Archivi tag: Jackie Oates

Boney was a warrior

Leggi in italiano

A sea shanty  originally born as a street ballad on the Napoleonic wars: Napoleon embodied the hopes for independence and the revolutionary demands of the European populations and the American colonies (Ireland in the lead); loved by the poorer layers as well as by intellectuals, it is the romantic hero par excellence, in its greatness and its fall. Nowadays, no one siding with Napoleon, but two centuries before, the spirits flared up for him!

Napoleone Bonaparte

SEA SHANTY VERSION

AL Lloyd wrote “A short drag shanty. These simple shanties were uses when only a few strong pulls were needed, as in boarding tacks and sheets and bunting up a sail in furling, etc. Boney was popular both in British and American vessels and in one American version Bonaparte is made to cross the Rocky Mountains.”: there are many text versions that all portray the victories and defeats of Napoleon in a few lines. The melody recalls the Breton maritime song “Jean François de Nantes” (with text in French)
C’est Jean François de Nantes OUE, OUE, OUE
Gabier sur la fringante Oh mes bouées Jean François
(here)
The adventure “Asterix in Corsica” pays homage to the shanty giving the name Boneywasawarriorwayayix to the chief of the resistance in Corsica

Paul Clayton


Boney(1) was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A warrior, a tarrier(2),
John François (3)
Boney fought the Prussians,
Boney fought the Russians.
Boney went to Moscow,
across the ocean across the storm
Moscow was a-blazing
And Boney was a-raging.
Boney went to Elba
Boney he came back again.
Boney went to Waterloo
There he got his overthrow.
Boney he was sent away
Away in Saint Helena
Boney broke his heart and died
Away in Saint Helena

NOTES
1) Boney diminutive for Napoleon. The origin of the name is uncertain may mean “the Lion of Naples”, the first illustrious name was that of Cardinal Napoleone Orsini (at the time of Pope Boniface VIII)
2) terrier = mastiff
3) or Jonny Franswor! quote from the Breton maritime song Jean-François de Nantes

.. the punk-rock version with irony
Jack Shit in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006

I
Boney(1) was a warrior
A warrior a terrier(2)
Boney beat the Prussians
The Austrians, the Russians
Boney went to school in France
He learned to make the Russians dance
Boney marched to Moscow
Across the Alps through ice and snow.
II
Boney was a Frenchy man
But Boney had to turn again
So he retreated back again
Moscow was in ruins then
He beat the Prussians squarely
He whacked the English nearly
He licked them in Trafalgar’s Bay(1)
Carried his main topm’st away
III
Boney went a cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian(2)
Boney went to Saint Helen’s
He never came back again
They sent him into exile
He died on Saint Helena’s Isle
Boney broke his heart and died
In Corsica he wished he stayed

NOTES
1) The battle of Trafalgar saw the British outnumbered but Nelson’s unconventional maneuver (a position called in military jargon to T) displaced the enemy line up arranged in a long line (the excellent study in see), the only blow inflicted by the French was the death of Nelson. England was an unequaled naval power for the French and the Spanish, so Napoleon renounced the invasion of Great Britain who became the mistress of the seas until the First World War
2) the ship that brought Napoleon into exile on Saint Helena was Bellerephon but the name was crippled in Billy Ruffian or Billy Ruff’n by his sailors not sufficiently well-known to appreciate the references to Greek mythology.

JOHN SHORT VERSION


The authors write in the short Sharp Shanties project notes “Short’s words were few—a mere two and a half verses—but sufficient to indicate that his, like every other version of the shanty, essentially followed Napoleon Bonaparte’s life story to a greater or lesser extent depending on the length of the job in hand (although, as Colcord points out, some versions introduced inventive variations on his life). We have simply borrowed some (of the true) verses from other versions—but by no means all that were available!.. Perhaps, we are again dealing with a shanty that changed its purpose—Jackie has chosen a slower rendition which may be more appropriate to the time. Sharp noted: “Mr. Short sang ‘Bonny’ not ’Boney’, which is the more usual pronunciation; while his rendering of ’John’ was something between the French ’Jean’ and the English ’John’.” (tratto da qui)

Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2

Boney was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A bulling fighting tarrier,
John François
First he fought the Russians
then he fought the Prussians.
Boney went to Moscow,
Moscow was on fire oh.
We licked him in Trafalgar’s
Billy ??
Boney went to Elba
he came back to make another show
Boney went to Waterloo
and than he maked his overthrow.
Boney went to a-cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Boney went to Saint Helena
Boney he didn’t get back
Boney broke his heart and died
in Corsica he should stay
Boney was a general
A ruddy, snotty general.

An interesting version in the folk environment comes from Maddy Prior who sings it like a nursery rhyme with the cannon shots and the drum roll in the background
Maddy Prior from Ravenchild 1999


Boney was a warrior
Wey, hey, ah
A warrior, a terrier
John François
He planned a distant enterprise
A great and distant enterprise.
He is off to fight the Russian bear
He plans to drive him from his lair.
They left with banners all ablaze
The heads of Europe stood amazed.
He thinks he’ll beat the Russkies
And the bonny bunch of roses. (1)

NOTES
1) english soldiers

FRENCH SHANTY: Jean-François de Nantes

Les Naufragés live

C’est Jean-François de Nantes
Oué, oué, oué,
Gabier de la Fringante
Oh ! mes bouées, Jean-François
Débarque de la campagne
Fier comme un roi d’Espagne
En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course
Une montre, une chaîne
Qui vaut une baleine
Branl’bas chez son hôtesse
Carambole et largesses
La plus belle servante
L’emmène dans la soupente
En vida la bouteille
Tout son or appareille
Montre et chaîne s’envolent
Attrape la vérole
A l’hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente
Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche
Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine
Pauvr’ Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier de la Fringante.

LINK
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/boney-was-a-warrior/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boney.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boney.html http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/boneywas.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=84540 https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1560890
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/french.htm

Sweet Nightingale from Cornwall

Leggi in italiano

In Italy, the nightingale returns in mid-March and leaves in September. His song, melodious and powerful, presents a remarkable variety of modulations and phrasings, by able songwriter, so that one can speak of a personal repertoire different from bird to bird.
In the folk tradition the nightingale is the symbol of lovers and their love meeting, immortalized by Shakespeare in “Romeo and Juliet” he sings at the pomegranate and the only choice is between life and death: to stay in the nuptial thalamus and die or to leave for exile (and perhaps salvation)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

JULIET
Wilt thou be gone?
It is not yet near day.

It was the nightingale,
and not the lark,

That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate tree.
Believe me, love,
it was the nightingale.

ROMEO
It was the lark,
the herald of the morn,

No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

Thus the song of the nightingale has assumed a negative characteristic, he is not the singer of joy as the lark but of melancholy and death.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Fresco detail Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompeii

The fresco in the House of the Golden Bracelet, in Pompeii, dated between 30 and 35 AD. depicting scenes taken from a wooded garden, portrays a lonely nightingale among the rose branches.
And it is precisely for his nocturnal hiding in the thick of the wood that in the traditional songs he has approached to trivial kind with double meanings alluding to the erotic sphere and his sweet song is an invitation to abandon oneself to the pleasures of sex.
The folk song was probably born in Cornwall with the titles of”Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” or “Down in those valleys below”.

