Archivi tag: Donegal

Báidín Fheidhlimidh

Leggi in Italiano

The island of Tory or better Oileán Thoraigh, is a grain of rice (measuring 5 km in length and 1 in width) 12 km off the northern coast of Donegal. Ancient fortress of the Fomorians that from here left to raid the coasts of Ireland, a race of primordial gods, like Balor of the Evil Eye, the Celtic god of darkness that had only one eye on the back of the head.
It is called the island of artists since a small community of painters has been established in the 1950s. The hundreds of people who live there are Gaelic speakers and have been “governed” since the Middle Ages by a king of the island: it is up to the king to explain the legends and traditions of the island to the tourists!

TORAIG~1
island of Tory
by Pixdaus 

Bright and verdant in summer it is flagellate from strong storms in the winter months, theater of great tragedies of the sea.
But above all it is a land of rabbits and birds among which we can distinguish the puffins of the sea with the characteristic triangular beak of a bright orange with yellow and blue stripes wearing the frak.

“UNA BARCHETTA IN MEZZO AL MAR”

“Phelim’s little boat” or “Báidín Fheidhlimidh” (Báidín fheilimi) is one of the “songs of the sea” and is taught to Irish children at schools being a rare example of a bilingual song. Almost certainly handed down for generations in oral form, the song may have been composed in the seventeenth century.
Despite appearing as a nursery rhyme, the ballad tells the story of Feilimí Cam Ó Baoill, or Phelim O’Boyle, who, to escape his bitter enemy, abandons Donegal. He was one of the Ulster leaders of the O’Neil clan, one of the largest tribal dynasty in Northern Ireland (see). A warrior-fisherman leader who, to avoid conflict with the Mac Suibhne clan, or Sweeney, takes the sea on a small boat to the island of Gola; but, still not feeling safe, he changes the route to the island of Tory, more jagged and rich in hiding places, even if more treacherous for the presence of the rocks. And right on the rocks the small boat breaks and Phelim drowns.

The Gaelic here is peculiar because it comes from Donegal and has different affinities with the Scottish Gaelic. Baidin is a word in Irish Gaelic that indicates a small boat and the concept of smallness returns obsessively in all verses; so the nursery rhyme has its moral: in highlighting the challenge and the audacity in spite of a contrary destiny, we do not have to forget the power of the sea and we must remind that freedom has a very high price.

Sinéad O’Connor from  Sean-Nós Nua 2002:  ua voice with such a particular tone; here the pitch is melancholic supported by a siren-like echo effect. In the commentary on the booklet Sinéad writes:
It tells the story of Feilim Cam Baoill, a chieftain of the Rosses [in Donegal] in the 17th century. He had to take to the islands off Donegal to escape his archenemy Maolmhuire an Bhata Bu Mac Suibhne. Tory Island was more inaccessible and seemed safer than Gola, but his little boat was wrecked there. For me, the song is one of defiance and bravery in spite of terrible odds. It is a song of encouragement that we should be true to ourselves even if being true means ‘defeat’. A song of the beauty of freedom. And a song of the power of the sea as a metaphor for the unconscious mind. It shows that we can never escape our soul.”

Na Casaidigh from Singing for memory 1998: a fine arrangement of the voices in the choir and a final instrumental left to the electric guitar in a mix between traditional and modern sounds very pleasant and measured.

Angelo Branduardi from Il Rovo e la Rosa 2013,  (his Gaelic is a bit strange!) the arrangement with the violin is very precious

English
I
Phelim’s little boat went to Gola,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat went to Gola,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it
Chorus:
A tiny little boat, a lively little boat,
A foolish little boat, Phelim’s little boat,
A straight little boat, a willing little boat,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it.
II
Phelim’s little boat went to Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat went to Tory,
Phelim’s   little boat and Phelim in it.
III
Phelim’s little boat crashed on Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it,
Phelim’s little boat crashed on Tory,
Phelim’s little boat and Phelim in it.
Donegal Gaelic
I
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Gabhla,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Gabhla,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Curfá:
Báidín bídeach, Báidín beosach,
Báidín bóidheach, Báidín Fheidhlimidh,
Báidín díreach, Báidín deontach,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh’s Feidhlimidh ann.
II
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Toraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh’s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh d’imigh go Toraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann.
III
Báidín Fheidhlimidh briseadh i dToraigh,
Báidín Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann
Báidín Fheidhlimidh briseadh i dToraigh,
Báidín  Fheidhlimidh ‘s Feidhlimidh ann (1)

NOTES
1) or Iasc ar bhord agus Feilimí ann  [Laden with fish and Phelim on board]

THE DANCE: Waves of Tory

The island has also given the title to an Irish folk dance “Waves of Tory” which reproduces the waves breaking on the rocks! Among the dances for beginners is performed with one step and presents only a difficult figure called Waves.
see more

LINK
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18074#177081

https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/dance-crib/waves-of-tory.html

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

Leggi in italiano

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore ” is a traditional Irish song originally from Donegal, of which several textual versions have been written for a single melody.

TUNE: Erin Shore

A typically Irish tune spread among travellers already at the end of 1700, today it is known with different titles: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (LISTEN instrumental version of the Irish group The Corrs from Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (LISTEN to the version always instrumental of the Corrs from Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair or The Green Glens Of Gweedor (with text written by Francie Mooney)

Standard version: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

The common Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore was first sung on an EFDSS LP(1969) by Packie Manus Byrne, now over 80 and living in Ardara Co Donegal*. He was born at Corkermore between there and Killybegs. It was taken up by Paul Brady and subsequently. However, there are longer and more local (to north Derry, Donegal) versions in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People and in Jimmy McBride’s The Flower of Dunaff Hill.” (in Mudcats ) and Sam Henry writes “Another version has been received from the Articlave district, where the song was first sung in 1827 by an Inishowen ploughman.”
The recording made by Sean Davies at Cecil Sharp House dates back to 1969 and again in the sound archives of the ITMA we find the recording sung by Corney McDaid at McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal in 1987 (see) and also Paul Brady recorded it many times.
Kevin Conneff recorded it with the Chieftains in 1992, “Another Country” (I, II, IV, V, II)

Amelia Hogan from “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.”

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny ( I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (I, II, IV, V)

intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

NOTES
*additional first verse by Garrison White
1) It refers to the reception of immigrants who were inspected and held for bureaucratic formalities, but the sentence is not very clear. Ellis Island was used as an entry point for immigrants only in 1892. Prior to that, for approximately 35 years, New York State had 8 million immigrants transit through the Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Lower Manhattan.

OTHER VERSIONS

This text was written by Patrick Brian Warfield, singer and multi-instrumentalist of the Irish group The Wolfe Tones. In his version the point of landing is not New York but Baltimore.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones from Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 

Lyrics: Patrick Brian Warfield 
I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore

This version takes up the 3rd stanza of the previous version as a chorus
The High Kings

I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
III
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór (2)
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore

NOTES
1) Banna Strand , Banna Beach, is situated in Tralee Bay County Kerry
2) my love

Shamrock shore

LINK
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

Altan musica di famiglia

Mairéad Ni Mhaonaigh e Francie Mooney

Dal nome di un piccolo lago ai piedi del monte Errigal nel nord-ovest del Donegal il gruppo Altan è fondato nello scorcio del 1980 da Mairéad Ni Mhaonaigh, figlia di Proinsias Ó Maonaigh (ossia Francie Mooney), rinomato fiddler di Gaoth Dobhair (Gweedore), che già nei primi anni ’70 aveva chiamato il suo gruppo di musica tradizionale “Ceoltoiri Altan”.
Mairéad , dalla voce d’angelo e dalle abili dita da leprecauno, conosce sul finire degli anni ’70 il suo futuro compagno del cuore, il flautista Frankie Kennedy. I due giovanissimi (18enne lui e 14enne lei) si conobbero all’insegna della musica essendo solito per Frankie (di Belfast) trascorrere l’estate a Gweedore per imparare il gaelico irlandese e approfondire lo studio del flauto irlandese e del whistle.  Entrambi tirocinanti al St.Patrick College di Dublino, si sposano e nel 1983 incidono un album “Ceol Adush” (Gael Linn: ‘musica del Nord’) a quei tempi la musica del Donegal non varcava i confini della Gaeltacht.
Ascoltiamo la loro intesa perfetta mentre suonano seduti al tavolo di un pub
https://youtu.be/hn12ns2XzwQ

https://youtu.be/5JH-NXoGLBU
E’ però “Altan” (1987) considerato l’album del debutto in gruppo con Ciarán Curran al bouzouki e Mark Kelly alla chitarra e la collaborazione di Dónal Lunny – Bodhrán , tastiere.

