Archivi tag: Dolores Keane

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

Leggi in italiano

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore ” is a traditional Irish song originally from Donegal, of which several textual versions have been written for a single melody.

TUNE: Erin Shore

A typically Irish tune spread among travellers already at the end of 1700, today it is known with different titles: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (LISTEN instrumental version of the Irish group The Corrs from Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (LISTEN to the version always instrumental of the Corrs from Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair or The Green Glens Of Gweedor (with text written by Francie Mooney)

Standard version: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

The common Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore was first sung on an EFDSS LP(1969) by Packie Manus Byrne, now over 80 and living in Ardara Co Donegal*. He was born at Corkermore between there and Killybegs. It was taken up by Paul Brady and subsequently. However, there are longer and more local (to north Derry, Donegal) versions in Sam Henry’s Songs of the People and in Jimmy McBride’s The Flower of Dunaff Hill.” (in Mudcats ) and Sam Henry writes “Another version has been received from the Articlave district, where the song was first sung in 1827 by an Inishowen ploughman.”
The recording made by Sean Davies at Cecil Sharp House dates back to 1969 and again in the sound archives of the ITMA we find the recording sung by Corney McDaid at McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal in 1987 (see) and also Paul Brady recorded it many times.
Kevin Conneff recorded it with the Chieftains in 1992, “Another Country” (I, II, IV, V, II)

Amelia Hogan from “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.”

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny ( I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (I, II, IV, V)

intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

NOTES
*additional first verse by Garrison White
1) It refers to the reception of immigrants who were inspected and held for bureaucratic formalities, but the sentence is not very clear. Ellis Island was used as an entry point for immigrants only in 1892. Prior to that, for approximately 35 years, New York State had 8 million immigrants transit through the Castle Garden Immigration Depot in Lower Manhattan.

OTHER VERSIONS

This text was written by Patrick Brian Warfield, singer and multi-instrumentalist of the Irish group The Wolfe Tones. In his version the point of landing is not New York but Baltimore.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones from Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 

Lyrics: Patrick Brian Warfield 
I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore

This version takes up the 3rd stanza of the previous version as a chorus
The High Kings

I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
III
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór (2)
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore

NOTES
1) Banna Strand , Banna Beach, is situated in Tralee Bay County Kerry
2) my love

Shamrock shore

LINK
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

My Own Dear Galway Bay

Galway Bay è oggetto di diverse canzoni tradizionali irlandesi (vedi), questa dal titolo “My own dear Galway Bay” è stata scritta da Francis Arthur Fahy  (1854–1935), di Kinvara (Co. Galway) poeta e scrittore ricordato per il suo ruolo nell'”Irish literary revival” di fine Ottocento:  emigrò in Inghilterra nel 1873 andando a vivere a Clapham (Londra) dove fondò il  Southwark Literary Club (diventata l’ Irish Texts Society), per mantenere salde negli immigrati e nei loro figli la cultura irlandese.
Scrisse alcune canzoni ancora popolari su melodie tradizionali, in particolare per Galway Bay prese come riferimento la melodia “Skibbereen“; in una secondo tempo è prevalsa invece la melodia scritta da Tony Small nativo di Galway

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane (I, III, V, VI)
versione live con Dé Danann


ASCOLTA Liadan


I
‘Tis far away I am today
from scenes I roamed a boy,
And long ago the hour I know
I first saw Illinois;
But time nor tide nor waters wide
could wean my heart away,
For ever true it flies to you,
my old dear Galway Bay.
II
My chosen bride is by my side,
her brown hair silver-grey,
Her daughter Rose as like her grows
as April dawn to day.
Our only boy, his mother’s joy,
his father’s pride and stay;
With gifts like these I’d live at ease,
were I near Galway Bay.
III
Oh, grey and bleak,
by shore and creek,
the rugged rocks abound,
But sweet and green
the grass between,
as grows on Irish ground,
So friendship fond,
all wealth beyond,
and love that lives always,
Bless each poor home
beside your foam,
my dear old Galway Bay.
IV
A prouder man I’d walk the land
in health and peace of mind,
If I might toil and strive and moil,
nor cast one thought behind,
But what would be the world to me,
its wealth and rich array,
If memory I lost of thee,
my own dear Galway Bay.
V
Had I youth’s blood
and hopeful mood
and heart of fire once more,
For all the gold the world might hold
I’d never quit your shore,
I’d live content whate’er God sent
with neighbours old and gray,
And lay my bones, ‘neath churchyard stones,
beside you, Galway Bay.
VI
The blessing of a poor old man
be with you night and day,
The blessing of a lonely man
whose heart will soon be clay;
‘Tis all the Heaven I’ll ask of God
upon my dying day,
My soul to soar for evermore
above you,
Galway Bay.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oggi sono molto lontano dai luoghi dei miei vagabondaggi giovanili,
ed è da molto tempo che vidi
l’Illinois per la prima volta;
ma nè il tempo, la marea o il vasto mare potranno disabituare il mio cuore
perchè per sempre devoto a te volerà,
mia cara vecchia Baia di Galway
II
La sposa che ho scelto mi è accanto
i capelli castani grigio- argento, sua figlia Rose cresce come lei, così (è) l’alba d’Aprile fino al giorno (1), il nostro unico ragazzo, la gioia di sua madre,  l’orgoglio di suo padre e sostegno; con regali come questi vivrei tranquillo se fossi vicino alla Baia di Galway
III
Oh grige e brulle
dalla spiaggia al torrente
le rocce aspre abbondano,
ma fresca e verde
l’erba in mezzo
cresce come sul suolo irlandese,
così l’amicizia fedele
oltre ogni ricchezza
e l’amore che vive sempre (2).
Benedici ogni povera casa
davanti alle tue onde
mia cara vecchia baia di Galway
IV
Da uomo prudente comminavo sulla terra, in salute e in pace
se potessi sgobbare, darci dentro e faticare, 
incapace di pensare al passato! Ma che valore avrebbe il mondo per me, con la sua ricchezza sconfinata, se perdessi il ricordo di te
la mia cara Baia di galway
V
Se avessi il sangue giovane
e la speranza
e ancora un cuore di fuoco
per tutto l’oro che il mondo potrebbe contenere, non lascerei mai la tua riva
per vivere contento ovunque dio mi mandi e con i vicini vecchi e grigi
riposeranno le mie ossa sotto le pietre del cimitero
accanto a te Baia di Galway
VI
La benedizione di un povero vecchio
sarà con te notte e giorno
La benedizione di un uomo solo
il cui cuore diventerà presto terra;
è questo il paradiso che chiederò a Dio
nel giorno della mia morte
la mia anima che voli per sempre
su di te
Baia di Galway

NOTE
1) se ho ben interpretato il paragone Rose cresce come la luce del sole nell’alba del mese d’aprile (primavera)  fino alla sua pienezza del mattino.
2) oppure “away”: se ho ben colto il senso della frase l’amicizia e l’amore sono paragonati all’erba verde che cresce nonostante le asprezze e le difficoltà della vita

FONTI
https://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/galway_bay_colm_toland
https://songoftheisles.com/2013/02/17/my-own-deargalway-bay/

The Grey Funnel Line

Il folksinger Cyril Tawney  scrisse “The Grey Funnel Line” nel 1959 prima di congedarsi dalla Marina Reale del Regno Unito. E’ lo stesso Cyril a raccontare la genesi del brano (vedi): come in molti shanty il marinaio si lamenta del suo arruolamento desiderando con nostalgia la vita accanto al proprio amore, ma sono in genere lacrime da coccodrillo..
ASCOLTA Jolie Holland Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006, una versione con molto soul

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane, Mary Black, Emmylou Harris

