Archivi tag: Donal Lunny

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

Leggi in italiano

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore ” is a traditional Irish song originally from Donegal, of which several textual versions have been written for a single melody.

TUNE: Erin Shore

A typically Irish tune spread among travellers already at the end of 1700, today it is known with different titles: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (LISTEN instrumental version of the Irish group The Corrs from Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (LISTEN to the version always instrumental of the Corrs from Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair or The Green Glens Of Gweedor (with text written by Francie Mooney)

Standard version: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

The common Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore was first sung on an EFDSS LP(1969) by Packie Manus Byrne, now over 80 and living in Ardara Co Donegal*. He was born at Corkermore between there and Killybegs. It was taken up by Paul Brady and subsequently. However, there are longer and more local (to north Derry, Donegal) versions in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People and in Jimmy McBride’s The Flower of Dunaff Hill.” (in Mudcats ) and Sam Henry writes “Another version has been received from the Articlave district, where the song was first sung in 1827 by an Inishowen ploughman.”
The recording made by Sean Davies at Cecil Sharp House dates back to 1969 and again in the sound archives of the ITMA we find the recording sung by Corney McDaid at McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal in 1987 (see) and also Paul Brady recorded it many times.
Kevin Conneff recorded it with the Chieftains in 1992, “Another Country” (I, II, IV, V, II)

Amelia Hogan from “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.”

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny ( I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (I, II, IV, V)

intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

NOTES
*additional first verse by Garrison White
1) It refers to the reception of immigrants who were inspected and held for bureaucratic formalities, but the sentence is not very clear. Ellis Island was used as an entry point for immigrants only in 1892. Prior to that, for approximately 35 years, New York State had 8 million immigrants transit through the Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Lower Manhattan.

OTHER VERSIONS

This text was written by Patrick Brian Warfield, singer and multi-instrumentalist of the Irish group The Wolfe Tones. In his version the point of landing is not New York but Baltimore.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones from Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 

Lyrics: Patrick Brian Warfield 
I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore

This version takes up the 3rd stanza of the previous version as a chorus
The High Kings

I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
III
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór (2)
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore

NOTES
1) Banna Strand , Banna Beach, is situated in Tralee Bay County Kerry
2) my love

Shamrock shore

LINK
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

Altan musica di famiglia

Mairéad Ni Mhaonaigh e Francie Mooney

Dal nome di un piccolo lago ai piedi del monte Errigal nel nord-ovest del Donegal il gruppo Altan è fondato nello scorcio del 1980 da Mairéad Ni Mhaonaigh, figlia di Proinsias Ó Maonaigh (ossia Francie Mooney), rinomato fiddler di Gaoth Dobhair (Gweedore), che già nei primi anni ’70 aveva chiamato il suo gruppo di musica tradizionale “Ceoltoiri Altan”.
Mairéad , dalla voce d’angelo e dalle abili dita da leprecauno, conosce sul finire degli anni ’70 il suo futuro compagno del cuore, il flautista Frankie Kennedy. I due giovanissimi (18enne lui e 14enne lei) si conobbero all’insegna della musica essendo solito per Frankie (di Belfast) trascorrere l’estate a Gweedore per imparare il gaelico irlandese e approfondire lo studio del flauto irlandese e del whistle.  Entrambi tirocinanti al St.Patrick College di Dublino, si sposano e nel 1983 incidono un album “Ceol Adush” (Gael Linn: ‘musica del Nord’) a quei tempi la musica del Donegal non varcava i confini della Gaeltacht.
Ascoltiamo la loro intesa perfetta mentre suonano seduti al tavolo di un pub
https://youtu.be/hn12ns2XzwQ

https://youtu.be/5JH-NXoGLBU
E’ però “Altan” (1987) considerato l’album del debutto in gruppo con Ciarán Curran al bouzouki e Mark Kelly alla chitarra e la collaborazione di Dónal Lunny – Bodhrán , tastiere.

