Archivi tag: Flora MacDonald

E la barca va: The Prince & the Ballerina

Leggi in italiano

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met Charles Stuart. After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) the then twenty-six-year-old Bonnie Prince managed to escape and remain hidden for several months, protected by his loyalists, despite the British patrols and the price on his head!
Charles found many hiding places and support in the Hebrides but it was a dangerous game of hide-and-seek.

THE PRINCE & THE BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes the girl, Flora MacDonald.
The MacDonalds as loyal to the king and Presbyterian confession, but they were sympathizers of the Jacobite cause and so Flora who lived in Milton (South Uist island) went on visiting her friend, wife of the clan’s Lady Margareth of Clanranald , and she was presented to Charles Stuart.

In another version of the story the prince was hiding at the Loch Boisdale on the Isle of South Uist, hoping to meet Alexander MacDonald, who had recently been arrested. Warned that a patrol would inspect the area, Charles fled with two jacobites to hide in a small farm near Ormaclette where the meeting with Flora MacDonald had been arranged. The moment was immortalized in many paintings like this by Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, there was the Bonny Prince! (see more)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraThe boat with four (or six) sailors to the oars left Benbecula on 27 June 1746 for the Isle of Skye in the Inner Hebrides. They arrived to Portée and on July 1st they left, the prince gave Flora a medallion with his portrait and the promise that they would meet one day

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Among the Scottish dances is still commemorated the dance with which Flora performed in front of the Prince. It ‘a very graceful dance, inevitable in the program of Highland dance competitions: it is a courtship dance, in which girl shows all her skills while maintaining a proud attitude and composure.
It is performed with the Aboyne dress, dress prescribed for the dancers in the national Scottish dances, as disciplined by the dance commission in the Aboyne Highland Gathering of 1970 (with pleated skirt doll effect, in tartan or the much more vaporous white cloth) .
Melody is a strathspey, which is a slower reel, typical of Scotland often associated with commemorations and funerals.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Many other musical tributes were dedicated to the beautiful Flora. The melody of this reel appears with many titles, the first printed version is found in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances”, 1757 and also in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland by Niel Gow (Vol I). The reel is in two parts

Tonynara from “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: CLAN MACKINNON COCKTAIL

Rusty-NailTo repay the help given by Clan MacKinnon during the months when he had to hide from the English, Prince Stuart revealed to John MacKinnon the recipe for his secret elixir, a special drink created by his personal pharmacist. The MacKinnon clan accepted the custody of the recipe, until at the beginning of the ‘900, a descendant of the family decided that it was time to commercially exploit the recipe calling it “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie

Procedure: directly prepare an old fashioned glass with ice. Stir gently and garnish with a twist of lemon.

A double-scottish cocktali: Scotch Whiskey and Drambuie which is a liqueur whose recipe is a mix of whiskey, honey … secrets and legends. Even today the company is managed by the same family and keeps the contents of the recipe secret. (Taken from here)

At this point many will ask “But the Skye boat song, where did it end?” (here  is)

LINK
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org

Twa Bonnie Maidens, a jacobite song

Leggi in italiano

“Twa Bonnie Maidens” is a jacobite song published by James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics”, Volume II (1819). It refers to the occasion when Bonnie Prince Charlie sailed with Flora MacDonald from the Outer Hebrides to Skye, dressed as Flora’s maid. The event described here took place during Bonnie Prince Charlie’s months in hiding after his defeat at the Battle of Culloden (April 16, 1746). By late July, the Hannoverians thought they had Charlie pinned down in the outer Hebrides.

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

The prince had managed to get to the Island of Banbecula of the Outer Hebrides, but the surveillance was very tight and had no way to escape. And here comes Flora MacDonald.
In the anecdotal version of the story, Flora devised a trick to take away Charlie from the island : on the pretext of visiting her mother (who lived in Armadale after remarried), she obtained the safe-conduct for herself and her two servants; under the name and clothes of the Irish maid Betty Burke, however, it was hidden the Bonny Prince!: Il Principe e la Ballerina

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
“Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie” di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

TWA BONNIE MAIDENS

Hogg took the Gaelic words down from a Mrs. Betty Cameron from Lochaber.
Was copied verbatim from the mouth of Mrs Betty Cameron from Lochaber ; a well-known character over a great part of the Lowlands, especially for her great store of Jacobite songs, and her attachment to Prince Charles, and the chiefs that suffered for him, of whom she never spoke without bursting out a-crying. She said it was from the Gaelic ; but if it is, I think it is likely to have been translated by herself. There is scarcely any song or air that I love better.”
Quadriga Consort from “Ships Ahoy ! – Songs of Wind, Water & Tide” 2011
Marais & Miranda from A European Folk Song Festival 2012 (I, III)
Archie Fisher from “The Man with a Rhyme” 1976


I
There were twa bonnie maidens,
and three bonnie maidens,
Cam’ ower the Minc (1),
and cam’ ower the main,
Wi’ the wind for their way
and the corrie (2) for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Chorus
Come alang, come alang,
wi’ your boatie and your song,

Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!

The nicht, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gane,

And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.

II
There is Flora (3), my honey,
sae neat and sae bonnie,
And ane that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the ane for my Queen
and the ither for my King (4)
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
III (5)
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!
By the sea mullet’s nest (6)
I will watch o’er the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
English translation Cattia Salto
I
There were two pretty maidens,
and three pretty maidens,
Came over the Minch ,
and came over the main,
With the wind for their way
and the mountains for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
Chorus
Come along, come along,
wi’ your boat and your song,
To my hey! pretty maidens,
my two pretty girls!
The night, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gone,
And you’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
II
There is Flora, my honey,
so neat and so pretty,
And one that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the one for my Queen
and the other for my King
And they’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.
III
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
To my hey! pretty maidens,
my two pretty girls!
By the sea mullet’s nest
I will watch over the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
to Skye again.