Diventati un quintetto con l’entrata del violino di Paul O’Shaughnessy (che lascerà il gruppo nel 1992) incidono “Horse with a Heart” (1989): con il loro equilibrato repertorio fondato sulla musica tradizionale del Donegal e gli influssi scozzesi  diffondono in tutto il mondo filastrocche e canzoncine in gaelico che finiscono immancabilmente nelle compilation di musica celtica.

ASCOLTA Lass of Glanshee in “Horse with a Heart” (1989)

e proseguono con una serie di album ( The Red Crow, Harvest Storm e Island Angelche si aggiudicano il titolo di Best Celtic Album assegnato dalla NAIRD e con i quali vincono premi e si assestano in vetta  alla charts delle isole britanniche: il frutto più maturo è forse “Island Angel” del 1993 una scaletta perfetta di brani cantati, set da danza e slow air,  (per lo più tradizionali ma anche composti dai membri del gruppo) chiude la “Aingeal an Oileáin” scritta da Mairéad per il suo Frankie, che morirà poco dopo sconfitto dal tumore diagnosticato l’anno precedente, ASCOLTA

UN PATTO DI SANGUE

Con Mairéad  e Frankie Kennedy Ciaran Tourish (violino, whistle), Ciarán Curran (Bouzouki e chitarra), Mark Kelly (chitarra), Dáithí Sproule (chitarra); Frankie fa promettere a tutti i componenti del gruppo di continuare a suonare insieme anche dopo la sua morte,  tutti i cinque giurano di mantenere vivo il progetto musicale e così sarà, mostrandosi la line-up più longeva.

ASCOLTA Scotch Style Jig (Andy de Jarlis) – Ingonish (Mike McDougall) – Mrs. McGhee (trad) in “Island Angel“, 1993


Il gruppo non si scioglie anche se ha bisogno di tempo per ripartire, nel 1996 pubblica Blackwater con Dermot Byrne all’organetto (a cui subentra nel 2014 Martin Tourish) a riformare il sestetto e un nutrito entourage di rinforzo, ma è con Another Sky registrato nel 2000 che ritrova lo stato di grazia (e nasce l’amore tra Mairéad e Dermot Byrne): set strumentali irresistibili, più song e una voce sopraffina.

ASCOLTA Beidh Aonach Amárach in Another Sky, 2000 video promozionale

ASCOLTA Altan & Chieftains live a Woodhill House “The Donegal Set”: un miracolo di sincronismo

Nel nuovo corso pur restando sempre fedeli alla tradizione irlandese (in particolare del Donegal e gli influssi scozzesi) gli Altan si approcciano alla balladry americana e alla musica appalacchiana; la tendenza sarà via via approfondita negli album successivi.

(Image: www.jamescummingsphotography.com)

E così con The Blue Idol (2002) Local Groung (2005) Gleann Nimhe (2012) e The Windening Gyne (2015) i cinque arrivano al loro 35esimo anniversario.

NA MOONEYS

E la tradizione continua, da genuino chieftain (capo clan) Mairéad raccoglie intorno a se la sua parentela e getta un ponte tra le generazioni, “una famiglia di musicisti e cantanti della Donegal Gaeltacht”: le sorelle Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh, leader degli Altan (voce e violino), e Anna Ní Mhaonaigh, già nel gruppo Macalla (voce e whistle), il fratello Gearóid Ó Maonaigh (chitarra) e suo figlio Ciarán (violino e violino baritono). Con la collaborazione di Nia Byrne, figlia di Mairéad (violino e voce) e Caitlin Nic Gabhan, moglie di Ciarán (concertina, podiritmia e danza). In aggiunta l’amico di sempre Mànus Lunny (bouzouki, tastiere, co-produzione e fonico).
Nell’album del debutto (2016) dal titolo omonimo fa capolino papà  Proinnsias (deceduto nel 2006) e il repertorio rende omaggio all’antenato caposcuola della fiddle music e della cultura orale della contea (da ascoltare tutto qui)
ASCOLTA Máire Mhór live

tag Altan

FONTI
http://www.mairead.ie/
https://altan.ie/
https://www.irlandaonline.com/cultura/musica/artisti-irlandesi/altan/

https://namooneys.bandcamp.com/

AN GABHAR BÁN

Il canto in gaelico An Gabhar Bàn (in inglese The White Goat) è la storia di un uomo in fuga sulle montagne per sottrarsi agli ufficiali giudiziari per questioni di contrabbando o di affitto non pagato, e per questo paragonato ad una capra bianca di montagna, la canzone fu tramandata da Kitty Johnny Sheáin di Gaoith Dobhair, la roccaforte della cultura irlandese nel Donegal mistico triangolo delle Bermude per i gruppi e artisti di musica celtica che hanno raggiunto la fama internazionale.
ASCOLTA Clannad in Clannad 2, 1975

e per fare due ristate ecco la versione sottotitolata  con una “misheard lyrics”

I
Sa tsean ghleann thiar a bhi sí raibh
Go dtí gur fhás na hadharc’ uirthi
Bliain is céad is corradh laethe
Go dtáinig an aois go tréan uirthi
Bhi sí gcró bheag ins an cheo
Go dtáinig feil’Eoin is gur éalaigh sí
Thart an ród san bealach mór
Gur lean a tóir go gear uirthi
II
Ni raibh nduine ar a tóir ach Donnchú óg
Is d’ith sí an lón san t-anlann air
Ni raibh aige ina dhorn ach ceap túine mór
Agus leag sé anuas ón arradh í
Nuair a chuala an gabhar bán go raibh sí ar lár
Thug sí léim chun tárrthála
Thug sí rás ‘s ni raibh sí sásta
Is leag sí spíon an táilliúra
III
Chomh cruinn le rón gur thóg sí feoil
Gan pis gan mórán déibhirce
Ach d’ith sí cib agus barr an fhraoich
Slánlús min is craobhógai
Draoin is dreas is cuilcann glas
Gach ní ar dhath na h-áinleoga
Cutharán sléibhe, duilliúr féile
Caora sréana agus blainséogai
IV
Chuaigh sí dhíol cios le Caiftín Spits
Is chraethnaigh a croi go dtréigfí í
Chaith sí an oíche ar bheagán bidh
Mar ndúil is go geasfaí féar uirthi
d’Fan sí ‘a óiche i dtóin Ros Coill
Is chaith sí é go pléisúra
Go dtáinig an slua ar maidin go luath
Is thug siad amach as Éirinn

