Archivi tag: Helston

Helston Flora Day (Cornwall)

Leggi in italiano

 

In Helston, Cornwall it takes place every year on 8 May the Furry Dance (Flora or Floral dance) in the Feast of St. Michael. The meaning of Furry is found in the root of the gaelic  fer = fair. Inside the program of the tipical dance there is a sacred representation with historical and mythical theme, which unfolds in a procession that starts from the church: the characters are Robin Hood and his brigade, Saint George and Saint Michael, which announce the arrival of Spring.
1834733

SEE MORE 

THE FURRY DANCE

The dance is a very long promenade of young couples (and not really young) parading behind the band: they are for the most part walking (or hopping step) alternating a couple of turns with their partner. There are two shows, one in the morning and the second in the midday with more formal dresses (long dress and elaborate hat for ladies, tight and top hat for gentlemen: of British origin, the tight or taitè also called morning dress because worn during the day, it is the male dress in public ceremonies and for all occasions concerning the English royal family.)


THE GAMES OF ROBIN HOOD

In the late Middle Ages the “Robin Hood Games” were practiced during the May Day. It began with a parade of the various characters of the legendary Robin Hood, the masks of the horse and the dragon and the May pole brought by the oxen. The May pole was then raised and a dance took place around it. After the buffoon performances of the horse and dragon masks the competition began: the challenge of archery.
At the end people dancing around the May pole until late. Tradition has lasted until the end of the nineteenth century

img013

LINK
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

More commonly known under the title “Hal an tow” is the main song in the representation of mummers at Flora Day in Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band from ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband from Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arranged in rock version has become very popular among the groups of the genre celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o

NOTES
1)  The translation of Hal an tow could be “May day garland” (halan = calende) and the same name was attributed to the groups of youths who, early in the morning, went into the woods to cut the branches of the May and brought them to the village dancing and singing for the arrival of Spring.
But many scholars tend to refer to the meaning of “heel and toe,” referring to the dance step of the Morris dancing.
Another interpretation translates it as “pulling the rope” (from the Dutch “Haal aan het Touw” derived from the Saxon) referred to the work of the sailors on the ships but also to the game of tug of war, one of the few survivors from the May Games by Robin Hood. Some interpret all the stanzas in a seafaring key, as if the song were a sea-shanty and explain the term “rumbelow” as the rum in the vessel at the time of the pirates!
What shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.How do you deny the reference to the deer god and, more generally, to the symbolism of the deer as a sacred animal, the bearer of fertility? see more
3) Shirley Collins:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: the image is ironic about the Spaniards who eat goose feathers by english arrows to whom the roast goose is mockingly due as the winners
5)  Shirley Collins:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) St George day in many populations of the Mediterranean rural world, represents the rebirth of nature and the arrival of Spring, the Saint has inherited the functions of a more ancient pagan deity associated with solar cults: St. George defeating the Dragon became the solar god who defeats the darkness. see more
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Our Lady  Originally, therefore, the invocation was a prayer referring to the goddess of spring. In other versions the sentence becomes”The Lord and Lady bless you” 

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html

HAL AN TOW in Helston (Cornovaglia)

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow mayday songs 
Furry Dance di Helston

1834733

A Helston in Cornovaglia si  celebra la Furry Dance (Flora o Floral  dance) che si svolge durante l’arco della giornata dell’8 Maggio. Il significato di Furry si trova  nella radice del gaelico cornico fer = fiera, festa che nel contesto di Helston è dedicata a San Michele. All’interno del nutrito programma delle danze si svolge  una specie di sacra rappresentazione a tema storico e mitico, che si snoda in una processione che parte dalla  chiesa di San Giovanni: i personaggi sono Robin Hood e la sua brigata, San  Giorgio e San Michele, che annunciano l’arrivo della Primavera.


VEDI altre riprese della festa

THE FURRY DANCE

E’ molto semplicemente una lunghissima promenade di giovani (e non proprio giovani) coppie che sfilano dietro alla banda per lo più camminando ( o con passo saltellato) alternando un paio di giri di volta con il proprio partner . Si tratta di due sfilate la prima del mattino e  la seconda di mezzogiorno con abiti più formali (abito lungo e elaborato cappellino per le signore,  tight e cilindro per i signori, very british: di origine britannica, il tight o taitè un capo dell’abbigliamento formale maschile di notevole eleganza, detto anche morning dress (“abito da giorno”) poiché indossato di giorno, è l’abito di rigore nelle cerimonie pubbliche e per tutte le occasioni che riguardano la famiglia reale inglese.)
LA DANZA DEL MATTINO
LA DANZA DI MEZZOGIORNO

