Archivi tag: Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem

To Hear the Nightingale Sing One Morning in May

Leggi in Italiano

”The Bold Grenader”, “A bold brave bonair” or “The Soldier and the Lady” but also “To Hear the Nightingale Sing”, “The Nightingale Sings” and “One Morning in May” are different titles of a same traditional song collected in England, Ireland, America and Canada.

THE PLOT

The story belongs to some stereotypical love adventures in which a soldier (or a nobleman, sometimes a sailor) for his attractiveness and gallantry, manages to obtain the virtue of a young girl. The girls are always naive peasant women or shepherdesses who believe in the sweet words of love sighed by man, and they expect to marry him after sex, but they are inevitably abandoned.

NURSERY RHYME: WHERE ARE YOU GOING MY PRETTY MAID

soldierIn the nursery rhyme above “Where are you going my pretty maid” this seductive situation is sweetly reproduced and the illustrator portrays the man in the role of the soldier. Walter Craine (in “A Baby’s Opera”, 1877) represents him as a dapper gentleman, but in reality he is the archetype of the predator , the wolf with the fur inside and the woman of the nursery rhyme with his blow-answer seems to be a good girl who has treasured the maternal teachings

In other versions is the girl (bad girl !!) to take the initiative and to bring the young soldier in her house (see more), only the season is always the same because it is in the spring that blood boils in the veins; as early as 1600 there was a ballad called “The Nightingale’s Song: The Soldier’s Rare Musick, and Maid’s Recreation”, so for a song that has been around for so long, we can expect a great deal of textual versions and different melodies. An accurate overview of texts and melodic variations starting from 1689 here

FOLK REVIVAL: “They kissed so sweet & comforting”

This is the version almost at the same time diffused by the Dubliners and the Clancy Brothers, the most popular version in the 60’s Folk clubs.

The Dubliners

Clancy Brothers & Tommy Maker, from Live in Ireland, 1965
The Nightingale


I
As I went a walking one morning in May
I met a young couple so far did we stray
And one was a young maid so sweet and so fair
And the other was a soldier and a brave Grenadier(1)
CHORUS
And they kissed so sweet and comforting
As they clung to each other
They went arm in arm along the road
Like sister and brother
They went arm in arm along the road
Til they came to a stream
And they both sat down together, love
To hear the nightingale sing(2)
II
Out of his knapsack he took a fine fiddle(3)
He played her such merry tunes that you ever did hear
He played her such merry tunes that the valley did ring
And softly cried the fair maid as the nightingale sings
III
Oh, I’m off to India for seven long years
Drinking wines and strong whiskies instead of strong beer
And if ever I return again ‘twill be in the spring
And we’ll both sit down together love to hear the nightingale sing
IV
“Well then”, says the fair maid, “will you marry me?”
“Oh no”, says the soldier, “however can that be?”
For I’ve my own wife at home in my own country
And she is the finest little maid that you ever did see

NOTES
1) soldier becomes sometimes a volunteer, but the grenadier is a soldier particularly gifted for his prestige and courage, the strongest and tallest man of the average, distinguished by a showy uniform, with the characteristic miter headgear, which in America was replaced by a bear fur hat.
2) it is the code phrase that distinguishes this style of courting songs. The nightingale is the bird that sings only at night and in the popular tradition it is the symbol of lovers and their love conventions (vedi)
3) perhaps the instrument was initially a flute but more often it was a small violin or portable violin called the kit violiner (pocket fiddle): it was the popular instrument par excellence in the Renaissance. It is curious to note how in this type of gallant encounters the soldier has been replaced by the itinerant violinist, mostly a dance teacher, so it is explained how any reference to the violin, to its bow or strings could have some sexual connotations in the folk tradition

SECOND MELODY: APPALCHIAN TUNE

John Jacob Niles – One Morning In May

Jo Stafford The Nightingale

THIRD MELODY: THE MOST ANCIENT VERSION, THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY

The melody spread in Dorsetshire, so vibrant and passionate but with a hint of melancholy, a version more suited to the Romeo and Juliet’s love night and to the nightingale chant in its version of medieval aubade, also closer to the nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” of which takes up the call and response structure.

To savor its ancient charm, here is a series of instrumental arrangements

Harp

Guitar

Le Trésor d’Orphée
Redwood Falls (Madeleine Cooke, Phil Jones & Edd Mann)

Isla Cameron The Bold Grenadier from “Far from The Madding Crowd”


I
As I was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a makin’ of hay.
O one was a fair maid and her beauty showed clear
and the other was a soldier, a bold grenadier.
II
Good morning, good morning, good morning said he
O where are you going my pretty lady?
I’m a going a walking by the clear crystal stream
to see cool water glide and hear nightingales sing.
III
O soldier, o soldier, will you marry me?
O no, my sweet lady that never can be.
For I’ve got a wife at home in my own country,
Two wives and the army’s too many for me.

LINK
http://jopiepopie.blogspot.it/2018/02/nightingales-song-1690s-bold-grenadier.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folksongs-appalachian-2/folk-songs-appalacian-2%20-%200138.htm
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/105092
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LP14.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/onemorninginmay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3646
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29541
http://www.military-history.org/soldier-profiles/british-grenadiers-soldier-profile.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/sing.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/america/nighting.html
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1506

Il canto dell’Usignolo: attente al Lupo!

Read the post in English

”The Bold Grenader”, “A bold brave bonair” o “The Soldier and the Lady” ma anche “To Hear the Nightingale Sing”, “The Nightingale Sings” e “One Morning in May” sono i vari titoli di una stessa canzone tradizionale diffusa in Inghilterra, Irlanda, America e Canada.

LA TRAMA

La storia appartiene al filone delle avventure amorose abbastanza stereotipate in cui un soldato (o un nobiluomo, talvolta un marinaio) per la sua avvenenza e galanteria, riesce a ottenere la virtù di una giovane ragazza. Le ragazze sono sempre delle ingenue contadinotte o pastorelle che credono alle dolci parole d’amore sospirate dall’uomo, e si aspettano che lui le sposi dopo aver consumato, ma sono immancabilmente abbandonate.

LA NURSERY RHYME: WHERE ARE YOU GOING MY PRETTY MAID

soldierNella nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” si riproduce in modo edulcorato proprio questa situazione seduttiva e l’illustratore ritrae l’uomo nei panni del soldato, Walter Craine (in “A Baby’s Opera”, 1877) lo rappresenta come un azzimato gentiluomo, ma in realtà è l’archetipo del predatore, il lupo con il pelo all’interno e la donna della filastrocca con il suo botta-risposta sembra essere una brava ragazza che ha fatto tesoro degli insegnamenti materni..

