Archivi tag: dundee jute mills

THE SPINNER’S WEDDING BY MARY BROOKSBANK

La canzone è riportata in Songs and Ballads of Dundee, 1985 di Nigel Gatherer, e appare nella raccolta di Mary Brooksbank (1897-1978) “Sidlaw Breezes” (1966). Come ci racconta la stessa Mary “This describes what went on when a girl in the mill was getting married. The gaffer couldn’t get the work properly done… They danced and they sang and had a right rollicking time. There would usually be a pey-off* and they ate cookies and drank lemonade. Ultimately they dressed her up in a long lace curtain and a cabbage as a bouquet. Another girl would dress up as the bridegroom and they would walk through the streets with their friends behind them.” (*il “pey-off” era una colletta per comprare i rinfreschi)

ASCOLTA Mary Brooksbank

ASCOLTA Cilla Fisher & Artie Trezise – Balcanquhal


I
The gaffer’s(1) looking worried
The flett’s(2) a’ in a steer(3),
Jessie Brodie’s getting merried
And the morn she’ll no be here
CHORUS
Hurrah, hurro, a daddie-o (x3)
Jessie’s getting merried –o
II
The helper and the piecer(4) went
Doon the toon last nicht,
Tae buy a wee bit present
Tae mak her hame look bricht
III
They bocht a cheeny(5) tea-set
A chanty(6) fu o saut(7)
A bonnie coloured carpet,
A kettle and a pot
IV
The shifters(8) they’re a’ dancing
The spinners singing tae,
The gaffer’s standing watching
But there’s nothing he can dae
V
Here’s best wishes tae ye, lassie
Standing at yer spinning frame,
May ye aye hae full and plenty
In yer wee bit hame
VI
Ye’ll no make muckle(9) siller (10)
Nae maitter hoo ye try
But hoard ye love and loyalty,
That’s what money canna buy
TRADUZIONE  CATTIA SALTO
I
Il capo (1) sembra preoccupato
il posto di lavoro (2) è tutto in fermento (3), Jessie Brodie si sposa
e al mattino non sarà qui
CORO
Evviva evviva, paparino
Jessie si sposa
II
Le operaie (4) andarono
giù in città la notte scorsa
per comprare un piccolo regalo
da rendere la casa allegra
III
Comprarono un set cinese (5) da te
un vasetto (6) pieno di sale (7)
un bel tappeto colorato
un bollitore e una pentola.
IV
Le addette alle bobine (8) ballano e anche le addette ai filatori cantano,
il capo è in piedi a guardare
ma non c’è niente che possa fare
V
Ecco i migliori auguri a te, ragazza
che stai al filatoio, che tu possa avere una vita piena e generosa
nella tua piccola casetta
VI
Non farai tanti soldi
non importa quanto tu ci provi
ma amore e lealtà,
non possono essere comprati con i soldi

NOTE
1) Gaffer: boss, foreman
2) Flett, flat,: working platform of the spinning machinery
3) Steer: bustle, excitement
4) Piecers: millworkers, often children, who had to join the ends of broken fibres
5) Cheeny: china
6) Chanty: Potty
7) Saut: salt come portafortuna
8) Shifters: millworkers, often children, who moved amongst machinery to change bobbins on the frame
9) Muckle: much
10) Siller: money

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/spinnerswaddin.htm
http://www.dundeewomenstrail.org.uk/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63477

O DEAR ME BY MARY BROOKSBANK

Scritta  intorno al 1920 “O dear me” (conosciuta anche come “The Jute Mill Song” ) è la canzone più popolare di Mary Brooksbank. Mary Brooksbank in Chapbook Vol 3 no.4 dice: “That was a’ there was of it, just one verse. I first heard it in 1912 … they used tae sing it in the street and up and down the Passes between the frames in the mills.

