Archivi tag: Carl Peterson

Rolling home across the sea

Leggi in italiano

A “rolling home” is a traveling home on wheels, but it is also the title of the best known among the homeward-bound shanty. In America home is California or Boston, while in Europe it is England, London or Hamburg, but also Scotland, Ireland or Dublin, the song is equally popular on German and Dutch ships.
Taken from a homonymous poem written by Charles Mackay in 1858 it is considered a forecastle song, but it has also been a capstan shanty. The question of origin is still controversial, about twenty versions are known and according to Stan Hugill it could have a Scandinavian origin.

STANDARD VERSION

It is the version penned in the poem by Charles Mackay who wrote it on May 26, 1858 while he was on board “The Europe” going home and in effect the verses are a little more elaborate than the phrases usually used by the shantyman
Dan Zanes from Sea Music
Carl Peterson

ROLLING HOME
I
Up aloft, amid the rigging
Swiftly blows the fav’ring gale,
Strong as springtime in its blossom,
Filling out each bending sail,
And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they rise;
“We have tarried here to bear you
To the land you dearly prize”.
CHORUS
Rolling(1) home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea,
Rolling home to dear old Scotland (2)
Rolling home, dear land to thee (3).
II (4)
Full ten thousand miles behind us,
And a thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well remembered shore.
Newborn breezes swell to send us
To our childhood welcome skies,
To the glow of friendly faces
And the glance of loving eyes.
III (5)
I have watched the rolling hillside
Of the wondrous river Clyde (6)
As I sailed away from Greenock
My heart beat fast inside
But I knew as I was sailing
Far from that Scottish shore
I will miss her every minute
But I’ll return once more.

NOTES
1) rolling has many meanings: it is generally synonymous with “sailing” but it can also derive from “rollikins” an old English term for “drunk”; often as Italo Ottonello suggests, we mean in a literal sense that the typical gait of the sea wolves is “rocking”
2) or England
3) according to Hugill the song comes from a Scandinavian version and he notes that the verse is sometimes sung as “the land’s forbee” with “forbee” = “passing by” or “near.” Förbi is Swedish stands for “past, by.”
4) Carl Peterson skips the 2nd stanza of Charles Mackay’s poem
5) the stanza was added by Carl Peterson
6) it refers to the rolling hills near the Clyde estuary that flows near the port city of Greenock, located on the southern coast

SCOTTISH VERSION

Old Blind Dogs from The Gab O Mey 2003, in a version with a lot of Scotsness

ROLLING HOME
I (1)
Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable running clear
Heave around and with the wheel, boys
For our homeland we must steer
Chorus
Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to Caledonia
Rolling home, dear land, to thee
II
From the pines of California
And by Chile’s endless strand
We have sailed the world twice over
Every port in every land
III
And to all ye blaggard pirates
Who would chase us from the waves
Heed ye well that those who’ve tried us
Soon have found their watery graves
IV
We were boarded in Jamaica
Where the Jolly Rodger flew
But our swords were hardly drawn, boys
‘Ere they took a rosy hue
V
We return with precious cargo
And with bounty coined in gold
And our sweethearts will rejoice, boys
For they lo’e their sailors bold

NOTES
1) it resumes the II stanza of the poem by Charles Mackay

IRISH VERSION: Rolling home to Ireland

Irish Rovers different text and melody

ROLLING HOME TO IRELAND
I
I come from Paddy’s land
I’m a rake and ramblin’ man
Since I was young, I’ve had the urge to roam
So don’t you weep for me
When I’m sailing on the sea
For you won’t see me till I come rolling home
Chorus
Rolling home to Ireland, rolling home across the sea
Back to me own con-ter-ree (country)
Two thousand miles behind us
and a thousand more to go

So fill the sails and blow winds blow!
II
We sailed away from Cork
We were headed for New York
I’d always dreamed the sailor’s life for me
But the days were hard and long
With no women, wine, or song
And it wasn’t quite the fun I’d thought ‘twould be
III
We weren’t too long a-sail
When the wind became a gale
Our boat was tossed and turned upon the foam
With waves like moutains high
Well I thought that I would die
I wished to God that I was rolling home
IV
And when I reach the shore
I will go to sea no more
There’s more to life than sailing ‘round the Horn
Good luck to sailor men
When they’re headed out again
I wish them all safe harbor from the storm