Traduzione inglese*
I
In the old glen yonder she was always
Until the horns grew on her
Eleven years and some odd days
Until age came heavily to her
She was in a small hovel in the fog
Until St. John’s Day came and she escaped
Down the road through the big gap
Until she was hotly pursued
II
No one was after her except young Donnchú
And she ate his lunch
He only had in his fist a __
And he brought it down from the __
When the white goat heard that she was __
She leapt for freedom __
She gave a race and she wasn’t satisfied
And she knocked down the thorn of the tailor
III
As smart as a seal that she took the meat
Without peas or without much __
But she ate sedge and the top of the heather
__ and small branches
__ and briars and green __
Everything with the color of __
Mountain __, feast leaves
__ sheep and __
IV
She went the rent payment of Caiftín Spits
And her heart __ that they would abandon her
She spent the night on the little food
Like __ grass __
She spent the night at the bottom of Ros Coill
And she spent it happily
Until the crowd came early in the morning
And took her out from Ireland
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
In quella vecchia valle da sempre stava
finchè non le crebbero le corna (1)
11 anni e qualche giorno
e la vecchiaia le piombò addosso,
stava in una piccola grotta nella foschia, finchè il giorno di San Giovanni scappò
avviandosi verso la strada per l’alta montagna, ma venne fieramente inseguita
II
Dietro di lei solo il giovane Donnchú
e lei mangiò il suo pranzo
(il poliziotto) aveva nel suo pugno un_
e lo portò giù da _
quando la capra bianca sentì che era
saltò per la libertà
prese la rincorsa ma non era soddisfatta
e abbattè la spina del sarto (2)
III
Intelligente come una foca lei prese la carne senza piselli o senza molto_
ma mangiò .. e la cima dell’erica
_ e rametti
_ e .. e verde _
IV
Andò a pagare l’affitto di Caiftín Spits
e in cuor suo_ che l’avrebbero abbandonata
Passo la notte sul piccolo cibo
come _ erba _
passò la notte in cima a Ros Coil
e la passò felicemente
finchè la folla arrivò al mattino presto
e la portò via dall’Irlanda

NOTE
*Al momento la traduzione in inglese è lacunosa
1) nel linguaggio in furbesco le corna sono l’alambicco della distilleria abusiva
2) non ho idea del significato

THE PEELER AND THE GOAT

Ed ecco la versione inglese, sempre in tema capre e poliziotti, scritta nell’Ottocento da Darby Ryan di Bansha, un piccolo villaggio a metà strada sulla strada tra Cahir e Tipperary: il testo è umoristico e allusivo la capra rappresenta ironicamente i cattolici irlandesi perseguitati dagli Inglesi, ed è il poliziotto ad essere messo in ridicolo per il suo comportamento prepotente, supponente, ma pronto a girarsi dall’altra parte in cambio di due soldi per una bevuta!
ASCOLTA The Wolfe Tones 


I
A Bansha Peeler went one night
On duty and patrolling O
And met a goat upon the road
And took her for a stroller O
With bayonet fixed he sallied forth
And caught her by the wizzen O
And then he swore a mighty oath
‘I’ll send you off to prison O’
II
‘Oh, mercy, sir’, the goat replied
‘Pray let me tell my story O
I am no Rogue, no Ribbon man
No Croppy , Whig, or Tory  O
I’m guilty not of any crime
Of petty or high treason O
I’m sadly wanted at this time
This is the milking season O’
III
‘It is in vain for to complain
Or give your tongue such bridle O
You’re absent from your dwelling place
Disorderly and idle O
Your hoary locks will not prevail
Nor your sublime oration O
You’ll be transported by Peel’s Act
Upon my information O’
IV
‘No penal law did I transgress
By deeds or combination O
I have no certain place to rest
No home or habitation O
But Bansha is my dwelling-place
Where I was bred and born O
Descended from an honest race
That’s all the trade I’ve learned O’
V
‘The consequence be what it will
A peeler’s power, I’ll let you know
I’ll handcuff you, at all events
And march you off to Bridewell O
And sure, you rogue, you can’t deny
Before the judge or jury O
Intimidation with your horns
And threatening me with fury O’
VI
‘I make no doubt but you are drunk
With whiskey, rum, or brandy O
Or you wouldn’t have such gallant spunk
To be so bold or manly O
You readily would let me pass
If I had money handy O
To treat you to a poiteen glass
It’s then I’d be the dandy O’
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Un pula (1) di Bansha andò una notte
per il pattugliamento di servizio
e incontrò una capra sulla strada
e la scambiò per un barbone (2),
innestata la baionetta andò all’assalto
e l’afferrò per la gola
e poi fece un solenne giuramento
“Ti manderò dritto in prigione”
II
“O pietà signore – replicò la capra-
lasciatemi raccontare la mia storia:
non sono un malvivente, nè un affiliato alla Società del Nastro (3), un ribelle (4), un Whig o un Tory (5)
non sono colpevole di alcun crimine
di piccolo o d’alto tradimento
sono purtroppo richiesto in questo periodo che è la stagione del latte (6)”
III
“E’ inutile lamentarsi
e parlare a briglia sciolta
sei un fuori sede
casinista e sfaccendato
non prevarrai sulle tue catene
neppure con la tua oratoria sublime
sarai deportato per il Peel Act (7)
su mia accusa”
IV
“Non ho trasgredito nessuna legge penale, con o senza testimoni
non ho una fissa dimora dove stare
casa o abitazione
ma Bansha è la mia residenza
dove sono nato e cresciuto
discendendo da una razza onesta,
questo è il mestiere che ho imparato”
V
“Le conseguenze saranno ciò che io vorrò,
ti farò vedere il potere del poliziotto
ti ammanetterò in ogni caso
e ti spedirò a Bridewel
sta certo, canaglia, non puoi negare
davanti al giudice o alla giuria
per intimidazione con le tue corna
e minacce furiose verso di me”
VI
“Sono certo che sei ubriaco
di whiskey, rum, o brandy
o non avresti una tale grinta
nel mostrarti coraggioso e virile
Saresti pronto a farmi passare
se avessi del denaro in mano
per offrirti un bicchiere di whiskey casalingo (8)
e allora sarei un damerino!

NOTE
1) peeler è sinonimo di poliziotto, dal nome del fondatore del corpo di polizia Robert Peel che nel 1829 fondò la prima polizia metropolitana a Londra nella sede storica di Scotland Yard, una trentita d’anni più tardi l’istituzione di corpi di polizia locali fu obbligatoria in tutto il Regno Unito
2)  stroller che ho tradotto come barbone, nel senso di senzatetto è anche sinonimo di “passeggiatrice”
3) Ribbonmen sono gli affiliati alla Società del Nastro (Ribbon Society) una società agraria segreta dell’Ottocento formata da irlandesi cattolici mezzadri o braccianti per difendersi dai soprusi dei proprietari terrieri e locatari (vedi anche qui)
4) Croppy boys sono i ribelli irlandesi del 1798 (vedi)
5) Nomi delle due maggiori forze politiche presenti in Inghilterra dal XVII secolo alla metà del XIX. Il termine irlandese tory, in origine attribuito ai cattolici fuorilegge, indicava i seguaci conservatori del pretendente cattolico al trono Giacomo II Stuart (1679) e in seguito i sostenitori degli interessi dei proprietari agrari, della monarchia e della chiesa anglicana. Rinnovata da W. Pitt il Giovane (1784-90), la fazione tory dominò la vita politica inglese fino agli anni Trenta dell’Ottocento, quando per opera di R. Peel si trasformò nel moderno Partito conservatore britannico. Il termine whig, in origine usato per i ladri di cavalli, quindi per i presbiteriani scozzesi, nel suo significato politico indicò dapprima gli avversari di Giacomo Stuart e poi i fautori degli interessi urbani e commerciali, della limitazione dei poteri della monarchia e della tolleranza religiosa. Riorganizzata da C. Fox alla fine del Settecento, la fazione whig, interprete di una forte spinta riformatrice in senso politico e socioeconomico, assunse il potere dopo il 1832, trasformandosi quindi nel moderno Partito liberale britannico. (dal dizionario Zanichelli tratto da qui)
6) in altre versioni diventa “mating season” la stagione dell’amore.
7) Peel Act: la riforma di Peel della legge criminale in cui si riducono i crimini puniti con la morte
8) in altre versioni diventa “parting glass” ossia il bicchiere della staffa.

