Archivi tag: Clipper

Hurrah For the Black Ball Line!

Leggi in italiano

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the commercial demands of ships always faster and less “armed” compared to the previous century (era of massive galleons, vessels and frigates): so the Clipper was born, ships for the transport of goods, without frills and with more sails. They are the latest models of sailing ships, the apogee of the Age of sailing, then soon the engines will take over .. and the repertoire of the sea shanties will end up among the curiosities of antique dealers (or in the circuits of Folk music).

THE CLIPPER

Clippers traveled the two most important trade sea routes: China – England for tea and Australia – England for wool, they were competing with each other to reach maximum speed and arrive first, because the higher price was fixed by the first ship that reached the port. (see more)
The ships were famous for the harsh discipline on board and for the brutality of its officers: but the recruitment of the sailors was constant given the brevity of the engagement. The ships with the most terrible name were called “bloodboat” and its crew (mostly Irish sailors) “packet rats“.

“BLACK BALL” LINE

The Black Ball Line was the first shipping company to offer a transatlantic line service for the transport of passengers and goods. Born in 1817 from the idea of Jeremiah Thompson, with four clippers covering the route between Liverpool and New York, the Black Ball remained in business for about sixty years. The Black Ballers, were also postal and derived the name from their flag (the company logo) red forked with a black disk in the middle.

In addition to the red flag, the Black Ball were distinguished by a large black ball also designed on the bow sail

The Company was renowned for its scrupulous organization of departures that took place on the first of the month, with any weather; it had very fast ships and the journey from England to America, mostly against the wind, lasted generally “just” four weeks, while the return, with the wind in its favor, could last less than three weeks. The business was profitable despite the competition, in fact in 1851 the company James Baines & Co. of Liverpool adopted the same name and the same flag of the Black Ball Line! The Black Ball Line of James Baines & Co. also operated on the route between Liverpool and Australia.

Given the premises it could not therefore miss a sea shanty on the Black Ball line (probable origin 1845): the text versions are many, compared to few recordings on YouTube

W. Symons. – Patterson, J.E. “Sailors’ Work Songs.” Good Words 41(28) (June 1900) Public Domain

 “Hurrah For the Black Ball Line”

Peter Kasin  with  introduction and demonstration of the type of work combined with the singing
 Ewan MacColl – The Blackball Line 0:01 (Rare UK 8″ EP record released on Topic Records in 1957)

I served my time in the Black Ball line
To me way-aye-aye, hurray-ah
with the Black ball line I served me time
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you (1)
(For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour could clip
You will surely find a rich gold mine(2)
Just take a trip in the Black Ball Line)
Just take a trip to Liverpool (3)
To Liverpool, that Yankee school
The Yankee sailors (4) you’ll see there
With red-top boots (5) and short-cut hair
(At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
To Poll and Bet and lovely Sue
And now we’re bound for New York Town
It’s there we’ll drink, and sorrow drown)

NOTES
1) even if it seems an advertising spot, the reality for the crews boarded on the Black Ballers was harder: the first officer was usually ruthless and violent to maintain discipline and keep the speed standard of the crossing high
2) this verse refers, at the time of the gold fever that broke out in California in 1848
3) between the beginning and the mid-nineteenth century the majority of British immigrants boarded from the port of Liverpool
4) even if the captain was American (the ships were equipped with the best captains money of the time could buy), the sailors were not only American but often English, Irish and Scandinavian
5) red was the dominant color of sailors uniform also in the cuffed boots

Foc’sle Singers & Paul Clayton (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings 1959) 


In the Black Ball line I served my time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
In the Black Ball line I had a good time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you
For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour(1) could clip(2)
Her yards were square(3), her gear all new,
She had a good and gallant crew
One day whilst sailing on the sea,
They saw a vessel on their lee,
They knew it was a pirate craft,
All armed with guns before and aft,
They did not fear as you may think
But made the pirates water drink

NOTES
(text from here, see also an extended version here)
1)1 knot is worth 1 mile / h, so 14 knots means 14 miles per hour
2) To clip it = to run with speed
3)  “in seamens language, the yards are square, when they are arranged at right angles with the mast or the keel. The yards and sails are said also to be square, when they are of greater extent than usual. “

Roger Watson from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor (Vol 1)

Tozer calls this shanty an anchor song, Whall gives it for windlass, Colcord for halyard. Hugill says that he disagrees with the collectors who attribute shanties to specific jobs. Short, who gave it to Sharp as a capstan shanty, gave only one verse (“In Tapscott’s Line…”) and the words Sharp published are, frankly, unbelievable (e.g. “It was there we discharged our cargo boys” and “The Skipper said, that will do, my boys”). Both Colcord and Hugill also comment on Sharp’s published words. We have utilised fairly standard Blackball Line verses, slightly bent towards Short’s Tapscott Line theme. There is a degree of cynicism in this text—Tapscott was a con-man: he advertised his ships as being over 1000 tons when, in reality, they were 600 tons at the most!” (from here)