LINK
https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/rolling-home
http://www.nathanville.org.uk/web-albums/burgess/scrapbook/victorian-culture/pages/The-collected-songs-of-Charles-Mackay.htm
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/RollingHome.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/rolling.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67591

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17029
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/rolling.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555620.asp

Rolling home

Read the post in English

Con “Rolling home” s’intende una casa viaggiante su ruote, ma è anche il titolo della più conosciuta tra le  homeward-bound shanty. In America casa è la California o Boston, mentre in Europa è l’Inghilterra, Londra o Amburgo, ma anche  la Scozia, l’Irlanda o Dublino, la canzone è altrettanto popolare sulle navi tedesche e olandesi.
Tratta da una poesia omonima scritta da Charles Mackay nel 1858 è considerata una forecastle song, ma è stata anche  una capstan shanty. La questione dell’origine è ancora controversa, si conoscono una ventina di versioni e secondo Stan Hugill potrebbe avere un’origine  scandinava.

LA VERSIONE STANDARD

E’ la versione riportata nella poesia di Charles Mackay che la scrisse il 26 maggio 1858 mentre era a bordo dell’Europa diretto verso casa  e in effetti i versi sono un po’ più elaborati rispetto alle frasi utilizzate di solito dallo shantyman
Dan Zanes in Sea Music
Carl Peterson


I
Up aloft, amid the rigging
Swiftly blows the fav’ring gale,
Strong as springtime in its blossom,
Filling out each bending sail,
And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they rise;
“We have tarried here to bear you
To the land you dearly prize”.
CHORUS
Rolling(1) home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea,
Rolling home to dear old Scotland (2)
Rolling home, dear land to thee (3).
II (4)
Full ten thousand miles behind us,
And a thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well remembered shore.
Newborn breezes swell to send us
To our childhood welcome skies,
To the glow of friendly faces
And the glance of loving eyes.
III (5)
I have watched the rolling hillside
Of the wondrous river Clyde (6)
As I sailed away from Greenock
My heart beat fast inside
But I knew as I was sailing
Far from that Scottish shore
I will miss her every minute
But I’ll return once more.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Sul pennone, in mezzo al sartiame
soffia spedito un vento favorevole,
vigoroso come la primavera in fiore
riempie ogni vela e la flette,
e le onde che ci lasciamo dietro
sembrano mormorare con il movimento” Ci siamo attardate qui per sostenerti fino alla terra che hai cara”
Coro
Naviga a casa, naviga a casa

naviga a casa sul mare,
naviga a casa alla cara vecchia Scozia,
naviga a casa,  cara terra, a te

II
Dieci mila miglia buone dietro di noi
e un un migliaio davanti, le onde dell’antico oceano per trasportarci verso la terra che ricordiamo bene.
Le nuove brezzesi soffiano per guidarci verso i benvenuti cieli della nostra infanzia, al sorriso di volti amici e allo sguardo di occhi amorevoli.
III
Ho visto il profilo ondulato
del meraviglioso fiume Clyde
mente salpavo da Greenock
il mio cuore batteva forte
ma sapevo che stavo navigando
lontano dalla costa scozzese,
mi mancherà ogni minuto
ma ritornerò ancora una volta

NOTE
1)  rolling ha molti significati: in genere è sinonimo di“sailing” ma può anche derivare da “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”; spesso come suggerisce Italo Ottonello si intende in senso letterale come “dondolante” la tipica andatura dei lupi di mare
2) oppure England
3) secondo Hugill la canzone deriva da una versione scandinava e rileva che il verso è a volte cantato come “the land’s forbee” con “forbee”= “passing by” o “near.” Förbi is svedese sta per “past, by.”
4) Carl Peterson salta la II strofa della poesia di Charles Mackay
5) la strofa è stata aggiunta da Carl Peterson
6) si riferisce alle colline ondulate nei pressi all’estuario del Clyde che sfocia in prossimità della città portuale di Greenock,  
situata sulla costa meridionale   stupende immagini del fiume 