Diventati un quintetto con l’entrata del violino di Paul O’Shaughnessy (che lascerà il gruppo nel 1992) incidono “Horse with a Heart” (1989): con il loro equilibrato repertorio fondato sulla musica tradizionale del Donegal e gli influssi scozzesi  diffondono in tutto il mondo filastrocche e canzoncine in gaelico che finiscono immancabilmente nelle compilation di musica celtica.

ASCOLTA Lass of Glanshee in “Horse with a Heart” (1989)

e proseguono con una serie di album ( The Red Crow, Harvest Storm e Island Angelche si aggiudicano il titolo di Best Celtic Album assegnato dalla NAIRD e con i quali vincono premi e si assestano in vetta  alla charts delle isole britanniche: il frutto più maturo è forse “Island Angel” del 1993 una scaletta perfetta di brani cantati, set da danza e slow air,  (per lo più tradizionali ma anche composti dai membri del gruppo) chiude la “Aingeal an Oileáin” scritta da Mairéad per il suo Frankie, che morirà poco dopo sconfitto dal tumore diagnosticato l’anno precedente, ASCOLTA

UN PATTO DI SANGUE

Con Mairéad  e Frankie Kennedy Ciaran Tourish (violino, whistle), Ciarán Curran (Bouzouki e chitarra), Mark Kelly (chitarra), Dáithí Sproule (chitarra); Frankie fa promettere a tutti i componenti del gruppo di continuare a suonare insieme anche dopo la sua morte,  tutti i cinque giurano di mantenere vivo il progetto musicale e così sarà, mostrandosi la line-up più longeva.

ASCOLTA Scotch Style Jig (Andy de Jarlis) – Ingonish (Mike McDougall) – Mrs. McGhee (trad) in “Island Angel“, 1993


Il gruppo non si scioglie anche se ha bisogno di tempo per ripartire, nel 1996 pubblica Blackwater con Dermot Byrne all’organetto (a cui subentra nel 2014 Martin Tourish) a riformare il sestetto e un nutrito entourage di rinforzo, ma è con Another Sky registrato nel 2000 che ritrova lo stato di grazia (e nasce l’amore tra Mairéad e Dermot Byrne): set strumentali irresistibili, più song e una voce sopraffina.

ASCOLTA Beidh Aonach Amárach in Another Sky, 2000 video promozionale

ASCOLTA Altan & Chieftains live a Woodhill House “The Donegal Set”: un miracolo di sincronismo

Nel nuovo corso pur restando sempre fedeli alla tradizione irlandese (in particolare del Donegal e gli influssi scozzesi) gli Altan si approcciano alla balladry americana e alla musica appalacchiana; la tendenza sarà via via approfondita negli album successivi.

(Image: www.jamescummingsphotography.com)

E così con The Blue Idol (2002) Local Groung (2005) Gleann Nimhe (2012) e The Windening Gyne (2015) i cinque arrivano al loro 35esimo anniversario.

NA MOONEYS

E la tradizione continua, da genuino chieftain (capo clan) Mairéad raccoglie intorno a se la sua parentela e getta un ponte tra le generazioni, “una famiglia di musicisti e cantanti della Donegal Gaeltacht”: le sorelle Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh, leader degli Altan (voce e violino), e Anna Ní Mhaonaigh, già nel gruppo Macalla (voce e whistle), il fratello Gearóid Ó Maonaigh (chitarra) e suo figlio Ciarán (violino e violino baritono). Con la collaborazione di Nia Byrne, figlia di Mairéad (violino e voce) e Caitlin Nic Gabhan, moglie di Ciarán (concertina, podiritmia e danza). In aggiunta l’amico di sempre Mànus Lunny (bouzouki, tastiere, co-produzione e fonico).
Nell’album del debutto (2016) dal titolo omonimo fa capolino papà  Proinnsias (deceduto nel 2006) e il repertorio rende omaggio all’antenato caposcuola della fiddle music e della cultura orale della contea (da ascoltare tutto qui)
ASCOLTA Máire Mhór live