“The words of Sweet Nightingale were first published in Robert Bell’s Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England, 1857, with the note:“This curious ditty—said to be a translation from the ancient Cornish tongue… we first heard in Germany… The singers were four Cornish miners, who were at that time, 1854, employed at some lead mines near the town of Zell. The leader, or captain, John Stocker, said that the song was an established favourite with the lead miners of Cornwall and Devonshire, and was always sung on the pay-days and at the wakes; and that his grandfather, who died 30 years before at the age of a hundred years, used to sing the song, and say that it was very old.” Unfortunately Bell failed to get a copy either of words or music from these miners, and relied in the end on a gentleman of Plymouth who “was obliged to supply a little here or there, but only when a bad rhyme, or rather none at all, made it evident what the real rhyme was. I have read it over to a mining gentleman at Truro, and he says it is pretty near the way we sing it.”The tune most people sing was collected by Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould from E.G. Stevens of St. Ives, Cornwall.” (from here)

The song also includes a version in cornish gaelic titled “An Eos Hweg“, but it is a more recent translation from the folk revival of the Celtic traditions.  It is a popular song often sung in pubs today in repertoire of the choral groups.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968

THE NIGHTINGALE
I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.

NOTES
1) Pretty Bets or Betty or Sweet maiden
2) the girl was a milkmaid and the young man offers to take home the bucket with fresh milk
3) certainly the girl had become pregnant

third part

LINK
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

The Pleasant Month of May

Leggi in italiano

“The haymaker’s song” aka “The Pleasany Month of May”, ‘”Twas in the Pleasant Month of May” or ” The Merry Haymakers” is in the Family Copper’s collection of traditional songs from Sussex (see): in the season of haymaking, starting in May, the farmers went to make hay, cutting the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.

George Stubbs - Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)
George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Mr A. L. Lloyd (“Folk Song in England”, p 234/5) traces a possible source to a broadside of 1695; collected versions seem more in the style of the 18th century and presumably stem from the late broadsides, of which there were one or two. Found in tradition mainly in the South and South East of England, the exception being Huntington, Sam Henry’s Songs of the People(1990) which has an unprovenanced set, Tumbling Through the Hay, presumably noted in Ulster.” (from here)

After the hard work, however, it’s time to have fun and so all the workers are dancing in the middle of the haystacks on the melodies of a piper !!


William Pint & Felicia Dale
from Hartwell Horn 1999 
Jackie Oates from Hyperboreans 2009 
Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

PLEASANT MONTH OF MAY *
I
‘Twas in the pleasant month of May,
In the springtime of the year,
And down in yonder meadow
There runs a river clear.
See how the little fishes,
How they do sport and play;
Causes many a lad and many a lass
To go there a-making hay.
II
Then in comes the scythesman,
That meadow to mow down,
With his old leathered bottle
And the ale that runs so brown.
There’s many a stout and a laboring man
Goes there his skill to try;
He works, he mows, he sweats, he blows,
And the grass cuts very dry.
III
Then in comes both Tom and Dick
With their pitchforks and their rakes,
And likewise black-eyed Susan
The hay all for to make.
There’s a sweet, sweet, sweet and a jug, jug, jug(1)
How the harmless birds do sing
From the morning to the evening
As we were a-haymaking.
IV
It was just at one evening
As the sun was a-going down,
We saw the jolly piper
Come a-strolling through the town.
There he pulled out his tabor and pipes(2)
And he made the valleys ring;
So we all put down our rakes and forks
And we left off haymaking.
V
We called for a dance
And we tripped it along;
We danced all round the haycocks
Till the rising of the sun.
When the sun did shine such a glorious light,
How the harmless birds did sing;
Each lad he took his lass in hand
And went back to his haymaking.

NOTES
1) sounds that recall the trill of birds: they are the verses that imitate birds singing
2) pipe and drum, in a combination called tabor-pipe: the three-hole flute allows the musician to play the instrument with one hand, while with the other he strikes the tambourine with a shoulder strap. If the combination was very versatile and well suited to street performances of the jester, it was also perfect for the performance of the dances and then in the ancient iconography convivial images are often frequent in the presence of dancers. ((see more)

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

LINK
http://www.hayinart.com/001405.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thepleasantmonthofmay.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/213.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/haymaker.htm
http://konkykru.com/e.caldecott.our.haymaking.html

Tommy’s Gone

Sea shanty variante della famiglia “To Hilo” nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor sono riportate ben due versioni.
Il marinaio di queste sea shanty è Tom e al suo nome si abbinano un buon numero di porti, la lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dalla durata del lavoro (‘Stringing out’) e quindi la lista dei porti visitati dal nostro Tom è molto vasta.

Tommy’s Gone (Tommy’s Gone Away)

ASCOLTA Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone, what will I do?
Tommy’s gone away.
Tommy’s gone to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that noted school.
Tommy’s gone to Baltimore
To dance upon that sandy floor
Tommy’s gone to Mobile Bay,
To screw the cotton all the day..
Tommy’s gone to Singapore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone to Buenos Aires,
Where the girls have long black hair,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Tommy’s gone forevermore,
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito
Tommy è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool quella scuola rinomata
Tommy è andato a Baltimora
a ballare sulla sabbia gialla
Tommy è andato a Mobile Bay
a raccogliere il cotone tutto il giorno
Tommy è andato a Singapore
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre
Tommy è andato a Buenos Aires
dove le ragazze portano i capelli neri e lunghi
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre

Tommy’s Gone to Ilo

La variante diffusa nel Canada.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
Away you Ilo (1).
My Tom’s gone, what shall I do?
My Tom’s gone to Ilo.
Tom’s gone to Liverpool
To Liverpool that packet school
Tom’s gone to Merasheen (2)
where they tied up
to tree (3)
Tom’s gone to Vallipo (4)
When he’ll come back I do not know
Tom’s gone to Rio
Where the girls put on show
Hilo town is in Peru
It’s just the place for me an’ you.
I wish I was in London town
then to see no more Ilo
A bully ship and a bully crew
Tom’s gone and I’ll gone too
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
via a Hilo
Tom se n’è andato, cosa farò?
Tommy è partito per Hilo
Tom è andato a Liverpool
a Liverpool a quella scuola navale
Tom è andato a Merasheen
dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta
Tom è andato a Vallipo
quando ritornerà non lo so
Tom è andato a Rio
dove le ragazze si mettono in mostra
Hilo è una città del Perù
ed è il posto perfetto per me e te
Vorrei essere a Londra
e non andare più a Hilo
Una nave tosta e una ciurma di bulli
Tom è partito e partirò anch’io