ASCOLTA Islands in A Sleep & a Forgetting 2012 Strofe I, II, V, VI


I
Don’t mind the rain or the rolling sea,
The weary night never worries me.
But the hardest time in sailor’s day
Is to watch the sun as it dies away.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line (1).
II
The finest ship that sailed the sea
Is still a prison for the likes of me.
But give me wings like Noah’s dove,
I’d fly up harbour to the girl I love.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
III
There was a time my heart was free
Like a floating spar on the open sea.
But now the spar is washed ashore,
It comes to rest at my real love’s door.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Every time I gaze behind the screws (2)
Makes me long for old Peter’s shoes (3).
I’d walk right down that silver lane
And take my love in my arms again.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Lord, if dreams were only real
I’d have my hands on that wooden wheel (4).
And with all my heart I’d turn her round
And tell the boys that we’re homeward bound.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
VI
I’ll pass the time like some machine
Until blue water turns to green.
Then I’ll dance on down that walk-ashore
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non bado alla pioggia o al mare agitato
la notte fredda non mi preoccupa mai
ma il tempo più duro in una giornata da marinaio è guardare il sole mentre tramonta, un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
II
La nave più bella che solcò il mare è tuttavia una prigione per quelli come me. Ma dammi le ali come la colomba di Noe volerò oltre il porto dalla ragazza che amo. Un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
III
Ci fu un tempo in cui il mio cuore era libero come una piattaforma galleggiante nel mare aperto. Ma ora la piattaforma è trasportata a riva, si ferma alla porta del mio vero amore. un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Ogni volta che guardo dentro ai motori ad elica mi viene da desiderare le scarpe del vecchio Peter.
Camminerei su quella scia d’argento e prenderei di nuovo il mio amore tra le braccia
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Signore, se i sogni fossero realtà
metterei le mani su quella ruota di legno
e con tutto il cuore la farei girare
e direi ai ragazzi che siamo diretti verso casa
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
VI
Passerò il tempo come quella macchina
finchè l’acqua azzurra non diventerà verde.
E ballerò su quel pontile
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line.

NOTE
1) i fumaioli delle navi a vapore essendo i tratti più evidenti e riconoscibili nelle lunghe distanze erano verniciati con colori ditintivi dalla varie linee mercantili, così i fumaioli della Royal Navi per Cyril Tawney erano grigio canna di fucile
2) non so se ho tradotto correttamente
3) Old Peter o Saint Peter’s shoes sono le scarpe del vecchio pescatore biblico, che grazie alla fede camminò sulle acque: Se avesse avuto l’abilità di Pietro di camminare sull’acqua, avrebbe potuto camminare sulla scia della luna per titornare tra le braccia del suo amore
4) il timone

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/thegreyfunnelline.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16942

MOLL DUBH A GHLEANNA

Bean (Moll) Dubh a’ Ghleanna è un canto in gaelico irlandese popolare in tutta l’Irlanda come love song, John O’Daly che la pubblicò nel suo “The poets and poetry of Munster” (Dublino, 1849), la attribuì allo spadaccino-poeta Éamonn an Chnoic (‘Ned of the Hills’) (vedi): una canzone d’amore dedicata a Molly la brunetta della valle.

LA MELODIA: UNA SLOW AIR

La melodia è una dolce e malinconica slow air: Edward Bunting included a version of the melody in A general collection of the ancient Irish music (London, 1796), 22. Thomas Moore based his song ‘Go Where Glory Waits Thee’ on Bunting’s ‘Bean Dubh an Ghleanna’ or ‘The Maid of the Valley’. George Petrie found fault with Bunting’s setting and felt compelled to print his own setting of the air which can be examined in David Cooper, The Petrie collection of the ancient music of Ireland (Cork, 2002), 239-41 (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Ernst Stolz

ASOLTA Aly Bain, Jay Ungar & Cathal McConnel da the Trans-Atlantic sessions.

ASCOLTA Altan in The Red Crow, 1990

I*
Tá ba agam ar shliabh s níl duine gam na ndiadh
Ach mé do mo bhuaidhreadh leofa
Bí odh idir mise is Dia más orthu tá mo thriall
Is bhain siad mo chiall go mór uaim
curfa:
‘Sí Moll Dubh (1) a’ Ghleanna í
‘Sí Moll Dubh an Earraigh í
‘Sí Moll Dubh is deirge ná’n rósa
‘S dá bhfaighinnse féin mo roghainn
De mhná óga deasa ‘n domhain
‘Sí Moll Dubh a’ Ghleanna ab fhearr liom
II
Mise bheith gan mhaoi
Feasta choíche ní bhim
Is Moll dubh bheith i dtús a h-óige
Och, is fann guth an éin
A labhras leis féin
Ar thulaigh nó ar thaobh na mónadh
III
Is ag Moll dubh a’ ghleanna
Tá mo chroí-se i dtaiscí
‘S í nach bhfuair guth na náire
Is go céillí, múinte, cneasta
A dúirt sí liom ar maidin
“Ó imigh uaim ‘s nach pill go brách orm”
IV
Níl’n óganach geanúil
Ó Bhaile Átha Cliath go Gaillimh
Is timpeall go h-Umhaill Uí Mháinnle
Nach bhfuil a dtriall uilig ‘na ghleanna
Ar eacraidh slime sleamhainne
I ndúil leis an bhean dubh a b ‘áille


I
I hear cattle on the hill with no one there to tend them
And for them I am deeply worried
Between myself and God, to them I take the trail/For they have taken my senses from me
CHORUS
She’s Moll Dubh of the valley
She’s Moll Dubh of spring
She’s Moll Dubh, more ruddy than the red rose
And if I had to choose
From the young maids of the world
Moll Dubh a’ Ghleanna would be my fancy
II
Me without a wife
I won’t be all my life
And Moll Dubh in youth just blooming
Lifeless the song of the bird
That sings alone
On a mound by the edge of the moorland
III
The Dark Molly of the glen
Has my heart in her keeping
She never had reproach or shame
So mannerly and honestly
She said to me this morning
“Depart from me and do not come again”
IV
There’s not a handsome youth
From Dublin down to Galway
And around by ‘Umhail Uí Mháinnle’
That’s not heading for the glen
On steeds so sleek and slim
Hoping to win the dark maid’s affection
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Sento le mucche sulla collina e nessuno che le accudisce, e per quelle sono tanto preoccupato
dentro di me e Dio prendo il sentiero nella loro direzione
perchè ho perso il senno per loro
CORO
E’ Molly la brunetta della valle
Molly la brunetta della primavera
Molly Dubh più rubiconda di una rosa rossa
e se dovessi scegliere
tra le giovani fanciulle del paese
Molly Dudh della valle sarà la mia fidanzata
II
Io senza moglie
per tutta la vita non voglio stare
e Molly Dubh nella giovinezza sta sbocciando,
senza vita (è) il canto dell’uccello
che canta solitario
su un tumulo al confine della brughiera
III
Molly la brunetta della valle
è la custode del mio cuore
non mi ha mai rimproverato  o disonorato, così di buone maniere e onesta, ma disse a me questa mattina
“Vattene da me e non ritornare di nuovo”
IV
Non c’è un bel ragazzo
da Dublino a Galway
e per ‘Umhail Uí Mháinnle’
che non stia andando nella valle
su destrieri così agili e slanciati
nella speranza di ottenere l’affetto della fanciulla mora

ASCOLTA Emer Kenny in Parting Glass 2004

(tratto (da qui)
I
Ta bo agam ar shliabh,
‘s is fada me na diadh
o’ chaill me mo chiall
le nochair
a seoladh soir is siar
Ins gach ait da dteann an ghrian
No go bhfilleann si ar ais trathnona
II
Si Moll Dubh a Ghleann i
‘S si Moll Dubh an earraigh i
Si Moll Dubh is deirge
Na na rosa
‘S da bhfaighinnse fein mo rogha
De mhna oga deas an domhain
Si Moll Dubh a Ghleann
Ab fhearr liom
III
Nuair a braithnionn fein anon
Ins an ait a mbionn mo run
Sileann o mo shuil
Sruth deora
‘S a Ri ghil na nDul
Dean fuascailt ar mo chuis
Mar si bean dubh an nGleann
A bhreoigh me