In Tapscott (1) line we’re bound to shine
A way, Hooray, Yah
In Tapscott line we are bound
to shine
Hooray for the Black Ball Line.
In the Black Ball line I served my time
in the Black Ball I wasted me prime.
Just you’ll take a trip to Liverpool
To Liverpool, a Yankee school.
Oh the Yankee sailors you’ll see there
With red-top boots and short-cut hair.
Fifteen days is a Black Ball ride(2)
but Tapscott ship are a thousand
ton.
At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
for Tapscott ship and golden crew.
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine

NOTES
1) William and James Tapscott were brothers who organized the trip for immigrants from Britain to America (the first based in Liverpool and the second in New York) often taking advantage of the ingenuity of their clients. Initially they worked for the Black Ball Line and then set up their own transport line that provided a very cheap trip to the Americas, so the conditions of the trip were terrible and the food poor. In 1849 William Tapscott went bankrupt and was tried and convicted of fraud against the company’s shareholders.  see more
2) legendary racing competitions were hired between the American and British companies: under the motto “play or pay” two ships left New York on February 2, 1839, it was the first challenge between the Black baller Columbus, 597 tons, Captain De Peyster and the Sheridan of the Dramatic Line 895 tons; Columbus won the race in 16 days, while Sheridan arrived in Liverpool two days later
“England, frankly confessing herself beaten and unable to compete with such ships as these, changed her attitude from hostility to open admiration. She surrendered the Atlantic packet trade to American enterprise, and British merchantmen sought their gains in other waters. The Navigation Laws still protected their commerce in the Far East and they were content to jog at a more sedate gait than these weltering packets whose skippers were striving for passages of a fortnight, with the forecastle doors nailed fast and the crew compelled to stay on deck from Sandy Hook to Fastnet Rock.” ~ Old Merchant Marine, Ch VIII. “The Packet Ships of the Roaring Forties”

LINK
https://hubpages.com/education/Legends-of-the-Blackball-Line
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/12/74-hooraw-for-blackball-line.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LxA489.html http://warrenfahey.com/fc_maritime8c.html http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Black%20Ball%20Line.html http://www.oceannavigator.com/October-2011/Nov-Dec-2011-Issue-198-Hurrah-for-the-Black-Ball-Line/ http://www.contemplator.com/sea/blkball.html http://anitra.net/chanteys/blackball.html
http://warrenfahey.com/ccarey-s13.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/songs-and-shanties/american-folk-celtic/music/album/smithsonian
http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/smithsonian_folkways/SFW40053.pdf
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=61

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO

Una grande varietà di testi per questo sea shanty classificato come pulling chanty che era perciò eseguito dallo shantyman nella manovra per issare le vele.
“A Long Time Ago is one of the shanties with the greatest number of variations. Old sailors can remember such different versions as There were two Ships in Callao Bay, Noah built this Wonderful Ark and A Hundred Years is a Very Long Time, but they were all the same song originally.” (tratto da qui)

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO

Tra queste si esamina la versione “A hundred years ago“, ancora controversa la sua origine, era molto popolare sui clipper che facevano la spola New York – San Francisco via Capo Horn.

ames Buttersworth Clipper Ship at Cape Horn
James Buttersworth “Clipper Ship at Cape Horn” 1850-90

 VERSIONE CLIPPER

Scrive A.L. Lloyd nelle note all’album Blow Boys Blow registrato con Ewan MacColl nel 1967: “English and American folklorists fail to agree whether this shanty was first made under the Stars and Stripes or the Red Ensign. It has close associations with the Baltimore clippers, yet John Masefield heard it on British ships in his seafaring days, and the singer who gave it to Cecil Sharp knew it as an English sailors’ song. It may be a seaman’s remake of the mid-nineteenth century minstrel song called A Long Time Ago. Whatever it is, it made a good nostalgic-sounding shanty for the long pulls on the halyard.” (tratto da qui)
I clipper (i primi modelli provengono da Baltimora e risalgono al 1812) per andare sempre più veloce avevano una superficie velica di molto superiore ai vascelli precedenti e quindi il lavoro dei marinai era più impegnativo. Nella canzone lo shantyman impartisce l’ordine di issare le vele tirando la cima (drizza) per alzare il pennone ovvero l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge la rispettiva vela.

ASCOLTA A.L. Lloyd in Blow Boys Blow 1967


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore(1),
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
Oh, when I sailed across the sea,
My girl said she’d be true to me.
I promised her a golden ring,
She promised me that little thing.
Oh, up aloft this yard(2) must go,
For mister mate has told us so.
I thought I heard the old man say,
That we was homeward bound today(3).
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale(1)
oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
un centinaio d’anni fa
Quando navigavo per i mari, la mia ragazza diceva che mi sarebbe stata fedele, le promisi un anello d’oro
e lei mi promise quella cosina.
Oh su, questo pennone(2) deve andare perchè il primo  ci ha detto così. Credo di aver sentito il capitano dire che leveremo l’ancora diretti a casa oggi!