NOTES
1) Minch=channel between the Outer and Inner Hebrides
2) corry=a hollow space or excavation in a hillside
3) Flora MacDonald
4) Bonnie Prince Charlie
5) the stanza is a synthesis between the III and the IV of the version reported by Hogg
6) The Nest Point is another striking view on the western tip of the Isle of Skye (on the opposite side of Portree), an excellent spot to watch the Minch the stretch of sea that separates the Highlands of the north west and the north of Skye from the Harris Islands and Lewis, told by the ancient Norse “Fjord of Scotland”
At the time of the Jacobite uprising there was still no Lighthouse designed and built by Alan Stevenson in the early 1900s.

TUNE: Planxty George Brabazon or Prince Charlie’s Welcome To The Isle Of Skye?

The Irish harpist Turlough O’Carolan (the last of the great itinerant irish harper-composers) wrote some arias in homage to his guests and patrons, whom he called “planxty”, whose text in Irish Gaelic (not received) praised the nobleman on duty or commemorated an event; the melodies are free and lively with different measures (not necessarily in triplets). With the title of George Brabazon two distinct melodies attributed to Carolan are known.
“George Brabazon” was retitled in Scotland “Prince Charlie’s Welcome to the Island of Skye” in honor of the Pretender as the vehicle for the song “Twa Bonnie Maidens.” It also appears in the Gow’s Complete Repository, Part Second (1802) under the title “Isle of Sky” (sic), set as a Scots Measure and with some melodic differences in the second part. This is significant, for it predates the earliest Irish source (O’Neill) by a century.
Source “The Fiddler’s Companion” (cf. Liens).
J.J. Sheridan
Siobhan Mcdonnell

The Chieftains  in Water From the Well 2000

“Over the Sea to Skye”

Link
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/twabonny.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25774
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_maidens.htm
https://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/Twa_Bonnie_Maidens.shtml
https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk/see-and-do/location-a-coilleag-a-phrionnsa-bonnie-prince-charlie-trail-p538071

https://thesession.org/tunes/1609
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46578
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19657
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6422
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9152

Twa Bonnie Maidens

Read the post in English  

“Twa Bonnie Maidens” (in italiano “Due graziose fanciulle”) è una canzone giacobita pubblicata da James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics”, Volume II (1819) che celebra l’arrivo nell’isola di Skye di una barchetta con due belle fanciulle, senonchè l’ancella di Flora Macdonald è il nostro Bel Carletto travestito, nella sua fuga dalla Scozia, dopo la disfatta della rivolta giacobita nella rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746).

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

Il principe era riuscito ad arrivare nell’isola di Banbecula delle Ebridi Esterne, ma la sorveglianza era strettissima e non aveva modo di fuggire. Ed ecco che entra in scena la fanciulla, Flora MacDonald.
Nella versione anedottica della storia, Flora escogitò un trucco per portare via dall’isola Charlie: con il pretesto di andare a trovare la madre (che viveva ad Armadale dopo essersi risposata), ottenne per sè e per i due suoi domestici il salvacondotto; sotto il nome e gli abiti della cameriera irlandese Betty Burke però si celava il Bonny Prince!: Il Principe e la Ballerina

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
“Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie” di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

TWA BONNIE MAIDENS

Hogg trascrisse il testo dalla testimonianza della signora Betty Cameron di Lochaber, la quale affermava che originariamente la canzone fosse in gaelico scozzese. Così scrive Hogg
È stato copiato letteralmente dalla bocca della signora Betty Cameron di Lochaber; un personaggio ben noto in gran parte delle Lowlands, specialmente per la sua grande quantità di canzoni giacobite, e il suo attaccamento al principe Carlo, e ai capi che soffrirono per lui, dei quali non parlò mai senza scoppiare a piangere. Disse che la canzone era dal gaelico; ma se lo è, penso che probabilmente l’ha tradotta lei stessa. Non c’è quasi nessuna canzone o aria che amo di più”
Quadriga Consort in “Ships Ahoy ! – Songs of Wind, Water & Tide” 2011
Marais & Miranda in A European Folk Song Festival 2012 (strofe I, III)
Archie Fisher in “The Man with a Rhyme” 1976


I
There were twa bonnie maidens,
and three bonnie maidens,
Cam’ ower the Minc (1),
and cam’ ower the main,
Wi’ the wind for their way
and the corrie (2) for their hame,
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Chorus
Come alang, come alang,
wi’ your boatie and your song,

Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!

The nicht, it is dark,
and the redcoat is gane,

And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.

II
There is Flora (3), my honey,
sae neat and sae bonnie,
And ane that is tall,
and handsome withall.
Put the ane for my Queen
and the ither for my King (4)
And they’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
III (5)
There’s a wind on the tree,
and a ship on the sea,
Tae my hey! bonnie maidens,
my twa bonnie maids!
By the sea mullet’s nest (6)
I will watch o’er the main,
And you’re dearly welcome
tae Skye again.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’erano due graziose fanciulle
e tre fanciulle belle
che attraversarono il Minch
oltre il mare
sospinte dal vento a favore
e accolte dalle nostre montagne
sono sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye
Coro
Venite, venite
con la vostra barchetta e la vostra canzone, belle fanciulle,
mie due fanciulle belle!
La notte è buia
e le giubbe rosse sono partite,
voi siete sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye.
II
C’è Flora, la mia diletta;
così forte e bella
e uno che è alto
e anche bello.
Metti l’una come Regina
e l’altro come Re
sono sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye
III
C’è il vento all’albero
e una barca nel mare
belle fanciulle,
mie due fanciulle belle!
Dal nido di triglie
sorveglierò il mare
voi siete sinceramente le benvenute
a Skye.