Traduzione inglese
I
I have a cow on the hillside,
and I’m a long while following her,
until I’ve lost my senses
with a spouse;
driving her east and west,
wherever the sun goes,
until she returns in the evening.
II
She is dark Moll of the glen,
she is dark Moll of the steed
Dark woman more red
than roses
Oh if I could but choose just one precious bloom
My dark Moll of the glen,
I’d choose you
III
When I look across
to the place where my love lives,
my eyes fill
with tears;
Bright King of the Elements,
resolve my predicament:
the dark woman of the glen
has destroyed me.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Ho una mucca sulla collina
e da molto tempo l’accudisco
fino a quando ho perso la ragione
per una sposa;
e la guidavo a est e a ovest
fino al calar del sole
quando ritornava a sera
II
E’ Molly la brunetta della valle
Molly la brunetta del destriero
la donna mora più rubiconda di una rosa
e se dovessi scegliere
solo un prezioso bocciolo
Molly mia brunetta della valle, sceglierei te
III
Quando guardo
verso il luogo dove vive il mio amore
i miei occhi si riempiono
di lacrime
Re luminoso degli Elementi
aiutami:
la brunetta della valle
mi ha distrutto (1)

NOTE
* per la fonetica qui
1) nel Donegal Moll non è una bella ragazza dai capelli neri ma il whiskey illegale

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane in Sail Óg Rua , 1983

FONTI
https://thesession.org/tunes/13358
http://www.joeheaney.org/en/bean-dubh-an-ghleanna/
http://songsinirish.com/mal-dubh-an-ghleanna-lyrics/
http://www.irishpage.com/songs/molldubh.htm
http://www.cathieryan.com/lyrics/dark-moll-of-the-glen-moll-dubh-a-ghleanna/
https://www.doegen.ie/ga/LA_1072d2
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45577
http://www.macsuibhne.com/amhran/teacs/257.htm

SEVEN GYPSIES

Una ballata originaria della Scozia sugli zingari e il fascino dell'”esotico”: una bella lady è rapita da uno zingaro o abbandona il marito di sua spontanea volontà, e sebbene inseguita e richiamata alle sue responsabilità, si rifiuta di tornare a casa. .
Come sempre nel caso di ballate molto popolari ampiamente diffuse dalla tradizione orale, si hanno molte varianti del testo anche con diversi finali.

LE VERSIONI INGLESI: SEVEN GYPSIES

Le varianti di questa versione sono moltissime, man mano che la ballata si sposta in Irlanda e Inghilterra, così dopo averle raggruppate a seconda delle melodie, ne evidenzio solo alcune per l’ascolto. (prima parte qui)
Gli zingari sono più spesso tre ma in alcune versioni diventano sette essendo un numero simbolico che preannuncia agli ascoltatori l’approssimarsi della sventura e della morte.

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane in “There was a Maid” 1978


I
There was seven yellow gypsies all in a gang
There was none of them lame or lazy-O
Sure the fairest one is among them all
She is going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
II
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I wouldn’t give a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Not for all of Cashill’s money-O
III
Oh saddle for me me pretty white steed
Saddle him up so bonny-O
So that I may go and find me own wedded wife
That she’s going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
IV
Oh she rode west but he rode best
Until he came to Strathberry
When who shall he find but his own wedded wife
She is going with the dark-eye gypsy-O
V
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I wouldn’t give a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Not for all of Cashill’s money-O
VI
Oh what will you do to your house and your land?
What will you do to money-O?
Oh what will you do with your two fine beds
Now you’re going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
VII
Oh what will you do to your fine feather bed
With the sheets turned down so bonny-O?
Oh what will you do with your own wedded lord
Now you’re going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
VIII
Oh what do I care for me house and me land?
What do I care for me money-O?
And what do I care for me to fine beds
Now I’m going with the dark eye gyspsy-O?
IX
Last night I lay on a fine feather bed
With the sheets turned down so bonny-O
But tonight I lay on a cold barn floor
With seven yellow gypsies to annoy me-O
X
Oh will you come with me, me pretty fair maid?
Will you come with me, me honey-O?
Sure I want to get a kiss of the gypsy laddie’s lips
Than you and all your money-O
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
C’erano sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra (1) in comitiva
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
e di certo il più bello è tra tutti loro,
lei sta scappando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri
II
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco dare un bacio alle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di tutto il denaro di Cashill
III
Sellatemi il mio destriero bianco
sellatelo così grazioso
così che possa andare a cercare mia moglie appena sposata
che è scappata con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri
IV
Lei cavalcò a Ovest ma lui cavalcò meglio
finche arrivò allo Strathberry
e chi ti trova se non la sua mogliettina appena sposata
che se n’è andata con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
V
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco dare un bacio alle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di tutto il denaro di Cashill”
VI
“Cosa intendi fare della tua casa
e della terra,
cosa intendi fare dei soldi?
Cosa intendi fare dei tuoi due bei letti
ora che stai andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
VII
Cosa intendi fare del tuo bel letto di piume
con le coperte ben rimboccate?
Cosa intendi fare con il tuo Lord appena sposato
ora che stai andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?”
VIII
“Che cosa mi interessa della casa e
della terra
cosa m’interessa del denaro?
E cosa m’importa dei letti ben fatti
ora che sto andando con lo zingaro dagli occhi neri?
IX
L’altra notte dormivo in un letto di piume,
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene
e stanotte dormirò in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivasta che mi infastidiscono”
X
“Verrai con me, mia bella fanciulla?
Verrai con me mia cara?”
“Preferisco avere un bacio dalle labbra del ragazzo zingaro
piuttosto di te e di tutto il tuo denaro”