NOTE
1) la costa orientale dell’America
2) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela.
3) oppure “Just one more pull and then belay” (in italiano= Ancora un tiro e poi lasciate, ragazzi.) nell’album “The Black Ball Line” 1957

A Hundred Years on the Eastern Shore

ASCOLTA Jeff Warner in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor Vol 1 (su spotify)


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
A handred years have passed an’ gone,
a hundred years will come once more
Oh, Bully John from Baltimore,
Oh, Bully John on the Eastern Shore.
Oh, Bully John, I knew him well,
But now he’s dead and gone to hell.
A hundred years is a very long time
A hundred years will come again
A long time was a very long time
it’s a very long time I made this rhyme
I thought I heard the old man say,
Just one more pull and then belay.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale/oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale/ un centinaio d’anni fa
un centinaio d’anni sono andati e sepolti, un centinaio d’anni
Oh Bully John sulla Costa Orientale
Oh Bully John lo conoscevo bene
ma ora è morto e andato all’inferno.
Un centinaio d’anni è un tempo molto lungo, un centinaio d’anni ritorneranno ancora. Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei, ed è da tanto tempo che sto componendo questi versi.
Credo di aver sentito dire dal vecchio,
ancora un tiro e poi lasciate.

VERSIONE BALENIERE

L’altra versione è quella cantata sulle baleniere e si divide idealmente in tre parti: nella prima lo shantyman accenna alla fedeltà della fidanzata, nella parte centrale descrive i ruggenti venti di Capo Horn e le insidie di quel tratto di mare. Nella parte finale commemora la figura del marinaio Bully John di Baltimora.
ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl in “Whaler out of New Bedford, and other songs of the Whaling Era” 1962


A hundred years on the Eastern Shore(1),
Oh, yes, oh!
A hundred years on the Eastern Shore,
A hundred years ago
Oh, when I sailed across the sea,
My girl said she’d be true to me.
I promised her a golden ring,
She promised me that little thing.
I wish to God I’d never been born,
To go rambling round and round Cape Horn(4)
Around Cape Stiff(4) where the wild winds blow(5),
Around Cape Stiff through sleet and snow.
Around Cape Horn with frozen sails,
Around Cape Horn to fish for whales.
Oh, Bully John from Baltimore,
I knew him well on the Eastern Shore.
Oh, Bully John, I knew him well,
But now he’s dead and gone to hell.
Oh, Bully John was the boy for me,
A bucko on land and a bully(6) at sea.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
oh si, oh
Un centinaio d’anni sulla Costa Orientale
un centinaio d’anni fa
Quando navigavo in mare
la mia ragazza mi diceva che mi sarebbe stata fedele
le promisi un anello d’oro
e lei mi promise quella cosina
vorrei per Dio non essere mai nato,
piuttosto che andare su e giù per Capo Horn
a doppiare Capo Stiff(4) dove soffiano i venti forti,
a doppiare Capo Stiff con gelo e neve
per Capo Horn con le vele ghiacciate,
attorno a Capo Horn per pescare le balene,
Oh Bully John da Baltimora
lo conoscevo bene sulla costa orientale
Oh Bully John lo conoscevo bene,
ma ora è morto ed è andato all’inferno
Oh Bully John era il ragazzo per me
un macellaio a terra e un duro(6) per mare

NOTE
4) Capo Horn, detto dai marinai “Cape Stiff”, la nera scogliera all’estremità dell’America Meridionale dove si scontrano le masse d’acqua e d’aria dell’Atlantico e del Pacifico, provocando venti che vanno dai 160 ai 220 Km/h e una risalita verso Ovest quasi proibitiva. Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, per i forti venti, le grani onde e gli iceberg vaganti, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
 “Grandi Naufragi” impossibile stabilire il numero delle navi che sono andate perdute in queste estreme acque tra le onde alte anche 20 metri. Tempeste di neve, violenti uragani, nebbie e pericolosi iceberg alla deriva, fanno capire quanto sia stato difficile passare indenni per la via di Capo Horn. I pochi naufraghi dovevano affrontare oltre all’inospitalità di quelle terre anche l’avversità degli indigeni che aggredivano i superstiti per depredarli di alcool ed armi. (tratto da qui)
5) “Quaranta ruggenti” termine coniato dagli inglesi all’epoca dei grandi velieri con rotta per Cape Horn. Venti, considerati i più temibili al mondo, prendono slancio da migliaia di miglia nel Pacifico senza che il minimo ostacolo possa smorzare la forza, riuscendo nelle acque di Capo Horn addirittura ad esaltarsi con l’incontro di aria fredda proveniente dall’Antartide. “Ruggenti” dal sibilo intenso che il vento produce tra gli alberi, il sartiame e la velature delle imbarcazioni. (tratto da qui)
6) bully è un termine da marinai con molti significati: in senso positivo per dire che il marinaio è un tipo “very good”, o “first rate”, ma bully è anche l’attaccabrighe sempre pronto a fare a pugni. Anche il termine bucko era spesso utilizzato in modo gergale per indicare un primo ufficiale manesco e violento che trattava in modo brutale la ciurma.