In altre versioni è la ragazza (bad girl!!) a prendere l’iniziativa e a portare nottetempo il giovane soldato nientedimeno che in casa propria (vedi), solo la stagione è sempre la stessa perchè è in primavera che il sangue ribolle nelle vene; già nel 1600 circolava una ballata dal titolo  “The nightingale’s song: or The soldier’s rare musick, and maid’s recreation“, così per una canzone in giro da così tanto tempo non possiamo aspettarci che una grande quantità di versioni testuali, nonchè l’abbinamento con diverse melodie. Un’accurata panoramica di testi e varianti melodiche a partire dal 1689 qui

LA MELODIA DEL FOLK REVIVAL: “They kissed so sweet & comforting”

E’ la versione diffusa quasi in contemporanea dai  Dubliners e dai Clancy Brothers ed è quella più popolare che andava per la maggiore nei Folk club degli anni 60

The Dubliners

Clancy Brothers & Tommy Maker, Live in Ireland, 1965 titolo The Nightingale


I
As I went a walking one morning in May
I met a young couple so far did we stray
And one was a young maid so sweet and so fair
And the other was a soldier and a brave Grenadier(1)
CHORUS
And they kissed so sweet and comforting
As they clung to each other
They went arm in arm along the road
Like sister and brother
They went arm in arm along the road
Til they came to a stream
And they both sat down together, love
To hear the nightingale sing(2)
II
Out of his knapsack he took a fine fiddle(3)
He played her such merry tunes that you ever did hear
He played her such merry tunes that the valley did ring
And softly cried the fair maid as the nightingale sings
III
Oh, I’m off to India for seven long years
Drinking wines and strong whiskies instead of strong beer
And if ever I return again ‘twill be in the spring
And we’ll both sit down together love to hear the nightingale sing
IV
“Well then”, says the fair maid, “will you marry me?”
“Oh no”, says the soldier, “however can that be?”
For I’ve my own wife at home in my own country
And she is the finest little maid that you ever did see
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre ero a passeggio in un mattino di Maggio
incontrai una giovane coppia, così tanto ci allontanammo,
una era una giovane fanciulla tanto amabile e bella
e l’altro era un soldato e un prode granatiere(1)
RITORNELLO
E si baciavano con amorevole trasporto
attaccati uno all’altra
andavano a braccetto per la strada
come sorella e fratello
andavano a braccetto per la strada
finchè arrivarono ad un ruscello
ed entrambi si sedettero insieme, amore
ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare (2)
II
Fuori dalla sua sacca egli prese un bel violino(3)
le suonò delle melodie allegre che non se se sono mai sentite
le suonò delle melodie allegre che per la vallata risuonavano
e piano gridò la bella fanciulla mentre l’usignolo cantava
III
“Starò fuori in India per sette lunghi anni, a bere vino e forte whisky invece che birra scura
e se mai ritornerò di nuovo sarà in primavera
ed entrambi ci siederemo insieme, amore, ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare.”
IV
“Bene allora – dice la bella fanciulla – mi vuoi sposare?”
“Oh no – dice il soldato –
come potrei?
Perchè tengo moglie a casa nel mio paese
e lei è la più bella fanciulla che si sia mai vista”

NOTE
1) il più generico soldier diventa un volunteer, ma il granatiere è un soldato particolarmente dotato per la sua prestanza e il coraggio, l’uomo più forte e più alto della media, contraddistinto da una vistosa uniforme, con il caratteristico copricapo a mitria, che in America venne sostituito da un colbacco in pelo di orso.
2) è la frase in codice che contraddistingue questo filone di courting songs. L’usignolo è l’uccello che canta solo di notte e nella tradizione popolare è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, (vedi)
3) forse lo strumento inizialmente era un flauto ma più spesso si trattava di un piccolo violino o violino portatile detto il kit violiner (pocket fiddle):  era lo strumento popolare per eccellenza nel Rinascimento. E’ curioso notare come in questa tipologia degli incontri galanti il soldato sia stato sostituito dal violinista itinerante, per lo più un maestro di danza, perciò si spiega come ogni riferimento al violino, al suo archetto o all’impeciamento delle corde abbia assunto nelle ballate popolari delle sottointese connotazioni sessuali

SECONDA MELODIA: APPALCHIAN TUNE

John Jacob Niles – One Morning In May

Jo Stafford The Nightingale

TERZA MELODIA: LA VERSIONE PIU’ ANTICA, THE GRENADIER AND THE LADY

E’ la melodia diffusa nel Dorsetshire, così vibrante e appassionata ma con una punta di malinconia, una versione più adatta alla notte d’amore di Romeo e Giulietta e al canto dell’usignolo nella sua versione di aubade medievale, e che più si avvicina alla struttura della nursery rhyme “Where are you going my pretty maid” di cui riprende la struttura a botta e risposta.

Per assaporarne il fascino antico ecco una serie di arrangiamenti strumentali
PER ARPA

PER CHITARRA
Le Trésor d’Orphée

Tra gli interpreti più recenti
Redwood Falls (Madeleine Cooke, Phil Jones & Edd Mann)
recensione qui

Isla Cameron The Bold Grenadier dal film “Far from The Madding Crowd”


I
As I was a walking one morning in May
I spied a young couple a makin’ of hay.
O one was a fair maid and her beauty showed clear
and the other was a soldier, a bold grenadier.
II
Good morning, good morning, good morning said he
O where are you going my pretty lady?
I’m a going a walking by the clear crystal stream
to see cool water glide and hear nightingales sing.
III
O soldier, o soldier, will you marry me?
O no, my sweet lady that never can be.
For I’ve got a wife at home in my own country,
Two wives and the army’s too many for me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre ero a passeggio in un mattino di Maggio, vidi una giovane coppia che faceva il fieno: l’una era una giovane fanciulla e la sua bellezza si mostrava con evidenza e l’altro era un soldato, un prode granatiere
II
“Buon giorno Buon giorno Buon giorno -disse lui- dove state andando mia bella signorina?”
“Sto andando a passeggiare accanto al ruscello di puro cristallo
per vedere scorrere l’acqua fresca
ad ascoltare l’usignolo cantare.”
III
“O soldato, mi vuoi sposare?”
“O no mia bella signorina come potrei?
Perchè tengo moglie a casa nel mio paese
due mogli e l’esercito sarebbero troppo per me”

FONTI
http://jopiepopie.blogspot.it/2018/02/nightingales-song-1690s-bold-grenadier.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folksongs-appalachian-2/folk-songs-appalacian-2%20-%200138.htm
http://folktunefinder.com/tunes/105092
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LP14.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/onemorninginmay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3646
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29541
http://www.military-history.org/soldier-profiles/british-grenadiers-soldier-profile.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/sing.htm
http://www.contemplator.com/america/nighting.html
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1506

LOOK AT THE COFFIN: AN IRISH WAKE

irish-wakePossiamo considerare tutte le celebrazioni funebri una sorta di rituale per accertarsi che il morto non ritorni più a disturbare i vivi. Un tempo del resto non erano insoliti i casi di morte apparente e la veglia al cadavere era il modo migliore per essere certi dell’avvenuto trapasso.