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy

[prima parte]
I
There were seven yellow (1) gypsies and all in a row
And none of them lame nor lazy-O,
And they sang so sweet and so complete
That they stole the heart of the lady-O.
II
And they sang sweet and they sang shrill
That fast her tears began to flow,
And she lay down her silken gown,
Her golden rings and all her show.
III
She plucked off all her highheeled shoen,
All made of the Spanish leather-O,
And she would in the street in her bare bare feet
To run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
[seconda parte]
IV
They rode north and they rode south,
And they rode it late and early-O
Until they come to the river side
And oh but she was weary-O.
V
Says, Last night I rode by the river side
With me servants all around me-O,
And tonight I must go with me bare bare feet
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
[terza parte]
VI
It was late last night when the lord come home
And his servants they stood ready-O.
And the one took his boots and the other took his horse,
But away was his own dear lady-O.
VII
And when he come to the servants’ door
Enquiring for his lady-O,
The one she sighed and the other one cried,
She’s away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
VIII
For I met with a boy and a bonny, bonny boy,
And they were strange stories he told me-O,
Of the moon that rose by the river side
For pack with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
IX
Go saddle to me my bonny, bonny mare,
For the brown’s not so speedy-O.
And I will ride for to seek my bride
Who’s run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
X
Oh he rode north and he rode south,
And he rode it late and early-O
Until he come to the river side
And it was there that he spied his lady-O.
[quarta parte]
XI
What makes you leave all your house and your land,
All your gold and your treasure for to go?
And what makes you leave your new-wedded lord
To run away with the seven yellow gypsies-O?
XII
What care I for me house and me land?
What care I for me treasure-O?
And what care I for me new-wedded lord,
For I’m away with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XIII
Last night you slept in a goose feather bed
With the sheet turned down so bravely-O.
And tonight you will sleep in the cold barren shed
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XIV
What care I for me goose feather bed
With the sheet turned down so bravely-O?
For tonight I will sleep in the cold barren shed
All along with the seven yellow gypsies-O.
XV
There were seven yellow gypsies and all in a row,
None of them lame nor lazy-O.
And I wouldn’t give a kiss from the gypsies’ lips
For all of your land or your money-O.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
[prima parte]
I
C’erano sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra tutti in fila
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
e cantavano in modo così armonioso
da rubare il cuore della Lady
II
Cantavano alto e cantavano basso
che presto le sue lacrime iniziarono a sgorgare
e lei si tolse gli abiti di seta,
gli anelli d’oro e tutti i suoi orpelli.
III
Si tolse le sue scarpette
con il tacco alto,
fatte di cuoio spagnolo (2)
e lei fu in strada
a piedi nudi
per scappare con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
[seconda parte]
IV
Cavalcarono verso Nord
e cavalcarono verso Sud
andarono  in fretta
finchè arrivarono
sulla sponda del fiume e lei era tanto stanca.
V
“L’ultima notte che attraversai il fiume avevo i servitori mi assistevano,
ma questa notte
devo andare a piedi nudi
per seguire i sette
zingari dalla pelle olivastra”.
[terza parte]
VI
Era notte fonda
la scorsa notte
quando il Lord ritornò a casa
e i servitori erano tutti pronti
uno preso gli stivali
e l’altro il cavallo
ma via era la sua cara signora.
VII
E quando venne
alla porta della servitù
in cerca della sua Lady
uno sospirava e l’altro singhiozzava
“E’ scappata
con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
VIII
“Ho incontrato un ragazzo, un bel ragazzo
e lui mi raccontò
delle strane storie
della luna che sorge dalla sponda del fiume
del carico con i sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
IX
Sellate la mia bella giumenta
perchè il baio non è altrettanto veloce
e io cavalcherò
in cerca della mia sposa
che è scappata via
con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra
X
Cavalcò a nord e cavalcò a sud
andò  in fretta
finchè arrivò
sulla sponda del fiume
e fu là che vide la sua Lady
[quarta parte]
XI
“Come hai potuto lasciare la tua casa
e la tua terra,
tutto l’oro e il tesoro,
per andare via?
Come hai potuto lasciare il tuo novello sposo,
per scappare via con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra?”

XII
“Che cosa mi interessa della casa e
della terra
cosa m’interessa del denaro?
E cosa m’importa del mio sposo novello
perchè sono scappata con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XIII
L’altra notte dormivi in un letto di piume,
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene
e stanotte dormirai in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XIV
“Che cosa mi interessa del letto di piume
con le lenzuola rimboccate così bene?
Perchè stanotte dormirò in un fienile freddo
insieme con sette zingari dalla pelle olivastra”
XV
C’erano sette zingari olivastri tutti in fila
e nessuno di loro era zoppo o pigro
“preferirei baciare le labbra degli zingari
piuttosto che avere tutta la tua terra e i tuoi soldi”

NOTE
1) il termine yellow è usato più in senso dispregiativo che per definire il colore della pelle: fina dal medioevo il giallo è stato il colore dei giullari ad indicare infamia e sentimenti malevoli
2) il cuoio spagnolo era molto apprezzato, decorato con rilievi su fondi d’oro, cesellato e dipinto

ASCOLTA  Nic Jones

I
There were seven gypsies all of a row
And they sang neat and bonny-O;
Sang so neat and they’re so complete,
They stole the heart of a lady.
II
She’s kicked off her high heel shoes
Made of the Spanish leather,
And she’s put on an old pair of brogues
To follow the gypsy laddie.
III
Late at night her lord come home
And he’s enquiring for his lady.
And his servant’s down on his knees and said,
“She’s away with the seven gypsies.”
IV
He’s ridden o’er the high, high hills
Till he come to the morning,
And there he’s found his own dear wife
And she’s in the arms of the seven gypsies.
V
“Well, last night I slept in a feather bed
And the sheets and the blankets around me;
Tonight I slept in the cold open fields
In the arms of my seven gypsies.”
VI(2)
Seven gypsies all of a row
And they sang neat and bonny-O;
Sang so neat that they all were hanged
For the stealing of a famous lady.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
C’erano sette zingari tutti in fila
e cantavano
così bene
cantavano così
armoniosamente
che rubarono il cuore di una Signora
II
Lei si tolse le sue scarpe d
ai tacchi alti
fatte con cuoio spagnolo
e si mise un paio di vecchi
zoccoli
per seguire il giovane zingaro.
IV
La sera tardi il Signore ritornò a casa,
cercando la sua Lady
e la cameriera si gettò sulle ginocchia e disse
“Se n’è andata con sette
zingari”.
IV
Così lui cavalcò per le alte colline
finchè venne il mattino
e là lui trovò la sua propria amata moglie
tra le braccia di sette zingari..
V
“La notte scorsa ho dormito in un letto di piume
con lenzuola e coperte introno
Stanotte ho dormito al freddo in un campo aperto
tra le braccia dei miei sette zingari.”
VI
Sette zingari tutti in fila
e cantavano così armoniosamente
cantavano così armoniosamente e furono impiccati
perchè rapirono una famosa Signora

VERSIONE Jim Moray

I
Three gypsies stood at the castle gates,
They sang so high and they sang so low,
And the lady sits in her chamber late
and her heart it melted away like snow.
II
Well they sang so high and they sang so clear,
Fast her tears began to flow.
So she’s laid aside her silken gown
to follow the raggle taggle gypsies.
III
Well she’s kicked off her high heeled shoes,
made of Spanish leather
And over her shoulders a blanket she’s threw,
to follow the raggle taggle gypsies.
IV
Well it’s late at night her lord comes home
inquiring for his lady.
Well the servant girl gave this reply,
“Oh, She’s gone with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
V
“So saddle to me my milk white steed.
Bridle me my pony,
that I may ride to seek my bride
who’s gone with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
VI
So he’s ridden o’er yon high high hill.
He’s rode through woods and copses,
Until he’s came to the broad open stream,
and there he spied his lady.
VII
He says “What makes you leave your houses and land?
What makes you leave your money?
And what makes you leave your unwedded lord?
To go with the raggle taggle gypsies.”
VIII
She says “What care I for my goose-feather bed,
with the sheets turned down so bravely?
For tonight I will sleep in the cold open field,
with the love of me raggle taggle gypsies.”
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
Tre zingari stavano ai cancelli del castello
cantavano sia forte
sia piano
e la Signora sedeva nella sua camera privata e il suo cuore si scioglieva come neve.
II
Cantarono così armoniosamente
che rapide le lacrime iniziarono a sgorgare
così lei si tolse l’abito di seta per seguire gli zingari (1)
III
Lei si tolse le sue scarpe dai tacchi alti
fatte con cuoio spagnolo
e si gettò sulle spalle una coperta
per seguire gli zingari.
IV
Era sera tardi che il Signore
ritornò a casa,
cercando la sua Lady
e la cameriera diede questa risposta
“Se n’è andata con dei volgari
zingari”.
V
“Sellatemi il destriero bianco
mettete le briglie al mio cavallino
e cavalcherò per cercare la mia sposa, che se n’è andata con dei volgari
zingari”.
VI
Così lui cavalcò per le alte colline
e cavalcò per foreste e boschi,
finchè venne a un ampio torrente
dove vide la sua signora.
VII
“Come hai potuto lasciare la tua casa e la tua terra,
come hai potuto lasciare il tuo denaro, come hai potuto lasciare il tuo Lord in procinto delle nozze, per andare con dei rozzi e volgari zingari?”
VIII
“Che cosa mi interessa del letto di piume
con le lenzuola bel rimboccate?
Stanotte dormirò al freddo in un campo aperto
con l’amore dei miei zingari.”