Una variante con il titolo Around Cape Horn (vedi) estrapola la parte centrale del testo precedente  trasformandosi in un canto nostalgico.

ASCOLTA White Magic in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.


A long time was a very good time
Long time ago
A long was a very long time
Long time ago
Around Cape Horn(4) we got to go
Around Cape Horn to Calleao(7)
You give me the girl and you take me away(8)
A long long time in the hull below
Around Cape Horn with frozen sails
Around Cape Horn to fish for whales
I wish to God I’d never been born
A long long time in the hull below
Around Cape Horn where wild winds blow(5)
Around Cape Horn through sleet and snow
A long long time in the hull below
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei tempi, tanto tempo fa
Tanto tempo fa erano davvero bei tempi, tanto tempo fa

per Capo Horn dovevamo andare
a doppiare Capo Horn verso Callao(7),
mi dai la ragazza e mi porti via(8),
tanto tempo sotto nello scafo,
per Capo Horn con le vele ghiacciate,
attorno a Capo Horn per pescare le balene,
vorrei per Dio non essere mai nato,
tanto, tanto tempo sotto nello scafo,
per Capo Horn dove i venti di bufera soffiano,
a doppiare Capo Horn con neve e nevischio, tanto, tanto tempo sotto nello scafo

NOTE
7) Callao si trova vicino a Lima nel Perù, le navi commerciali che facevano scalo a Callao caricavano il prezioso guano per portarlo in Inghilterra. Alcuni traducono Call-e-a-o come California, che però dovrebbe essere scritto Califor-ni-o
8) ?!non capisco il significato della frase

continua “Noah’s Ark Shanty

FONTI
http://www.capehorn.it/400-anos/
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/facility/panama-canal-horn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ahundredyearsago.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/noahsarkshanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/hundred.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/noahsarkshanty.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/index.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/mystic.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/holdstock.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10638
https://musescore.com/sangerforum/scores/2232266
http://memory.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.award.rpbaasm.0463/default.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cc2gQAi1OKY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBMBW_G_uJE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK_Sj8GbLa8
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LongTimeAgo/shay.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/100years.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/aroundca.html

ELIZA LEE

Questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) detta anche “Clear the track”, “Let the Bulgine Run”, oppure” Margaret (Margot) Evans” era secondo Stan Hugill una capstan shanty. Secondo John Short si tratta di una variante della canzone tradizionale irlandese “Shule Agra”: così argomenta Johana Colcord The probability is that some Irish sailor, ashore on liberty in Mobile, sang “Shule Agra” in a water-front saloon. It pleased the ear of the negroes hanging about outside; and the next day they sang what they could remember while screwing home the great bales of cotton in some Liverpool ship’s hold. Negro fashion, they put in the rattling sucession of 16th notes, and added “bulgine” for good measure. The crew of the ship heard and liked it, perhaps without recognizing its origin; and took it back with them to Liverpool. There the crew of the Margaret Evans, a well known American packet-ship, lying in the Clarence or the Waterloo Dock, picked it up and fitted in the name of their ship, and took it back to New York, with Liza Lee and the bulgine still in close conjunction with the low-backed car, to the puzzlement of future folk-lorists!” (Colcord, Johana C. 1924. Roll and Go)

Secondo Wikipedia la Margaret Evans era un postale che faceva la spola tra Londra e New York, è stata varata nel 1846 e ha continuato i suoi viaggi fino al 1860. “She was 899 tons, built 1846 in New York by Westervelt & MacKay and owned by E.E. Morgan. She continued sailing into the 1860s.”