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

Old Blind Dogs in The Gab O Mey 2003, in una versione con molta Scotsness


I (1)
Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable running clear
Heave around and with the wheel, boys
For our homeland we must steer
Chorus
Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to Caledonia
Rolling home, dear land, to thee
II
From the pines of California
And by Chile’s endless strand
We have sailed the world twice over
Every port in every land
III
And to all ye blaggard pirates
Who would chase us from the waves
Heed ye well that those who’ve tried us
Soon have found their watery graves
IV
We were boarded in Jamaica
Where the Jolly Rodger flew
But our swords were hardly drawn, boys
‘Ere they took a rosy hue
V
We return with precious cargo
And with bounty coined in gold
And our sweethearts will rejoice, boys
For they lo’e their sailors bold
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Chiama tutti gli uomini per maneggiare l’argano, vedete come la catena scorre bene, avvolgetela ragazzi, perchè verso casa dobbiamo fare rotta
Coro
Navigo a casa, navigo a casa
navigo a casa sul mare,
navigo a casa a Caledonia,
navigo a casa, la cara terra, a te

II
Dai pini della California
e dalla spiaggia infinita del Cile
abbiamo navigato per il mondo due volte, in ogni porto e in ogni terra
III
A tutti voi furfanti di pirati
che vorreste inseguirci tra le onde
ascoltate bene che quelli che ci hanno provato hanno presto trovato la loro tomba nel mare
IV
Ci siamo imbarcati in Giamaica
dove veleggia il Jolly Roger
ma le nostre spade erano ben affilate, ragazzi
e hanno preso una tonalità rossa
V
Ritorniamo con il nostro prezioso carico e con abbondanza di  monete d’oro e le nostre innamorate si rallegreranno, ragazzi
perchè amano il loro marinai coraggiosi

NOTE
1) riprende la II strofa della poesia di Charles Mackay

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

Melodia diversa come pure il testo la Rolling home to Ireland degli Irish Rovers


I
I come from Paddy’s land
I’m a rake and ramblin’ man
Since I was young, I’ve had the urge to roam
So don’t you weep for me
When I’m sailing on the sea
For you won’t see me till I come rolling home
Chorus
Rolling home to Ireland, rolling home across the sea
Back to me own con-ter-ree (country)
Two thousand miles behind us
and a thousand more to go

So fill the sails and blow winds blow!
II
We sailed away from Cork
We were headed for New York
I’d always dreamed the sailor’s life for me
But the days were hard and long
With no women, wine, or song
And it wasn’t quite the fun I’d thought ‘twould be
III
We weren’t too long a-sail
When the wind became a gale
Our boat was tossed and turned upon the foam
With waves like moutains high
Well I thought that I would die
I wished to God that I was rolling home
IV
And when I reach the shore
I will go to sea no more
There’s more to life than sailing ‘round the Horn
Good luck to sailor men
When they’re headed out again
I wish them all safe harbor from the storm
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Vengo dalla terra di Paddy
sono un giramondo gaudentete
da quando ero ragazzo ho avuto la necessità di girovagare,
così non piangere per me
mentre navigo per mare
perchè non mi vedrai finchè non tornerò a casa
Coro
Navigando verso l’Irlanda, navigando verso casa per il mare
di ritorno nel mio paese

due mila miglia dietro alle spalle
e altri mille da fare, così gonfiate le vele e soffiate, venti, soffiate!

II
Abbiamo navigato lontano da Cork
eravamo diretti a New York
ho sempre sognato la vita del marinaio per me
ma i giorni erano duri e lunghi
senza donne, vino o canzoni
e non era proprio il divertimento che credevo
III
Eravamo da poco in alto mare, quando il vento è diventato una tempesta
la nostra barca fu sbattuta dai marosi
con onde alte come montagne.
Beh, pensavo che sarei morto
e sperai che Dio mi facesse ritornare a casa
IV
E quando raggiungerò la riva
non andrò più per mare
c’è di più nella vita che navigare intorno all’Horn.
Buona fortuna ai marinai
quando vanno di nuovo fuori
vorrei che fossero tutti al sicuro dalla tempesta