NOTE
1)raggle-taggle: arruffato, scarmigliato, rude o rozzo

continua

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/sevenyellowgipsies.html

La terra del verde trifoglio di Paddy

Read the post in English

“Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore” è una  canzone irlandese tradizionale originaria del Donegal, di cui per una sola melodia sono state scritte diverse versioni testuali,

LA MELODIA

Una melodia tipicamente irish diffusa tra i traveller già alla fine del 1700, oggi si conosce con diversi titoli: Shamrock shore, Erin Shore (ASCOLTA versione strumentale del gruppo irlandese The Corrs in Forgiven, Not Forgotten 1995), Lough Erin Shore (ASCOLTA la versione strumentale sempre dei Corrs in Unpluggesd 1999), Gleanntáin Ghlas’ Ghaoth Dobhair, Gleanntan Glas Gaoith Dobhair ovvero The Green Glens Of Gweedor (con testo scritto da Francie Mooney)

LA VERSIONE STANDARD: Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

” Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore è stata cantata per la prima volta su un EFDSS LP (1969) di Packie Manus Byrne, ora ultraottantenne [Packie è morto il 12 maggio 2015] e residente ad Ardara -Contea del Donegal. Era nato a Corkermore tra lì e Killybegs ed è stata ripresa da Paul Brady. Tuttavia, ci sono versioni più lunghe e locali (a North Derry, Donegal) in “Songs of the People” di Sam Henry e in “The Flower of Dunaff Hill” di Jimmy McBride” (tratto da qui) Sam Henry scrive in merito “Un’altra versione proviene dal distretto di Articlave, dove la canzone è stata cantata per la prima volta nel 1827 da un aratore di Inishowen.
La registrazione effettuata da Sean Davies al Cecil Sharp House risale al 1969 e ancora negli archivi sonori  dell’ITMA troviamo la registrazione cantata da Corney McDaid al McFeeley’s Bar, Clonmany, Co. Donegal nel 1987 (vedi) e anche Paul Brady l’ha registrata più volte.
Kevin Conneff la registra con i Chieftains nel 1992 per l’album “Another Country” 

Amelia Hogan in “Transplants: From the Old World to the New.” con un bellissimo video -racconto

Liam Ó Maonlai & Donal Lunny (strofe I, IV, V, II)

Dolores Keane & Paul Brady live 1988 (strofe I, II, IV, V)

VERSIONE STANDARD
intro*
Come Irishmen all, who hear my song, your fate is a mournful tale
When your rents are behind and you’re being taxed blind and your crops have grown sickly and failed
You’ll abandon your lands,
and you’ll wash your hands of all that has come before and you’ll take to the sea to a new count-a-ree, far from the green Shamrock shore.
I
From Derry quay we sailed away
On the twenty-third of May
We were boarded by a pleasant crew
Bound for Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we’d run short going to New York
Far away from the shamrock shore
II (Chorus)
Then fare thee well, sweet Liza dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold (boys)
That dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune shall favour me
And I to have money in store
I’ll come back and I’ll wed the wee lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
At twelve o’clock we came in sight
Of famous Mullin Head
And Innistrochlin to the right stood out On the ocean’s bed
A grander sight ne’er met my eyes
Than e’er I saw before
Than the sun going down ‘twixt sea and sky
Far away from the shamrock shore
IV
We sailed three days (weeks), we were all seasick
Not a man on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
And no-one to pity poor me
No mother dear nor father kind
To lift (hold) up my head, which was sore
Which made me think more on the lassie I left
On Paddy’s green shamrock shore
V
Well we safely reached the other side
in three (fifteen) and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man(1)
and led round in six different ways,
We each of us drank a parting glass
in case we might never meet more,
And we drank a health to Old Ireland
and Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
introduzione
Venite irlandesi che ascoltate la mia canzone, il vostro destino è una storia triste, quando siete indietro con gli affitti e siete tartassati e i raccolti sono andati a male
abbandonerete le vostre terre
e vi laverete le mani di tutto quello che è avvenuto e prenderete il mare per una nuova occasione, lontano dalla terra del verde trifoglio.
I
Dal molo di Derry partimmo
il 23 di Maggio
eravamo imbarcati in una simpatica ciurma che salpava per l’America,
abbiamo preso cinque mila e più litri di acqua fresca
per il breve viaggio
fino a New York,
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
II
Così addio cara e dolce Liza,
e addio alla città di Derry
e due volte addio ai miei bravi compagni
che restano su quella terra santa,
se fama e fortuna mi arrideranno
e farò dei soldi a palate,
ritornerò indietro e sposerò la fidanzatina che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
III
Alle dodici in punto abbiamo avvistato
il famoso Mullin Head
e Innistrochlin a destra spiccava sul letto dell’oceano,
una vistra migliore mai prima videro i miei occhi
del sole che tramonta tra il mare e il cielo
lontano dalla terra del trifoglio.
IV
Navigammo per tre giorni (settimane) e abbiamo sofferto tutti il mal di mare, non c’era un uomo a piede libero a bordo, eravamo tutti confinati nelle nostre cuccette, senza nessuno a confortarmi, né la cara madre, né il buon padre a sorreggermi la testa che era dolorante, il che mi ha fatto pensare ancora di più alla ragazza che ho lasciato nella terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
V
Raggiungemmo infine l’altra sponda in salvo in 23 gioni, siamo stati presi come passeggeri da un uomo che ci ha portato in giro in sei strade diverse
così bevemmo tutti il bicchiere dell’addio nel caso non ci fossimo più incontrati e bevemmo alla salute della vecchia Irlanda e alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

NOTE
* strofa introduttiva scritta da Garrison White
1) si riferisce dell’accoglienza degli immigrati che erano ispezionati e trattenuti per le formalità burocratiche, ma la frase non è molto chiara. Ellis Island fu usata come punto d’ingresso agli immigrati solo nel 1892. Prima di allora, per circa 35 anni, lo Stato di New York ha fatto transitare 8 milioni di immigrati per il Castle Garden Immigration Depot situato in Lower Manhattan

Rispetto alla versione “standard” si trovano un paio di testi, i quali riprendono sempre il tema dell’emigrazione

ALTRE VERSIONI

Questo testo è stato scritto da Patrick Brian Warfield, cantante e polistrumentista del gruppo irlandese The Wolfe Tones (autore di molte canzoni per il gruppo). Nella sua versione il punto di sbarco non è New York ma Baltimora.
Young Dubliners

The Wolfe Tones in Across the Broad Atlantic 2005 


I
Oh, fare thee well to Ireland
My own dear native land
It’s breaking my heart to see friends part
For it’s then that the tears do fall
I’m on my way to Americae
Will I e’er see home once more
For now I leave my own true love
And Paddy’s green shamrock shore
II
Our ship she lies at anchor
She’s standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night
As we sail across the sea
Many ships have been lost, many lives it cost
On this journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I’ll say goodbye
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
III
So fare thee well my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find
Although we’ll be far, far away
Though I’ll be alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way
Back home to the shamrock shore
IV
And now our ship is on the way
May heaven protect us all
With the winds and the sail we surely can’t fail
On this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wave to the end
‘Til I could see them no more
I then took a chance with one last glance
At Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio all’Irlanda
la mia cara terra natia,
mi si spezza il cuore a separarmi dagli amici
perchè è allora che le lacrime scorrono, devo andare in America.
Rivedrò ancora una volta la mia casa, per ora lascio la mia innamorata e la terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
II
La nostra nave si trova in rada
e lei è in piedi sul molo;
che la buona sorte ci accompagni ogni notte
mentre solchiamo mare,
molte navi sono andate perdute (nel naufragio) costato molte vite,
in questo viaggio che abbiamo davanti, con le lacrime agli occhi, dirò addio alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi.
III
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai ,
anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi
IV
Ora la nostra nave è in viaggio
che il cielo ci protegga tutti
con i venti e  le vele di certo non falliremo
in questo viaggio verso Baltimora,
ma che genitori e amici restino a salutare
fino a quando non riuscirò più a vederli e allora darò l’ultimo sguardo
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