C’era l’usanza comune in molte tradizioni di lasciare aperta la finestra o la porta della stanza per permettere all’anima di uscire (così le aperture dovevano essere richiuse dopo un paio d’ore in modo da impedirne il ritorno). Per agevolare il transito dell’anima si scioglievano tutti i nodi e si coprivano gli specchi (che potevano intrappolare l’anima nel proprio riflesso). Il cadavere doveva soprattutto essere vegliato: in Irlanda era sistemato su di una tavola in bella vista (nel soggiorno o comunque nella stanza migliore della casa) facendo in modo che un gruppo di visitatori fosse sempre pronto a circondare il cadavere per impedire agli spiriti maligni di avvicinarsi al corpo e prendere l’anima (lasciando però un passaggio libero nella direzione della finestra o della porta precedentemente lasciata aperta).
Il corpo dopo essere stato lavato e vestito con il vestito più bello (spesso coperto da un candido lino) era circondato dalle candele; si adottavano anche particolari accorgimenti: ad esempio mettere un pizzico di sale (antidoto verso il male) sul petto, legare gli alluci dei piedi tra loro (senza fare un nodo ovviamente) per evitare che potesse ritornare come fantasma. Venivano pagate delle prefiche per il lamento funebre (in irlandese “keenning“) che doveva iniziare solo dopo la preparazione della salma per evitare di invocare gli spiriti maligni.
Poteva così avere inizio la veglia vera e propria con cibo (dolci, panini rigorosamente tagliati a forma triangolare), bevute (particolarmente gradito il poteen e l’irish whiskey), fumatine con la pipa, musica e canti, danze e giochi. (vedi)

936-1366859006563
Al momento di andare al cimitero (o alla chiesa per il rito religioso) il cadavere era messo nella cassa da morto con gli oggetti che il defunto aveva con sé al momento della morte o con gli oggetti che aveva più cari per evitare che il suo spirito tornasse per cercarli. Al ritorno dal cimitero si finiva in un pub per trascorrere il resto del giorno per brindare molte e molte volte alla salute del morto!!!

A TRADITIONAL IRISH WAKE

(tratto da qui)
The most anxious thoughts of the Irish peasant through life revert to his death; and he will endure the extreme of poverty in order that he may scrape together the means of obtaining “a fine wake” and a “decent funeral.” He will, indeed, hoard for this purpose, though he will economise for no other; and it is by no means rare to find among a family clothed with rags, and living in entire wretchedness, a few untouched garments laid aside for the day of burial. It is not for himself only that he cares; his continual and engrossing desire is, that his friends may enjoy “full and plenty” at his wake; and however miserable his circumstances, “the neighbors” are sure to have a merry meeting and an abundant treat after he is dead. His first care is, as his end approaches, to obtain the consolations of his religion; his next, to arrange the order of the coming feast. To “die without the priest” is regarded as an awful calamity. We have more than once heard a dying man exclaim in piteous accents, mingled with moans – “Oh, for the Lord’s sake, keep the life in me till the priest comes!” In every serious case of illness the priest is called in without delay, and it is a duty which he never omits; the most urgent business, the most seductive pleasure, the severest weather, the most painful illness, will fail in tempting him to neglect the most solemn and imperative of all his obligations-the preparing a member of his flock to meet his Creator. When the Roman Catholic sacrament of extreme unction has been administered, death has lost its terrors- the sufferer usually dies with calmness, and even cheerfulness. He has still, however, some ef the anxieties of earth; and, unhappily, they are less given to the future destinies of his family, than to the ceremonies and preparations for his approaching wake.
The formalities commence almost immediately after life has ceased;. The corpse is at once laid out, and the wake begins: the priest having been first summoned to say mass for the repose of the departed soul, whicn he generally does in the apartment in which the body reposes! It is regarded by the friends of the deceased as a sacred duty to watch by the corpse until laid in the grave; and only less sacred is the duty of attending it thither.
The ceremonies differ somewhat in various districts, but only in a few minor and unimportant particulars. The body, decently laid out on a table or bed, is covered with white linen, and, not unfrequently, adorned with black ribbons, if an adult; white if the party be unmarried; and flower, if a child. Close by it, or upon it, are plates of tobacco and snuff; aiound it are lighted candles. Usually a quantity of salt is laid upon it also. The women of the household arrange themselves at either side, and the keen (caoinej) at once commences. They rise with one accord, and moving their bodies with a slow motion to and fro, their arms apart, they continue to keep up a heart-rending cry. This cry is interrupted for a while to give the ban cuointhc (the leading keener,) an opportunity of commencing. At the close of every stanza of the dirge, the cry is repeated, to fill up as it were, the pause, and then dropped; the woman then again proceeds with the dirge, and so on to the close. The only interruption which this manner of conducting a wake suffers, is from the entrance of some relative of the deceased, who, living remote, or from some other cause, may not have been in at the commencement. In this case, the ban caointhe ceases, all the women rise and begin the cry, which is continued until the new-cemsr has cried enough. During the pauses of the women’s wailing, the men, seated in groups by the fire, or in the corners of the room, are indulging in jokes, exchanging repartees, and bantering each other, some about their sweethearts, and some about their wives, or talking over the affairs of the day – prices and politics, priests and parsons, the all-engrossing subjects of Irish conversation.
A very accurate idea of an Irish wake may be gathered from a verse of a rude song, It is needless to observe that the merriment is in ill keeping with the solemnity of the death chamber, and that very disgraceful scenes are or rather were, of frequent occurrence; the whiskey being always abundant, and the men and women nothing loath to partake of it to intoxication.

The keener is usually paid for her services-the charge varying from a crown to a pound, according to the circumstances of the employer. The funerals are invariably attended by a numerous concourse; some from affection to the deceased: others, as a tribute of respect to a neighbor; and a large proportion, because time is of small value, and a day unemployed is not looked upon in the light of money lost. No invitations are ever issued. Among the upper classes, females seldom accompany the mourners to the grave; but among the peasantry the women always assemble largely.
The procession, unless the churchyard is very near, (which is seldom the case) consists mostly of equestrians-the women being mounted behind the men on pillions; but there are also a number of cars, of every variety. The wail rises and dies away, at intervals, like the fitful breeze.- On coming to a crossroad it is customary, in some places, for the followers to stop and offer up a prayer for the departed soul; and in passing through a town or village, they always make a circuit round the site of an ancient cross. In former times the scene at a wake was re-enacted with infinitely less decorum in the church-yard; and country funerals were often disgraced by riot and confusion. Itinerant venders of whiskey always mingled among the crowd, and found ready markets for their inflammatory merchandise. Party fights were consequently very common; persons were frequently set to guard the ground where it was expected an obnoxious individual was about to be interred; and it often happened that, after such conflicts, the vanquished party have returned to the grave, disinterred the body, and left it exposed on the highway. The horror against suicide is so great in Ireland, that it is by no means rare to find the body of a wretched man, who has been guilty of the crime, remaining for weeks without interment-parties having been set to watch every neighboring church yard to prevent its being deposited in that which they consider belongs peculiarly to them.
It is well known that if two funerals meet at the same churchyard, a contest immediately takes place to know which will enter first; and happily if, descrying each other at a distance, it is only a contest of speed; for it is often a eontest of strength, terminating in bloodshed and sometimes in Death.