NOTE
1) Hilo è il nome di un porto che si trova sia in Perù che  nelle Hawai (vedi)
2) anche scritto come Merrimashee c’è un isola di Merasheen a Terranova (Canada), ma più probabilmente è Miramichi, una cittadina del Canada, situata nella provincia del Nuovo Brunswick, ma anche un grande fiume che da il nome alla baia in cui sfocia, nel Golfo di San Lorenzo. Spesso i marinai ripetevano le canzoni ad orecchio ed era più probabile che venissero storpiati i nomi delle località che non si conoscevano.
3) vedi commento in Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie) 
4) Valparaiso in Cile

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/hilo-in-the-sea-shanties/
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/514.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/tomsgonetohilo.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=147564

DOODLE LET ME GO (YALLER GIRLS)

Originariamente una capstan chantey è diventata più comunemente una forebitter song dal titolo “Yellow (Yaller) Girl”.
Diffusa dai folksingers durante gli anni 1970  contiene una serie di mondegreen (è ancora aperto a molteplici spiegazioni il significato del termine doodle) e vari aggiustamenti testuali.
C’è da dire inoltre che gli stessi shantymen erano i primi a ideare fantasiose spiegazioni per i termini “strani”, poichè molte parole erano state ripetute a pappagallo o storpiate durante il processo di trasmissione.

PIRATE SONG

In questa versione il marinaio si dichiara più che soddisfatto delle “prestazioni” delle ragazze di Madam Gashee rinomato bordello di Callao.
Mor Ladron y Borth

Brise-Glace live, saltano il primo verso e iniziano con “I wish I was in Madame Gashay’s, down in Callayo..”


Once I had a yellow girl belonged to Mobile Bay (1)
Hoorah my yellow(2) girls,
doodle (3) let me go

Doodle let me go me girls, doodle let me go, Hoorah my yellow girls,
doodle let me go

I wish I was in Madam Gashee(4)’s down in Callao(5)
(She tripped her feet, she swung her hip, she gave a sassy smile
She took me in, she gave me gin, she took me to her room) (6)
She grabbed me by the bobstay (7) boys and danced me round the room
The mate is drunk, the crew are drunk, the old man’s got a load
We’ll tie a rope round Madam Gashee’s and take the place in tow
Traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
Una volta avevo una ragazza creola di Mobile Bay
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte ,
datevi da fare 

datevi da fare, datevi da fare
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte
datevi da fare

Vorrei essere da Madam Gashee a Callao
lei caracollava e ancheggiava
e lanciava sorrisi lascivi;
mi fece entrare, mi diede del gin e mi portò nella sua stanza
mi afferrò il “bompresso”, ragazzi e mi fece ballare per tutta la stanza.
Il primo ufficiale è ubriaco,
la ciurma è ubriaca
e il capitano ha un carico.
Legheremo una cima intorno alla casa di Madam Gashe e la rimorchieremo con noi.

NOTE
1) Mobile, città portuale dell’Alabama nel Golfo del Messico, già capitale della Louisiana francese. Mobile passò sotto il controllo britannico (Florida) e finì sotto il dominio spagnolo (dal 1780 al 1812) per poi diventare territorio degli Stati Uniti. “Tra il 1819 ed il 1822, con la creazione delle piantagioni, la popolazione aumentò a dismisura, inoltre, a favorire lo sviluppo cittadino vi era la sua posizione geografica, al centro delle tratte commerciali tra l’Alabama ed il Mississippi. Si sviluppò particolarmente il settore legato alla vendita ed al commercio del cotone, tanto che nel 1840, Mobile era seconda solo a New Orleans per esportazione del prezioso materiale.” (Wikipedia).
2) yella, yallow era usato dai marinai britannici-americani per indicare il colore della pelle di una mulatta (creola). Più raramente per indicare una ragazza di razza asiatica.
3) doodle o do you let? Doodle potrebbe voler dire ragazza (dal francese dou-dou ovvero una parola diffusa nei Caraibi come “innamorata”) come un vezzeggiativo oppure stare per Do-a let me go, ovvero Do n’ let me go oppure Do let my go in italiano: (non) lasciarmi andare.. Come osservato i marinai avevano l’usanza di aggiungere una d prima di una l così la parola “do let” diventa foneticamente “do –d- let” e quindi doodle. O ancora potrebbe essere una parola nonsense (vedere discussione qui) Io a naso propendo per la versione “datti da fare” il cui significato è ovvio essendo riferito alle signorine di Madam Gashee
4) rinomata casa del piacere di Callao
5) Callao  (porto del Perù vicino a Lima)
6) oppure i Brise-Glace cantano:
She guv me gin, she guv me food, she took me to a room.
She swung her hips, she tripped her feet, she winked her sassy eye.
7) ma che fantasiosi questi marinai!

LA VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

Nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties il testo riprende la folk song “Blow the Candles Out
Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 ♪ 

Considering how widespread this shanty is in the revival, it is interesting to note that only Sharp and Terry give it, apart from Hugill – and his version comes (surprise, surprise) from Harding the Barbadian. ‘Doodle’, of course, is simply ‘Do’ with interpolated extra consonant(s) again!  Short gave Terry only the first verse (“Mr. Short had one verse of words; I have perpetrated the remaining two”), but he gave Sharp more, which are duly recorded in mss, although he only published the first verse. Although Short starts with the more or less standard ‘merchant’s daughter’ verse, his text rapidly becomes the folk song Blow the Candle Out.  Here, the Sharp fragments are expanded to coherent narrative from standard versions of Blow the Candle Out. The broadside text is however edited – the full text would over-fill even the longest of capstan tasks!   (tratto da qui)

*
It’s of a merchant’s daughter belonged to Callio;
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
Chorus
Doodle let me go, me girls,
doodle let me go,

Hurrah, me yaller girls,
doodle let me go

I
..  the saturday evening
he went to see his dear
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
The candles they were burning
and the moon shone bright and clear.
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
He went in her window
To ease of her pain
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
She quickly rose to let him in
and went to bed again.
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
Chorus
II
The streets are too lonely for you to walk about
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
and take me in your arms, love
And blow the candles out.”
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
III
.. the day
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
the sailor moon.. and farewell my dear
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
And if we prove successful, love
Please name it after me.
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
And if we have a baby, boys, we’ll name him after me.
Hurrah, me yaller girls, doodle let me go
Chorus
IV
It was six months after this young girl she
..
blow the candles out
Traduzione Cattia Salto
Si tratta della figlia di un mercante che vive a Callao
Urrà, mie ragazze mulatte datevi da fare
Coro
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte,
datevi da fare
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte
datevi da fare
I
.. sabato sera
andò a trovare la sua bella
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
le candele erano accese
e la luna brillava chiara
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
andò alla sua finestra
per alleviarle il dispiacere
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
lei si alzò lesta e lo fece entrare
e poi andò a letto
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
Coro
II
Le strade sono troppo solitarie per camminarci
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
e prendimi tra le tue braccia, amore e spegni la candela
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
III

Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare

Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
E se la prova avrà successo, amore
ti prego di dargli il mio nome.
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare
e se avremo un bambino, ragazzi, gli daremo il mio nome
Urrà mie ragazze mulatte, datevi da fare