Questa versione riprende  la III strofa della versione precedente con un coro
The High Kings


I
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
Farewell to old Ireland
Good-bye to you, Bannastrant(1)
No time to look back
Facing the wind, fighting the waves
May heaven protect us all
From cold, hunger and angry squalls
Pray I won’t be lost
Wind in the sails, carry me safe
Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
I’ll think of you night and day
A place in my mind you will surely find
Although I am so far away
And when I’m alone far away from home
I’ll think of the good times once more
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore.
II
Out now on the ocean deep
Ship’s noise makes it hard to sleep
Tears fill up my eyes
The image of you won’t go away
(Chorus)
New York is in sight at last
My heart, it is pounding fast
Trying to be brave
Wishing you near
By my side, a stór
(Chorus)
Until I can make it back someday here
To Paddy’s green shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio il mio solo vero amore
ti penserò notte e giorno
addio alla vecchia Irlanda
e addio a te Bannastrant
non c’è tempo per guardarsi indietro, ma fronteggiare il vento e combattere le onde, che il cielo ci protegga
dal freddo, dalla fame e dalle raffiche rabbiose, ti prego non voglio perdermi,
vento nelle vele portami al sicuro
Coro
Così addio amore mio,
ti penserò notte e giorno
e un posto nel mio cuore tu di certo troverai , anche se siamo tanto lontani
e sebbene io sarò solo, lontano da casa, ripenserò ai bei tempi ancora una volta, fino al giorno in cui potrò fare ritorno
alla terra del verde trifoglio degli irlandesi

II
Fuori ora sull’oceano profondo
il rumore della nave rende difficile il sonno, gli occhi si riempiono di lacrime
la tua immagine non se ne vuole andare via. (coro)
New York alla fine è in vista
il mio cuore batte forte
cerco di essere coraggioso
ma desidero averti vicino
accanto a me, cuore mio
(coro)
Finchè potrò fare ritorno un giorno alla terra del verde trifoglio degli Irlandesi

NOTE
1) Banna Strand , ovvero Banna Beach, si trova nella Tralee Bay contea di Kerry

Shamrock shore

FONTI
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=&refer=&abstract=&ftpstyle=&grab=&linemode=&max=250?isindex=green+shamrock+shore
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/191-paddy-s-green-shamrock-shore http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/192-paddys-green-shamrock-shore-1 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/soundtracks/paddys.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/5936 https://thesession.org/discussions/2129 https://thesession.org/tunes/7048 https://thesession.org/recordings/218

WILL YE GO TO FLANDERS, MY MALLY, O?

Una Ballata scozzese risalente al 1600 o al 1700, in cui un soldato in partenza per le Fiandre, chiede alla fidanzata di seguirlo. Potrà assistere alla battaglia sull’alto di una collina, così com’era consuetudine dei tempi recarsi nei pressi dei campi di battaglia (a distanza di sicurezza ovviamente) per “gustarsi” lo spettacolo (come se la guerra fosse uno sport), sorseggiando bevande e mangiando qualche pasticcino. A questa scena idilliaca si contrappone la cruda realtà della morte, così il canto si pone tra le prime canzoni contro la guerra nella storia! La storia si può leggere come la domanda di una fanciulla rivolta al suo Mally (Malcom): ti unirai alle truppe in partenza per le Fiandre?

La canzone è compresa nella raccolta di David Herd “Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs” (1776) mentre la melodia si trova trascritta in ‘Caledonian Pocket Companion’ (James Oswald 1743). La melodia è molto simile alla versione irlandese Gramachree Molly la quale risale al 1600 e si ipotizza un’origine comune anche per The Maid in Bedlam.
Le Fiandre, terra fiamminga, oggi parte del Belgio furono teatro di guerra nel 1568-1648 (la rivolta dei Paesi Bassi contro il dominio spagnolo), ai tempi della guerra di successione austriaca 1740-1748, poco dopo il conflitto si riaccese con la guerra dei Sette anni 1756-1763

Ossian, in Dove Across the Water 1982

Dolores Keane & John Faulkner:  Live, 1978 (in Broken Hearted I’ll Wander 1979).

ASCOLTA Birkin Tree, notevole versione


I(1)
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally (2), O?
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally, O?
There we’ll get wine (ale) and brandy,
And sack(3) and sugar-candy(4)
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally, O?
II
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally, O?
And see the bonny sodjers there,
my Mally, O
They’ll gie the pipes a blaw
Wi’ their plaids(5) and kilts sae braw,
The fairest o’ them a’,
my Mally, O
III
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally, O?
And see the chief commanders, my Mally, O
You’ll see the bullets fly
And the soldiers how they die
And the ladies loudly cry,
my Mally, O?
IV
Will ye go to Flanders, my Mally, O?
And join the bold hielanders(3), my Mally, O?
Ye’ll hear the captains callin’
And see the sergeants crawlin’
And a’ the sodjers fallin’, my Mally, O.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Verrai nelle Fiandre Mally?
Verrai nelle Fiandre Mally?
avremo vino e brandy
e vino liquoroso e confetti
verrai nelle Fiandre Mally?
II
Verrai nelle Fiandre Mally
a vedere i bei soldati,
Mally,
che soffiano nelle cornamuse
coi loro tartan e gonnellini così vivaci
il più bello di tutti
Mally?
III
Verrai nelle Fiandre Mally?
a vedere i Comandanti in Capo,
Mally
vedrai volare i proiettili
e come muoiono i soldati
e le donne lamentarsi ad alta voce Mally?
IV
Verrai nelle Fiandre Mally
per unirti ai coraggiosi highlanders Mally
sentirai il richiamo del capitano
e vedrai strisciare il sergente
e tutti i soldati cadere Mally.

NOTE
1) nella raccolta di Herd sono trascritte solo la I e la III strofa, la II strofa è stata aggiunta da Billy Ross  insieme a quest’altra strofa
And will ye go wi me tae Flanders my Mally-o
Gin I’d take the royal shillin my Mally-o
Wid ye tae a foreign shore
A’ tae hear the canons roar
and the bloody shouts o’ war My Mally-o
2)  Mally è il diminutivo di Malcom
3) Sack = sherry, vino bianco liquoroso importato dalla Spagna o dalle Isole Canarie, il termine ricorre nelle broadside ballads del XVII secolo
4) sugar candy: sono le caramelle di zucchero che possono essere in forma mordiba come le gelatinose oppure dure; ma potrebbe anche essere lo zucchero candito (lo zucchero fatto caramellare)
5) oppure scritto anche: coats o red; nella II strofa il soldato descrive un reggimento scozzese con tanto di cornamuse e tartan e poteva trattarsi solo del “Royal Scots” (e di scozzesi delle lowlands) “Highland Regiments” si formano solo ai tempi della guerra di secessione austriaca 1740-1748.
The Royal Scots saw service under Malborough during the War of the Spanish Succession and followed this with garrison duty in Ireland where they remained until 1742. From this date the two battalions were usually to be separated and posted far apart. The 1st Battalion moved in 1743 to Germany to take part in the Austrian War of Succession, and was involved in the Battle of Fontenoy. In the following year, the 2nd Battalion became involved in the fight against the Young Pretender which culminated in the Battle of Culloden” (tratto da qui)

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/willyegotaeflanders.htm https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/willyegotoflanders.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10176 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18542

CRAIGIE HILL, IRISH SONG OF EMIGRATION

Emigrants_leave_Ireland“Craigie Hill” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese collezionata dalla madre di Paddy Tunney il quale riteneva che la canzone fosse originaria di Larne, Contea di Antrim, il porto da cui partivano gli emigranti nord-irlandesi. Come è scritto su Wikipedia (qui) “Un monumento di Curran Park commemora i Friends Goodwill, la prima nave di emigranti a salpare da Larne nel maggio 1717, per raggiungere Boston negli Stati Uniti. Le radici irlandesi di Boston derivano infatti da Larne. Anche Larne è stata investita dalla grande carestia irlandese della metà dell’Ottocento.” Ma per dirla come Paddy stesso “every Irish port had an emigrant ship” (vedi emigration songs)