Notes:
Salt has been considered by all nations as an emblem of friendship; and it was anciently offered to guests at an entertainment, as a pledge of welcome. The Irish words ” Caoin” and ” Cointhe” cannot easily be pronounced according to any mode of writing them in English. The best idea that can be given of the pronunciation, is to say that the word has a sound between that ol the English words ” Keen” and Queen.”
The wake lasted two to four days.

May17_12d

AIN’T IT GRAND TO BE BLOOMING WELL DEAD

E’ una canzone del music-hall inglese, cavallo di battaglia di Leslie Sarony grande performer tra il 1880 e il 1930. La canzone si sviluppa in due parti (parole e melodia di Leslie Sarony). Si ironizza dicendo che un bel funerale è una gioia per il morto

ASCOLTA Leslie Sarony 1932

Parte prima
I
Lately there’s nothing but trouble, grief and strife
There’s not much attraction about this bloomin’ life
Last night I dreamt I was bloomin’ well dead
As I went to the funeral, I bloomin’ well said:
Look at the flowers, bloomin’ great orchids
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at the corfin, bloomin’ great ‘andles
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead
II
I was so ‘appy to think that I’d popped off
I said to a bloke with a nasty, ‘acking cough
Look at the black ‘earse, bloomin’ great ‘orses
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the bearers, all in their frock coats
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at their top ‘ats, polished with Guiness
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
III
Some people there were praying for me soul
I said, ‘It’s the first time I’ve been off the dole’
Look at the mourners, bloomin’ well sozzled(1)
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!Look at the children, bloomin’ excited
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the neighbours, bloomin’ delighted
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
IV
‘Spend the insurance’, I murmered, ‘for alack
‘You know I shan’t be with you going back.’
Look at the Missus, bloomin’ well laughing
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!Look at me Sister, bloomin new ‘at on
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
And look at me Brother, bloomin’ cigar on
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
V
We come from clay and we all go back they say
Don’t ‘eave a brick it may be your Aunty May(2)
Look at me Grandma, bloomin’ great haybag(3)
Ain’t it grand, to be bloomin’ well dead!
Parte Seconda
OTHER VOICES: Where oh where has our Leslie gone?
Oh where oh where can he be?
He promised to be on the other side.
Ha-ha, ho-ho, hee-hee!LESLIE: I’ve got me eye on ya! You’re the blokes that told me to learn to play the bloomin’ ‘arp.
I ‘aven’t played a bloomin’ note since I’ve been ‘ere.
Look at the florists countin’ their profits.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the lawyers readin’ the will out.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!Taxes an’ rent I’ll ‘ave no need to pay.
I’ve dodged ‘em by bloomin’ well snuffin’ it. Hooray!
Look at the landlord, bloomin’ ol’ shylock!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the bulldog (arf!) bloomin’ well barkin’.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the tomcat (meow!) bloomin’ well flirtin’.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
People said ‘e was so good to the poor.
I said as I thought what they called me before:
Look at the sexton. Bloomin’ great shovel!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

Look at me schoolmates bloomin’ well gigglin’!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the earthworms bloomin’ well wrigglin’!
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
All my old Chinas(4) I saw them standin’ round.
I said as they slowly lowered me in the ground:
Look at the tombstones, granite with knobs on.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

Now it’s all over. Look at them scarpering.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Look at the weather bloomin’ well raining.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!
Then I awoke with a really shocking start.
I found me in bed with the missus of me ‘eart.
I got the milk in. Baby was screaming.
Ain’t it grand to be bloomin’ well dead!

NOTE
1)”sozzled” — intoxicated, pickled, plastered, soused, canned, loaded, etc.
2) anche scritto ” Don’t aim a brick” mi sfugge il senso della frase
3) “hay-bag” — a mess, noisy or riotous
4) Chinas = China plates = mates

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
parte prima Ultimamente non ci sono che disordini, dolore e lotta e non c’è niente di interessante in questa fottuta vita, la notte scorsa ho sognato che ero belle morto e mentre andavo al funerale dicevo “guarda i fiori, fottute grosse orchidee, non è forte essere morti stecchiti! Guardate la bara, belle maniglie, non è forte essere morti stecchiti! Ero così felice di essere spuntato fuori che dissi a un tizio con una brutta tosse secca: guarda il carro funebre, che bei cavalli; guarda ai portatori tutti nella loro redingote, guarda i loro cilindri puliti con la Guiness. Alcuni stavano pregando per la mia anima dissi “E’ la prima volta che sono senza il sussidio di disoccupazione” Guarda alle prefiche tutte esaltate, guarda i bambini tutti eccitati, guarda i vicini così felici. “Spendi l’assicurazione – mormorai ahimè lo sai che non potrò ritornare indietro” Guardate la moglie come se la ride, guardami sorella che bel nuovo cappellino guardami fratello che bel sigaro. Veniamo dalla terra e ci ritorneremo tutti dicono, non puntare al mattone potrebbe essere la zia May(2), guardami nonna che gran confusione, non è forte essere morti stecchiti!
parte seconda “Dov’è andato il nostro Leslie? oh dove potrebbe essere? Ha promesso di essere dall’alta parte!” Vi vedo, siete i tizi che mi dicevate di imparare a suonare la fottuta arpa. Non ho suonato una sola nota da quando sono stato qui! Guarda i fiorai che contano i loro guadagni, e gli avvocati che leggono le ultime volontà. Tasse e affitto non devo pagare, li ho schivati morendo, evviva! Guarda il padrone di casa, vecchio ciarpame. Guarda il bulldog che bell’abbaio, guarda il gatto che bel trastullo.  La gente diceva era così buono con i poveri, io dicevo mentre pensavo a come mi chiamavano prima: Guarda che sagrestano che grande pala. Guarda i miei compagni di scuola come ridacchiano bene, guarda i lombrichi come si divincolano bene; tutti i miei vecchi compagni li vidi starmi intorno: guarda le lapidi granito coni pomelli. Ora è tutto finito guardali come se la svignano, guarda il tempo che bella pioggia. Poi mi svegliai di soprassalto e mi trovai nel letto con la moglie sul cuore. Ho preso il latte il bambino urlava, non è forte essere morti stecchiti!

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: LOOK AT THE COFFIN

E’ l’adattamento irlandese della canzone resa popolare da Leslie Sarony al tempo del music hall
ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem
ASCOLTA Troy Bennett

Look at the coffin, with golden handles
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

CHORUS
Let’s not have a sniffle, let’s have a bloody-good cry
And always remember: The longer you live
The sooner you’ll bloody-well die

Look at the flowers, all bloody withered
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the mourners, bloody-great hypocrites
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the preacher, a bloody-nice fellow
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

Look at the widow, bloody-great female
Isn’t it grand, boys, to be bloody-well dead?