clipper-coulter

I CLIPPER

Navi dallo scafo basso e affusolato, un dispiegamento di superficie velica imponente, i clipper sfrecciavano sui mari a velocità mai viste prima (un Clipper poteva raggiungere la velocità di 9 nodi (16 km/h), con punte di 20 nodi (37 km/h), mentre la velocità massima delle altre navi era di 5 nodi (9 km/h) scarsi).
I primi vascelli di questo tipo ad essere varati sono stati i piccoli Clipper di Baltimora che vennero realizzati negli USA durante la guerra del 1812. Inizialmente la principale rotta sulla quale furono utilizzati i Clipper fu la New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, che restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia. Grazie ad essi questa linea era in servizio continuo, dato che per le navi precedenti risultava troppo pericoloso il passaggio continuo per Capo Horn. L’epoca d’oro dei Clipper durò dal 1840 al 1870 circa. Nel 1852 i cantiere americani vararono ben 61 Clipper, nel 1853, invece, furono 125. In questo periodo, i Clipper furono le navi preferite per il trasporto di carichi poco ingombranti e molto redditizi come le spezie, la seta, la lana o il tè. Con queste cifre in gioco si sviluppò una feroce competizione, molto popolare e seguita da tutti i giornali inglesi dell’epoca, tra i diversi equipaggi e le diverse compagnie di navigazione che diede origine a quella che venne chiamata la Great Tea Race. Questa competizione avveniva sulla rotta di 15.000 miglia (27.780 km) tra Shanghai e la Gran Bretagna. Veniva vinta dalla prima nave che giungeva in porto in Inghilterra. Inizialmente il record era di 113 giorni di traversata che successivamente, nel 1866, venne portato a 90. Una grande gara, che durò per vari anni, coinvolse in particolare due Clipper: il Thermopylae e il Cutty Sark. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Alan Mills in Songs of the Sea 1957


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Cross Line(3).
So clear the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
Tibby Hey rig a jig in a jaunting car(5).
(Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
With Lizer Lee(6) all on my knee.
So clear the track, let the Bullgine run.)
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Cross Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
Oh the gels are walking on the pier
And I’ll  soon be home to you, my dear.
Oh when I come home across the sea,
It’s Lizer you will marry me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(e via hai quasi finito)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Cross Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4), hey Tommy fatti un giro sul calesse(5), e via hai quasi finito
con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore

La Margaret Evan della compagnia “Blu Cross”
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
Oh le ragazze stanno camminando sul molo e presto sarò a casa da te, tesoro, oh quando ritornerò a casa dal mare è Liza che mi sposerà!

NOTE
1) Agli inizi Ottocento si richiedono sempre più navi veloci e non più “armate” come nel secolo precedente (epoca di galeoni, vascelli e fregate): si richiedono navi per il trasporto delle merci, senza tanti fronzoli e con più vele, nasce così il “Clipper”. Sono gli ultimi modelli delle navi a vela, l’apogeo dell’età della vela poi a breve subentreranno i motori..
2) In altre versioni è la Rosalind della Black Ball line
3) Più che il nome di una compagnia navale (riportato variamente come Blue Cross Line, Blue Star line o una ancora più improbabile blue sky line) ci si riferisce alla bandiera con una stella o una croce blu al centro.Throughout the various changes of management the Black Ball liners carried a crimson swallowtail flag with a black ball in the centre; the Dramatic liners, blue above white with a white L in blue and a black L in white for the Liverpool ships, and a red swallowtail with white ball and black L in the centre for the New Orleans ships; the Union Line to Havre, a white field with black U in the centre; John Griswold’s London Line, red swallowtail with black X in centre; the Swallowtail Line, red before white, swallowtail for the London ships, and blue before white, swallowtail for the Liverpool ships; Robert Kermit’s Liverpool Line, blue swallowtail with red star in the centre; Spofford & Tillotson’s Liverpool Line, yellow field, blue cross with white S. T. in the centre. These flags disappeared from the sea many years ago. (tratto da qui). Ci fu una Blue star line, una compagnia navale inglese ma venne fondata solo nel 1911.
4) bullgine (bulgine) è un termine slang per engine, ma anche il termine degli afro-americani per dire locomotiva (La John Bull fu una locomotiva americana che iniziò la sua corsa nel 1831 circa) Si tratta ovviamente di una gara tra il clipper e il trasporto via treno: la rotta  New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia.
5) anche “Timme Hey, Rig-a-jig, and a jaunting run!” E’ scritto anche low-backed (back) car(cart) ovvero il caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote: letteralmente “balla una giga sul calesse” ma il doppio senso è implicito
6) è il nome della ragazza a dare più spesso il titolo alla canzone

ASCOLTA Johnny Collins in Shanties & Songs of the Sea 1998 il testo apporta delle piccole variazioni alla versione precedente e aggiunge ulteriori strofe.