NOTE
1) Minch=canale tra le Ebridi esterne e le Ebridi interne
2) corry=una nicchia o uno scavo nella collina
3) 3) Flora MacDonald
4) Bonnie Prince Charlie
5) la strofa è una sintesi  tra la III e la IV della versione riportata da Hogg
6) i due sbarcarono nel villaggio di Portree. Il Nest Point è invece un altro suggestivo panorama  sulla punta occidentale dell’isola di Skye (sul lato opposto di Portree), ottimo punto per guardare il Minch il tratto di mare che separa le Highlands do nord ovest e il nord di Skye dalle isole Harris e Lewis, detto dagli antichi Norreni “Fiordo della Scozia”
Ai tempi della rivolta giacobita non esisteva ancora il Faro progettato e costruito da Alan Stevenson nei primi anni del 900.

LA MELODIA: Planxty George Brabazon o Prince Charlie’s Welcome To The Isle Of Skye?

L’arpista irlandese Turlough O’Carolan (ricordato come l’ultimo dei bardi-arpisti itineranti) scrisse alcune arie in omaggio ai suoi ospiti e mecenati, che chiamava “planxty”, il cui testo in gaelico irlandese (non pervenuto) elogiava il nobile di turno o ne commemorava un evento; le melodie sono libere e vivaci con tempi diversi (non necessariamente in terzine). Con il titolo di George Brabazon si conoscono due distinte melodie attribuite a Carolan.
“George Brabazon”è stato rititolato in Scozia “Prince Charlie’s Welcome to the Island of Skye” in onore del Pretendente come veicolo per la canzone “Twa Bonnie Maidens”. Appare anche nel Complete Repository di Gow, Parte Seconda (1802) con il titolo “Isle di Sky “(sic), suonato come una Scots Measure e con alcune differenze melodiche nella seconda parte. Questo è significativo, perché precede la prima fonte irlandese (O’Neill) di un secolo.
Fonte “The Fiddler’s Companion” (cf. Liens).

J.J. Sheridan
Siobhan Mcdonnell

The Chieftains  in Water From the Well 2000

“Over the Sea to Skye”

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/twabonny.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25774
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_maidens.htm
https://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/Twa_Bonnie_Maidens.shtml
https://www.visitouterhebrides.co.uk/see-and-do/location-a-coilleag-a-phrionnsa-bonnie-prince-charlie-trail-p538071

https://thesession.org/tunes/1609
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46578
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19657
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6422
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9152

Outlander: Skye boat song

Leggi in italiano.

“E LA BARCA VA”

charlie e flora
Flora and the Prince

After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart, then twenty-six, escaped and remained hidden for several months, protected by his faithful.
Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met the Bonnie Prince and helped him to leave the Hebrides; we see them depicted into a boat at the mercy of the waves, she wraps in her shawl and looks at the horizon as the sun sets, he rows with enthusiasm.
(here’s how it actually went: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

THE CROSSING AT SEA: THE ESCAPE OF CHARLES STUART

The “romantic” escape is remembered in “Skye boat song” written by Sir Harold Boulton in 1884 on a scottish traditional melody which is said to have been arranged by Anne Campbell MacLeod; a decade ago Anne was on a trip to the Isle of Skye and heard some sailors singing “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in English “The Cuckoo in the Grove”). “The Cuckoo in the Grove” was printed in 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, by Alfred Moffat, with a text attributed to William Ross (1762 – 1790). The melody is therefore at least dating back to the time of the story.

LO IORRAM
The song (in “Songs of the North” by Sir Harold Boulton and Anne Campbell MacLeod, London  1884)  is a “iorram”, not really a sea shanty: his function is giving rhythm to the rowers but at the same time it was also a funeral lament. The time is 3/4 or 6/8: the first beat is very accentuated and corresponds to the phase in which the oar is lifted and brought forward, 2 and 3 are the backward stroke. Some of these tunes are still played in the Hebrides as a waltz.

The song was a success: from the very beginning rumors circulated that they passed the text as a translation of an ancient Gaelic song and soon became a classic piece of Celtic music and in particular of traditional Scottish music (revisited from beat to smooth, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), countless instrumental versions (from one instrument – harp, bagpipe, guitar, flute – or two up to the orchestra) with classical arrangements, traditional, new age, also for military and choral bands.


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king(1)
Over the sea to Skye (2)
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked (3) in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head

III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again (4).

NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Who was the “Young Pretender”? Probably just a dandy with the Italian accent and the passion of the brandy, but how much was the charm that exercised on the Scottish Highlands! (see more)
2) Skye isle in theInner Hebrides, but it sounds like “sky” and therefore a metaphor, Charlie is a hero in the firmament
3)  “rocked” as in many sea songs and sea shanties it stand for “cradled by the sea”
4) in 1884 Charles Stuart was dust, but romantic literature maintained live the Jacobite spirit and songs still burned in hearts

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)In 1896 Robert Louis Stevenson wrote “Over the sea to Skye” (aka Sing Me a Song of a Lad That Is Gone) a new version of Sir Harold Boulton’s Skye Boat song, because he wasn’t satisfied with what it was written by an English baronet.
Charles Edward wasn’t a Bonny Prince any more but an old, sickness man, even if in his “golden” exile between Rome and Florence. Vittorio Alfieri describes him as tyrannic and always drunk husband (but he was in love with Louise of Stolberg-Gedern -Charles Edward’s fair-haired wife). The Prince, embittered and addicted to alcohol, died in Rome on 31 January 1788 (also abandoned by his wife four years ago).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
Robert Louis Stevenson 1896)
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?

III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.