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Guardate la bara, con le maniglie dorate, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? CORO: Cerchiamo di non prendere il raffreddore, cacciamo un bell’urlo e sempre ricordate: più a lungo si vive, più presto si morirà Guardate i fiori, tutti appassiti, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate alle prefiche, grandi ipocrite, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate il prete, un collega grazioso, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti? Guardate la vedova, un bel pezzo di femmina, non è forte, ragazzi essere morti stecchiti?

FONTI
https://mysendoff.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/irish_wake_infographic.png http://www.maggieblanck.com/Mayopages/Customs.html http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Readings/aintitgrand.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62586

THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY

“The Merry Ploughboy (in italiano L’allegro contadinello)” è una canzone irlandese accreditata a Dominic Behan che molto probabilmente ha invece aggiustato e arrangiato un vecchio brano tradizionale inglese intitolandolo “Off to Dublin in the Green“.
La canzone in origine era una reclame pro-arruolamento, ironicamente trasformata da Behan in una canzone anti-britannica e repubblicana, ambientata nei primi decenni del XX secolo.

VERSIONE INGLESE: The Kaki and the Blue  (The Scarlet and the Blue)

La versione ci viene dalla famiglia Watersons chiamata anche The Kaki and the Blue (registrata in A Yorkshire Garland, 1966)

Nel sito de The Yorkshire Garland Group leggiamo “According to A.L.Lloyd The Scarlet and the Blue was written in the 1870s by John Blockley and popularized on both sides of the Atlantic by Ed Harrigan and Tony Hart. This information has been frequently reprinted whenever oral versions have been published but no-one I know has actually seen any verified references to Blockley’s authorship or a copy of the original sheet music. Blockley was a prolific composer of music for parlour pieces up to his death in 1882 but he seldom was credited with any lyrics. Although the song could well have been written in the 1870s and applied to the many colonial wars of that era, all of the versions I have come across can only be traced back to having been sung in World War I. Although some writers quite rightly claim the practice of wearing scarlet and blue was replaced by khaki in the 1880s, song writers continued to use the title for army songs up to at least 1900 when J. Horspool wrote the words and music to a song of this title. Another of the same title was written in 1884 by W. Sapte, music by Joseph Duggan. John Farmer also produced a book in 1898 entitled Scarlet and Blue, Songs for Soldiers and sailors.
Whatever its prior history it must have been very popular amongst the troops in World War I to judge by the fact that it was still being widely sung in rural England in the second half of the twentieth century, and in fact is still sung by many retired farm workers today. It was particularly adopted by Royal Artillery regiments. During World War I the horse was still the main source of power for transporting heavy equipment and ordnance, so young ploughmen and other heavy horse workers were seen as ideal recruiting fodder for artillery regiments like the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery. This song must have been a godsend as a recruiting song for these artillery regiments.
One such was Sykes’s Wagonners Reserves which recruited on the Yorkshire Wolds, particularly the area around the Sykes’s Sledmere Estate. Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Mark Sykes MP established the regiment in anticipation of World War I, consequently those Wagonners who were lucky enough to return after the war had the song in their repertoires and eventually passed it on to younger farm workers, so that throughout the twentieth century there was scarcely a farm lad in the East Riding who could not sing it.”

ASCOLTA Ted Hutchinson di Canal Head, Driffield che ha imparato il brano dai contadini più anziani della zona

I
I once was a jolly ploughboy ploughing in the fields all day,
When a very funny thought came across my mind, I thought I’d run away,
For I’m sick and tired of the country life and the place where I was born,
So I’ve been and joined the army and I’m off tomorrow morn.
Chorus:
So hurrah for the scarlet(1) and the blue, see the helmets glisten in the sun,
And the bay’nets flash like lightning to the beat of a military drum.
There’s a flag in dear old England proudly waving in the sky
And the last words of my comrades were, ‘We’ll conquer or we’ll die.’
II
I put aside my old grey mare, I put aside my plough,
I put aside my two-tined fork, no more to reap or mow,
No more will I go harvesting to reap the golden corn,
For I’ve been and joined the army and I’m off tomorrow morn.
III
But there’s one little girl I must leave behind and that is my Nellie dear;
She said she would be true to me if I be far or near;
And when I come back from the foreign shore how happy I will be,
For I’ll march my Nellie off to church and a sergeant’s wife she’ll be.
TESTO FAMIGLIA WATERSON
I
Well I once was a merry ploughboy
I was a-ploughing in the fields all day
Till a very funny thought came to me head
That I should roam away
O I’m tired of my country life
Since the day that I was born
So I’ve gone and joined the army
And I’m off tomorrow morn
Chorus
Hoorah for the khaki(1) and the blue
Helmets glittering in the sun
Bayonets flash like lightning
To the beating of a military drum
And no more will I go harvesting
Or gathering the golden corn
‘Cos I got the good king’s shilling
And I’m off tomorrow morn
II
Well I’ll leave aside my pick and spade
And I’ll leave aside my plough
And I’ll leave aside my old grey mare
For no more I’ll need her now
For there’s a little spot in England
Up in the Yorkshire dales so high
Where we mast the good king’s standard
Saying we’ll conquer or we’ll die
III
But there’s one little thing I must tell you
About the girl I leave behind
And I know she will prove true to me
And I’ll prove true in kind
And if ever I return again
To my home in the country
I’ll take her to the church to wed
And a sergeant’s wife she’ll be

NOTE
1) la tinta scarlatta delle divise militari inglesi è stata sostituita dal
color kaki nel 1880.

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: THE MERRY PLOUGHBOY

9_Benson_IRA_1La ballata è diventata un simbolo del nazionalismo irlandese contemporaneo. Il protagonista è un giovane contadino, insoddisfatto della propria condizione sociale (anche se merry) che decide di posare i suoi strumenti di lavoro per imbracciare il fucile e combattere per la libertà della sua nazione; al suo ritorno spera di potersi sposare con la fidanzata Mary.

Alcuni fanno derivare la versione irlandese dal brano intitolato “The Warwickshire R.H.A.” la sigla per la Royal Horse Artillery risalente al 1793 che era inglobata nella Royal Artillery dell’Esercito britannico (ancora oggi ci sono quattro reggimenti che si fregiano del simbolo RHA.): le strofe sono identiche alla versione inglese riportata ma il coro diventa
The Warwickshire R.H.A.
And hurrah for the Horse Artillery,
See the spurs how they glitter in the sun,
And the horses gallop like lightening,
With an fifteen pounder gun,
And when we get to France my boys,
The Kaiser he will say,
Ach Ach Mien Gott what a jolly fine lot,
Are the Warwickshire R.H.A.

Una melodia “tipicamente irish” allegra e scanzonata che si presta anche alle versioni punk o metal, ma per l’ascolto consiglio i “classici”!