*trascrizione parziale da completare

continua versione irlandese: Yellow Gals 

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/doodleletmego.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49421
http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=380
https://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=96
https://www.8notes.com/scores/4255.asp
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm

BRIGG FAIR TO MEET LOVE

Le Lammas Fairs (come si dice nelle isole britanniche o le country fairs come sono più comunemente chiamate in America) si svolgono dopo il raccolto del grano: sono un mercato del bestiame (in particolare cavalli) dove gli agricoltori si ritrovano per vendere e comprare i prodotti dell’estate, ma anche un importante evento di socializzazione per le fattorie isolate.
Nella stagione dell’abbondanza si ringrazia la terra per i suoi frutti, e si condivide la gioia con musica, danze, giochi. Nella tradizione celtica era Lughnasad, una festa dedicata al corteggiamento e a combinare i matrimoni (sotto i buoni uffici del dio Lugh).
Così nelle ballate quando è tempo di fiera gli innamorati si incontrano per scambiarsi le promesse matrimoniali

Donnybrook Fair 1859 by Erskine Nicol 1825-1904

BRIGG FAIR

Questa canzone appartiene alla tradizione folk inglese ed è stata riportata su cilindro di cera agli inizi del 900 da Percy Grainger che la raccolse da Joseph Taylor (primi due versi ascolta); lo stesso Grainger ne fece un arrangiamento per coro a 5 voci aggiungendo ulteriori versi. Il brano vanta anche un arrangiamento classico essendo stato d’ispirazione alla “English raphsody” composta sempre in quegli anni da Frederick Delius (ASCOLTA)
ASCOLTA The Queen’s six l’arrangiamento per corale di Percy Grainger


VERSIONE TESTUALE PERCY GRAINGER
I
It was on the fifth of August-
er’ the weather fine and fair,
Unto Brigg Fair(1) I did repair,
for love I was inclined.
II
I rose up with the lark in the morning,
with my heart so full of glee(2),
Of thinking there to meet my dear,
long time I’d wished to see.
III
I took hold of her lily-white hand, O
and merrily was her heart:
“And now we’re met together,
I hope we ne’er shall part”.
IV
For it’s meeting is a pleasure,
and parting is a grief,
But an unconstant lover is worse
than any thief.
V
The green leaves they shall wither
and the branches they shall die
If ever I prove false to her,
to the girl that loves me.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era il 5 di agosto
il tempo bello e mite
alla fiera di Brigg(1) mi recavo
perchè dall’amore ero attratto
II
Mi alzai con l’allodola al mattino
e il mio cuore era pieno di allegria(2)
al pensiero di incontrare là il mio amore
che da tanto tempo desideravo vedere
III
Le presi in mano la sua mano bianco giglio e allegro era il suo cuore
“Adesso che ci siamo incontrati
spero che non ci separeremo più”
IV
Perchè incontrarsi è un piacere
e separarsi è un dolore
ma un amore insincero è peggiore
di un ladro
V
Le foglie verdi appassiranno
e le radici marciranno
se mai io mi dimostrassi falso con lei
la ragazza che mi ama.

NOTE
1)  Glanford Brigg nel Lincolnshire al guado del fiume Ancholme : già il nome è sintomatico di un posto per tradizione luogo di raduni dove si tengono fiere di bestiame e competizioni sportive
2)”mirth, joy, rejoicing; a lively feeling of delight caused by special circumstances and finding expression in appropriate gestures and looks”. In Old and Middle English it’s chiefly a poetic word, meaning primarily ‘entertainment, pleasure, sport’, and especially ‘musical entertainment, music, melody’ (this is how we get musical glees and glee clubs and a current popular television series). Anglo-Saxon poets sang ‘glees’ (gleow) with their harps, and a common Middle English word for ‘minstrel’ isgleeman.

LA VERSIONE FOLK

Le versioni che conservano un carattere più folk come dalla melodia di Joseph Taylor sono con interpreti per lo più al femminile.
Martin Carthy  definisce la melodia “un po’ meditabonda ma molto allegra“: ” When Percy Grainger first went up to Lincolnshire in the early days of field recording (he was one of the first in England to use recording techniques in the collection of folksong) one of the men he recorded was a beautiful singer by the name of Joseph Taylor. Among the many songs taken down on the wax cylinders was Brigg Fair, slightly pensive but very happy. Mr Taylor subsequently became one of the first of the traditional (or “field”) singers to have recordings issued by a commercial recording company; he has great subtlety, beautiful timing, and, despite of his old age, a fine clear voice. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy in Byker Hill; 1967

ASCOLTA Jackie Oates 2011

ASCOLTA Shirley Collins 1964

ASCOLTA June Tabor “Quercus” (2013)


I
It was on the fifth of August
The weather fair(hot) and mild
Unto Brigg Fair I did repair
For love I was inclined
II
I got(rose) up with the lark in the morning
with my heart full of glee(1)
Expecting there to meet(see) my dear(love)
Long time I’d wished to see
III
I looked over my left shoulder
To see what I might see
And there I spied(saw) my own true love
Come a-tripping down to me
IV
I took hold of his(her) lily-white hand
And I merrily sang my heart
For now we are together
We never more shall part
V
For the green leaves, they will wither
And the roots, they’ll all decay
Before that I prove false to him(her)
The man(lass) that loves me well(true)
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era il 5 di agosto
il tempo bello e mite
alla fiera di Brigg mi recavo
perchè dall’amore ero attratta
II
Mi alzai con l’allodola al mattino
con il cuore pieno di allegrezza
nell’attesa di incontrare il mio amore
che da tanto tempo desideravo vedere
III
Guardai oltre la mia spalla sinistra
per vedere quello che riuscivo vedere
e là vidi il mio vero amore
che veniva verso di me
IV
Gli presi la mano bianco giglio
e allegramente cantava il mio cure, perchè adesso eravamo insieme
e non ci saremmo più separati
V
Perchè le foglie verdi appassiranno
e le radici marciranno
prima che io mi mostri falsa con lui
l’uomo che mi ama veramente (sinceramente)

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/joseph.taylor/songs/briggfair.html
http://aclerkofoxford.blogspot.it/2012/05/brigg-fair-and-history-of-glee.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpM_JQNBVYs
https://thesession.org/tunes/6799

Andare a fare il fieno nel mese di maggio!

Read the post in English

“The haymaker’s song” anche “The Pleasany Month of May”, ‘”Twas in the Pleasant Month of May” oppure ” The Merry Haymakers” è riportata nella raccolta di canti tradizionali della famiglia Copper del Sussex (vedi): nella canzone, che plaude all’onesto lavoro nei campi, ci si riferisce a un attività particolare della stagione agricola, quella in cui si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi.
Per tutto l’Ottocento non mancarono poesie e canzoni sul tema “Making of the Hay” vedi

George Stubbs - Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)
George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Al Lloyd (“Folk Song in England”, p 234/5) traccia una possibile fonte in un foglio volante del 1695; le versioni raccolte richiamano però lo stile del 1700 e presumibilmente derivano da un paio di broadsides più recenti. Trovata principalmente nella tradizione  nel sud e sud-est dell’Inghilterra, ad eccezione di Huntington; in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry (1990), “Tumbling Through the Hay”, presumibilmente trascritto in Ulster.” (tratto da qui)

Dopo il duro lavoro arriva però il momento di divertirsi e così tutti i lavoranti si trovano a danzare in mezzo ai covoni di fieno sulle melodie di un piper di passaggio!!