OUTLANDER VERSION

Skye Boat song’s tune is a principal theme in Outlander tv series sung by Raya Yarbrough and arranged by Bear McCreary, from Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem,  referencing how Claire Randall travels 200 years back in time.
Outlander season I -The Skye Boat Song (Short)
Outlander Season I -The Skye Boat Song (Extended)
Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song (French version)

Outlander season 3  -The Skye Boat Song Caribbean version

I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul (1), she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye. 
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.


French Version
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone,
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun,
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
III
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye.
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rùm on the port
Eigg on the starboard bow
Glory of youth glowed in her soul
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there
Give me the sun that shone
Give me the eyes, give me the soul
Give me the lass that’s gone
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas
Mountains of rain and sun
All that was good, all that was fair
All that was me is gone
Notes
1) she was feeling very merry in her heart, she was happy

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

E la barca va: il Principe e la Ballerina

Read the post in English  

Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), aveva 24 anni quando incontrò Charles Stuart. Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) il Bonnie Prince allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi, nonostante i pattugliamenti inglesi e la taglia sulla sua testa.
Charles trovò nelle isole Ebridi molti nascondigli e sostegno ma era un pericoloso gioco a rimpiattino..

IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA

Il principe era riuscito ad arrivare nell’isola di Banbecula delle Ebridi Esterne, ma la sorveglianza era strettissima e non aveva modo di fuggire. Ed ecco che entra in scena la fanciulla, Flora MacDonald..
I MacDonald per quanto leali al re e di confessione presbiteriana, erano simpatizzanti della causa giacobita e così Flora che viveva a Milton (isola South Uist) nella casa paterna, ma si trovava in visita dalla sua amica, nonché moglie del capoclan Lady Margareth di Clanranald, venne presentata a Charles Stuart.

In un’altra versione della storia il principe si trovava nascosto presso il Loch Boisdale sull’Isola di South Uist, sperando di incontrare Alexander MacDonald, che però era stato arrestato da poco. Avvisato che una pattuglia avrebbe ispezionato la zona, Charles fuggì con due fedelissimi per nascondersi in una piccola fattoria vicino a Ormaclette dove era stato concordato l’incontro con Flora MacDonald. Il momento venne immortalato in molti dipinti come questo di Alexander Johnston.

Flora MacDonald's Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)
Flora MacDonald’s Introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie di Alexander Johnston (1815-1891)

Nella versione anedottica della storia, Flora escogitò un trucco per portare via dall’isola Charlie: con il pretesto di andare a trovare la madre (che viveva ad Armadale dopo essersi risposata), ottenne per sè e per i due suoi domestici il salvacondotto; sotto il nome e gli abiti della cameriera irlandese Betty Burke però si celava il Bonny Prince! (vedi)

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e floraLa barca con quattro (o sei) marinai ai remi lasciò Benbecula il 27 giugno 1746 alla volta dell’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne. I due arrivarono fino a Portée in varie tappe e il 1° luglio si lasciarono, il principe  donò a Flora un medaglione con il suo ritratto e la promessa che si sarebbero rivisti un giorno…

FLORA MACDONALD’S FANCY

Tra le danze scozzesi è ancora commemorata la danza con cui  Flora si esibì davanti al Principe. E’ una danza molto aggraziata e leggiadra, immancabile nel programma delle esibizioni: è se vogliamo una danza di corteggiamento, in cui la ragazza mostra tutta la sua abilità mantenendo sempre portamento fiero e compostezza.
Si esegue con l’abito Aboyne ovvero il vestito prescritto per le danzatrici nei balli nazionali scozzesi, come disciplinato dalla commissione di danza nell’Aboyne Highland Gathering del 1970 (con gonna a pieghe effetto bambola, in tartan o la molto più vaporosa stoffa bianca).
La melodia è una strathspey, che è un reel più lenta tipica della Scozia spesso associata alle commemorazioni e ai funerali.

FLORA MACDONALD’S REEL

Alla bella Flora vennero dedicati molti altri omaggi musicali. La melodia di questo reel compare con molti titoli, la prima versione stampata si trova in Robert Bremer “Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances“, 1757 e anche in Repository Complete of the Dance Music of Scotland di Niel Gow (Vol I). Il reel è in due parti

Tonynara in “Sham Rock” – 1994

The Virginia Company

RUSTY NAIL: IL COCKTAIL DEL CLAN MACKINNON

Rusty-NailPer sdebitarsi dell’aiuto prestato dal Clan MacKinnon durante i mesi in cui dovette nascondersi dagli Inglesi, il principe Stuart rivelò a John MacKinnon la ricetta del suo elisir segreto, una bevanda speciale creata dal suo farmacista personale. Il clan MacKinnon accettò la custodia della ricetta, finchè agli inizi del ‘900, un discendente della famiglia decise che era giunto il momento di sfruttare commercialmente la ricetta chiamandola “Drambuie”

4.5 cl Scotch whisky
2.5 cl Drambuie
Procedimento: si prepara direttamente un bicchiere tipo old fashioned con ghiaccio. Agitare delicatamente e guarnire con un twist di limone.

Un cocktali doppiamente scozzese: lo Scotch Whisky e il Drambuie che è un liquore la cui ricetta è un mix di whisky, miele… segreti e leggende. Ancora oggi l’azienda è gestita dalla stessa famiglia e mantiene segreto il contenuto della ricetta. (Tratto da qui)

A questo punti molti si chiederanno ” Ma la canzone della barca, la Skye boat song, dovè finita?” (eccola qui)

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755
http://thesession.org/tunes/2629

MO GHILE MEAR

Testo: Seán Clárach MacDomhnaill ovvero John Clare McDowell (1691-1754)
Musica: motivo tradizionale irlandese

MAIGUE POETS

Sean Clarach (Giovanni da Charlestown) faceva parte dei Maigue Poets, la cerchia di poeti irlandesi della contea di Limerick che nel Settecento si riunivano nella taverna di  Seán Ó Tuama in Mungret street a Croom villaggio attraversato dal fiume Maigue.