ASCOLTA Wolfe Tones

ASCOLTA Dubliners

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers& Tommy Makem “Green in the Green”


I
Oh, I am a merry ploughboy
And I plough the fields all day
Till a sudden thought came to my mind
That I should roam away.
For I’m sick and tired of slavery
Since the day that I was born
And I’m off to join the I.R.A.
And I’m off tomorrow morn.
Chorus:(1)
And I’m off to Dublin in the green(2), in the green
Where the helmets glisten in the sun
Where the bay’nets(3) flash and the riffles crash
To the echo(4) of the Thompson gun.
II
I’ll leave aside my pick and spade
And I’ll leave aside my plough
I’ll leave aside my old grey mare
For no more I’ll need them now.
I’ll leave aside my Mary,
She’s the girl I do adore
And I wonder if she think of me
When she hears the cannons roar.
III
And when the war is over
And dear old Ireland is free
I’ll take her to the church to wed
And a rebel’s wife she’ll be.
Well some men fight for silver
and some men fight for gold
But the I.R.A. are fighting
for the land that the Saxons stole(5)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un allegro contadinello
e aro i campi tutto il giorno finchè un pensiero improvviso mi sovvenne, che dovrei andarmene in giro.
Sono nauseato e stanco di essere schiavo fin dal giorno in cui sono nato
e andrò ad unirmi all’I.R.A.
ci andrò domani mattina.
Ritornello:
e sono fuori da Dublino, in campo aperto(2), in campo aperto, dove gli elmetti brillano al sole
dove le baionette scintillano e i fucili rimbombano
per l’eco(4) della pistola Thompson
II
Lascerò da parte picca e vanga
e lascerò da parte il mio aratro
lascerò da parte la mia vecchia giumenta grigia, che non ne avrò più bisogno. Lascerò da parte la mia Mary
la ragazza che amo
e mi domando se lei pensa a me
quando sente i cannoni ruggire
III
E quando la guerra è finita
e la vecchia cara Irlanda è libera
la porterò in chiesa per sposarla
e la moglie di un ribelle lei sarà.
Alcuni combattono per l’argento
e altri per l’oro
ma l’I.R.A. combatte
per la terra che i Sassoni rubarono(5)

NOTE
1) il ritornello cantato da Dominic in “Off to Dublin in the Green”
“So I’m off to Dublin in the green in the green
Where the the helmets glitter in the sun
Where the rifles crash and the thunders crash
To the echo of the Thompson guns.”
il ritornello cantato dai Dubliners
“We’re off the Dublin in the green, in the green,
Our bayonets glitterin’ in the sun
And his hands they flew like lightin’ to
The rattle of a Thompson gun.”
il ritornello cantato dai Clancy
“We’re off the Dublin in the green, in the green,
Our bayonets glitterin’ in the sun
And his hands they flew like lightin’ to
The rattle of a Thompson gun.”
2) in the green tradotto in italiano come “essere all’aperto, nei prati” è letteralmente “essere nel verde” cioè identificarsi nel colore dei ribelli che per tradizione fin dal 1600 hanno scelto di indossare il colore verde come forma di “irlandesità” vedi
3) bay’nets “baionette”. Presente esclusivamente nel ritornello, questo termine, rappresenta un’espressione dialettale, molto diffusa nel linguaggio colloquiale ed è la contrazione della forma standard bayonet. ” A bayonet is a weapon with a worker at both ends”
4) nei Dubliners diventa “rattle” con un effetto molto più crudo
5) in origine “the land De Valera sold” Éamon de Valera fu un politico e patriota irlandese, tra le figure di spicco della lotta per l’indipendenza dal Regno Unito e uno dei padri della repubblica d’Irlanda. dopo la vittoria elettorale del suo partito Fianna Fai nel 1932 divenne primo ministro avviando una politica di progressivo sganciamento dell’Irlanda del Sud dalla Gran Bretagna. Ancora primo ministro dal 1951 al 1954 e dal 1957 al 1959, fu eletto in quell’anno presidente della repubblica mantenendo tale carica fino al 1973.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54596
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6825
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thekhakiandtheblue.html
http://www.mysongbook.de/msb/songs/o/offtodub.html
http://www.yorkshirefolksong.net/song_database/
Military/The_Jolly_Ploughboy.55.aspx

RIDDLES WISELY EXPOUNDED (seconda parte)

Gli indovinelli compaiono spesso nei rituali nunziali come mezzo per riunire gli opposti, diventano un po’ il surrogato delle “imprese impossibili” compiute dall’eroe o dall’eroina della fiaba per poter ottenere un matrimonio vantaggioso.
Così nella prima parte abbiamo esaminato la prima delle ballate raccolte nel libro del professor Child “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads”: Riddles Wisely Expounded,  versione A (vedi)

VERSIONE C

devil-woodcutL’inizio è simile alla versione A in cui le tre sorelle accolgono con sollecitudine lo “straniero” e la più giovane passa la notte con lui. Al mattino il “cavaliere villano” nel senso di privo di modi cortesi e raffinati, esorta la sorella più giovane a rispondere ai suoi indovinelli e la minaccia però che, in caso di errore, sarà di certo portata via dall’old Nick (uno dei tanti pseudonimi del diavolo).
Solo allora la fanciulla (e con lei il pubblico) inizia ad avere timore dello straniero, e con la sua ultima risposta lo costringe a rivelarsi nel suo aspetto demoniaco!


There was a lady of the North Country,
Lay the bent to the bonny broom
And she had lovely daughters three.
And you may beguile a fair maid soon.
There came a stranger to the gate,
And he three nights and days did wait.
He came unto the lady’s door,
And asked where her three daughters here.
“The eldest is to the washing gone,
The second’s to the baking gone.
The youngest is to a wedding gone,
And it will be night before they’re home.”
He sat him down upon a stone,
Till the three lasses came tripping home.
The oldest one’s to the bed making,
The second one’s to the sheet spreading.
But the youngest sister so bold and bright,
She lay abed with this uncouth knight.
And in the morning when it was grey,
These words to her did the stranger say.
“Now answer me these questions three,
Or you shall surely go with me.
Now answer me these questions six,
Or you shall surely be old Nick’s.
What is sharper than the thorn?
What is louder than the horn?
What broader than the way?
What is colder than the clay?
What is greener than the grass?
And what is worse than a woman was?”
“Hunger is sharper then the thorn,
And thunder is louder than the horn.
Love is broader than the way,
And death is colder than the clay.
Envy’s greener than the grass,
And the Devil’s worse than a woman was.
As soon as she the fiend did name,
He flew away in a blazing flame
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era una signora nel Nord del Paese (1)
poni il giunco con la bella ginestra (2)
che aveva tre amabili figlie
tra poco ingannerai una fanciulla (3)
Venne un forestiero ai cancelli
e attese per tre notti e tre giorni
Andò alla porta della signora
e le chiese dove fossero le sue tre figlie


“La più grande è andata al lavatoio
la seconda è andata al forno
La più giovane è andata a un matrimonio e verrà notte prima che ritornino a casa”
Lui si sedette su una pietra
finchè le tre ragazze rientrarono
La più grande per fare il letto
le seconda per stendere le lenzuola
ma la più giovane sorella così audace e brillante,
per giacere a letto con questo rozzo cavaliere.