Non si tratta di lavoro nei Mulini ma nei Filatoi industriali spuntati come funghi a Dundee, rinomata Jutopolis della Scozia (vedi)

Intervistata da Hamish Henderson in merito alla canzone Mary disse “Only the ditty, ‘Oh dear me, the mill’s gaen fest, the puir wee shifters…’ The verses are all mine. And that verse, ‘to feed and cled my bairnie’ was brought to me by a lassie who was worried. It wis hard lines if she, ye hid an illigitimate child and you had to pay for it aff that meagre wage, you know what I mean, and she used to say, oh I wish the day was done. And eh, tell me her troubles, her trackles, what she hid tae dae for her bairn and that, nae help that sort o’ thing, and that brought that tae mind. And then I used to think on my own aboot how ill divided the world wis.

Una specie di ninna-nanna della disperazione basata su una strofa tradizionale
‘Oh, dear me, the mill’s gaen fast,
The puir wee shifters canna get a rest,
Shiftin’ bobbins coorse and fine,
Wha the hell wad work for ten and nine
.’

ASCOLTA Mary Brooksbank

ASCOLTA Lowland folk (con delle immagini d’epoca sui lavoratori nei filatoi di Dundee che parlano più delle parole)

ASCOLTA A Parcel o’ Rogues


Chorus
O, dear me,
the mill is running fast
And we poor shifters canna get nae rest
Shifting bobbins coarse and fine
They fairly make you work for your ten and nine
I
O, dear me,
I wish this day was done
Running up and doon the Pass is nae fun
Shiftin’, piecin’, spinning warp, weft and twine
Tae feed and clothe ma bairnie offa ten and nine
II
O, dear me,
the warld is ill-divided
Them that works the hardest are the least provided
But I maun bide(8) contented, dark days or fine
There’s nae much pleasure living offa ten and nine
TRADUZIONE  di CATTIA SALTO
CORO
O povera me
il filatoio (1) va veloce
e noi povere cambiste (2) non possiamo riposarci,
cambiare i rocchetti di filato grosso e fine, ti fanno ben lavorare per i tuoi dieci scellini e nove (3)
I
O povera me
vorrei che questo giorno fosse finito
correre su e giù per la Passerella (4) non è divertente
cambiare, riattaccare e filare ordito (5), trama (6) e spago (7)
per nutrire e vestire il mio bambino con dieci scellini e nove
II
O povera me
il mondo è suddiviso male,
coloro che lavorano più duramente sono gli ultimi
e devo ritenermi (8) soddisfatta , con il bello o il brutto,
non è facile vivere con dieci scellini e nove

NOTE
1) La rivoluzione industriale del 700 si è subito appropriata del processo tessile e ha meccanizzato la produzione dei filati e della tessitura: in particolare le prime industrie tessili sfruttavano l’energia cinetica dell’acqua (e il vapore poi) ed erano costruite vicino ai fiumi, così a Dundee in Scozia le “jute mills“, i grandi filatoi industriali per trasformare la fibra della juta in filato, nel 19° secolo davano lavoro a 50.000 operai.
2) shifter (detto anche doffer) era l’addetto a togliere i rocchetti di filo completati per mettere quelli vuoti; piecer era quello che univa le estremità dei fili interrotti, spinner era l’addetto alla macchina della filatura. Mary iniziò a lavorare nel Baltic Jute Mill  all’età di 13 anni come doffer e divenne una spinner all’età di 15 anni
3) la paga nei filatoi di Dundee negli anni 20-30
4) Pass: passage between frames or machines in a factory
5) Warp: threads on a loom through which the crossthreads are passed
6) Weft: the crossthreads of a web of material, the woof
7) Twine: twist (into a thicker fibre)
8) stay at, live at, remain

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/ohdearme.htm
http://www.8notes.com/scores/5180.asp?ftype=gif
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3920
http://unionsong.com/u313.html

DUNDEE LASSIE BY MARY BROOKSBANK

mary-brooksbankCanzone scritta da Mary Brooksbank nel suo libro “Sidlaw Breezes” (1966), la raccolta di poesie e canzoni sulla dura vita delle lavoratrici nei filatoi di Dundee, Scozia.
DUNDEE è una cittadina vicino ad Edimburgo conosciuta come “Jutopolis” con una sessantina di juta mills che ancora agli inizi del 900 impiegavano 50.000 lavoratori; l’ultima fabbrica ha chiuso nel 1997, adesso la juta è lavorata in India e non resta più nessun edificio a ricordare il passato tranne il Verdant Works Jute Mill trasformato in un museo sui processi di trasformazione della juta da fibra a tela e cordame. continua

Nei filatoi di Dundee degli anni 40 – ai tempi della gioventù di Mary, si lavorava per 10 ore di fila.