William Pint & Felicia Dale in Hartwell Horn 1999 
Jackie Oates in Hyperboreans 2009 
Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

PLEASANT MONTH OF MAY *
I
‘Twas in the pleasant month of May,
In the springtime of the year,
And down in yonder meadow
There runs a river clear.
See how the little fishes,
How they do sport and play;
Causes many a lad and many a lass
To go there a-making hay.
II
Then in comes the scythesman,
That meadow to mow down,
With his old leathered bottle
And the ale that runs so brown.
There’s many a stout and a laboring man
Goes there his skill to try;
He works, he mows, he sweats, he blows,
And the grass cuts very dry.
III
Then in comes both Tom and Dick
With their pitchforks and their rakes,
And likewise black-eyed Susan
The hay all for to make.
There’s a sweet, sweet, sweet and a jug, jug, jug(1)
How the harmless birds do sing
From the morning to the evening
As we were a-haymaking.
IV
It was just at one evening
As the sun was a-going down,
We saw the jolly piper
Come a-strolling through the town.
There he pulled out his tabor and pipes(2)
And he made the valleys ring;
So we all put down our rakes and forks
And we left off haymaking.
V
We called for a dance
And we tripped it along;
We danced all round the haycocks
Till the rising of the sun.
When the sun did shine such a glorious light,
How the harmless birds did sing;
Each lad he took his lass in hand
And went back to his haymaking.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Si era nel felice mese di Maggio
nella Primavera dell’Anno
e giù per quel prato
scorreva un ruscello limpido.
Guarda come i pesciolini
giocano e nuotano
perchè più di un ragazzo e una ragazza
vanno là a fare il fieno.
II
Allora arriva l’uomo con la falce
a falciare quel prato
con la sua vecchia fiaschetta
e la birra che scorre così scura
c’è più  di un robusto e alacre bracciante che
va dove c’è da mostrare la sua bravura
lavora, falcia, suda,
ansima
e l’erba molto secca taglia.
III
Poi entrano sia Tom e Dick
con i loro forconi e rastrelli
e anche Susan dagli occhi scuri
per fare tutti il fieno.
c’era una melodia, cip, cip
ciop, ciop
come cantavano gli uccellini
da mattina a sera
mentre eravamo a fare il fieno!
IV
E non appena arrivava la sera
quando il sole tramontava
si vedeva l’allegro piper
che girovaga per i paesi.
Allora tirava fuori il tamburo
e il flauto
e faceva risuonare la vallata
così si posavamo rastrelli e forconi
e si smetteva di fare fieno.
V
Si invitava per un ballo
e si girava in tondo
danzavamo intorno al covoni di fieno
fino al sorgere del sole.
Quando il sole risplendeva nella sua luce gloriosa,
mentre gli uccellini cantavano;
ogni ragazzo prendeva la sua ragazza per mano e ritornava a fare il fieno

NOTE
1) suoni che richiamano il trillo degli uccelli: sono dei versi che imitano il canto degli uccelli
2) piffero e tamburo, in una combinazione detta tabor-pipe:  il flauto a tre buchi  permette al musicista di suonare lo strumento con una sola mano, mentre con l’altra percuote il tamburino a tracolla. Se la combinazione era molto versatile e ben si prestava alle esecuzioni di strada del giullare, era anche perfetta per l’esecuzione delle danze e quindi nell’antica iconografia sono frequenti le immagini conviviali spesso in presenza di danzatori. (continua)

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

FONTI
http://www.hayinart.com/001405.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thepleasantmonthofmay.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/213.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/haymaker.htm
http://konkykru.com/e.caldecott.our.haymaking.html

Il canto dell’usignolo in Cornovaglia

Read the post in English

In Italia l’usignolo ritorna a metà marzo e riparte a settembre per svernare al caldo. Il suo canto, melodioso, potente, presenta una notevole varietà di modulazioni e fraseggi, da consumato interprete canoro, tant’è che si può parlare di un repertorio personale diverso da uccello a uccello.
Nella tradizione popolare l’usignolo è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, immortalato da Shakespeare nel “Romeo e Giulietta” canta presso il melograno ed è la scelta tra la vita e la morte: restare nel talamo nunziale e morire o partire per l’esilio (e forse la salvezza)?

Romeo and Juliet, Heather Craft

GIULIETTA
Vuoi andare già via? Ancora è lontano il giorno:
non era l’allodola, era l’usignolo
che trafisse il tuo orecchio timoroso:
canta ogni notte laggiù dal melograno;
credimi, amore, era l’usignolo.
ROMEO
Era l’allodola, messaggera dell’alba,
non l’usignolo. Guarda, amore, la luce invidiosa
a strisce orla le nubi che si sciolgono a oriente;
le candele della notte non ardono più e il giorno
in punta di piedi si sporge felice dalle cime
nebbiose dei monti. Devo andare: è la vita,
o restare e morire.

Così il canto dell’usignolo ha assunto una caratteristica negativa, egli non è il cantore della gioia come l’allodola bensì della malinconia e della morte.

CORNISH NIGHTINGALE

usignolo-pompei
Dettaglio affresco Casa del bracciale d’oro, Pompei

L’affresco nella Casa del Bracciale d’Oro, a Pompei,  databile fra il 30 e il 35 d.C. raffigurante delle scene tratte da un giardino boschivo,  ritrae un usignolo solitario tra i tralci di rosa.
E proprio i suo celarsi notturno nel fitto del bosco lo ha accostato a un certo filone di canti triviali con doppi sensi allusivi alla sfera erotica e il suo dolce canto è un invito ad abbandonarsi ai piaceri del sesso.
La canzone di tradizione popolare è nata probabilmente in Cornovaglia con i titoli di “Sweet Nightingale”, “My sweetheart, come along” o “Down in those valleys below”.
Il testo di “Sweet Nightingale” fu pubblicato nel Ancient Poems of the Peasantry of England di Robert Bell, (1857) con il commento  “Questa curiosa canzonetta – che si diceva di tradotta dall’antica lingua della Cornovaglia … l’abbiamo sentita per la prima volta in Germania … I cantanti erano quattro minatori della Cornovaglia, che all’epoca, il 1854 , lavoravano in alcune miniere di piombo vicino alla città di Zell. Il capo, o capitano, John Stocker, disse che la canzone era la prediletta dei minatori della Cornovaglia e del Devonshire, ed era sempre cantata nei giorni di paga e nelle veglie; e che suo nonno, che morì 30 anni prima all’età di cento anni, cantava la canzone, e diceva che era molto vecchia. “Sfortunatamente Bell non riuscì a ottenere una copia del brano da questi minatori, e alla fine si affidò a un gentiluomo di Plymouth che “fu costretto a riempire un po ‘qua e là, ma solo quando una brutta rima, o piuttosto nessuna, rendeva evidente quale fosse la vera rima. L’ho letto a un gentiluomo del settore minerario a Truro, e dice che è molto vicino al modo in cui lo cantiamo. “La melodia più cantata è stata raccolta dalla Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould di E.G. Stevens di St. Ives, Cornovaglia. ” (Tratto da qui)

Della canzone si conosce anche una versione in gaelico con il titolo “An Eos Hweg”, una traduzione  però più recente sulla scia del revival delle tradizioni celtiche in quel di Cornovaglia. (vedi). E’ un canto popolare intonato spesso dalla gente nei pubs oggi in repertorio nei gruppi corali.