I GIOCHI DI ROBIN HOOD

Di moda nel tardo Medioevo i “Giochi di Robin Hood” erano praticati durante la festa del Maggio. Si iniziava con un corteggio in  costume dei vari personaggi del leggendario Robin Hood, chiuso dal palo di  maggio portato al traino dei buoi, e dalle maschere del cavallo e del drago. Il palo del Maggio era quindi innalzato  tra il tripudio generale e si svolgeva una danza intorno ad esso. Quindi  seguivano le esibizioni buffonesche delle maschere del cavallo e del drago.
Aveva inizio quindi la gara vera e  propria: la sfida del tiro con l’arco.
Al termine la lizza era presa d’assalto  dal popolino che proseguivano fino a tardi danzando intorno al palo di  maggio. La tradizione è perdurata fino a tutto l’Ottocento

img013

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

Conosciuta più comunemente con il titolo di “Hal an tow” è la canzone principale nella rappresentazione dei mummers al Flora Day di Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band in ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband in Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arrangiata in versione rock è diventata molto popolare tra i gruppi del  genere celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)
V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
(Coro:
Hal-an-Tow, una bella festa 
ci siamo alzati presto  prima del giorno, per salutare l’estate,
per salutare il Maggio,
perché l’estate è arrivata
e l’inverno se né andato).
I
Da quando l’uomo è stato creato
le sue opere sono state dibattute
si è celebrato
l’arrivo della Primavera
II
Prendi lo scorno e  indossa le corna, era lo stemma quando  sei nato,
il padre di tuo padre lo portava,
e anche tuo padre.
III
Robin Hood e Little John
sono andati entrambi  alla fiera
e andremo nel bosco per cacciare il cervo e la lepre.
IV
Dove sono gli Spagnoli
che si sono vantati  così grandemente? Mangeranno le piume  d’oca e noi mangeremo l’arrosto.
V
Prendiamo San Giorgio o
San Giorgio era un cavaliere o
Di tutti i cavalieri della Cristianità
San Giorgio è il protettore o
in ogni terra
in ogni terra dove andiamo
VI
Ma prendiamo uno ancora più grande di San Giorgio, chi di Helston ha preso le parti, San Michele con le ali spiegate
l’arcangelo così luminoso
che ha combattuto il diavolo
nemico di tutti gli uomini
VII
Dio benedica Santa  Maria (e Mosè)
e tutta la sua  potenza e la forza,
che ci mandi la pace  in Inghilterra,
che ci mandi la pace  notte e giorno

NOTE
1)  La traduzione di Hal an tow potrebbe essere “la ghirlanda del Calendimaggio”  (halan=calende) e lo stesso nome veniva attribuito  ai gruppi di giovinetti che fin dal mattino presto andavano nei boschi a  tagliare i rami del Maggio e li portavano in paese danzando e cantando  l’arrivo della Primavera.
Ma molti studiosi propendono per il significato di “heel and toe,”   del tipo “dagli di tacco, dagli di punta” riferito al passo di  danza proprio delle Morris dancing.
Un’altra interpretazione la traduce come “tirare la corda” (dall’olandese “Haal aan het   Touw” derivato dal sassone) riferito al lavoro  dei marinai sulle navi ma anche al gioco del tiro alla fune, uno dei pochi  sopravvissuti dai Giochi di Maggio di Robin Hood. Alcuni interpretano tutte le  strofe in chiave marinaresca, come se la canzone fosse un sea-shanty  e spiegano il termine “rumbelow” come una storpiatura  di rumbowling – rumbullion  come veniva chiamato il rum e successivamente il grog all’epoca dei pirati!
2) Take the scorn and wear the horns: la prima strofa si ritrova quasi identica nella  commedia di Shakespeare As You Like  scritta nel 1599, Atto IV, Scena II, la scena di caccia nella foresta alla  richiesta di chi abbia ucciso il cervo Jaques risponde “portiamo  quest’uomo al duca, come un trionfale conquistatore romano, che metta le  corna del cervo sulla testa, come la corona della vittoria” e alla  domanda se il guardiacaccia conosca una canzone per l’occasione ecco di  seguito il testoWhat shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.(Traduzione italiano: Cosa dobbiamo dare all’uomo che ha  ucciso questo cervo? Dategli la pelle e le corna da  indossare. Poi cantate questa canzone andando a casa: non vergognatevi di indossare le corna, sono state portate da prima che voi  nasceste, il padre di vostro padre le portava e anche vostro padre. Il corno, il corno vigoroso non è da deridere o da disprezzare). Come si fa a negare il riferimento al  dio cervo e più in generale al simbolismo del cervo come animale sacro  portatore di fertilità? vedi
3) Shirley Collins canta invece:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: l’immagine ironizza sugli Spagnoli che  mangiano le piume d’oca sconfitti dalla muraglia di frecce degli Inglesi ai  quali beffardamente spetta l’arrosto d’oca poichè  vincitori
5)  Shirley Collins canta invece:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) San Giorgio nacque in Palestina e morì decapitato nel 287. La sua festa presso molte popolazioni del mondo rurale mediterraneo, rappresenta la rinascita della natura e l’arrivo della Primavera, il Santo ha ereditato le funzioni di una più antica divinità pagana connessa con i culti solari: San Giorgio che sconfigge il Drago è diventato il dio solare che sconfigge le tenebre. continua
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Santa Maria  o la Madonna. Nel tentativo attuato dalla Chiesa di portare nell’alveo della  venerazione dei Santi i rituali praticati dal popolo verso le divinità pagane  più radicate nella tradizione. In origine quindi l’invocazione era una  preghiera riferita alla dea della primavera. In altre versioni la frase  diventa “The Lord and Lady bless you” con una connotazione più pagana “Il Dio e la Dea vi benedicano”

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html