The life of the women workers of Dundee right up to the thirties was … a living hell of hard work and poverty. It was a common sight to see women, after a long ten-hour-day in the mill, running to the stream wash-houses with the family washing. They worked up to the last few days before having their bairns. Often they would call in at the calenders from their work and carry home bundles of sacks to sew. These were paid for at the rate of 5 pence for 25, 6 pence for a coarser type of sack. Infant and maternal mortality in Dundee was the highest in the country.” (testimonianza di Mary Brooksbank)

ASCOLTA Janet Jones

I
Ah’m a Dundee lassie
ye can see
An ye’ll a’ways find me cheerful
nae matter whaur Ah be
Tho at times ah feel doonherted, sad or ill
Ah’m a spinner  intae Baxter’s mill.
II
Ma mither died when
Ah was young,
ma faither fell in France
Ah’d like tae been a teacher
but ah never got the chance
Ah’ll soon be getting married tae a lad they ca Tam Hill
An he is an iler  intae Halley’s mill
III
Ah’m chumming  wi a lassie,
they ca her Jeannie Bain
She says she’ll never mairry,
her lad got killed in Spain
Ah often hear her speak aboot a place they ca Teruel
An she is a winder intae Craigie’s mill
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Sono una ragazza di Dundee
come vedi
e mi vedete sempre allegra (1)
non importa dove sono,
talvolta mi sento giù di corda
triste o stanca, sono una filatrice (2) al filatoio di Baxter (3).
II
Mia madre morì quando ero giovane
mio padre cadde in Francia (4)
mi sarebbe piaciuto essere una maestra, ma non ne ho avuto l’opportunità
mi sono presto sposata con un ragazzo di nome Tam Hill
e lui è un ingrassatore (5) al filatoio di Halley
III
Chiacchierando (6) con una ragazza
di nome Jeannie Bain
dice che non si sposerà mai,
il suo fidanzato è rimasto ucciso in Spagna e spesso la sento parlare di un posto chiamato Teruel (7)
e lei è una accavigliatrice (8) al filatoio di Craigie

NOTE
1) “it is known that the Dundee mill girls had a reputation for ‘hilarity and making light of things.’” (Nigel Gatherer in Songs of Dundee) “He is quoting a writer, William Walker who said this was probably a “triumph of fortitude over adversity”, as there was little for many people in Dundee to be cheerful about, including those lucky enough to have a job” ( tratto da qui)
2) spinner: Shifting, piecing e spinning erano tre tipi di mansioni che si svolgevano attorno alla macchina: shifter (detto anche doffer) era l’addetto a togliere i rocchetti di filo completati per mettere quelli vuoti; piecer era quello che univa le estremità dei fili interrotti, spinner era l’addetto alla macchina della filatura. Mary iniziò a lavorare nel Baltic Jute Mill  all’età di 13 anni come doffer e divenne una spinner all’età di 15 anni
3) si tratta dei “jute mills”. La rivoluzione industriale del 700 si è subito appropriata del processo tessile e ha meccanizzato la produzione dei filati e della tessitura: in particolare le prime industrie tessili sfruttavano l’energia cinetica dell’acqua (e il vapore poi) ed erano costruite vicino ai fiumi, così a Dundee in Scozia le “jute mills“, i grandi filatoi industriali per trasformare la fibra della juta in filato, nel 19° secolo davano lavoro a 50.000 operai (per lo più donne e bambini)
4) prima guerra mondiale; in realtà la madre era ancora in vita quando Mary all’età di 50 anni per occuparsi della madre malata,  riprese la sua attività di violinista e cantante, mettendosi a scrivere canzoni e poesie sulla vita dei lavoratori nelle fabbriche tessili, sulla vita delle donne e le ingiustizie sociali, gli eventi politici e la letteratura
5) Iler: oiler of mill machinery, non so bene come tradurre il termine in italiano essendo oliatore l’attrezzo che contiene l’olio da applicare sulle giunture dei macchinari
6) Chumming: going about as friends
7) Teruel: città spagnola in cui si svolse una cruenta battaglia al tempo della guerra civile spagnola -1937-8. Molti scozzesi si arruolarono volontari  per combattere contro Franco
8) Winder: job on the flett or working platform of the mill. Nell’industria tessile, avvolgere i filati di lana o di seta intorno ai fusi