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Star Line(3).
Clear away the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
To my aye rig a jig in a junting car(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, clear away the track and let the bulgine run.
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Star Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
And when we’re outward bound in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
When we’ve stowed our freight at the West Street Pier
We’ll ahead get back to Liverpool pier,
Oh I thought I heard the old man say
“We’ll keep the brig three points away.”
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(Ho eh, ho ah, hai finito?)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Star Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4),
fatti un giro sul calesse(5) con me,
e via hai quasi finito?
Con ELiza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)

La Margaret Evan della Blu Star
Line
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
E quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in cerchio con quelle vivaci ragazze
e quando avremo stivato il nostro carico al Molo di West Street
andremo dritti verso il molo di Liverpool.
Mi è sembrato di sentire dire dal capitano “Terremo il brigantino a tre punti di distanza”
E quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

ASCOLTA The Dreadnoughts in Victory Square 2009 (un rimake della versione di Johnny Collins con dei mix testuali tra le due versioni precedenti)


The smartest clipper you can find is,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Shes’s the Margaret Evans on a Blue Star line(3)!
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run(4).
To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh, we’re outward bound for the West creek pier
We’ll go ashore at Liverpool pier,
And when we’re over in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
Oh the Margaret Tenans on the blue star line(3),
Shes never a day behind the time,
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper più tosto che tu possa trovare è, Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
E’ la Margaret Evan della Blu Star Line(3)
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)
Con me balla una giga sul calesse (5)
Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
Con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore.

Oh, dobbiamo partire dal Molo di West Creek
e sbarcheremo sul Molo di Liverpool
e quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in tondo con quelle vivaci ragazze
Oh la Margaret Tenans della Blue Star Line(3)
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo
e quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool
mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

NOTE
5) scritto impropriamente gun per fare rima con run. Si tratta in realtà  del caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: The Bull John Run

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


I wish I was a fancy man
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
I wish I was a fancy man
So clear the track,
let the Bullgine run.

As I walked out one morning fair
I met Miss Liza I declare
The day was fine and the wind was free
with Lize Lee all on my knee.
I said “My dear when you’ll be mine,
I’ll dress you up in silk so fine”
I wish I was in London Town
it was there I saw the gals all around
The london judies hung around
and then my Lize will be fine
You’ll ever be in New York, New York
is there you’ll see those girls fly around
and Marigold I love so dear
with there .. away some golden air (*)
I’ll take another girl on my knee
and leave behind my Lize Lee
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car
I wish I was a shantyman
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car

* non riesco a capire la pronuncia dele parole

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Ho eh, ah ah hai quasi finito?
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Così, sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore
.
Mentre ero a passeggio in un bel mattino incontrai Miss Liza, dico.
Il giorno era bello e non c’era vento
con Lize Lee sulle mie ginocchia.
dissi “Mio caro quando sarai mia
ti vestirò con seta tanto bella”.
Vorrei essere a Londra, era lì che ho visto le ragazze tutt’intorno.
Le ragazze londinesi erano in giro
così la mia Lize andrà bene.
Se sarai a New York, New York
è lì vedrai quelle ragazze volare in giro
e Marigold amo così tanto
???
Prenderò un’altra ragazza sulle mie ginocchia
e lascerò da parte la mia Lize Lee
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse
Vorrei essere uno shantyman
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse

FONTI
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Clear_the_track_let_the_Bullgine_run
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/898.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Song_about_the_Margaret_Evans
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/elizalee.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1208
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8629
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3864
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8578
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/letthebulginerun.html

Hurrah For the Black Ball Line!

Read the post in English

Agli inizi Ottocento le esigenze commerciali richiedono navi sempre più veloci e meno “armate” rispetto al secolo precedente (epoca d’imponenti e massicci galeoni, vascelli e fregate): navi per il trasporto delle merci, senza tanti fronzoli e con più vele, nasce così il Clipper. Sono gli ultimi modelli delle navi a vela, l’apogeo dell’età della vela, poi a breve subentreranno i motori.. e il repertorio delle sea shanties finirà tra le curiosità degli antiquari (o nei circuiti della musica Folk).

I CLIPPER

I clipper percorrevano le due rotte commerciali più importanti : Cina – Inghilterra per il tè e Australia – Inghilterra per la lana facendo a gara tra loro per raggiungere la massima velocità e arrivare per primi, perchè il prezzo maggiore veniva fissato proprio dalla prima nave che raggiungeva il porto. (continua)
Le navi erano famose per la dura disciplina a bordo e per la brutalità dei suoi ufficiali: ma l’arruolamento dei marinai era costante data la brevità dell’ingaggio. Le navi con la nomea più terribile erano chiamate “bloodboat” e la sua ciurma (per lo più marinai irlandesi)  “packet rats“.

“BLACK BALL” LINE

La Black Ball Line fu la prima compagnia di navigazione marittima a offrire servizio transatlantico di linea per il trasporto di passeggeri e merci. Nata nel 1817 dall’idea di Jeremiah Thompson, con quattro clipper copriva la rotta tra Liverpool e New York e rimase in attività per una sessantina d’anni. I Black Ballers, erano anche postali e derivavano il nome dalla loro bandiera (il logo della compagnia) rossa biforcuta con un disco nero al centro.