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan 1981
ASCOLTA Dolores Keane 1982
ASCOLTA Susan McKeown 1998
ASCOLTA Cara Dillon in Cara Dillon 2003

ASCOLTA Caladh Nua in Happy Days 2009


I
It being the spring time,
and the small birds were singing,
Down by yon shady arbour
I carelessly did stray;
The thrushes they were warbling,
The violets they were charming:
To view fond lovers talking,
a while I did delay.
II
She said, “My dear don’t leave me all for another season,
Though fortune does be pleasing
I ‘ll go along with you.
I ‘ll forsake friends and relations and bid this holy nation,
And to the bonny Bann banks(1) forever I ‘ll bid adieu.”
III
He said, “My dear, don’t grieve or yet annoy my patience.
You know I love you dearly the more I’m going away,
I’m going to a foreign nation to purchase a plantation,
To comfort(2) us hereafter all in Amerikay.
IV
Then after a short while a fortune does be pleasing,
It’ll cause them for smile at our late going away,
We’ll be happy as Queen Victoria, all in her greatest glory,
We’ll be drinking wine and porter all in Amerikay.
V
The landlords(3) and their agents, their bailiffs and their beagles
The land of our forefathers we’re forced for to give o’er
And we’re sailing on the ocean for honor and promotion
And we’re parting with our sweethearts, it’s them we do adore
VI
If you were in your bed lying and thinking on dying,
The sight of the lovely Bann banks, your sorrow you’d give o’er,
Or if were down one hour, down in the shady bower,
Pleasure would surround you, you’d think on death no more.
VII
Then fare you well, sweet Cragie Hill(4), where often times I’ve roved,
I never thought my childhood days I ‘d part you ever more,
Now we’re sailing on the ocean for honour and promotion,
And the bonny boats are sailing, way down by Doorin shore(5).”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era primavera
e gli uccellini cantavano,
per quell’ombreggiato boschetto sbadatamente camminavo;
i tordi gorgheggiavano e le violette erano incantevoli; a guardare gli amanti appassionati che chiacchieravano mi sono un po’ attardato.
II
Disse lei “Non lasciarmi tutta sola
per un’altra stagione,
se la fortuna ci arriderà,
io verrò via con te.
Abbandonerò amici e parenti e a questa santa nazione
e alle belle rive del Bann (1)
per sempre dirò addio.”
III
Disse lui “Non rattristare e mettere alla prova la mia pazienza,
lo sai che ti amo teneramente anche se sto andando via,
andrò in una nazione straniera per acquistare una piantagione
per dare conforto (2) a tutti noi d’ora in poi in America.
IV
Dopo un po’ la fortuna
ci arriderà
e loro saranno contenti della nostra partenza;
saremo felici come la Regina Vittoria in pompa magna,
berremo vino e porter
in America.
V
Ai proprietari terrieri (3) e i loro agenti, gli ufficiali giudiziari con i loro cani,
la terra dei nostri padri siamo stati costretti a cedere
e solcheremo l’oceano per l’onore e la carriera
e ci separeremo dalle nostre fidanzate,
le sole e uniche che amiamo.”
VI
“Se tu fossi steso nel letto in procinto di morire
la vista delle belle rive del Bann ti avrebbero allevato il dolore,
o se andassi per un ora fino al pergolato ombroso,
il piacere ti circonderebbe e non penseresti più alla morte.”
VII
“Addio amata Craigie Hill (4) dove spesso sono andato in giro,
mai pensavo nei giorni della mia fanciullezza che ti avrei lasciato,
ora stiamo navigando sul mare per l’onore e la carriera
e le belle navi navigano via dalla spiaggia di Doorin (5)”

NOTE
1) The Banks Of The Bann è il titolo di un’altra canzone irlandese sulla separazione. il fiume Bann scorre nel Nord-Est dell’Irlanda ed è il fiume che ha portato lo sviluppo economico nell’Ulster con l’industria del lino. Il fiume fa un po’ da spartiacque tra cattolici e repubblicani a ovest e protestanti e unionisti a est.
2) se ho capito il senso della frase
3) Ai primi del XVII secolo inglesi e scozzesi andarono alla “conquista” dell’Irlanda: la terra fu per lo più confiscata agli irlandesi e la parte cattolica degli Irlandesi venne emarginata; la maggioranza queste “colonie” si concentrò nella parte nord dell’Irlanda
4) Craggy è la roccia scoscesa a più livelli, Craige o Craig si dice anche per il sito di una fortezza preistorica, in inglese “hillfort” o “ring-fort”, in italiano “forte ad anello” ovvero fortificazioni a forma circolare risalenti all’età del ferro (o secondo le ultime datazioni, all’età del primo Medioevo). Le fortezze sono state assorbire dalla campagna ma la memoria storica è rimasta nella credenza che il luogo fosse la dimora delle fate.
5) Doorin Point e un promontorio su Inver Bay, vicino a Mountcharles, nel Donegal

FONTI
http://comhaltasarchive.ie/compositions/5
https://thesession.org/discussions/23580
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=155019 http://songoftheisles.com/2013/04/29/craigie-hills/ http://filstoria.hypotheses.org/tag/irlanda-del-nord

WANDERING WAITS e gli Zampognari

C’era un’usanza inglese per Natale quello dei musicisti di strada che suonavano (o facevano schiamazzo a seconda dell’opinione) nel cuore della notte durante il Natale, detti Christmas waits.
All’origine della tradizione degli Zampognari ci sono quelle che potrebbero essere definite le antenate delle “bande comunali”: i waites (modernizzato in Waits) cioè delle sentinelle musicali che, prima degli orologi sulle torri pubbliche cittadine, annunciavano il passare del tempo e nello stesso tempo svolgevano la funzione di sorveglianti di coloro che dormivano (i guardiani notturni ante-litteram). Prima ancora delle città erano i guardiani dei Castelli, alle dipendenze del Dominus, pattugliavano le strade e stavano di vedetta sulle torri.

ALL’ARME, ALL’ARME

Con i loro strumenti dal suono potente (waits pipe) lanciavano l’allarme  sull’alto della torre campanaria. In un secondo tempo queste guardie si evolsero in un gruppo musicale per assumere una carica pubblica con tanto di divisa nei colori cittadini. Il loro incarico comprendeva l’accoglienza degli ospiti di riguardo e la partecipazione alle ceronie pubbliche commemorative e processioni proprio come accade per le bande comunali moderne.

IL WAYTE

un oboe medievale

L’origine del nome secondo alcuni studiosi potrebbe derivare dal tipo di strumento utilizzato, il wayte (wayghtes) o oboe che corrisponde al piffero o ciaramella della nostra tradizione popolare natalizia, strumenti che si accompagnano alla zampogna dei pastori (che secondo la tradizione furono i primi ad accorrere a testimoniare la nascita di Gesù). Altri invece fanno risalire il nome delle Waits proprio a quei pastori ‘watchnight’ o ‘waitnight’ che custodivano le pecore al pascolo quando gli angeli apparvero a portare la lieta novella. Altri ancora rispolverano la vecchia parola scozzese “waith” che significa “andare in giro” in riferimenti ai menestrelli ambulanti autorizzati a suonare nel periodo natalizio chiedendo denaro. Il nome finì per identificare più indistintamente tutti i musicisti che suonavano per strada.

Print. Street Musicians (Pifferari), Ferris Collection. GA*14886.

Questi musicisti ambulanti ( zampognari o pifferai) si distinguono dai carollers e i wassailers per via del loro organico composto per lo più da strumentisti autorizzati con permessi speciali.
Dalle melodie pastorali agli schiamazzi notturni il passo è breve così le Waits sono state ufficialmente soppresse con il Municipal Corporations Act del 1835 (con questa legge  i musicisti di strada continuarono a suonare, ma non erano più sotto “contratto” cittadino).