Con il titolo Dundee Lassie peraltro si indicano anche diverse melodie tra cui anche una country dance

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/jute-mill-songs/
http://sangstories.webs.com/dundeelassie.htm

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Dundee_Lassie
http://abcnotation.com/tunePage?a=tunearch.org/wiki/Dundee_Lassie.no-ext/0001

THE JUTE MILL SONGS

mary-brooksbankI have never had any personal ambitions. I have but one: to make my contribution to destroy the capitalist system.”

Mary Brooksbank (1897- 1978) poetessa-musicista e attivista politico, nata a Aberdeen da povera gente iniziò a lavorare al filatoio di Dundee all’età di 12-13 anni come “doffer” e ci lavorò fino ai vent’anni. Nel 1920 Maria aderì al partito comunista e partecipò alle manifestazioni e agli scontri per i diritti dei lavoratori e fu più volte imprigionata. Dopo la morte prematura del marito riprese a lavorare nei filatoi fino al 1947 quando, per occuparsi della madre malata, all’età di 50 anni riprende la sua attività di violinista e cantante mettendosi a scrivere canzoni e poesie sulla vita dei lavoratori nelle fabbriche tessili, sulla vita delle donne e le ingiustizie sociali, gli eventi politici e la letteratura; alla fine degli anni 60 Mary viene invitata alle trasmissioni televisive e radiofoniche in Scozia e nei folk club di Dundee; viene descritta da Hamish Henderson come “a heroine of the working class movement in Dundee, and a free-spoken, free-thinking old rebel who got thrown out of the CP for denouncing Stalin in the early thirties.”.

Così riporta Ythanside nel thread di Mudcat.org (vedi)
Mary Brooksbank, one of the most decent human beings you could ever be fortunate enough to meet, paid dearly for the ideals she embraced.
A life-long communist and humanist, she was expelled from the Communist Party in 1936 or ’37 for daring to suggest that ‘Uncle’ Joe Stalin was a brutal fascist dictator who enslaved millions of his fellow-countrymen and women and worked them to death.
Black-listed by mill owners for her efforts to organise unions, and and therefore unable to obtain legitimate employment, she took to street-singing to keep herself and her family alive, and kept this up into her 60s. She continued to address public meetings, and was arrested on one occasion and jailed for sedition. It is no coincidence that the local politicians waited until she was safely dead before granting her the ‘recognition’ of placing her name on any building. In the days before Consumer Protection, Legal Aid or Citizens Advice Bureaux she campaigned tirelessly on behalf of those unfortunates, less articulate than herself, who found themselves embroiled in battles with the Police or unscrupulous landlords, employers or moneylenders. The path to her front door was well-worn. How she found time to write and collect songs and poems I do not know. In the early 1970s, while she sat at home in Mid Craigie, unwell and suffering the after-effects of a stroke, Luke Kelly, on stage with the Dubliners at the Caird Hall, berated the audience for allowing such a gem as Mary Brooksbank to languish in obscurity.”

Dalla raccolta di Mary Brooksbank (1897-1978) “Sidlaw Breezes” (1966) una serie di poesie e canzoni sulla dura vita delle lavoratrici nei filatoi di Dundee, Scozia.

continua

FONTI
http://www.grahamstevenson.me.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=70:mary-brooksbank&catid=2:b&Itemid=98
http://citylifedundee.com/2015/02/15/mary-brooksbank-oary-dundees-first-lady/
http://www.dundeewomenstrail.org.uk/womens-trail/mary-brooksbank/