volte preceduta da questa
Take a bible in your hand
And read a chapter through
And when the day of judgment comes
The Lord will think of you

così è riportato nel “Nooks and Corners of English Life, Past and Present”, John Timbs, 1867: “A Saffron Walden, e nel villaggio di Debden, una vecchia canzone di Calendimaggio è ancora cantata dalle bambine, che festeggiano portando le  ghirlande di porta in porta. Le ghirlande  sono talvolta grandi e belle, e una bambola di solito è posta al centro, vestita di bianco, così come vuole la tradizione: questa bambola rappresenta la Vergine Maria ed è una reliquia dell’epoca del Cattolicesimo “.

HERTFORDSHIRE

William Hone nel suo “The Every Day Book “, descrive in una lettera datata 1 maggio 1823 i mummers del May Day a Hitchin che allietano i passanti con le loro danze: sono “Moll la pazza” e il marito (con la faccia annerita dal fumo e vestiti di stracci, “lei” che impugna un grosso mestolo e lui una scopa), “il Signore e la Signora” ( vestiti di bianco e ornati da nastri e sgargianti fazzoletti, con il signore che impugna una spada) e altre cinque-sei coppie di danzatori più svariati musicisti- sono tutti uomini perchè alle signore non era permesso mescolarsi ai mummers, ballano fanno smorfie, inseguono il pubblico con la scopa e fanno ridere gli spettatori.

Sempre William Hone ci racconta che i mayers andavano di casa in casa a portare il maggio già alle prime luci del giorno (a partire dalle 3 del mattino) cantando la “Mayer’s Song.”  e William Chappell in  The Ballad Literature and Popular Music of the Olden Time, 1859 trascrive anche la melodia, più o meno la stessa di “God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman.”

Hitchin May Day Song

I
‘Remember us poor Mayers all,
And thus we do begin
To lead our lives in righteousness,
Or else we die in sin.
II
We have been rambling all this night,
And almost all this day,
And now returned back again,
We have brought you a branch of May.
III
A branch of May we have brought you,
And at your door it stands;
It is but a sprout, but it’s well budded out
By the work of our Lord’s hands.
IV
The hedges and trees they are so green,
As green as any leek,
Our Heavenly Father he watered them
With heavenly dew so sweet.
V
The heavenly gates are open wide,
Our paths are beaten plain,
And, if a man be not too far gone,
He may return again.
VI
The life of man is but a span,
It flourishes like a flower;
We are here to-day, and gone to-morrow,
And we are dead in one hour.
VII
The moon shines bright, and the stars give a light,
A little before it is day;
So God bless you all, both great and small,
And send you a joyful May!’

ASCOLTA Sedayne, The Heavenly Gates (a may carol)

non proprio gli stessi versi, mancano alcune strofe
I
We’ve been rambling all the night, the best part of this day,
we are returning here back again to bring you a garland gay.
II
A bunch of May we bare about, before the door it stands;
it is but a sprout but it’s well budded out; it is the work of God’s own hands.
III
Oh wake up you, wake up pretty maids, and take the may bush in –
for it will be gone e’er tomorrow morn and you will have none within.
IV
The heavenly gates are open wide to let escape the dew;
it makes no delay, it is here today & it forms on me & you.
V
The life of a man is but a span, he’s cut down like the flower;
he makes no delay, he is here today & he’s vanished all in an hour
VI
And when you are dead & you’re in your grave, all covered with the cold cold clay,
the worms they will eat your flesh good man & your bones they will waste away.
VII
My song is done I must be gone, I can no longer stay;
God bless us all both great & small & wish us a gladsome May.

FONTI

http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/bedford.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32490 http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/maysong.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/themoonshinesbright.html
http://www.cbladey.com/mayjack/maysong.html http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/ NonChristmas/bedfordshire_may_day_carol.htm http://folkopedia.efdss.org/images/ 7/73/1908_32_Bedfordshire_May_Day_Carol.pdf
http://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/week-36-northill-may-song/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59752
http://piereligion.org/maydaysongs.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Text/Hone/may_day_at_hitchin.htm

http://spellerweb.net/cmindex/Cornish/Valentine.pdf
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110990