continua

FONTI
http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofEngland/Sir-Robert-Peel/
https://thesession.org/tunes/5327
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic28125.html

SIUBHÁN NÍ DHUIBHIR

Gustave Courbet: Portrait of Jo, the Beautiful Irish Girl-1865
Gustave Courbet: Portrait of Jo, the Beautiful Irish Girl-1865

‘Siúbhán’ o Siúbhán è un vecchio nome gaelico equivalente a ‘Siun’, derivato dal francese normanno “Jehanne, Jean”, che è equivalente a Jane, Janet (in italiano Giovanna), ma per assonanza anglicizzato in Susan . Ni (figlia di) Dhuibhir porta l'”h” – se fosse un maschio il cognome sarebbe scritto O’ (oppure Mac) Duibhir- che in inglese diventa Dwyer o Macguire (per assonanza fonetica Gwir). Il titolo è trasposto in inglese più spesso come Susan O’Dwyer oppure Susy Mac Guire.

La canzone a volte è confusa con un altro titolo “Sean Ni Duibhir” che però si riferisce ad un uomo , ossia John O’Dwyer Of The Glen, il cui testo è stato scritto da Canon Patrick Augustine Sheehan alla fine dell’Ottocento o agli inizi del Novecento su una melodia tradizionale irlandese (vedi) – alla quale dedicherò un altro post.

LA MELODIA
E’ una slow air tradizionale originaria del Donegal
ASCOLTA Patrick Ball e la sua caratteristica arpa con le corde metalliche

Il testo in gaelico irlandese, riprende il tema tipico degli affanni amorosi, come per Scarborough fair i due ex si avvalgono di un intermediario con il compito di riferire le reciproche ambasciate, la melodia è malinconica con una venatura di rimpianto.

ASCOLTA Clannad, nell’album d’esordio dal titolo omonimo pubblicato nel 1973 (e ristampato come cd nel 1997) l’arrangiamento è molto “anni 70”

ASCOLTA Alan Stivell in Chemins de Terre 1973, con il titolo di Susy Mac Guire

ASCOLTA Relativity

ASCOLTA Cait Agus Sean in Celtic Heart, 2008

ORIGINALE IN GAELICO IRLANDESE
I(1)
A Shiubhán Nic Uidhir, ‘s tú bun agus bárr mo scéil.

Ar mhná na cruinne go dtug sise ‘n báire léi;
Le gile, le finne, le maise vs le dhá dtrian scéimh,
‘S nach mise ‘n truagh Mhuire bheith scaradh amárach léi.
II
D’éirigh mé ar maidin a tharraing
Chun aonaigh mhóir
A dhíol ‘s a cheannacht
Mar dhéanfadh mo dhaoine romham
Bhuail tart ar a’ bhealach mé
‘S shuí mise síos a dh’ól
‘S le Siún Ní Dhuibhir
Gur ól mise luach na mbróg
III
A Shiún Ní Dhuibhir
An miste leat mé bheith tinn?
Mo bhrón ‘s mo mhilleadh
Má’s miste liom tú ‘bheigh i gcill
Bróinte ‘s muilte bheith
Scileadh ar chúl do chinn
Ach cead a bheith in Iorras(2)
Go dtara síoi Éabh ‘un cinn
IV
A Shiún Ní Dhuibhir
‘S tú bun agus barr mo scéil
Ar mhná an cruinne
Go dtug sise ‘n báire léi
Le gile le finne le mais’
Is le dhá dtrian scéimh
‘S nach mise ‘n trua Mhuire
Bheith scaradh amárach léi
V
Thiar in Iorras tá searc
Agus grá mo chléibh
Planda ‘n linbh a d’eitigh
Mo phósadh inné
Beir scéala uaim chuicí
Má thug mise póg dá béal
Go dtabharfainn dí tuilleadh
Dá gcuirfeadh siad bólacht léi
VI
“Beir scéala uaim chuige
Go dearfa nach bpósaim é
Ó chuala mise gur chuir sé
Le bólacht mé
Nuair nach bhfuil agamsa
Maoin nó mórán spré
Bíodh a rogha aige
‘s beidh mise ar mo chomhairle féin.
VII(3)
‘S beith mise ‘r mo chomhairle féin”
Saighdiúirín singil mé a briseadh as gárda ‘ rí,
‘S gan aon phighinn agham a bhéarfainn ar chárta dighe;
Bhuailinn a’ droma ‘s sheinninn ar chláirsigh chaoimh,
Is ar Churrach Chill Dara gur scar mé le grádh mo chroidhe.


TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
II
I set out one morning
For market
Buying and selling
As my people did before me
I got thirsty on the way
And sat down to drink
And with Susan O’Dwyer
I drank the price of the boots
III
Susan O’Dwyer
Do you care if I’m ill?
Sorrow and ruin be upon me
If I wish you to be in a graveyard
My grief and troubles
Rain down on you
But you can stay in Irras(1)
Until the tribe of Eve comes to the fore(2)
IV
Susan O’Dwyer
You’re the beginning and the end of my story
From the women of the world
She took the prize
With brightness and fairness, goodness
And almost perfect beauty
And I’m the sad case
To leaving her tomorrow
V
My true love is
Over in Irras
The young sweet thing
That refused to marry me yesterday
Tell her from me
If I give her a kiss
That I would give her more
If they’d send me a dowry with her
VI
“Tell him from me
For certain I won’t marry him
For I heard that he wanted
Me with a dowry
Since I don’t have wealth
Or much of a fortune
Let him have whoever he wishes
And I’ll be about my own business”

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
II
Una mattina sono andato
al mercato
per comprare e  vendere
come altri hanno fatto prima di me
per strada mi è venuta sete
e mi sono fermato a bere,
con Susan O’Dwyer
ho bevuto per il prezzo di un paio di scarponi
III
Susan O’Dwyer
non ti importa se sono malato?
Dolore e rovina che si avvicinano
se voglio che tu sia in un cimitero
il mio rimorso e gli affanni
cadono su di te
che resterai a Erris
finchè le donne si faranno avanti
IV
Susan O’Dwyer
inizio e fine della mai vita tu sei
di tutte le donne del mondo
lei è la prima
per intelligenza, onestà e bontà
e una perfetta bellezza
e io sono triste
di lasciarla domani
V
Il mio amore è
finito a Erras
la dolce giovane
che si è rifiutata di sposarmi ieri,
dille da parte mia
che le do un bacio
e le avrei dato di più
se( i genitori) me l’avessero mandata con la dote
VI
“Ditegli da parte mia
che di sicuro non lo sposerò
perché ho saputo che mi voleva
con la dote
ma poiché non ho ricchezza
o una fortuna,
che vada dove vuole
e io mi farò i fatti miei”

NOTE
1) versione testuale in Pádraig Mac Seáin. “Ceolta Theilinn”. Belfast: Institute of Irish Studies – Queen’s University, 1973. (come collezionata a Teelin, Co. Donegal, Irlanda). Il primo verso dice: Beautiful Siubhán/Joan Maguire is all my concern. I am wretched at leaving her tomorrow.
2) Iorras tradotto come Irras. Erras è una regione nel nord-ovest della contea di May, oin Irlanda per lo più montuosa e ricca di torba.
3) la traduzione in inglese: I’m a single soldier who was expelled from the King’s Guard. I’ve no money for a drink. I used to play the drum and harp and I parted from my love in the Curragh in Kildare.