Oltre che sulla bandiera rossa  le Black Ball si distinguevano per una grande palla nera disegnata anche sulla vela di prua

La Compagnia era rinomata per la sua scrupolosa organizzazione delle partenze che avvenivano il primo del mese, con qualunque tempo atmosferico;  aveva navi molto veloci e il percorso dall’Inghilterra all’America, per lo più contro vento, durava “appena” quattro settimane, mentre il ritorno, con il vento a favore, poteva durare meno di tre settimane. Gli affari erano lucrosi nonostante la concorrenza, infatti nel 1851 la compagnia James Baines & Co. di Liverpool adottò lo stesso nome e la stessa bandiera della Black Ball Line! La Black Ball Line di James Baines & Co. operava inoltre sulla rotta tra Liverpool e l’Australia.

Date le premesse non poteva perciò mancare una sea shanty sulla Black Ball line (probabile origine 1845): le versioni testuali sono molte, a fronte di una scarsa reperibilità di registrazioni  su YouTube

W. Symons. – Patterson, J.E. “Sailors’ Work Songs.” Good Words 41(28) (June 1900) Public Domain

 “Hurrah For the Black Ball Line”

Peter Kasin  con tanto di introduzione e dimostrazione del tipo di lavoro abbinato al canto
 Ewan MacColl – The Blackball Line 0:01 (Rare UK 8″ EP record released on Topic Records in 1957)


I served my time in the Black Ball line
To me way-aye-aye, hurray-ah
with the Black ball line I served me time
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you (1)
(For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour could clip
You will surely find a rich gold mine(2)
Just take a trip in the Black Ball Line)
Just take a trip to Liverpool (3)
To Liverpool, that Yankee school
The Yankee sailors (4) you’ll see there
With red-top boots (5) and short-cut hair
(At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
To Poll and Bet and lovely Sue
And now we’re bound for New York Town
It’s there we’ll drink, and sorrow drown)
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio primo imbarco fu nella Black Ball line/ Per me hurrà
con la Black Ball line ho avuto il primo imbarco
Hurrà per la Black Ball line
Le navi della Black Ball sono le migliori, sono le navi per me e per te.
Una volta c’era una nave Black Ball
che poteva percorrere 14 nodi all’ora;
Troverai certamente una ricca miniera d’oro, basta fare il viaggio sulla Black Ball line. Basta prendere un viaggio a Liverpool, da quella scuola yankee
e i marinai yankee là conoscerai,
con stivali bordati di rosso e i capelli corti.
Al molo di Liverpool diciamo addio
a Poll e Bet e alla bella Sue
e ora siamo imbarcati per New York
là berremo e annegheremo il dolore!

NOTE
1) anche se sembra uno spot pubblicitario, la realtà per gli equipaggi imbarcati sui Black Ballers era più dura: il primo ufficiale era di solito spietato e violento per mantenere la disciplina e tenere elevato lo standard di velocità della traversata
2) il riferimento colloca, per lo meno questo verso, all’epoca della febbre dell’oro scoppiata in California nel 1848
3) era dal porto di Liverpool che tra l’inizio e la metà dell’Ottocento si imbarcavano la maggior parte degli immigrati britannici
4) anche se il capitano della nave era americano (la compagnia ingaggiava i migliori che si trovassero sulla piazza), i marinai erano per non solo americani ma spesso inglesi, irlandesi e scandinavi
5) il rosso era il colore dominante della divisa dei marinai anche nel risvolto degli stivali

Foc’sle Singers & Paul Clayton (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings 1959) 


In the Black Ball line I served my time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
In the Black Ball line I had a good time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you
For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour(1) could clip(2)
Her yards were square(3), her gear all new,
She had a good and gallant crew
One day whilst sailing on the sea,
They saw a vessel on their lee,
They knew it was a pirate craft,
All armed with guns before and aft,
They did not fear as you may think
But made the pirates water drink
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Nella Black Ball line ho prestato servizio/ Hurrà per la Black Ball line
Nella Black Ball me la sono passata bene/ Hurrà per la Black Ball line
Le navi della Black Ball sono le migliori,
sono le navi per me e per te.
Una volta c’era una nave Black Ball
che poteva filare a 14 nodi;
i suoi pennoni erano larghi,
la sua attrezzatura tutta nuova,
aveva una bravo e valoroso equipaggio.
Un giorno che navigavamo in mare
avvistammo un vascello sottovento.
Sapevamo che era una imbarcazione pirata, tutt’armata con cannoni a poppa e a prua,
non avemmo paura come si può pensare, ma facemmo bere l’acqua ai pirati

NOTE
(testo tratto da qui, una versione più estesa qui)
1)  fourteen knots an hour, letteralmente “14 nodi all’ora” 1 nodo vale 1 miglio/h, pertanto 14 nodi significa  14 miglia all’ora
2) To clip it = to run with speed
3) ringrazio Italo Ottonello per la traduzione di “square” che non mi riusciva di collocare nel contesto, egli cita la seguente definizione: “in seamens language, the yards are square, when they are arranged at right angles with the mast or the keel.The yards and sails are said also to be square, when they are of greater extent than usual. “