tag Altan

FONTI
http://www.mairead.ie/
https://altan.ie/
https://www.irlandaonline.com/cultura/musica/artisti-irlandesi/altan/

https://namooneys.bandcamp.com/

La terra del verde trifoglio di Paddy

Read the post in English

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore” è una  canzone irlandese tradizionale originaria del Donegal, di cui per una sola melodia sono state scritte diverse versioni testuali,

LA MELODIA

Una melodia tipicamente irish diffusa tra i traveller già alla fine del 1700, oggi si conosce con diversi titoli: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (ASCOLTA versione strumentale del gruppo irlandese The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (ASCOLTA la versione strumentale sempre dei Corrs in Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair ovvero The Green Glens Of Gweedor (con testo scritto da Francie Mooney)

LA VERSIONE STANDARD: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

” Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore è stata cantata per la prima volta su un EFDSS LP (1969) di Packie Manus Byrne, ora ultraottantenne [Packie è morto il 12 maggio 2015] e residente ad Ardara -Contea del Donegal. Era nato a Corkermore tra lì e Killybegs ed è stata ripresa da Paul Brady. Tuttavia, ci sono versioni più lunghe e locali (a North Derry, Donegal) in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry e in “The Flower of Dunaff Hill” di Jimmy McBride” (tratto da qui) Sam Henry scrive in merito “Un’altra versione proviene dal distretto di Articlave, dove la canzone è stata cantata per la prima volta nel 1827 da un aratore di Inishowen.
La registrazione effettuata da Sean Davies al Cecil Sharp House risale al 1969 e ancora negli archivi sonori  dell’ITMA troviamo la registrazione cantata da Corney McDaid al McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal nel 1987 (vedi) e anche Paul Brady l’ha registrata più volte.
Kevin Conneff la registra con i Chieftains nel 1992 per l’album “Another Country” 

Amelia Hogan in “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.” con un bellissimo video -racconto

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny (strofe I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (strofe I, II, IV, V)

VERSIONE STANDARD
intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
introduzione
Venite irlandesi che ascoltate la mia canzone, il vostro destino è una storia triste, quando siete indietro con gli affitti e siete tartassati e i raccolti sono andati a male
abbandonerete le vostre terre
e vi laverete le mani di tutto quello che è avvenuto e prenderete il mare per una nuova occasione, lontano dalla terra del verde trifoglio.
I
Dal molo di Derry partimmo
il 23 di Maggio
eravamo imbarcati in una simpatica ciurma che salpava per l’America,
abbiamo preso cinque mila e più litri di acqua fresca
per il breve viaggio
fino a New York,
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
II
Così addio cara e dolce Liza,
e addio alla città di Derry
e due volte addio ai miei bravi compagni
che restano su quella terra santa,
se fama e fortuna mi arrideranno
e farò dei soldi a palate,
ritornerò indietro e sposerò la fidanzatina che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
III
Alle dodici in punto abbiamo avvistato
il famoso Mullin Head
e Innistrochlin a destra spiccava sul letto dell’oceano,
una vistra migliore mai prima videro i miei occhi
del sole che tramonta tra il mare e il cielo
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
IV
Navigammo per tre giorni (settimane) e abbiamo sofferto tutti il mal di mare, non c’era un uomo a piede libero a bordo, eravamo tutti confinati nelle nostre cuccette, senza nessuno a confortarmi, né la cara madre, né il buon padre a sorreggermi la testa che era dolorante, il che mi ha fatto pensare ancora di più alla ragazza che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
V
Raggiungemmo infine l’altra sponda in salvo in 23 gioni, siamo stati presi come passeggeri da un uomo che ci ha portato in giro in sei strade diverse
così bevemmo tutti il bicchiere dell’addio nel caso non ci fossimo più incontrati e bevemmo alla salute della vecchia Irlanda e alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