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/relativity/siun.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/9585
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=68340
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=55863
http://songsinirish.com/p/siun-ni-dhuibhir-lyrics-chords.html

GLEANNTÁIN GHLAS GHAOTH DOBHAIR

Francie Mooney (Pronsias Ó Maonaigh) è il padre Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh, voce e violino del gruppo Altan. Talentuoso violinista nello stile del Donegal originario di Gweedore ha scritto anche diverse canzoni per lo più in gaelico, essendo il gaelico nella contea del Donegal (Irlanda Nord-Ovest) una lingua ancora parlata dalla gente comune.
Così sulla melodia “Shamrock shore” ecco anche un testo in gaelico scritto in tempi moderni e intitolato “Gleanntáin Ghlas Ghaoth Dobhair” (in inglese”The Green Glens of Gweedore”). Il titolo richiama un altro brano tradizionale sempre originario di Gweedore “The Green fields of Gaothdobhair” da non confondere però, essendo due testi e due melodie distinte (vedi).
Il tema è quello tipico delle canzoni sull’emigrazione con il protagonista in partenza per l’America che lascia il suo cuore nell’amata Irlanda con la speranza di ritornarci per trascorrere una tranquilla vecchiaia.

ASCOLTA Altan in Runaway Sunday 1997

I
Céad slán ag sléibhte maorga
Chondae Dhún na nGall
Agus dhá chéad slán ag an Earagal árd
Ina stua os cionn caor ‘s call
Nuair a ghluais mise thart le loch Dhún Lúich
Go ciún ‘sa ghleann ina luí
I mo dhiaidh bhí Gleanntáin Ghlas Ghaoth Dobhair
Is beag nár bhris mo chroí
II
Ag taisteal domh amach fríd chnoic Ghleann Domhain
‘S an Mhucais ar mo chúl
Ní miste domh ‘ra le brón ‘s le crá
Gur fhreasach a shil mise súil
Go ‘Meiriceá siar, a bhí mo thriall
I bhfad thar an fharraige mhór
D’fhag mé slán ar feadh seal ag Dún na nGall
‘S ag Gleanntáin Ghlas Ghaoth Dobhair
III
Níorbh é mo mhiansa imeacht ariamh
Ó m’ thír bheag dhílis féin
Ach trom lámh Gall, le cluain
‘S le feall, a thiomáin mé i gnéill
B’é rún mo chroí-se pilleadh arís
Nuair a dhéanfainn beagán stór
‘S deireadh mo shaoil a chaitheamh lem ghaoil
Fá Ghleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair
IV
Slán, slán go fóill a Dhún na nGall
A chondae shéimh gan smál
‘S dod gheara breá in am an ghá
Nár umhlaigh riamh roimh Ghall
Tá áit i mo chroí do gach fear ‘s gach mnaoi
‘S gach páiste beag agus mór
Áta beo go buan, gan bhuairt, gan ghruaim
Fá Ghleanntáin Ghlas Ghaoth Dobhair

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
Farewell to the noble mountains of Donegal
And twice farewell to tall Errigal, arching over rowan and ash tree
When I passed by Dunlewey lake, lying quietly in the glen
Behind me were the little green glens of Gaoth Dobhair, and it nearly broke my heart
II
Travelling through Glendowan’s Hills, and Muckish behind me
I don’t mind saying with sorrow and grief, that tears fell from my eyes
Westward to America was my journey, far across the wide sea
I said farewell for a while to Donegal, and the little green glens of Gaoth Dobhair
III
I never wanted to leave my own beloved land
But the foreigner’s heavy handed deceit and treachery drove me away
It would be my heart’s desire to return again, when I should get a little money
To spend the end of my life with my family, ‘round the little green glens of Gaoth Dobhair
IV
Yet farewell, farewell to Donegal, the County fine and fair
And to your brave men who in time of need, did not ever cower before the foreigner
There’s a place in my heart for each man and woman, each child big and small
Who live in peace, without sorrow or grief, in the little green glens of Gaoth Dobhair
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Addio alle nobili montagne del Donegal e doppiamente addio all’alto Errigal (1)
che sovrasta il sorbo e il frassino, mentre passavo per il lago Dunlewey (2) disteso placido nella valle, alle mie spalle avevo le piccole verdi valli di Gweedore e il cuore era quasi a pezzi
II
Viaggiando per le colline di Glendowan e con Muckish (3) alle spalle, devo dire che con dolore e pena,
le lacrime mi cadevano dagli occhi, verso occidente per l’America era il mio cammino lontano sul vasto oceano e dissi addio per un momento al Donegal e alle piccole verdi valli di Gweedore.
III
Non avrei mai voluto lasciare la mia amata terra,
ma la “longa mano” dello straniero e il tradimento mi hanno allontanato:
vorrei ritornare di nuovo, quando avrò un po’ di denaro
per trascorrere la fine della mia vita con la mia famiglia e tutt’intorno le piccole verdi valli di Gweedore.
IV
Eppure addio al Donegal la contea graziosa e bella
e ai suoi uomini coraggiosi che nel tempo del bisogno non si sono mai inchinati davanti allo straniero,
c’è un posto nel mio cuore per ogni uomo e donna, ogni bambino grande e piccolo
che vivono in pace, senza dolore e sofferenza, nelle piccole verdi valli di Gweedore

NOTE
1) il Monte Errigal dalla forma conica appartiene al gruppo delle Seven Sisters. E’ rinomato per il colore rosato che assume al tramonto a causa della presenza di quarzite nella roccia.
2) Dhún Lúich il Forte di Lugh
3) il monte Muckish in gaelico significa “il dorso del maiale” per la vasta cima piatta

DONEGAL: UP THERE IT’S DIFFERENT
Un Ovest ancora selvaggio (torbiere, scogliere e grandi spazi disabitati) e poco turistico qui si respira la libertà forse per via del forte vento che soffia sempre.

http://tripvillage.it/donegal/
http://irlanda.ilreporter.com/speciali/donegal-irlanda-estrema/
http://ilariabattaini.it/2016/12/26/viaggio-nel-selvaggio-donegal-parte-prima/

http://ilariabattaini.it/2017/01/18/viaggio-nel-selvaggio-donegal-parte-seconda/

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/altan/gleanntain.htm http://songsinirish.com/p/gleanntain-ghlas-ghaoth-dobhair-lyrics.html
http://www.irishtune.info/tune/2963/

La terra del verde trifoglio di Paddy

Read the post in English

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore” è una  canzone irlandese tradizionale originaria del Donegal, di cui per una sola melodia sono state scritte diverse versioni testuali,

LA MELODIA

Una melodia tipicamente irish diffusa tra i traveller già alla fine del 1700, oggi si conosce con diversi titoli: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (ASCOLTA versione strumentale del gruppo irlandese The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (ASCOLTA la versione strumentale sempre dei Corrs in Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair ovvero The Green Glens Of Gweedor (con testo scritto da Francie Mooney)