E al mattino quando schiariva
lo straniero le disse queste parole
“Ora rispondi a queste tre domande
o di sicuro ti porterò con me!
Ora rispondi a queste sei domande
oppure tu sarai di certo del vecchio Nick (4)


Cos’è più pungente della spina?
Cosa fa più rumore del corno?
Cos’è più ampio della distanza?
Cos’è più freddo dell’argilla?
Cos’è più verde dell’erba?
Cosa c’è di peggiore di una donna (5)?”


“La fame è più pungente della spina,
e il tuono fa più rumore del corno.
L’amore è più ampio della distanza,
e la morte è più fredda dell’argilla
L’erba è più verde del bosco,
e il diavolo è peggiore della donna”
Non appena lei fece il nome del diavolo
egli volò via in una fiamma ardente (6)

NOTE
1) nel codice delle ballate britanniche il Nord è inteso dagli ascoltatori come negativo e quindi nel richiamarlo li si  prepara a qualcosa di terribile.
2) il refrain è presente anche in alcune versioni della ballata “The Cruel Sister” :al di là di ogni possibile traduzione delle parole la frase indica chiaramente il fare sesso. Alcuno traducono “bent” nel senso di “ricurvo” e quindi come un modo di descrivere l’horn cioè il corno (richiamando il corno o la tromba dell’elfo nella ballata “The Elfin Knight“) altri invece riconducono il termine all’Inglese antico (derivato dal sassone) nel senso di pianta o cespuglio della brughiera ossia l’erica o più in genera il giunco.
Il significato dell’intercalare Lay the bairn tae the bonnie broom è stato a lungo dibattuto, la traduzione proposta da Dall’Armellina -poni il giunco con la bella ginestra-è una sorta di codice che introduce una storia di corteggiamento (l’uomo è il bairn o il bent che si avvinghia alla – o entra nella- bella ginestra, la donna)
3) in molte altre versioni il verso diventa solo un ” Fa la la la la la la la la la”
4) il diavolo ha vari soprannomi, molti dei quali includono il termine Old: Old Harry, Old Ned, Old Nick, Old One, Old Roger, Old Scratch, Old Horny, Old Gentleman
8) di certo non l’indovinello più adatto per un corteggiamento, essendo carico di misoginia!
6) il demone viene costretto a mostrarsi con le sue vere sembianze e quindi sconfitto e scacciato! Un tempo chi conosceva il nome delle cose era una persona potente, non solo nel senso di sapiente ma anche di mago: nella convinzione che nome e oggetto fossero interdipendenti, conoscere il nome di una cosa dava potere al mago sulla cosa stessa, la parola poteva essere manipolata, inserita in un rituale magico, controllata, da qui la riluttanza delle antiche genti nel rivelare il nome dei loro dei, del loro paese e anche del loro stesso nome. Così il diavolo smascherato viene messo in fuga è probabilmente la fanciulla mentre risponde agli indovinelli traccia intono a sè un cerchio protettivo e con l’ultima risposta scaccia il diavolo.

ASCOLTA Jean Redpath 1980


A lady lived in the north country
Lay the bent tae the bonnie broom
And she had lovely daughters three
Fa la la la la la la la la la
There was a knight of noble worth
Who also lived intae the north
One night when it was cold and late
This knight he cam’ to the lady’s gate
The eldest daughter she let him in
She’s pinned the door wi’ a siller pin
The second daughter she’s made his bed
And Holland sheets sae fine she spread
The youngest daughter sae fair and bright
She lay abed wi’ this noble knight

If you will answer me questions three
It’s then fair maid I will marry thee
Oh what is louder than a horn
And what is sharper than a thorn
And what is longer than the way
And what is deeper than the sea
And what is greener than the grass
And what more wicked than a woman e’er was

Oh thunder’s louder than a horn
And hunger sharper than a thorn
And love is longer than the way
And hell is deeper than the sea
Envy’s greener than the grass
And the devil more wicked than a woman e’er was
As soon as she the fiend did name
He flew awa’ in a bleezin’ flame

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era una signora nel Nord del Paese
poni il giunco con la bella ginestra 
che aveva tre amabili figlie
Fa la la la la la la la la la
C’era un cavaliere di nobile nascita
che pure viveva nel Nord
Una notte che faceva freddo ed era tardi, il cavaliere andò al cancello della signora, la più grande delle sorelle lo fece entrare e chiuse la porta con  una serratura d’argento, la seconda gli fece il letto,
stese lenzuola di fine lino olandese,
la più giovane sorella così  bella e brillante,
giacque con questo nobile cavaliere.

“Se risponderai a queste tre domande
allora bella dama ti sposerò!
Cosa fa più rumore del corno?
Cos’è più pungente della spina?
Cos’è più ampio della distanza?
Cos’è più profondo del mare?
Cos’è più verde dell’erba?
Cosa c’è di più malvagio di quanto sia mai una donna ?”

“Oh  il tuono fa più rumore del corno
e la fame è più pungente della spina,
L’amore è più ampio della distanza,
e l’inferno più profondo del mare
l’invidia è più verde dell’erba,
e il diavolo è più malvagio di quanto sia mai una donna”
Non appena lei fece il nome del diavolo
egli volò via in una fiamma ardente

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA: THE DEVIL’S NINE QUESTIONS


Il titolo dice nove domande ma gli indovinelli sono solo otto la nona domanda è probabilmente quella contenuta nel ritornello ovvero “chi è il più furbo tre noi due?”. Nel testo ci sono molte espressioni “bibliche” di rigore quando si parla del diavolo. Il testo è riportato in “Singing Traditions of Child’s Popular Ballads“, Bertrand Harris Bronson, come collezionato dalla signora Rill Martin, Virginia, 1922.
“We are told that Texas Gladden learnt her version of The Devil’s Nine Question from the collector Alfreda Peel, who had previously noted the songs from a Mrs Rill Martin of Mechanicsburg, VA, before passing it on to Texas.”

ASCOLTA Texas Gladden

ASCOLTA Paul Clayton & Jean Ritchie


If you don’t answer my questions nine
Sing ninety-nine and ninety(1),
I’ll take you off to hell alive,
And you are the weaver’s bonny(2).
What is whiter than milk?
What is softer than silk?
Snow is whiter than milk,
Down is softer than silk,
What is louder than a horn?
What is sharper than a thorn?
Thunder’s louder than a horn,
Death is sharper than a thorn(3),
What is higher than a tree?
What is deeper than the sea?
Heaven’s higher than a tree,
And hell is deeper than the sea.
What is innocenter than a lamb?
What is worse than womankind?
A babe is innocenter than a lamb,
The devil’s worse than womankind,
You have answered me questions nine,
You are God’s, you’re not my own,
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Se non risponderai alle mie nove domande, canta 999 (1),
ti porterò all’inferno da viva,
tu sei l’astuta! (2)
Cos’è più bianco del latte?
e più soffice della seta?
La neve è più bianca del latte,
una piuma è più soffice della seta.
Cos’è più rumoroso di un corno
e più affilato di una spina?
Il tuono è più rumoroso del corno
e la morte è più affilata di una spina (3).
Cos’è di più alto di un albero
e più in basso del mare?
Il cielo è più in alto di un albero
e l’inferno è più in basso del mare.
Cos’è più innocente di un agnello
e peggiore di una donna?
Un bambino è più innocente di un agnello
e il diavolo è peggio di una donna.
Hai risposto alle mie nove domande,
e sei di Dio, non mia