He was surnamed "Clarach" from the place of his birth near Charleville in Co. Cork. He was a "rank" Jacobite, and on more occasions than one he saved his life by hasty retreat from his enemies, the Bard-hunters. He moreover inherited all the hatred of his race for the "Saxon Churls" who had so basely murdered at Knockanas, near Mallon in 1648 the brave Irish General, Alister Mac Colquitto of his name and race. He was the author of many Jacobite pieces and had hoped had he lived to translate Homer into his native Gaelic, but he died in 1754 aged 63 years.
(Source: Comunn Chlann Domhnaill Dun Eideann -The Clan Donald Society of Edinburgh)

My Darling Gallant (Mo Ghile Mear) è un Aisling song ossia un canto in cui il poeta fa un sogno o ha una visione di una bella fanciulla o di una dea che porta un messaggio di speranza, perchè presto l’Irlanda sarà libera dal dominio inglese. Ma qui la donna è invece una vedova bianca con il marito in esilio, niente meno che il principe Carlo Edward Stuart (Roma 1720-88), noto come Bonnie Prince Charles.

Charlie-Flora-William Joy
Flora MacDonald e Bonnie Prince Charlie – George William Joy

La “vedova in stracci” è l’Irlanda stessa, sposa felice un tempo, ma ora il suo amore è lontano, in un esilio che sarà definitivo, la poesia è stata scritta infatti dopo la battaglia di Culloden (1746).
Nel tempo il canto è diventato il lamento di una donna per il suo innamorato lontano in guerra ed è tradizionalmente cantato nei pubs al momento della chiusura, quando il gestore tenta di chiudere e gli avventori, per bersi un ultimo bicchiere, la cantano con un misto di tristezza e malinconia e così facendo brindano alla salute di chi è lontano!

ASCOLTA Mary Black (bello anche il montaggio delle immagini)


ORIGINALE GAELICO IRLANDESE
I
Seal da rabhas im’ mhaighdean shéimh,
‘S anois im’ bhaintreach chaite thréith,
Mo chéile ag treabhadh na dtonn go tréan
De bharr na gcnoc is i n-imigcéin.
II
‘Sé mo laoch, mo Ghile Mear,
‘Sé mo Chaesar, Ghile Mear,
Suan ná séan ní bhfuaireas féin
Ó chuaigh i gcéin mo Ghile Mear.
III
Bímse buan ar buaidhirt gach ló,
Ag caoi go cruaidh ‘s ag tuar na ndeór
Mar scaoileadh uaim an buachaill beó
‘S ná ríomhtar tuairisc uaidh, mo bhrón.
IV
Ní labhrann cuach go suairc ar nóin
Is níl guth gadhair i gcoillte cnó,
Ná maidin shamhraidh i gcleanntaibh ceoigh
Ó d’imthigh uaim an buachaill beó.
V
Marcach uasal uaibhreach óg,
Gas gan gruaim is suairce snódh,
Glac is luaimneach, luath i ngleo
Ag teascadh an tslua ‘s ag tuargain treon.
VI
Seinntear stair ar chlairsigh cheoil
‘s líontair táinte cárt ar bord
Le hinntinn ard gan chaim, gan cheó
Chun saoghal is sláinte d’ fhagháil dom leómhan.
VII
Ghile mear ‘sa seal faoi chumha,
‘s Eire go léir faoi chlócaibh dubha;
Suan ná séan ní bhfuaireas féin
Ó luaidh i gcéin mo Ghile Mear.

TRADUZIONE IN INGLESE di J.Mark Sugars 1997
I
Once I was fair as a morn of May,
Now all I do is grieve and pray,
And scan the surging ocean waves
Since my gallant laddie went away.
II
‘Sé mo laoch, mo Ghile Mear,
‘Sé mo Chaesar, Ghile Mear,
Suan ná séan ní bhfuaireas féin
Ó chuaigh in gcéin mo Ghile Mear.
III
Pain and sorrow are all I know,
My heart is sore, my tears a’ flow
Since o’er the seas we saw him go
No news has come to ease our woe.
IV
In chestnut trees no birdsong sounds,
The glens no more echo with coursing hounds,
Winter’s gloom lasts all year ‘round,
Since my laddie left for to seek his crown.
V
A proud and youthful chevalier,
A highland lion of cheerful mien,
A slashing blade, a flashing shield,
Fighting foremost in the field.
VI
Come, drain your cups as wild harps play
Let every Celt praise his noble name
As long as blood flows in your veins
Raise a toast for his health, wish him length of days.
VII
Hero whose hopes have turned to smoke,
Erin all wrapped in mourning cloak,
I watch and wait, I dread my fate,
Since my gallant laddie went awa

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO (dal WEB)
I
Un tempo ero una dolce fanciulla
ora sono una vedova in stracci
il mio sposo valica le onde del mare
e cammina sulle colline dell’esilio
II (RIT)
Lui è il mio eroe, il mio amore,
lui è il mio Cesare, il mio amore,
non ho trovato né pace nè fortuna
da quando il mio amore è partito
III
Ogni giorno sono sempre depressa
e verso amaramente copiose lacrime
da quando per mare se ne andò  e ahimè nessuna sua notizia ricevo
IV
Il cuculo non canta allegramente a mezzogiorno
e non si sente l’abbaiare dei levrieri nei boschi di nocciolo
non esiste più l’estate nelle valli nebbiose da quando se n’è andato, in cerca della sua corona
V
Nobile, orgoglioso, giovane cavaliere
guerriero senza tristezza, dal viso piacente, dal pugno pronto, rapido nella lotta che sconfigge il nemico e colpisce il forte.
VI
Che si intonino arie su arpe armoniose e che si riempiano molti bicchieri, con animo sollevato senza colpa o tristezza, brindiamo alla vita e alla salute del mio leone
VII
Sfolgorante amore ora attraversiamo un periodo di dolore e tutta l’Irlanda si ricopre di un manto nero, non trovo pace nè fortuna, da quando il mio amore è partito