LA VERSIONE STANDARD: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

” Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore è stata cantata per la prima volta su un EFDSS LP (1969) di Packie Manus Byrne, ora ultraottantenne [Packie è morto il 12 maggio 2015] e residente ad Ardara -Contea del Donegal. Era nato a Corkermore tra lì e Killybegs ed è stata ripresa da Paul Brady. Tuttavia, ci sono versioni più lunghe e locali (a North Derry, Donegal) in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry e in “The Flower of Dunaff Hill” di Jimmy McBride” (tratto da qui) Sam Henry scrive in merito “Un’altra versione proviene dal distretto di Articlave, dove la canzone è stata cantata per la prima volta nel 1827 da un aratore di Inishowen.
La registrazione effettuata da Sean Davies al Cecil Sharp House risale al 1969 e ancora negli archivi sonori  dell’ITMA troviamo la registrazione cantata da Corney McDaid al McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal nel 1987 (vedi) e anche Paul Brady l’ha registrata più volte.
Kevin Conneff la registra con i Chieftains nel 1992 per l’album “Another Country” 

Amelia Hogan in “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.” con un bellissimo video -racconto

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny (strofe I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (strofe I, II, IV, V)

VERSIONE STANDARD
intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
introduzione
Venite irlandesi che ascoltate la mia canzone, il vostro destino è una storia triste, quando siete indietro con gli affitti e siete tartassati e i raccolti sono andati a male
abbandonerete le vostre terre
e vi laverete le mani di tutto quello che è avvenuto e prenderete il mare per una nuova occasione, lontano dalla terra del verde trifoglio.
I
Dal molo di Derry partimmo
il 23 di Maggio
eravamo imbarcati in una simpatica ciurma che salpava per l’America,
abbiamo preso cinque mila e più litri di acqua fresca
per il breve viaggio
fino a New York,
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
II
Così addio cara e dolce Liza,
e addio alla città di Derry
e due volte addio ai miei bravi compagni
che restano su quella terra santa,
se fama e fortuna mi arrideranno
e farò dei soldi a palate,
ritornerò indietro e sposerò la fidanzatina che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
III
Alle dodici in punto abbiamo avvistato
il famoso Mullin Head
e Innistrochlin a destra spiccava sul letto dell’oceano,
una vistra migliore mai prima videro i miei occhi
del sole che tramonta tra il mare e il cielo
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
IV
Navigammo per tre giorni (settimane) e abbiamo sofferto tutti il mal di mare, non c’era un uomo a piede libero a bordo, eravamo tutti confinati nelle nostre cuccette, senza nessuno a confortarmi, né la cara madre, né il buon padre a sorreggermi la testa che era dolorante, il che mi ha fatto pensare ancora di più alla ragazza che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
V
Raggiungemmo infine l’altra sponda in salvo in 23 gioni, siamo stati presi come passeggeri da un uomo che ci ha portato in giro in sei strade diverse
così bevemmo tutti il bicchiere dell’addio nel caso non ci fossimo più incontrati e bevemmo alla salute della vecchia Irlanda e alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

NOTE
* strofa introduttiva scritta da Garrison White
1) si riferisce dell’accoglienza degli immigrati che erano ispezionati e trattenuti per le formalità burocratiche, ma la frase non è molto chiara. Ellis Island fu usata come punto d’ingresso agli immigrati solo nel 1892. Prima di allora, per circa 35 anni, lo Stato di New York ha fatto transitare 8 milioni di immigrati per il Castle Garden Immigration Depot situato in Lower Manhattan

Rispetto alla versione “standard” si trovano un paio di testi, i quali riprendono sempre il tema dell’emigrazione

ALTRE VERSIONI

Questo testo è stato scritto da Patrick Brian Warfield, cantante e polistrumentista del gruppo irlandese The Wolfe Tones (autore di molte canzoni per il gruppo). Nella sua versione il punto di sbarco non è New York ma Baltimora.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones in Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 


I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio all’Irlanda
la mia cara terra natia,
mi si spezza il cuore a separarmi dagli amici
perchè è allora che le lacrime scorrono, devo andare in America.
Rivedrò ancora una volta la mia casa, per ora lascio la mia innamorata e la terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
II
La nostra nave si trova in rada
e lei è in piedi sul molo;
che la buona sorte ci accompagni ogni notte
mentre solchiamo mare,
molte navi sono andate perdute (nel naufragio) costato molte vite,
in questo viaggio che abbiamo davanti, con le lacrime agli occhi, dirò addio alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
III
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai ,
anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
IV
Ora la nostra nave è in viaggio
che il cielo ci protegga tutti
con i venti e  le vele di certo non falliremo
in questo viaggio verso Baltimora,
ma che genitori e amici restino a salutare
fino a quando non riuscirò più a vederli e allora darò l’ultimo sguardo
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

Questa versione riprende  la III strofa della versione precedente con un coro
The High Kings


I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio il mio solo vero amore
ti penserò notte e giorno
addio alla vecchia Irlanda
e addio a te Bannastrant
non c’è tempo per guardarsi indietro, ma fronteggiare il vento e combattere le onde, che il cielo ci protegga
dal freddo, dalla fame e dalle raffiche rabbiose, ti prego non voglio perdermi,
vento nelle vele portami al sicuro
Coro
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai , anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

II
Fuori ora sull’oceano profondo
il rumore della nave rende difficile il sonno, gli occhi si riempiono di lacrime
la tua immagine non se ne vuole andare via. (coro)
New York alla fine è in vista
il mio cuore batte forte
cerco di essere coraggioso
ma desidero averti vicino
accanto a me, cuore mio
(coro)
Finchè potrò fare ritorno un giorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi

NOTE
1) Banna Strand , ovvero Banna Beach, si trova nella Tralee Bay contea di Kerry

Shamrock shore

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

GREEN FIELDS OF GAOTH DOBHAIR

I Clannad nell’album Fuaim 1982 scrivono di aver sentito cantare la canzone da Cathal Ó Baoill (Charlie Joe Thimlin) e di averla arrangiata abbinandola ad una melodia della Contea di Derry. Il canto è un emigration song che decanta le bellezze di Gweedore (irlandese: Gaoth Dobhair ), un distretto di lingua irlandese che si trova sulla costa atlantica della contea di Donegal, Irlanda.

Down past Dunlewey’s bonny lakes(1)
One morning I did stray,
Until I reached sweet Clady banks(2)
where the silvery salmon play,
I strolled around through old Bunbeg(3)
and down along the shore,(4)
And gazed with admiration
on the green fields of Gaothdobhair.

I visit Magherclocher,
On Middletown heights I stand,
Beneath me lies the ocean wide,
and Machergallon strand,
Those sandy banks so dear to me,
Those banks I do adore,
Behind me lies sweet Derrybeg(3)
and the green fields of Gaothdobhair.

The bonny Isle of Goal
and Inishmean so near,
I see the little fishing fleet
as it lies along the pier,
I wander through the graveyard
where those have gone before,
That once lived happy and content
on the green fields of Gaothdobhair.

I see sweet Inish Oirthir,
and far off Tory Isle,
I view the ocean liners
as they stream along in style,
on board are Irish emigrants
with hearts both sad and sore,
As they gazed on old Tir Chonaill(5) hills
and the green fields of Gaothdobhair.