NOTE
1) 999 è il numero del Diavolo (ovvero 666) perchè è un numero che si può leggere in tutte e due i versi
2) il ritornello si alterna con “And I’m the weaver’s bonny: tradotto letteralmente in italiano diventa “sei la bella di chi tesse” bonny però significa anche cara, favorita dal Fato, la grande tessitrice, depositaria della saggezza, quindi è una specie di rimpallo tra tu sei quella furba, no io sono quello più furbo, e così via che si conclude alla fine con la vittoria della saggezza femminile.
3) qui l’immagine ha a che vedere con il sangue, una spina punge e fa uscire il sangue dal corpo, ma la morte è quella che porta la falce e miete la vita.

VERSIONE B: JENNIFER GENTLE

Nota anche come “The Three Sisters” o “Juniper, Gentle & Rosemary” la ballata compare, peraltro in forma incompleta, in “Some Ancient Christmas Carols” di Davies Gilbert (1823). E’ la versione più romantica della storia in cui la sorella più giovane sa rispondere ai sei enigmi e riesce a sposare il “valiant knight”

ASCOLTA Magpie Lane in Six For Gold 2009


There were three sisters fair and bright,
Juniper, gentle and rosemary,(1)
And they three loved one valiant knight,
As the dew flies over the mulberry tree.
And the eldest sister let him in,
And she barred the door with a silver pin. (2)
And the middle sister made the bed,
And laid soft pillows beneath his head.
But the youngest sister that same night
She resolved to wed with that valiant knight.
“Oh it’s you must answer my questions three,
And then, fair maid, we can married be.
“Oh, what is louder than the horn?
And what is sharper than any thorn?”
“Oh, rumour is louder than the horn,
And hunger is sharper than any thorn.”
“And what is greener than the grass?
And what is smoother than the glass?”
“Oh, envy is greener than the grass,
And flatter is smoother than the glass.”
“And what is keener than the axe?
And what is softer than melting wax?”
“Oh, revenge is keener than the axe,
And love is softer than melting wax.”
“Now you have answered my questions three,
And now, fair maid, we can married be.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre sorelle buone
e belle
Ginepro, Genziana e Rosmarino (1)
e tutte e tre amavano un valente cavaliere
come la rugiada si posa sopra il gelso
La più grande lo fece entrare
e chiuse la porta con uno spillo d’argento (2)
quella mediana fece il letto
e pose soffici cuscini per la testa
ma la più giovane quella stessa
notte
decise di sposare il valente
cavaliere
“Prima devi rispondere alle mie domande
e poi, bella pulzella, potremmo sposarci.
Cos’è più forte di un corno
e più acuminato di una spina?”
“Il rumore è più forte di un corno
e la fame è più acuminata
di una spina.”
“Cos’è più verde dell’erba e più levigato
del vetro?”
“L’edera è più verde dell’erba e l’adulazione è più levigata del vetro.”
“Cos’è più affilata di un ascia
e più tenera della cera fusa?”
“La vendetta è più affilata di un ascia
e l’amore e più tenero della cera fusa.”
“Adesso che hai risposto alle mie domande
bella pulzella potremo sposarci!”

NOTE
1) sono i nomi delle tre sorelle Juniper, Gentian e Rosemary (in italiano Ginepro, Genziana e Rosmarino) oppure il tipico intercalare in cui si ricorre alla citazione delle erbe magiche. Gentle potrebbe essere il cognome di Jennifer oppure inteso come aggettivo e quindi la dolce Jennifer
2) nell’antichità i gioielli erano un tramite tra l’uomo e la divinità e servivano a invocarne le grazie per allontanare le forze negative; nella tradizione scozzese è ancora consuetudine da parte dell’uomo regalare alla futura sposa una spilla d’argento, che in Scozia prende il nome di “luckenbooth“: è in argento e con incisi due cuori intrecciati, variamente lavorata anche con pietre incastonate; è un regalo di fidanzamento che viene indossato durante il matrimonio e che passerà al primogenito, la spilla stessa è un amuleto che protegge la nuova coppia dall’invidia delle fate o più in generale dal male, favorendo la nascita di un bambino. Vedi

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem in Flowers In The Valley 1970. La versione testuale è scritta e musicata dai fratelli Eddy e Finbar Furey e richiama solo vagamente la versione originale della ballata.


I
Oh, Jennifer Gentle and Rosemaree
What is deeper than the sea?
And what is higher than the broadside,
As the dew falls over the mulberry tree?
II
What does make my heart feel glad,
And turn my winters into spring,
When all the world is so very sad?
It’s the joy that Jennifer Gentle brings.
III
The sun has gotten the ocean’s cold,
A lovely silver and pure bright gold;
While we lean girls walk down to rest,
On the welcome folds of the ocean’s breast.
IV
Love is deeper than the sea,
Jennifer Gentle and Rosemaree;
And the truth is higher than the broadside,
As the dew falls over the mulberry tree.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“O Jennifer Genlte e Rosemary
cos’è più profondo del mare?
E cos’è superiore come nei detti popolari della rugiada che cade sul gelso?”
II
E cosa fa essere il mio cuore allegro
e mutare i miei inverni in primavera
mentre il resto del mondo è triste?
E’ la gioia che Jennifer Genlte porta.
III
Il sole ha preso il freddo dell’oceano
un bell’argenteo e una pura luce dorata, mentre ci appoggiamo alle fanciulle per andare a dormire, nelle gradite onde tra le braccia del mare
IV
L’amore è più profondo del mare
Jennifer Genlte e Rosemary
e la verità è superiore come nei detti popolari,
della rugiada (1) che cade sul gelso

NOTE
1) la rugiada è un elemento che racchiude una piccola magia: è acqua ma non viene dal mare o dal fiume ma dall’aria e si posa a goccia, goccia sull’erba e le foglie, per assorbire la luce del sole e trasformarla in oro.

continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/captain-wedderburn.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_1
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/66.html
https://www.loomishousepress.com/assets/240824.pdf
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/inter-diabolus-et-virgo–rawlinson-broadside-1450.aspx
http://betterknowachildballad.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/child-1-riddles-wisely-expounded/
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/early_child/sidebar5.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/jennifer.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56572
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85953
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=140911

https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1223606
http://mainlynorfolk.info/john.kirkpatrick/
songs/bowdowntothebonnybroom.html

http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/gladden2.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/NonChristmas/three_sisters.htm

BIBLIOGRAFIA
L’eredità celtica. Antiche tradizioni d’Irlanda e del Galles (Alwin e Brinley Rees)