NOTE
* strofa introduttiva scritta da Garrison White
1) si riferisce dell’accoglienza degli immigrati che erano ispezionati e trattenuti per le formalità burocratiche, ma la frase non è molto chiara. Ellis Island fu usata come punto d’ingresso agli immigrati solo nel 1892. Prima di allora, per circa 35 anni, lo Stato di New York ha fatto transitare 8 milioni di immigrati per il Castle Garden Immigration Depot situato in Lower Manhattan

Rispetto alla versione “standard” si trovano un paio di testi, i quali riprendono sempre il tema dell’emigrazione

ALTRE VERSIONI

Questo testo è stato scritto da Patrick Brian Warfield, cantante e polistrumentista del gruppo irlandese The Wolfe Tones (autore di molte canzoni per il gruppo). Nella sua versione il punto di sbarco non è New York ma Baltimora.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones in Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 


I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio all’Irlanda
la mia cara terra natia,
mi si spezza il cuore a separarmi dagli amici
perchè è allora che le lacrime scorrono, devo andare in America.
Rivedrò ancora una volta la mia casa, per ora lascio la mia innamorata e la terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
II
La nostra nave si trova in rada
e lei è in piedi sul molo;
che la buona sorte ci accompagni ogni notte
mentre solchiamo mare,
molte navi sono andate perdute (nel naufragio) costato molte vite,
in questo viaggio che abbiamo davanti, con le lacrime agli occhi, dirò addio alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
III
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai ,
anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
IV
Ora la nostra nave è in viaggio
che il cielo ci protegga tutti
con i venti e  le vele di certo non falliremo
in questo viaggio verso Baltimora,
ma che genitori e amici restino a salutare
fino a quando non riuscirò più a vederli e allora darò l’ultimo sguardo
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

Questa versione riprende  la III strofa della versione precedente con un coro
The High Kings


I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio il mio solo vero amore
ti penserò notte e giorno
addio alla vecchia Irlanda
e addio a te Bannastrant
non c’è tempo per guardarsi indietro, ma fronteggiare il vento e combattere le onde, che il cielo ci protegga
dal freddo, dalla fame e dalle raffiche rabbiose, ti prego non voglio perdermi,
vento nelle vele portami al sicuro
Coro
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai , anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

II
Fuori ora sull’oceano profondo
il rumore della nave rende difficile il sonno, gli occhi si riempiono di lacrime
la tua immagine non se ne vuole andare via. (coro)
New York alla fine è in vista
il mio cuore batte forte
cerco di essere coraggioso
ma desidero averti vicino
accanto a me, cuore mio
(coro)
Finchè potrò fare ritorno un giorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi

NOTE
1) Banna Strand , ovvero Banna Beach, si trova nella Tralee Bay contea di Kerry

Shamrock shore

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

RAGLAN ROAD AT THE DAWNING OF THE DAY

Patrick Kavanag (1904-1967) pubblicò nel 1946 la poesia  intitolata “Dark Haired Myriam Ran Away” (su The Irish Times del 3 ottobre), tormentato da un amore non corrisposto , ma solo nel 1960 incontra Luke Kelly e nasce la popolarità della canzone “Raglan Road

La melodia è un’antica aria irlandese attribuita da Edward Bunting all’arpista Thomas Connellan (1640/1645 – 1698-1700) dal titolo “Fáinne Geal an Lae” letteralmente “Bright Ring of the day” (in italiano “Il brillante anello del giorno”) ovvero l’anello luminoso che contorna il sole quando sorge.. continua