PAST THREE O’CLOCK

“Past three o’clock” è un canto di Natale scritto da George Ratcliff Woodward sulla melodia tradizionale “London Waits”. Ma ritornello e melodia sono rinascimentali e si trovano nelle fonti del XVII secolo (ad esempio in The Dancing Master 1665). Il brano è stato pubblicato in “The Cambridge Carol Book” 1924. In originale contiene otto strofe.

ASCOLTA The Chieftains in “The Bells of Dublin” 1991 con i The Renaissance Singers


CHORUS
Past three a clock (1),
And a cold frosty morning,
Past three a clock;
Good morrow, masters all!
I
Born is a Baby,
Gentle as may be,
Son of the eternal
Father supernal.
II
Seraph quire singeth,
Angel bell ringeth;
Hark how they rime (2) it,
Time it and chime it.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
Sono passate le tre in punto
è una mattina gelida e fredda
Sono passate le tre in punto
Buon giorno Signori!
I
Nato è un bimbo
così buono,
figlio dell’eterno
Padre celeste.
II
Le schiere dei Serafini cantano
e suonano le campane angeliche
date ascolto a come si accodano,
battono il tempo e risuonano

NOTE
1) la funzione delle sentinelle notturne nelle città europee del Medioevo e per tutto il Settecento fu quella di avvisare la gente  del battere delle ore: alle tre del mattino iniziavano le laudi mattutine e per molti cittadini la giornata
2) più che il verbo to rime si intende to rhyme

Christmas Eve

Il reel composto dal violinista Tommy Coen (Urrachree, Aughrim, East County Galway) venne trasmesso dalla radio irlandese nel 1955 in occasione delle trasmissioni per la vigilia di Natale, prima chiamato semplicemente “Tommy Coen’s reel” diventò così il Christmas Eve.

ASCOLTA The Chieftains in “The Bells of Dublin” 1991 con le campane di Dublino

ASCOLTA  Dolores Keane (flauto) e Mairtin Byrnes (violino)

FONTI
http://www.medieval-life-and-times.info/medieval-music/waits.htm
http://from-bedroom-to-study.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/the-nocturnal-noises-of-wandering-waits.html
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Text/Chappell2/waits.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/past_three_a_clock.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/440

MORNING DEW

Con questo titolo generico “My Morning Dew”, “The May Morning Dew” o anche solo “Morning Dew” si indicano diverse canzoni e anche brani strumentali della tradizione celtica

Morning_Dew_III_by_Nitrok

Inizio come sempre dalla melodia

MAY MORNING DEW: SLOW AIR O REEL?

“The May Morning Dew” è il titolo di una slow air (vedi)

ASCOLTA Davy Spillane in “The Storm”, 1985

ASCOLTA Patrick Ball e la sua magica arpa dalle corde di metallo (la seconda melodia è The Butterfly jig)

ASCOLTA Mick O’Brien all’uilleann pipes

“Morning Dew” è anche un popolarissimo reel, generalmente in tre parti conosciuto anche con il nome di Giorria Sa BhFraoch, Hare Among The Heather o Hare In The Heather “Morning Dew [1]” has been one of the more popular reels in recent decades, although the title seems a relatively modern appellation. It was printed by James Kerr in Scotland as “Hare Among the Heather (The)” in the 1880’s, and it was recorded under that title by Margret Barry and County Sligo fiddler Michael Gorman in 1956. A portion of the tune was used by Chieftains piper Paddy Moloney for his first film score, Ireland Moving. Accordion player Luke O’Malley’s version starts with the part that usually appears as the 3rd part in most other versions (Kerr’s version also starts on another part). (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA il violino di Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

The Chieftains, live

MAY MORNING DEW AIR

La May Morning Dew (air) è una melodia tradizionale irlandese dalla tristezza infinita, che accompagna il canto di una persona molto anziana la quale, alla vista della vallata natia, richiama i ricordi dei tempi passati: e con essi la tristezza per il vuoto lasciato dalla perdita degli affetti.
La stagione della primavera è ricordata con rimpianto come la stagione della giovinezza ormai sfiorita e le lacrime cadono come rugiada del mattino.

La melodia è molto popolare nella zona Ovest della contea di Clare (Munster, costa occidentale) raccolta in “Around the Hills of Clare” , 2004 (vedi): This song, evoking old age and the passing of time, while being very popular in West Clare, does not seem to have been recorded from traditional singers very often elsewhere; the only other two versions listed by Roud being from Ann Jane Kelly of Keady, Armagh in 1952 and Paddy Tunney of Beleek, Fermanagh in 1965. (tratto da qui)

The Chieftains in “Water from the Well“, 2000


I
How pleasant in winter
To sit by the hob(1)
Just listening to the barks
And the howls of the dog
Or to walk through the green fields
Where wild daisies grew
To pluck the wild flowers
In the may morning dew
II
When summer is coming
When summer is near
With the trees oh so green
And the sky bright and clear
And the wee birds all singing
Their loved ones to woo
And young flowers all springing
In the may morning dew(2)
III
I remember the old folk
All now dead and gone
And likewise my two brothers
Young Dennis and John
How we ran o’er the heather
The wild hare to pursue
And the proud deer we hunted
In the may morning dew
IV
Of the house I was born in
There’s but a stone on the stone
And now all ‘round the garden
Wild thistles have grown
And gone are the neighbours(3)
That I once knew
No more will we wander
Through the may morning dew
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o camminare per i verdi campi
dove crescono le margherite selvatiche, a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
Quando l’estate è in arrivo
quando l’estate è vicina
con gli alberi così verdi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccellini cantano
per corteggiare le innamorate
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Mi ricordo i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei due fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
come correvamo sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
e cacciare il cervo fiero
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
La casa dove sono nato
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciuti i cardi selvatici
e se ne sono andati tutti i vicini
che conoscevo un tempo
non potremo più andare in giro
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

NOTE
1) hob piano di cottura dei camini di un tempo
2) tutta la strofa è tipica dei canti del Maggio, quando le allegre brigate dei giovani andavano nei boschi a raccogliere fiori e ramoscelli da portare in paese per far entrare il Maggio nelle case. continua
3) qui si accenna allo spopolamento del paese e il senso di abbandono del luogo si riverbera sulla condizione della vecchiaia

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane


I
How pleasant in winter
to sit by the hearth
Listening to the barks
and the howls of the dog
Or in summer to wander
the wide valleys through
And to pluck the wild flowers
in the May morning dew.
II
Summer is coming,
oh summer is here
With leaves on the trees
and the sky blue and clear
And the birds they are singing
their fond notes so true
And the flowers they are springing
in the May morning dew(2)
III
The house I was reared in
is but a stone on a stone
And all round the garden
the weeds they have grown
And all the kind neighbours
that ever I knew
Like the red rose they’ve withered
in the May morning dew
IV
God be with the old folks
who are now dead and gone
And likewise my brothers,
young Dennis and John
As they tripped through the heather
the wild hare to pursue
As their joys they were mingled
in the May morning dew
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o in Estate camminare
per le ampie valli
a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
L’estate è in arrivo
l’estate è qui
con le foglie sugli alberi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccelli cantano
le loro melodie appassionate e sincere
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Ma la casa dove sono cresciuto
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciute le erbacce
e tutti i vicini cordiali
che ho mai conosciuto
come la rosa rossa sono appassiti
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
Dio sia con i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
mentre corrono sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
quando le loro gioie si univano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

FONTI
https://thesession.org/tunes/8547
https://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/songs/themaymorningdew.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31905
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Morning_Dew_(1)_(The)
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_oconway.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_khayes.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_jlyons.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_pegmcmahon.htm