Sam Lee & Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 
Jackie Oates – The Sweet Nightingale (Live)

Alex Campbell – ‘Live’ 1968


I
“My sweetheart, come along!
Don’t you hear the fond song,
The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?/Don’t you hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below?
II
My sweetheart(1), don’t fail,
For I’ll carry your pail(2),
Safe home to your cot as we go;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below.”
III
“Pray let me alone,
I have hands of my own;
Along with you I will not go,
To hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
IV
“Pray sit yourself down
With me on the ground,
On this bank where sweet primroses grow;
You shall hear the fond tale
Of the sweet nightingale,
As she sings in the valleys below”
V
This couple agreed;
They were married with speed(3),
And soon to the church they did go.
She was no more afraid
For to walk in the shade,
Nor yet in the valleys below.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI:
“Amore mio, accompagnami!
Non senti il canto appassionato,
le dolci note che l’usignolo effonde?
Non senti la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti?
II
Amore mio non ti sbagliare
perchè io porterò il tuo secchio(2)
al sicuro nella tua capanna, strada facendo potrai sentire la storia d’amore del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
III LEI:
“Ti prego di lasciarmi sola,
ho le mie di mani.
Con te non verrò
ad ascoltare  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
IV LUI:
“Ti prego stenditi
a terra con me,
su questa riva dove cresce la dolce primula
potrai sentire  la storia d’amore
del dolce usignolo
mentre canta nelle valli sottostanti
V
Questa coppia decise
di sposarsi con celerità(3)
e subito alla chiesa andarono.
Lei non aveva più timore
di camminare nel bosco
e nelle valli sottostanti

NOTE
1) Pretty Bets o Betty oppure Sweet maiden
2) la fanciulla era una lattaia e il giovanotto si offre di portarle a casa il secchio con il latte appena munto
3) di certo la fanciulla era rimasta incinta

continua

FONTI
http://www.an-daras.com/cornish-songs/Kanow_Tavern-Sweet_Nightingale.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=120955
http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1541-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-sweet-nightingale
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/mysweeth.htm

FIRE DOWN BELOW THE LAST SHANTY

“Fire Down Below” oltre ad essere il titolo di un film (in italiano l’inferno sepolto) e di una canzone rock è soprattutto una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) o meglio l’ultima delle canzoni marinaresche secondo Stan Hugill. Dato il tema era spesso utilizzata come pump chanty ma anche come capstan chanty
ASCOLTA Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1 (su Spotify)

Chorus
Fire, fire, fire down below,
It’s Fetch a bucket of water girls
There’s fire down below.
I
Fire in the galley, fire down below.
It’s fetch a bucket of water girls,
There’s fire down below.
fire, fire..
II
Fire in the bottom fire in the main
It’s fetch a bucket of water girls,
And put it out again.
fire, fire..
III
As I walked out one morning
in the month of June
I overheard an irish girl
sing this old song
fire, fire..
IV
Fire in the lifeboat, fire in the gig(6),
Fire in the pig-stye roasting of the pig.
fire, fire..
V
Fire up aloft and fire down below,
???
???

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Al fuoco, al fuoco, laggiù
portate un secchio, ragazze,
c’è il fuoco laggiù
I
Fuoco in cucina, fuoco là sotto
portate un secchio, ragazze,
c’è il fuoco laggiù
Al fuoco, al fuoco ..
II
Fuoco in alto e fuoco in mare
portate un secchio, ragazze,
c’è il fuoco laggiù
Al fuoco, al fuoco ..
III
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino
nel mese di Giugno
ascoltai una ragazza irlandese
che cantava questa vecchia canzone
Al fuoco, al fuoco ..
IV
Fuoco nella scialuppa, fuoco nella lancia, fuoco nel recinto che arrostisce il maiale. Al fuoco, al fuoco ..
V

NOTE
?? putroppo non capisco le parole in inglese di quello che dice

ASCOLTA Shanty Gruppe Breitling in Haul the Bowline 2013 su Spotify


Fire in the galley, fire in the house,
Fire in the beef kid(1), scorching the scouse(2).
Fire, fire, fire down below,
Fetch a bucket of water boys
Fire down below.
Fire in the forepeak(3) fire in the main(4)
fire in the windlass(5) fire in the chain
Fire in the lifeboat, fire in the gig(6),
Fire in the pig-stye roasting the pig.
Fire on the orlop(7) (cabine) fire in the hold.
Fire in the strong room melting the gold.
Fire round the capstan(5), fire on the mast,
Fire on the main deck, burning it fast.
Fire on .. (8)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Fuoco in cucina, fuoco in casa
fuoco nella pignatta(1) che brucia lo stufato(2);
al fuoco, al fuoco, laggiù
portate un secchio, ragazzi,
c’è il fuoco laggiù.

Fuoco nel gavone(3) e fuoco sull’albero(4),
fuoco sull’argano(5) e sulla catena; fuoco nella scialuppa, fuoco nella lancia(6),
fuoco nel recinto che arrostisce il maiale.
Fuco sul ponte inferiore(7) e nella stiva,
fuoco nel crogiolo che fonde l’oro.
Fuoco sul verricello(5) fuoco sull’albero,
fuoco sul ponte principale che brucia in fretta