Il testo proviene dalla poesia “Dark Haired Myriam Ran Away”, scritta da Raglan RoadPatrick Kavanag (1904-1967) mentre era tormentato da un amore non corrisposto e venne pubblicata nel 1946 (su “The Irish Times” del 3 ottobre); però la canzone  “Raglan Road” diventò famosa solo dopo l’incontro tra Patrick Kavanag e  Luke Kelly. In un intervista del 1980 lo stesso Luke racconta come andò: i due si conobbero nel 1966 al The Baily di Dublino che all’epoca era un pub frequentato da artisti e Patrick Kavanag gli chiese di cantare la sua poesia.
“I was sitting in a pub in Dublin, The Baily, and as you know in the old days – It’s changed a bit now. It was known as a literary pub, an artistic pub. I happened to be sitting there in the same company as Patrick Kavanagh and one or two other poets, and someone asked him to recite a poem, which he did, and someone asked me to sing a song, which I did. Being in the presence of the great man I was very nervous. Then he leaned over to me and said in that sepulcharl voice of his, he could hardly get his voice out, he was very old. It was just the year before he died – and he said ”You Should Sing My Song”, and I said what’s that Mr. Kavanagh ? and he said Raglan Road, So he gave me permission. I got permission from the man himself.”
Così come riportato da Luke Kelly, sembra che l’adattamento della poesia alla melodia più conosciuta con il nome di “The dawning of the day” sia stata opera del poeta stesso, altri sostengono che Luke abbia voluto lasciare il merito al poeta, ma che in realtà sia stato lui a trovare la corrispondenza. In realtà Kavanag doveva già aver avuto in mente la canzone “The Dawning of the Day” quando scrisse la sua poesia: il tenore John McCormack l’aveva resa popolare nel 1934 (cantata anche nel film “Wings of the morning” uscito nel 1939). Oltre alla metrica simile alcune frasi si rispecchiano e lo stesso Kavanag la canticchiava negli anni 45-47!

HildaMoriartyLA MUSA

Il poeta aveva 40 anni quando conobbe Hilda Moriarty, studentessa poco più che ventenne in un pub di Dublino, e s’innamorò di lei (sembra in modo quasi ossessivo, oggi si direbbe da “stalker”): la passione non è mai stata ricambiata.
Un aneddoto, riportato in un intervista da Hilda stessa, ci dice che lei lo prendesse in giro perchè era un poeta “contadino” e che gli avesse chiesto di leggere qualcosa di più fondamentale scritto da lui, così Patrick compose “Raglan road”.
ASCOLTA intervista a Hilda Moriarty

Alla fine al poeta la cotta è passata e così le scrive: (vedi)
62 Pembroke Road.
31 May 1945.
My dearest Hilda,
Please do not take exception to the address of ‘dearest’ or think it a presumption on my part. I am no longer mad about you although I do like you very very much. I like you because of your enchanting selfishness and I really am your friend – if you will let me.
I should not, perhaps, write this letter to you without you replying to my other, but I am in such a good humour regarding you that I want you to know it. Remembering you is like remembering some dear one who has died. There has never been – and never will be – another woman who can be the same to me as you have been. Your friendship and love or whatever it was, was so curious, so different.
Write to me a friendly letter even if I cannot see you. I met Cyril in the Country Shop and he was looking well,
Believe me, Hilda,
Yours fondly,
Patrick.

A voler un po’ esagerare la lettera non sembra proprio essere una lettere d’addio quanto appunto una lettera da stalker: prima di tutto Patrick Kavanag le scrive, sebbene lei non abbia nemmeno risposto alla sua lettera precedente, per farle sapere che lui non è più innamorato di lei, però continua a ripetere quanto le piaccia proprio, ma proprio tanto, e che non c’è mai stata, e non ci sarà mai, un’altra donna come lei, il suo vero amore; che dire poi delle velate minacce “ti ricordo come si ricorda una cara persona che è morta“? Ovviamente non si tratta di una minaccia, quanto piuttosto la lettera sottolinea il dolore del poeta per aver perduto un rapporto importante.
In effetti Patrick continuò a pedinare Hilda fino a quando  lei sposò Donogh O’Malley nel 1947.( e Hilda ha mandato una corona di rose rosse al funerale di Kavanagh!)
Come dice Nora-Jane Thornton “l’amore non corrisposto piuttosto che l’amore stesso, è la più grande delle Muse!”