NOTE
1) il Lough Dunlewy è situato nella Poison Glen quella che è definiti come la valle più selvaggia del Donegal Il nome della valle è frutto di un refuso di un oscuro cartografo che nel tradurre il inglese i nomi in gaelico confuse la parola neamh (paradisiaco) con nimhe(avvelenato)
2) il fiume è ancora rinomato per la sua pescosità vedi
3) Bunbeg e Derrybeg sono due paesini così talmente vicini da sembrare un unico agglomerato VIDEO
4) La costa di Gweedore è un rincorrersi di lunghe spiagge sabbiose e scogliere frastagliate
5) Tir Chonaill= la Terra di Conall inglesizzato in Tyrconnell era un regno d’Irlanda (Nord-Ovest) rimasto indipendente fino al 1601 equivalente grosso modo alla contea del Donegal (anche se ben più vasto); il regno venne istituito nel V secolo da un figlio di Nial dei Nove Ostaggi (in inglese Niall of the Nine Hostages) e governato dal clan O’Donnell fino alla Fuga dei Conti

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Attraversavo un giorno il bel lago di Dunlewey finchè raggiunsi le rive del gradevole Clady dove nuotano i salmoni argentati, vagabondai per il vecchio Bunbeg e giù fino alla spiaggia e ammirai i verdi campi di Gweedore.
Visito Magherclocher e sulle alture di Machergallon mi metto in piedi, sotto di me giace il vasto oceano e la spiaggia di Machergallon, quelle rive sabbiose così care per me, quelle sponde che adoro, alle mie spalle scorre il dolce Derrybeg e i verdi campi di Gweedore.
La bella isola di Goal così vicina a Inishmean vedo la fila di pescherecci che stanno al molo, mi aggiro per il cimitero di coloro che se ne sono già andati  e un tempo vivevano felici e contenti sui verdi campi di Gweedore. Vedo il dolce Inish Oirthir e lontano l’isola di Tory, i transatlantici mentre seguono la corrente con eleganza, a bordo ci sono gli emigranti irlandesi con i cuori tristi e addolorati, che guardano fisso le colline della vecchia Tyrconnell e i verdi campi di Gweedore.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14695

 

COINLEACH GLAS AN FHOMHAIR: The Green Autumn Stubble

“The Green Autumn Stubble” (in italiano “I campi di stoppie in Autunno”) è una slow air proveniente dal Donegal (e più in generale del Nord- Ovest dell’Irlanda) e cantata in gaelico, di cui conosco ben poco per quanto riguarda le origini. In rete si trovano due versioni testuali con relative traduzioni in inglese (risalenti alla fine dell’Ottocento)

swan-maiden-2724La melodia è di una bellezza rara e lascia senza fiato, il protagonista che canta è un giovane lavoratore stagionale che durante il periodo del raccolto (orzo, grano) si innamora di una fanciulla bella come un cigno..

ASCOLTA Kitty Gallagher, Donegal 1951 registrazione raccolta sul campo da Alan Lomax (Irlanda 1951-1953) (strofe I e II)

ASCOLTA Clannad in Magical Ring 1983

ASCOLTA Maria McCool in Ailleog: Magical Songs Of Ireland 1999


I)
Ar chonnlaigh ghlais an Fhoghmhair
A stóirín gur dhearc mé uaim
Ba deas do chos i mbróig
‘Sba ró-dheas do leagan siubhail.
Do ghruaidh ar dhath na rósaí
‘Sdo chúirníní bhí fighte dlúith
Monuar gan sinn ‘ár bpósadh
Nó’r bórd luinge ‘triall ‘un siubhail.
II)
Tá buachaillí na h-áite seo
A’ gartha ‘gus ag éirghe teann
Is lucht na gcochán árd
A’ deánamh fáruis do mo chailín donn
Dá ngluaiseadh Rí na Spáinne
Thar sáile ‘s a shlóighte cruinn
Bhrúighfinn féar is fásach
‘S bhéinn ar láimh le mo chailín donn.
III)
Ceannacht buaibh ar aontaigh’
Dá mbínn agus mo chailín donn
Gluais is tar a chéad-searc
Nó go dtéidh muid thar Ghaoth-Bearra ‘nonn
Go sgartar ó n-a chéile
Bárr na gcraobh ‘s an eala ón tuinn
Ní sgarfar sin ó chéile
‘S níl ach baois díbh á chur ‘n mur gcionn.
IV)
Chuir mé leitir scríobhtha
Annsoir mo sweetheart agus casaoid ghéar
Chuir sí chugam arís í
Go rabh a croidhe istuigh i lár mo chléibh.
Cum na h-eala is míne
Ná’n síoda ‘s ná cluimh na n-éan
Nach trom an osna ghním-se
Nuair a smaoitighim ar a bheith ‘sgaradh léi.
V)
‘Sé chuala mé Dé Domhnaigh
Mar chómhrádh ‘gabháil eadar mhnáibh
Go rabh sí ‘gabháil ‘a pósadh
Ar óigfhear dá bhfuil san áit.
A stóirín glac mo chomhairle
‘S a’ foghmhar seo fan mar tá
‘S cha leigim le ‘bhfuil beo thú
A stór nó ‘s tú mo ghrádh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I)
On the green stubble-fields of Autumn I saw you, my sweetheart.
Nice were your feet in shoes it was too nice your way of walking
Your cheek was redder than the rose, And your ringlets tightly plaited
Alas that we’re not married
Or on board ship sailing away
II)
The boys around here are
Complaining and getting fired up
And the ones with the high-piled hair
Are making homes
for my brown-haired girl.
If the King of Spain would
Go abroad with his assembled men
I would trample pasture and wilderness /And I would be with my brown-haired girl
III)
If only my brown girl and I were buying cows at the fair
Go and come first love
Until we go over to Gaoth-Bearra
Even if the tops of the branches were parted and the swan was separated from the waves
That would not separate us And those who go against us are foolish
IV)
I wrote a letter To my sweetheart containing a sharp complaint
She wrote back to me
That her heart was inside my bosom.. The shape of a swan finer than silk or bird feathers;
Heavy is my sigh when I think of being apart from her.
V)
What I heard on Sunday
As conversation among the women That she was going to be married
To a young man from the place. Sweetheart take my advice
And this Autumn stay as you are I won’t let you go, my love, as long as you live.
Traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto *
I)
Tra le stoppie dei campi in Autunno,
ti vidi, amore mio,
belli i tuoi piedini nelle scarpe(1),
e camminavi così bene.
Le tue guance rosse come le rose,
e i tuoi boccoli intrecciati,
peccato che non siamo sposati
o a bordo di una nave in partenza(2)
II)
I ragazzi dei dintorni
si lamentano e si infiammano
e quelli con il cappello a tuba(3) stanno preparando la casa
per la mia fanciulla dai capelli neri.
Se il re di Spagna volesse andare all’estero con le sue armate calpesterei i pascoli e le brughiere per stare con la mia ragazza dai capelli scuri.(4)
III)
Se solo la mia ragazza mora ed io potessimo comprare mucche alla fiera per andare e sposarci, fino a superare il fiume Gweebarra (5);
anche se le cime dei rami sono divise e i cigni sono separati dalle onde
niente ci separerebbe
e coloro che ci vanno contro, sono degli schiocchi.
IV)
Ho scritto una lettere al mio amore contenente un amaro rimprovero,
lei mi ha risposto
che il suo cuore era nel mio petto.
L’aspetto di un cigno(6) più bello della seta o delle piume d’uccello,
e il mio lamento è grande quando penso di allontanarmi da lei
V)
La domenica ho sentito dalle chiacchiere delle donne che si sarebbe sposata con un giovanotto del posto.
Amore mio dammi retta e questo autunno resta come sei(7);
non ti lascerò andare amore mio finchè avrai vita.