Roger Watson in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor (Vol 1)

Nelle note si riporta “Tozer chiama questa sea shanty una canzone all’ancora, Whall la classifica per il verricello, Colcord per le velature. Hugill dice di non essere d’accordo con i collezionisti che attribuiscono le sea shanty a lavori specifici. Short che la consegna a Sharp come una capstan shanty, ha dato solo un verso (“In Tapscott’s Line …”) e le parole che Sharp pubblica sono, francamente, poco credibili (es. ” “It was there we discharged our cargo boys” and “The Skipper said, that will do, my boys”). Sia Colcord che Hugill commentano anche le parole pubblicate da Sharp. Abbiamo utilizzato i versi della Blackball più standard, con il riferimento di Short alla Tapscott Line. C’è un certo cinismo in questo testo: Tapscott era un truffatore: pubblicizzava le sue navi come se fossero di oltre 1000 tonnellate quando, in realtà, erano al massimo 600 tonnellate!” (tratto da qui)


In Tapscott (1) line we’re bound to shine
A way, Hooray, Yah
In Tapscott line we are bound
to shine
Hooray for the Black Ball Line.
In the Black Ball line I served my time
in the Black Ball I wasted me prime.
Just you’ll take a trip to Liverpool
To Liverpool, a Yankee school.
Oh the Yankee sailors you’ll see there
With red-top boots and short-cut hair.
Fifteen days is a Black Ball ride(2)
but Tapscott ship are a thousand
ton.
At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
for Tapscott ship and golden crew.
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Nella compagnia di Tapscott siamo destinati a emergere
A way,  Hurrà, Yah
Nella compagnia di Tapscott siamo destinati a emergere
Hurrà per la Black Ball line
Nella Black Ball line ho prestato servizio e ho sprecato la mia gioventù.
Farai solo un viaggio a Liverpool
a Liverpool, una scuola yankee
Oh i marinai americani vedrai con stivali bordati di rosso e i capelli corti.
15 giorni è una tragitto alla Black Ball
ma la nave di Tapscott è di mille tonnellate
Al molo di Liverpool diciamo addio
alla nave di Tapscott e alla ciurma d’oro.
Nella compagnia di Tapscott siamo destinati a emergere

NOTES
1) I fratelli William e James Tapscott (il primo con sede a Liverpool e il secondo a New York) organizzavano il viaggio per gli emigranti dalla Gran Bretagna all’America, spesso approfittando dell’ingenuità dei loro clienti. Inizialmente lavoravano per la Black Ball Line poi misero su una loro linea di trasporto che procurava un viaggio per le Americhe molto economico, perciò le condizioni del viaggio erano tremende e il cibo scadente. Nel 1849 William Tapscott ha fatto bancarotta ed è stato processato e condannato per frode verso gli azionisti della compagnia. continua
2) leggendarie furono le gare di corsa ingaggiate tra le compagnie americane e quelle inglesi: con il  motto  “play or pay”  due navi lasciarono New York il 2 febbraio 1839, era la prima sfida tra laBlack baller Columbus, 597 tonnellate, Capitano De Peyster e la Sheridan della Dramatic Line 895 tonnellate, la Columbus vinse la gara in 16 giorni, mentre la Sheridan arrivò a Liverpool due giorni dopo
“L’Inghilterra onestamente, si dichiarò  sconfitta e incapace di competere con navi del genere, cambiò il suo atteggiamento dall’ostilità all’aperta ammirazione. Ha ceduto il commercio dei postali atlantici alle imprese americane, e i mercanti inglesi hanno cercato i loro guadagni in altre acque. Le leggi sulla navigazione proteggevano ancora il loro commercio in Estremo Oriente e si accontentavano di un’andatura più tranquilla rispetto a questi postali terrificanti i cui comandanti si sforzavano per ottenere traversate di due settimane, con i portelli di prua inchiodate  e l’equipaggio costretto a rimanere sul ponte da Sandy Hook fino a Fastnet Rock..” ~ Old Merchant Marine, Ch VIII. “The Packet Ships of the Roaring Forties”

FONTI
https://hubpages.com/education/Legends-of-the-Blackball-Line
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/12/74-hooraw-for-blackball-line.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LxA489.html http://warrenfahey.com/fc_maritime8c.html http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Black%20Ball%20Line.html http://www.oceannavigator.com/October-2011/Nov-Dec-2011-Issue-198-Hurrah-for-the-Black-Ball-Line/ http://www.contemplator.com/sea/blkball.html http://anitra.net/chanteys/blackball.html
http://warrenfahey.com/ccarey-s13.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/songs-and-shanties/american-folk-celtic/music/album/smithsonian
http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/smithsonian_folkways/SFW40053.pdf
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=61