ASCOLTA la poesia recitata da Tom O’Bedlam

Quando la canzone venne messa nel repertorio dei Dubliners – nell’album Hometown, 1972 – fu scambiata per una canzone tradizionale.
Non è facile fare una cernita per la guida all’ascolto, anche perchè la canzone è stata eseguita da molti big della musica celtica e della scena rock: i vari interpreti hanno modificato alcune parole tranne Mary Black la cui versione testuale è identica alla poesia di Kavanag.

ASCOLTA Luke Kelly

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan in Kist O’ Gold 1977
ASCOLTA Mark Knopfler e Donal Lunny 1996 – live
Joan Osborne & The Chieftains in Tears of Stone 1999

ASCOLTA Young Dubliners in With all due respect, 2009

ASCOLTA Mary Black 1986
ASCOLTA Sinead O’Connor in Common live 1995
ASCOLTA Loreena McKennitt in An Ancient Muse 2006 – live

TESTO DI PATRICK KAVANAG
I
On Raglan Road(1)
on an autumn day
I met her first and knew
That her dark hair would weave a snare
That I might one day rue
I saw the danger yet I walked
Along the enchanted way(2)
And I said “let grief be a fallen leaf
At the dawning of the day (3)”
II
On Grafton Street in November
We tripped lightly along the ledge
Of a deep ravine where can be seen
The worth of passion’s pledge
The Queen of Hearts still making tarts(4)
And I not making hay(5)
Oh I loved too much and by such by such
Is happiness thrown away
III
I gave her gifts of the mind
I gave her the secret sign that’s known
To the artists who have known
The true gods of sound and stone(6)
And word and tint I did not stint
For I gave her poems to say
With her own name there
And her own dark hair
Like clouds over fields of May
IV
On a quiet street(7) where old ghosts meet
I see her walking now
Away from me so hurriedly my reason must allow
That I had wooed not as I should
A creature made of clay (8)
When the angel woos the clay
He’ll lose his wings at the dawn of day
TRADUZIONE di  CATTIA SALTO*
I
Sulla Raglan Road (1)
in un giorno d’autunno
la vidi per la prima volta e seppi
che i suoi capelli scuri avrebbero tessuto una trappola,
di cui un giorno mi sarei pentito,
vidi il pericolo e tuttavia m’incamminai per il Viale degli Incanti (2)
e dissi “Che il dolore sia una foglia caduta al sorgere del  giorno (3)”
II
Su Grafton Street a Novembre
ci fermammo spensierati sulla sporgenza
di un profondo burrone dove poteva essere visto il valore di una passione promessa, la Regina di Cuori ancora faceva le crostate (4)
e io non coglievo la mela (5);
oh ho amato troppo e per questo e quest’altro
la felicità è andata sprecata
III
Le diedi i doni della mente
le diedi il segno segreto che è riconosciuto
dagli artisti che hanno conosciuto
i veri dei del suono e della pietra (6),
e non mi limitai alla parola e alla tinta,
perché le diedi le poesie da recitare
là con il suo nome proprio
e i suoi capelli scuri
come nuvole sopra i campi di Maggio
IV
Sul “Viale del Tramonto” (7) dove i vecchi fantasmi si incontrano,
la vedo camminare ora,
si allontana da me più in fretta di quanto io riesca a pensare
di non aver amato come avrei dovuto, una creatura d’argilla(8);
quando l’angelo ama la terra
perderà le sue ali allo spuntare del giorno