ASCOLTA Sting & the Chieftains

VERSIONE INGLESE
CHORUS
‘Se mo laoch, mo Ghile Mear
‘Se mo Chaesar Ghile Mear
Suan ná séan ní bhfuaireas féin
Ó chuaigh in gcéin mo Ghile Mear.
I
Grief and pain  are all I know
My heart is sore
My tears a’flow
We saw him go.
No word we know of him, och on
II
A proud and gallant chevalier
A high man’s scion of gentle mean
A fiery blade engaged to reap
He’d break the bravest in the field
III
Come sing his praise as sweet harps play
And proudly toast his noble fame
With spirit and with mind aflame
So wish him strength and length of day
tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
Lui è il mio eroe, la mia sola luce,
lui è il mio Cesare, la mia sola luce,
non ho trovato riposo né sonno
da quando è partito, la mia sola luce.
I
Pena e dolore tutti li conosco,
Il mio cuore piange
lacrime come un fiume in piena.
Lo abbiamo visto partire
e non riceviamo sue notizie, ahimè.
II
Un cavaliere orgoglioso e gentile,
uno di nobile nascita e di viva intelligenza, una lama fiera impegnata a combattere, che ha ucciso il più coraggioso in battaglia.
III
Canteremo il suo elogio con dolci arpe,
e brinderemo fieri alla sua nobile fama
con animo e mente ardenti, per augurargli una lunga e prospera vita.

VERSIONE DEI MODENA CITY RAMBLERS

In un giorno di pioggia 1994 “Dichiarazione d’amore per l’Irlanda, nostra “patria dell’anima”. E’ anche un canto d’emigrazione: da buoni Irlandesi (benchè adottivi) hanno sentito il bisogno, con questa song, di lasciare l’isola di smeraldo. Portano a casa però il ricordo della musica, della luminosità del cielo (utile per perforare le micidiali nebbie padane) e della Guinness.”

Is è mo laoch, mo ghile mear
Is è mo shaesar ghile mear
Nì fhuaras fèin aon tsuan ar seàn
o chuaigh ì gcèin mo ghile mear

Addio, addio e un bicchiere levato
al cielo d’Irlanda e alle nuvole gonfie.
Un nodo alla gola ed un ultimo sguardo
alla vecchia Anna Liffey e alle strade del porto.

Un sorso di birra per le verdi brughiere
e un altro ai mocciosi coperti di fango,
e un brindisi anche agli gnomi a alle fate,
ai folletti che corrono sulle tue strade.

Hai i fianchi robusti di una vecchia signora
e i modi un po’ rudi della gente di mare,
ti trascini tra fango, sudore e risate
e la puzza di alcool nelle notti d’estate.

Un vecchio compagno ti segue paziente,
il mare si sdraia fedele ai tuoi piedi,
ti culla leggero nelle sere d’inverno,
ti riporta le voci degli amanti di ieri.

E’ in un giorno di pioggia che ti ho conosciuta,
il vento dell’ovest rideva gentile
e in un giorno di pioggia ho imparato ad amarti
mi hai preso per mano portandomi via.

Hai occhi di ghiaccio ed un cuore di terra,
hai il passo pesante di un vecchio ubriacone,
ti chiudi a sognare nelle notti d’inverno
e ti copri di rosso e fiorisci d’estate.

I tuoi esuli parlano lingue straniere,
si addormentano soli sognando i tuoi cieli,
si ritrovano persi in paesi lontani
a cantare una terra di profughi e santi.

E’ in un giorno di pioggia che ti ho conosciuta,
il vento dell’ovest rideva gentile
e in un giorno di pioggia ho imparato ad amarti
mi hai preso per mano portandomi via.

E in un giorno di pioggia ti rivedrò ancora
e potrò consolare i tuoi occhi bagnati.
In un giorno di pioggia saremo vicini,
balleremo leggeri sull’aria di un reel

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/moghile.htm
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=3235&lang=it
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/MoGhileMear.html

YE JACOBITES BY NAME

Giacobita è una parola sconosciuta ai più -che non siano di origini scozzesi (o Irlandesi o Inglesi) o accaniti lettori dei romanzi di Sir Walter Scott! Le rivolte giacobite che insanguinarono l’Inghilterra dal 1688 al 1746 non furono solo una lotta per la successione al trono e nemmeno una questione religiosa. In essa confluirono le speranze di indipendenza di due paesi, Irlanda e Scozia, che rivendicavano la loro autonomia, ma erano anche i colpi di coda del sistema di vita feudale dei clan scozzesi..continua

Pettie_-_Jacobites,_1745

YE JACOBITES BY NAME

Circolò alla fine del 1745 la canzone “Ye Jacobites by name” una canzone anti-giacobita di aspro rimprovero verso gli insorti (della serie non tutti gli scozzesi erano giacobiti). Tra i versi della canzone si possono ripercorrere la fasi salienti di quella che sarà l’ultima rivolta per portare sul trono la dinastia Stuart.
Ovviamente di questa versione si è perso ogni traccia!