NOTE
* per la traduzione ho cercato di mettere insieme le frasi inglesi che avevano più senso per me, purtroppo il gaelico non è tra le mie lingue conosciute
1) nei tempi passati non tutti potevano permettersi di portare le scarpe ai piedi, specialmente se contadini, il complimento quindi ai piedi e alle scarpe è segno di distinzione o della celebrazione di un’occasione speciale, probabilmente si trattava della festa del Raccolto
2) la nave in partenza suggerisce il desiderio di andare a vivere lontano dalla compagnia della gente o cercare la fortuna oltre mare
3) “high-piled hair” oppure “high hats” Nel primo casi si riferisce alla parrucca indossata dai gentiluomini nel Settecento (passata di modo dopo la rivoluzione francese..) oppure ai cappelli alti tipo tuba sempre nel guardaroba del gentleman ottocentesco. E tuttavia il dettaglio stride con il contesto rurale in cui ho appena collocato la canzone in base agli elementi fin qui emersi! Diciamo che il termine potrebbe descrivere una classe sociale appena più benestante del povero mezzadro o del lavorante stagionale. Sia i ragazzi della fattoria che quelli più benestanti spasimano d’amore per la bella
4) credo stia dicendo che se dovesse esserci un’invasione lui correrebbe da lei per proteggerla. Classica spacconata di chi non ha niente di sostanzioso da mostrare per garantire una certa sicurezza economica alla futura moglie
5)  Gaoth-Barra, Gaoth Beara è il nome gaelico del fiume Gweebarra che sfocia in mare in una splendida baia sulla costa Ovest del Donegal
6) il simbolismo del cigno è già presente in un’altra altrettanto dolente slow air. Qui evidentemente il bracciante stagionale è ritornato nel proprio paese e così scrive all’innamorata cercando di mantenere vivo il ricordo e l’amore. Il paragone credo voglia mettere in risalto la morbidezza della carnagione di lei
7) il giovanotto dice alla ragazza di non sposarsi che lui si farà avanti

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/artists/Clannad/lyrics/Coinleach.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9243 http://irishlearner.awyr.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=890 http://www.loc.gov/item/afc9999005.26102

WHERE THE BLARNEY ROSES GROW

b-384553-antique_roses_posters (2)“Le rose di Blarney” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese che parla di una bella ragazza che ha sedotto il protagonista lasciandolo con il cuore infranto e senza soldi!
La canzone è tipica del music hall ed è stata attribuita a A. Melville su un’aria tradizionale (Folksongs & Ballads Popular in Ireland, Volume 4″) forse tale Alexander Melville di Glasgow emigrato in America e morto nel 1929; egli scrisse molte canzoni con e per lo scozzese Henry “Harry” Lauder (1870-1950), famoso cantante e attore che calcò le scene del vaudeville americano e del music hall inglese.
La prima registrazione risale al 1926 ed è interpretata dal tenore irlandese George O’Brien. Nella “Dahr” Discography of American Historical Recordings troviamo accreditati Alex Melville (lyricist) e D. Frame Flint (arranger) così la canzone di certo era tipica dei repertori dei musical halls ed è diventata ben presto per il suo tema semi-serio e la sua aria scanzonata, una canzone tradizionale irlandese da cantare nei pubs.

ASCOLTA The Willoughby Brothers in ‘The Promise’ 2011 (i sei fratelli della contea Wicklow in un video molto patinato pieno di testosterone oserei dire sciccoso!)

ASCOLTA Noel McLoughin in “Noel Mcloughlin: Ireland” 2008

ASCOLTA Fine Crowd in “Newfoundland drinking songs” 2005


CHORUS
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses(1) grow?
Some say down in Limerick Town and more say in Mayo;
Somewhere in the Emerald Isle of this I’d like to know,
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses grow?
I
‘Twas over in old Ireland near the town of Cushendall(2),
One morn I met a damsel there, the fairest of them all;
‘Twas by me own affections and me money she did go,
She told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
II
Her cheeks were like the roses and her hair a raven hue,
Before that she had done with me, she had me raving, too;
She left me sorely stranded, not a coin she left, you know,
And she told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
III
They’ve roses in Killarney and the same in County Clare,
But ‘pon my word those roses, boys, you can’t see anywhere;
She blarney’d(3) me and, by the powers, she left me broke, you know,
Did this damsel that belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
IV
A-cushla gra mo chroi(4), me boys, she wants to leave with I,
If you belong to Ireland then yourself belongs to me;
Her Donegal come-all-ye brogue, it captured me, you know,
Bad luck to her, good luck(5) to where the blarney roses grow.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
CORO
Qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney(1)?
Alcuni dicono giù nella città di Limerick e altri dicono a Mayo;
da qualche parte nell’Isola di Smeraldo, e questo che vorrei sapere,
qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney?
I
Fu nella vecchia Irlanda, vicino alla città di Cushendall(2)
che una mattina incontrai una donzella, la più bella del reame;
si è presa il mio affetto e i miei soldi,
e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
II
Le sue guance erano come le rose e i capelli erano corvini,
prima che avesse finito con me, mi aveva mandato fuori di testa;
e dolorosamente mi ha piantato in asso, non una moneta mi ha lasciato, sai, e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
III
Ci sono rose a Killarney e anche nella Contea di Clare,
ma in fede mia quelle rose, ragazzi, non si trovano da tutte le parti;
mi ha intontito con le chiacchiere(3) e per Dio, lei mi ha lasciato al verde, sai
(così) ha fatto questa fanciulla che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
IV
A-chusla gra mo Chroi(4), ragazzi, lei vuole lasciarmi,
se fai parte dell’Irlanda, allora tu mi appartieni;
il suo accento del Donegal mi ha catturato, sai,
sfortuna per lei, buona sorte(5) al luogo in cui le rose Blarney crescono

NOTE
1) Non esiste una varietà botanica di rose detta Blarney, la frase richiama un’altrettanto famosa canzone del circo “The garden where the praties grow” (vedi)
2) Cushendall è un villaggio nella contea di Antrim (Irlanda del Nord) in una baia ai piedi delle Glens of Antrim: sulla Antrim Coast Road il tratto che va da Cushendun a Torr Head è uno dei più suggestivi panorami della costa irlandese (muretti a secco, ginestre, greggi di pecore e ovviamente scogliere) nelle giornate limpide si riesce a vedere la costa scozzeze che dista solo 20 km. Le valli sono ben nove e Cushendall si trova tra Glenballyemon (rinomata per le sue cascate), Glenaan (dove si trova la tomba di Ossian un sito megalitico leggendario) e Glencorp (il nome significa valle dei morti ma i suoi paesaggi sono meravigliosi, in genere si consiglia di seguire la Ballybrack che passa lungo le montagne di Trostan e Lurig poi sulla collina delle fate di Tieverah e infine scendendo ripidamente a Cushendall). Ma ciascuna delle nove valli ha un fascino particolare e vanta le sue tradizioni e leggende.
3) Blarney è una cittadina irlandese nella contea di Cork, famosa per il suo castello o meglio per una magica pietra nelle mura del castello che la leggenda vuole doni l’eloquenza a chi la baci, così il verbo blarney indica una parlantina sciolta, ma anche ingannevole
4) la frase  significa”My darling, love of my heart” è tipica della canzone del music hall infarcire le strofe con almeno una citazione in gaelico
5) in altre versioni l’espressione è più cruda!

IN VIAGGIO
Cushendall è situata in una baia sabbiosa ai piedi di tre delle nove Glens of Antrim, ovvero Glenballyemon, Glenaan e Glencorp, e per questo motivo è conosciuta come “The Capital of the Glens”. Si tratta di un grazioso villaggio formato da una serie di casette colorate raggruppate su una splendida spiaggia continua

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/blarney.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5387
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13513
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic97551.html
http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/800011039/BVE-36792-The_blarney_roses
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/nord/contea-di-antrim/glens-of-antrim/
http://www.minube.it/posto-preferito/glenariff-forest-park-a117111