NOTE
1) Beefkid = small wooden tub in which beef salt is served.
2) scouse = mixture of salt beef and crushed biscuit. E’ un piatto tradizionale di Liverpool, ossia uno stufato di carne e vedure principalmento con patate, cipolle, carote e carne d’angello. E’ un piatto popolare della cucina povera. Scouse è anche l’accento tipico di Liverpool (delle classi popolari) con chiare influenze celtiche, l’originarsi dell’accento è derivato molto probabilmente dalla pronuncia inglese da parte degli immigranti irlandesi giunti a Liverpool per cercare lavoro, un tipo di emigrazione cospicua e protratta nel tempo. Ad esempio nel censimento del 1841 un quarto degli abitanti di Liverpool era nato in Irlanda e ancora dal censimento all’inizio del XXI secolo si è rilevato che il 60% dei Liverpudlians ha origine irlandese.
3) forepeak= gavone un termine nautico per indicare una specie di “ripostiglio” a prora e a poppa in cui stivare vele e cime
4) main in termini nautici si traduce con varie parole ma composte da solo significa l’oceano, l’alto mare. Può indicare anche l’albero principale, il più alto degli alberi (mainmast) oppure la vela più grande (mainsail) albero maestro e vela maestra.
5) verricello e argano come termini nautici stanno a indicare due diverse “macchine” che svolgono però la stessa funzione quella cioè di sollevare pesi mediante l’uso di una fune o catena. Nelle navi a vela per diporto un winch è un verricello di modeste dimensioni che serve per manovrare le vele. La principale differenza tra le due macchine è che il verricello ha l’asse orizzontale, mentre l’argano ha l’asse verticale, Il verricello di norma è costruito per il traino, l’argano invece per il sollevamento. Si stralcia da wikipedia “Il verricello è formato da un cilindro orizzontale (chiamato tamburo) che avvolge la fune sulla quale è applicata la resistenza (carico). Questo viene fatto ruotare da un ingranaggio che moltiplica la forza di entrata, sia questa di una manovella come nel caso di un apparecchio manuale o di un motore elettrico, idraulico o pneumatico a seconda delle esigenze. Poiché il verricello è una macchina considerata molto antica, i primi prototipi non utilizzavano ingranaggi-moltiplicatori e pertanto all’epoca la sua potenza (braccio) era da considerarsi semplicemente tanto maggiore quanto più lunga era la manovella di azionamento. Un classico esempio di verricello è il pozzo in cui, girando una manovella, facciamo ruotare il tamburo attorno al quale è avvolta la corda che sostiene il secchio, facendolo salire o scendere. Oggi esistono infinite tipologie di verricelli ma praticamente tutte sfruttano le potenzialità dell’ingranaggio” “Capstan” è più propriamente il verricello dell’ancora,
6) gig= A light rowboat, powerboat or sailboat, often used as a fast launch for the captain or for a lighthouse keeper. The gig was always designed for speed, and was not used as a working boat.
7) orlop = the name of a lower deck.
8) il finale differisce dalle versioni standard e non riesco a capire le parole in inglese di quello che dice

SECONDA VERSIONE

Una versione decadente che con il “fuoco nella parti basse” allude alla sessualità dirompente di una giovane fanciulla!

ASCOLTA Nick Cave in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys  ANTI 2006.


She was the parson’s daughter
With her red and rosy cheeks
(Way, hey, hee, hi, ho!)
She went to church on Sunday
And sang the anthem sweet
(‘Cause there’s fire down below)
The parson was a misery
So scraggy and so thin
“Look here, you motherfuckers
If you lead a life of sin”He took his text from Malachi(1)
And pulled a weary face
Well, I fucked off for Africa (2)
And there, I feel(3) from grace
The parson’s little daughter
Was as sweet as sugar-candy
I said to her, “us sailors
Would make lovers neat and handy”
She says to me, “you sailors
Are a bunch of fucking liars
And all of you are bound to hell
To feed the fucking fires”
Well, there’s fire down below, my lad
So we must do what we oughta
‘Cause the fire is not half as hot
As the parson’s little daughter
Yes, there’s fire (fire)
Down (down)
Below (below)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Lei era la figlia del parroco
con le sue guance rosa e rubiconde
che andò la domenica in chiesa per cantare l’inno dolcemente
(perchè c’era il fuoco sotto).
Il parroco era un infelice
così allampanato:
“Guardatevi fottuti bastardi,
se condurrete una vita nel peccato”.
Prese il suo sermone da Malachia(1),
fece una faccia stanca,
bene affanculo l’Africa(2)
e li mi sono sentito nella Grazia(3).
La piccola figlia del parroco
era dolce come zucchero filato
le dissi “Noi marinai
facciamo l’amore bene e con destrezza”
Lei mi dice “Voi marinai
siete un branco di fottuti bugiardi
e ognuno di voi è destinato all’inferno per alimentare i fuochi della dannazione”
Beh c’è del fuoco lì sotto, ragazzo mio, così dobbiamo fare quello che dobbiamo
perchè il fuoco non è la metà caldo
di come è calda la piccola figlia del parroco.

NOTE
1) Malachia fu un Profeta Dell’Antico Testamento vissuto nel V secolo a. C. Wikipedia dice a riguardo: il suo libro profetico.. si compone di sei brani costituiti sullo stesso tipo; Jahvé, o il suo profeta, lancia un’affermazione, che è discussa dal popolo o dai sacerdoti e che è sviluppata in un discorso in cui si alternano minacce e promesse di salvezza. Sono soprattutto due i temi che lo riguardano: le colpe culturali dei sacerdoti e dei fedeli e lo scandalo dei matrimoni misti e dei divorzi.
2) il senso della frase mi sfugge letteralmente “ho mandato a puttane l’Africa”
3) trovato scritto sia come feel che come fell: nel primo caso significa “lì mi sono sentito nella grazia“, sotto inteso la Grazia di Dio (e non solo);  nel secondo  diventa “li sono caduto in (dis)grazia”

FONTI
http://www.bethsnotesplus.com/2015/01/fire-down-below.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/783.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/19/fire.htm
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2020
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35083
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or32B_IZWKs
https://ismaels.wordpress.com/2008/11/01/rogue%E2%80%99s-gallery-the-art-of-the-siren-4/

Napo era un mastino (Boney was a warrior sea shanty)

Read the post in English

Una sea shanty nata inizialmente come street ballad sulle guerre napoleoniche: Napoleone incarnò le speranze d’indipendenza e le istanze rivoluzionarie delle popolazioni europee e delle Colonie americane (Irlanda in testa); amato dagli strati più poveri come dagli intellettuali è l’eroe romantico per eccellenza, nella sua grandezza e nella sua caduta. Oggi più nessuno parteggia per Napoleone ma due secoli prima gli animi si infiammavano per lui !!

Napoleone Bonaparte

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Scrive AL Lloyd “A short drag shanty. These simple shanties were uses when only a few strong pulls were needed, as in boarding tacks and sheets and bunting up a sail in furling, etc. Boney was popular both in British and American vessels and in one American version Bonaparte is made to cross the Rocky Mountains.” Così ci sono moltissime versioni testuali che tutte tratteggiano le vittorie e le sconfitte di Napoleone in pochi versi. La melodia riprende il canto marinaresco bretone “Jean François de Nantes” (con testo in francese)
C’est Jean François de Nantes OUE, OUE, OUE
Gabier sur la fringante Oh mes bouées Jean François
(continua qui)
L’avventura “Asterix in Corsica” omaggia la shanty dando il nome Boneywasawarriorwayayix al capo della resistenza sulla Corsica

Paul Clayton


Boney(1) was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A warrior, a tarrier(2),
John François (3)
Boney fought the Prussians,
Boney fought the Russians.
Boney went to Moscow,
across the ocean across the storm
Moscow was a-blazing
And Boney was a-raging.
Boney went to Elba
Boney he came back again.
Boney went to Waterloo
There he got his overthrow.
Boney he was sent away
Away in Saint Helena
Boney broke his heart and died
Away in Saint Helena
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero,
Wey, hay, yah
un guerriero, un mastino
John François
Napo ha combattuto i prussiani
Napo ha combattuto i russi,
Napo è andato a Mosca attraverso l’oceano e la tempesta,
Mosca bruciava
e Napo era infuriato.
Napo è andato all’Elba
e poi è ritornato di nuovo:
Napo è andato a Waterloo
ed è stato rovesciato,
Napo è stato mandato via,
lontano a Sant’Elena
a Napo si è spezzato il cuore ed è morto, lontano a Sant’Elena