CHORUS
You Jacobites by Name,
now give Ear, now give Ear,
You Jacobites by Name,
now give Ear;

You Jacobites by Name,
Your Praise I will proclaim,
Some says you are to blame for this Wear.
I
With the Pope you covenant,
as they say, as they say,
With the Pope you covenant,
as they say,
With the Pope you covenant,
And Letters there you sent,
Which made your Prince(1) present to array.
II
Your Prince and Duke o’Perth(2),
They’re Cumb’rers o’ the Earth,
Causing great Hunger and Dearth where they go.
III
He is the King of Reef, I’ll declare,
I’ll declare,
Of a Robber and o’ Thief,
To rest void of Relief when he’s near.
IV
They marched thro’ our Land cruelly, cruelly,
With a bloody thievish Band
To Edinburgh then they wan Treachery.
V
To Preston then they came,
in a Rout, in a Rout,
Brave Gard’ner murd’red then.
A Traitor did command,
as we doubt(3).
VI
To England then they went,
as bold, as bold,
And Carlisle(4) they ta’en’t,
The Crown they fain would ha’en’t,
but behold.
VII
To London as they went,
on the Way, on the Way,
In a Trap did there present,
No battle they will stent, for to die.
VIII
They turned from that Place,
and they ran, and they ran,
As the Fox, when Hounds do chace.
They tremble at the Name, Cumberlan'(5).
IX
To Scotland then they came,
when they fly, when they fly,
And they robb’d on every Hand,
By Jacobites Command, where they ly.
X
When Duke William(5) does command,
you must go, you must go;
Then you must leave the Land,
Your Conscience in your Hand like a Crow.
XI
Tho’ Carlisle ye took
by the Way,
Short Space ye did it Brook,
These Rebels got a Rope on a Day.
XII
The Pope and Prelacy,
where they came, where they came,
They rul’d with Cruelty,
They ought to hing on high for the same.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Voi che vi chiamate Giabobiti,
prestate orecchio, prestate orecchio
Voi che vi chiamate Giabobiti,
prestate orecchio . Voi che vi chiamate Giabobiti,  e vi spiegherò il vostro errore,  si dice che siate da incolpare per la vostra condotta.
I Strofa
Si dice che con il Papa vi siate messi d’accordo,
con il Papa vi siete messi d’accordo,
si dice
con il Papa vi siete messi d’accordo
e gli avete mandato delle  lettere
che hanno fatto schierare il vostro attuale Principe.(1)
II Strofa
Il vostro Principe e il Duca di Perth(2)
sono Flagelli della Terr che causano grande carestia e morte
ovunque vanno .
III Strofa
Egli è il Re dei Pirati,
così dico
dei rapinatori e dei ladri,
quando lui è vicino non c’è scampo.
IV Strofa
Hanno marciato sulla nostra Terra
con ferocia, come una banda di ladri sanguinari, fino a prendere Edimburgo con il Tradimento.
V Strofa
A Preston quando vennero
ci hanno messo in fuga,
il coraggioso Gardiner è stato ucciso, per ordine di un traditore(3), senza dubbio
VI Strofa
Poi in Inghilterra sono venuti
come bravi, come bravi
e hanno preso Carlisle(4):
avrebbero preso la Corona,
ma attenzione!
VII Strofa
Mentre sono andati verso Londra,
lungo il cammino, il cammino
si trovarono intrappolati ma non ingaggiarono la battaglia per la morte.
VIII Strofa
Fecero dietro-front
e fuggirono, e fuggirono
come la volpe quando i cacciatori la rincorrono, essi tremano al nome di Cumberland (5)
IX Strofa
Allora in Scozia
sono ritornati di corsa,
e derubarono a piene mani dove si accampavano, nel nome dei Giacobiti.
X Strofa
Quando il Duca Guglielmo(5) lo comanda, dovrete andare, dovete andare, dovrete lasciare il paese
con la coscienza in mano nera come un corvo.
XI Strofa
Anche se a Carlisle siete ritornati ugualmente, non l’avete tenuta a lungo, i suoi occupanti ribelli sono stati impiccati lo stesso giorno
XII Strofa
Il Papa e i preti
dove sono venuti, dove sono venuti
hanno governato con crudeltà,
li si dovrebbe impiccare come esempio.

NOTE
Bonnie Prince Charlie nel 17451) Bonnie Prince Charlie ossia Carlo Edoardo Stuart, nato a Roma nel 1720 passò la sua giovinezza tra Roma e Bologna, e sbarcò in Scozia nel 1745 sulle isole Ebridi per comandare la rivolta giacobita. Per questo nella prima strofa si incolpa i giacobiti di aver complottato con il Papa per organizzare il ritorno del Giovane Pretendente. 2) James Drummond, Duca di Perth fu nominato tenente generale della Scozia da Prince Charlie e ha servito nell’esercito di Lord George Murray durante l’invasione dell’Inghilterra: ha comandato l’ala sinistra dell’esercito giacobita a Culloden ed è riuscito a sfuggire alla cattura dopo la disfatta. C’è una marcia per cornamusa con il suo nome, composta dal piper del Duca Finlay Dubh MacRae. La melodia vuole commemorare la vittoriosa battaglia di Prestonpans. Nella strofe successive i giacobiti vengono considerati una banda di razziatori, di ladri sanguinari che portano morte e distruzione nella terra di Scozia, in realtà il contingente giacobita grazie alla scarsa presenza dell’esercito inglese già il 17 settembre prese possesso di Edimburgo (con la guarnigione inglese che rimase asserragliata nel castello)
3) E arriviamo alla battaglia di Prestonpans ricordata anche con il nome di Battaglia di Gladsmuir: il contingente inglese comandato da Sir John Cope e schierato malamente, venne sbaragliato in pochi minuti dalla carica in massa degli highlanders. La figuraccia è ancora ricordata in una canzone dal titolo Johnnie Cope (vedi). Correva voce che Cope fosse stato il primo a darsela a gambe e qui viene bollato come traditore. All’opposto si riconosce il valore del colonnello James Gardiner (uno scozzese che combatteva con i governativi) che mentre cercava di radunare alcuni fanti per la difesa venne ferito a morte (nel 19° secolo per il suo atto di eroismo fu eretto un obelisco commemorativo).
4) Oramai il Giovane Pretendente si vedeva seduto sul trono: e in effetti fu in questo periodo che Charles iniziò a “spremere” i suoi sudditi (soprattutto delle Lowlands) per continuare a finanziare la guerra contro l’Inghilterra. Soggiorna ad Edimburgo qualche mese facendo il re e poi contrariamente al suggerimento di Murray di restare in Scozia a consolidare la posizione invade l’Inghilterra (e il suo consiglio di stato gli da ragione per un solo voto a favore). L’esercito giacobita si mise in marcia verso la capitale il 1 novembre 1745 e occupò Carlisle il 16, nell’avanzata verso Londra tuttavia smorzò il suo slancio (30 dicembre 1745): nella settima strofa della canzone si deride l’esercito giacobita che fugge la battaglia e trema davanti alle armate governative comandate dal (5) Duca di Cumberland, Guglielmo Augusto di Hannover, per ritirarsi verso la Scozia e la disfatta di Culloden. 

LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS 1791

Quarant’anni dopo la battaglia di Culloden, Robert Burns decise di comporre la sua versione sull’argomento mantenendo il ritornello della versione tradizionale e la melodia.
Lasciamo agli storici decidere se Robert Burns fosse o meno un giacobita, così come riscritto il testo si presta a tre letture: è una canzone antigiacobita, seppure su posizioni moderate; una canzone progiacobita che critica i giacobiti solo di nome, ma che per paura o interesse evitavano di esporsi; è una canzone anarchico-pacifista?
Ah dimenticavo la quarte lettura, quella in chiave nazionalista, ovvero al pari della Marsigliese un inno della rivolta indipendentista scozzese contro l’Inghilterra.. Se non fosse che gli Stuart stavano rivendicando il loro diritto di successione per linea maschile sul trono del Regno Unito e non lottando per restaurare l’indipendenza della Scozia (il tempo di Bruce era finito)!!

Indubbiamente ai nostri giorni prevale la lettura pacifista e molti gruppi, sulla scia della riproposizione del gruppo bretone Tri Yann negli anni 70, la interpretano così ancora oggi!
La musica è stata riscritta nel 1920 dal musicista inglese Sir Henry Walford Davies basandosi sulla melodia tradizionale riportata da Burns. Tuttavia gli arrangiamenti sono stati tantissimi.

ASCOLTA Tri Yann nell’album “Tri Yann an Naoned” (1972), la versione è però un live abbastanza recente. Quasi un inno che inizia in acustico e poi si fa più marziale – ma non martellante – con il ritmo della batteria, ad un certo punto si sente la cornamusa che diventa sempre più presente fino a suggellare il brano.

ASCOLTA Eddi Reader: a contrasto la sua versione è un lament (Eddi è sempre molto intensa e originale nei suoi arrangiamenti)

ASCOLTA Arany Zoltan il gruppo ungherese ha inserito un arrangiamento tra il medievale e il folk con violino, flauto e tamburi (con intervalli arabeggianti) che si muovono sul riff della chitarra, molto interessante lo sviluppo strumentale del finale

ASCOLTA Beltaine nel Cd KONCENtRAD – 2008 la versione dei polacchi Beltaine è un ottimo mix tra rock, contemporaneo e folk (polacco e irish) con una combinazione armoniosa di un ricco set strumentale.
[E qui è doverosa una parentesi perché c’è un altro gruppo che tiene lo stesso nome ma arriva dalla Repubblica Ceca: la loro musica è etichettata come pagan folk. Ora i cechi si sono formati nel 1996 mentre i polacchi nel 2002 e anche se frequentano due circuiti musicali diversi, non potevano scegliersi un altro nome?!
Il gruppo polacco: http://www.beltaine.pl
Il gruppo ceco: http://www.beltaine.net]


VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS, 1791
I
Ye Jacobites by name,
give an ear, give an ear,
Ye Jacobites by name,
give an ear,
Ye Jacobites by name,
Your fautes(1) I will proclaim,
Your doctrines I maun blame,
you shall hear.
II
What is Right, and What is Wrang,
by the law,
A short sword, and a lang,
A weak arm and a strang,
for to draw?(2)
III
What makes heroic strife,
famed afar?
To whet th’ assassin’s knife,
Or hunt a Parent’s life,
wi’ bluidy war?
IV
Then let your schemes alone,
in the state,
Adore the rising sun,
And leave a man undone,
to his fate.

Traduzione italiano Riccardo Venturi
I
O voi cosiddetti Giacobiti ,
state a sentire,
O voi cosiddetti Giacobiti ,
state a sentire,
O voi cosiddetti Giacobiti
proclamerò i vostri errori (1),
e biasimerò le vostre dottrine,
lo sentirete.
II
Cosa è giusto e cosa è sbagliato
per la legge?
Una spada corta o una lunga,
da sguainare con un braccio debole o uno forte (2)?
III
Per cosa  una lotta eroica
è rinomata?
Aguzzare il coltello dell’assassino o dare caccia a morte a un genitore con una guerra sanguinosa?
IV
Quindi basta coi vostri progetti, lasciateli stare,
adorate il sole che nasce
e lasciate l’uomo libero
al suo destino.

NOTE
1)  fautes= aults, injuries, defects, wants
2) Burns dice chiaramente: i giacobiti sono considerati dei criminali perchè hanno vinto i governativi

dalla serie televisiva Outlander

La melodia “Ye Jacobites by Name” è stata riarrangiata da Bear McCreary con il titolo “The Losing Side of History” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) ascolta su Spotify (qui)
FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/yejacobi.htm