NOTE
* (un’altra traduzione qui) si ringrazia Roberto Romano per aver portato luce sul significato dell’ultima strofa
1) strade di Dublino che identificano una zona precisa intorno al Trinity College tra St Stephen’s Green e Grand Canal
2) enchanted way: è il percorso tra le nuvole degli innamorati, il viale pieno di promesse e speranze soffuso di una luce rosata, ma anche alla luce della stagione autunnale il “viale del tramonto” presagio di desolazione e solitudine
3) la citazione è tratta dalla aisling song in  gaelico irlandese dal titolo “Fáinne Geal an Lae” letteralmente “Bright Ring of the day” ma tradotta poeticamente come “the dawning of the day”: il poeta incontra una dea ovvero una creatura fatata dalla sublime bellezza che rappresenta l’Irlanda.
4) citazione da “the queen of hearts baked some tarts” della nursery rhyme di origine 700esca sulle carte da gioco: la regina di cuori cuoce le torte e il fante di cuori le ruba.
The Queen of Hearts she made some tarts all on a summer’s day;
The Knave of Hearts he stole the tarts and took them clean away.
The King of Hearts called for the tarts and beat the Knave full sore
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts and
vowed he’d steal no more.
Nell’Alice nel paese delle Meraviglie di Lewis Carroll la filastrocca è portata come prova nel processo al fante di cuori.
5) letteralmente “fare fieno”, il detto irlandese “make hay while the sun shines” significa cercare di trarre vantaggio dalle opportunità, che sono spesso fugaci e irripetibili. Si intende anche con una sfumatura sessuale: in italiano equivale al significato di cogliere la “mela”. E’ anche l’equivalente dell’espressione “battere il ferro finchè è caldo”. Qui la frase conclude l’immagine dei due separati da una profonda difficoltà (invalicabile) al fondo della quale si agita la passione: significa che il poeta non ottiene l’amore della donna
6) si riferisce a un cromlech, vuole richiamare un cerchio di pietre? Più in generale gli dei  sono le muse della musica, poesia, scultura e pittura. Il protagonista ha condiviso con la donna la propria conoscenza come se fosse stata un’adepta da iniziare ai misteri arcani.
7) incidentalmente a Dublino c’è una strada rinomata per essere luogo di ritrovo dei fantasmi, Haddington Road, ma il poeta si riferisce ancora a Ragland Road: simmetricamente come la storia nasce in autunno lungo l'”enchanted way” adesso la storia è finita e la strada diventa una “quiet street” letteralmente “una via tranquilla”
8) letteralmente “fatta di terra” così commenta Roberto Romano: “That I had wooed not as I should A creature made of clay” vuol dire chiaramente “che non ho amato come avrei dovuto (cioè nella maniera che si conviene) una creatura fatta d’argilla (cioè di poco valore)” quindi: “ho amato troppo senza che ne valesse la pena”! Il concetto è rafforzato dalla stupenda metafora dell’angelo che, per aver amato la terra (qualcosa di “basso”, poco elevato) perde le ali (cioè la sua condizione sublime) e, a mio parere è spiegato fuor di metafore dai versi finali della 2a strofa: “Oh I loved too much and by such by such – Is happiness thrown away”. Secondo me la bellezza di questa poesia è proprio nel concetto di “dannarsi l’anima per un amore che non vale la pena”: chi non ha mai sperimentata questa forma di “eroismo sentimentale” che all’inizio appare coraggioso ma poi si rivela autodistruttivo?

FONTI
http://irelandofthewelcomes.com/home/the-story-of-raglan-road/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43818
http://www.leonardobrian.com/writing/essays/metaphors-as-interrogatives.html
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/raglan-road-song-meaning
http://www.mccormacksociety.co.uk/Mccormack/McCormack’s%20Recordings/John%20McCormack%20on%20Film,.htm
http://princesspana.blogspot.it/2010/11/on-raglan-road.html
http://www.nli.ie/blog/index.php/2012/02/14/yours-fondly-patrick/