NOTE
1) Boney equivalente al nostro diminutivo Napo per Napoleone. L’origine del nome è incerta potrebbe voler dire “il Leone di Napoli”, il primo nome illustre fu quello del Cardinale Napoleone Orsini (ai tempi di papa Bonifacio VIII)
2) terrier = mastino (e richiama il termine francese terrien nella sea shanty “Jean-François de Nantes”)
3) storpiato anche in Jonny Franswor! citazione del canto marinaresco bretone Jean-François de Nantes

.. la versione punk-rock con ironia
Jack Shit in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006


I
Boney(1) was a warrior
A warrior a terrier(2)
Boney beat the Prussians
The Austrians, the Russians
Boney went to school in France
He learned to make the Russians dance
Boney marched to Moscow
Across the Alps through ice and snow.
II
Boney was a Frenchy man
But Boney had to turn again
So he retreated back again
Moscow was in ruins then
He beat the Prussians squarely
He whacked the English nearly
He licked them in Trafalgar’s Bay(1)
Carried his main topm’st away
III
Boney went a cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian(2)
Boney went to Saint Helen’s
He never came back again
They sent him into exile
He died on Saint Helena’s Isle
Boney broke his heart and died
In Corsica he wished he stayed
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Boney era un guerriero
un guerriero, un mastino
Boney sconfisse i Prussiani
gli Austriaci e i Russi
Boney andò a scuola in Francia
e imparò a fare il ballo russo
Boney marciò su Mosca
attraversò le Alpi in mezzo al ghiaccio e alla neve
II
Boeny era un francese
eppure Boney dovette di nuovo rigirarsi
così si ritirò ancora
Mosca era in rovina allora
egli vinse i Prussiani in un sol colpo
e quasi sconfisse gli Inglesi
li bastonò nella Baia di Trafalgar
e portò via l’albero di maestra-
III
Boney andò in crociera
a bordo del Billy Ruffian
Boney andò a Sant’Elena
e non è mai più tornato.
Lo mandarono in esilio
e morì nell’isola di Sant’Elena
a Boney gli si spezzò il cuore e morì
in Corsica avrebbe preferito restare

NOTE
1) La battaglia di Trafalgar vedeva gli Inglesi in inferiorità numerica ma la manovra anticonvenzionale di Nelson (una posizione detta in gergo militare a T) spiazzò lo schieramento nemico disposto su una lunga fila (l’ottimo approfondimento in vedi), l’unico colpo inferto dai francesi fu la morte di Nelson.  l’Inghilterra era una potenza navale ineguagliabile per i Francesi e gli Spagnoli, così Napoleone rinunciò all’invasione della Gran Bretagna che diventò la padrona dei mari fino alla prima guerra mondiale
2) la nave che portò Napoleone in esilio su Sant’Elena era Bellerephon ma il nome veniva storpiato in Billy Ruffian o Billy Ruff’n dai suoi marinai non abbastanza colti da apprezzare i riferimenti alla mitologia greca.

 

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT


Nelle note del progetto Soirt Sharp Shanties gli autori scrivono “Short’s words were few—a mere two and a half verses—but sufficient to indicate that his, like every other version of the shanty, essentially followed Napoleon Bonaparte’s life story to a greater or lesser extent depending on the length of the job in hand (although, as Colcord points out, some versions introduced inventive variations on his life). We have simply borrowed some (of the true) verses from other versions—but by no means all that were available!.. Perhaps, we are again dealing with a shanty that changed its purpose—Jackie has chosen a slower rendition which may be more appropriate to the time. Sharp noted: “Mr. Short sang ‘Bonny’ not ’Boney’, which is the more usual pronunciation; while his rendering of ’John’ was something between the French ’Jean’ and the English ’John’.” (tratto da qui)

Jackie Oates in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2


Boney was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A bulling fighting tarrier,
John François
First he fought the Russians
then he fought the Prussians.
Boney went to Moscow,
Moscow was on fire oh.
We licked him in Trafalgar’s
Billy ??
Boney went to Elba
he came back to make another show
Boney went to Waterloo
and than he maked his overthrow.
Boney went to a-cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Boney went to Saint Helena
Boney he didn’t get back
Boney broke his heart and died
in Corsica he should stay
Boney was a general
A ruddy, snotty general.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero,
Wey, hay, yah
un fottuto mastino litigioso
John François
Prima ha combattuto i russi,
poi ha combattuto i prussiani
Napo è andato a Mosca
Mosca bruciava.
Lo bastonammo nella Baia di Trafalgar
??
Napo è andato all’Elba
e poi è ritornato per un altro giro.
Napo è andato a Waterloo
ed è stato rovesciato.
Napo è andato in crociera
a bordo del Billy Ruffian
Napo è andato a Sant’Elena
Mapo non è mai più tornato.
a Napo gli si spezzò il cuore e morì
in Corsica avrebbe preferito restare
Napo era un generale,
un dannato generale arrogante

Una interessante versione nell’ambiente folk viene da Maddy Prior che la canta come una filastrocca con i colpi di cannone e il rullo dei tamburi sullo sfondo
Maddy Prior in Ravenchild 1999


Boney was a warrior
Wey, hey, ah
A warrior, a terrier
John François
He planned a distant enterprise
A great and distant enterprise.
He is off to fight the Russian bear
He plans to drive him from his lair.
They left with banners all ablaze
The heads of Europe stood amazed.
He thinks he’ll beat the Russkies
And the bonny bunch of roses. (1)
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Napo era un guerriero
Wey, hey, ah
un guerriero, un mastino
ohn François
Progettò una impresa lontana
una grande e lontana impresa
andò a combattere l’Orso russo
progettò di cacciarlo dalla tana .
ritornarono con gli stendardi in fiamme. I capi d’europa fecero meraviglia!
Credeva di sconfiggere i Russi
e il bel mazzo di rose

NOTE
1) gli inglesi

LA VERSIONE FRANCESE

Les Naufragés live

C’est Jean-François de Nantes
Oué, oué, oué,
Gabier de la Fringante
Oh ! mes bouées, Jean-François
Débarque de la campagne
Fier comme un roi d’Espagne
En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course
Une montre, une chaîne
Qui vaut une baleine
Branl’bas chez son hôtesse
Carambole et largesses
La plus belle servante
L’emmène dans la soupente
En vida la bouteille
Tout son or appareille
Montre et chaîne s’envolent
Attrape la vérole
A l’hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente
Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche
Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine
Pauvr’ Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier de la Fringante.

FONTI
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/boney-was-a-warrior/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boney.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boney.html http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/boneywas.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=84540 https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1560890
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/french.htm