FONTI
https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/rolling-home
http://www.nathanville.org.uk/web-albums/burgess/scrapbook/victorian-culture/pages/The-collected-songs-of-Charles-Mackay.htm
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/RollingHome.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/rolling.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67591

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17029
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/rolling.htm
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555620.asp

MAGGIE MAY SEA SONG

Maggie Mae o May è una sea song popolare a Liverpool in cui si narra la disavventura del giovane marinaio, incappato nella mano lesta di una prostituta di nome Maggie, condannata alla fine alla deportazione a Botany Bay. Il periodo storico di riferimento viene perciò inquadrato tra il 1800 e il 1856 quando l’Australia era una colonia inglese utilizzata come colonia penale: la prima flotta per Botany Bay partì il 19 Gennaio 1788 con 11 vascelli, 730 detenuti e 250 liberi coloni a bordo. L’urgenza di trovare una soluzione per le carceri sovraffollate era diventata sempre più pressante per la Corona Inglese dopo la perdita delle colonie americane, ma all’arrivo i coloni si accorsero che la baia era inospitale perchè tutto il terreno era solo sabbia e c’era poca acqua dolce; così si spostarono un po’ più in su lungo la costa e sbarcarono a Port Jackson (l’attuale porto di Sydney), dove fondarono la prima colonia penale. Un altro dato che colloca la time line della sea song è il riferimento alla Casa del Marinaio di Canning Place la cui prima pietra venne posata nel 1850 per la volontà del suo benefattore (vedi)

Dal film “Nowhere boy” sulla nascita dei Beatles che agli esordi si chiamavano The Quarrymen, nella versione però non si fa cenno alla deportazione, ma solo all’arresto di Maggie.

I
Oh dirty Maggie Mae,
they have taken her away
and she’ll never walk down
Lime street (1) anymore.
Well that judge he guilty found her,
for robbin’ a homeward-bounder,
you dirty robbin’ no good Maggie Mae.
II
Now I was paid off at the Pool(2), in the port of Liverpool.
Well three pound ten a week that was my pay.
With a pocket full of tin I was very soon taken in,
by a gal with the name of Maggie Mae. Now the first time I saw Maggie
she took my breath away,
she was cruisin up and down in Canning Place (3).
III
She had a figure so divine her voice was so refined
well being a sailor I gave chase.
Now in the morning I awoke I was flat and stony broke.
No jacket, trousers, waistcoat did I find.
Oh and when I asked her “where?”
she said “My very dear sir they’re down in Kelly’s pawnshop number nine”.
IV
To the pawnshop I did go, no clothes there did I find and the police they took that gal away from me.
And the judge he guilty found her of robbin’ a homeward-bounder
she’ll never walk down Lime Street anymore.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Oh, la sporca Maggie Mae
l’hanno portata via,
e così non passeggerà più
per Lime Street (1).
Oh, il giudice l’ha trovata colpevole
di aver derubato un marinaio,
sporca, cattiva ladra Maggie Mae
II
Beh io avevo un lavoro alla Darsena (2)
nel porto di Liverpool,
beh tre sterline e dieci scellini era la mia paga a settimana.
Con le tasche piene di grana
fui subito preso
da una ragazza di nome Maggie Mae.
Beh la prima volta che vidi Maggie Mae
mi mozzò il fiato,
mentre passeggiava su e giù per Canning Place (3)
III
Aveva un figurino così divino e la voce era così sofisticata!
Beh, essendo un marinaio le diedi la caccia.
Poi al mattino mi svegliai, ero pallido e a pezzi,
non trovai né giacca, né pantaloni, né panciotto
e quando le chiesi “Dove sono?”
Lei rispose “Mio carissimo signore
“Sono giù al banco dei pegni di Kelly al numero nove”
IV
Andai al banco dei pegni e non trovai nessun vestito e la polizia si portò via la ragazza
e il giudice la trovò colpevole
di aver derubato un marinaio,
così non passeggerà più per Lime Street

NOTE
1) Lime street era diventata il centro della città con la creazione della stazione ferroviaria nel 1851, ricca di hotel e teatri
2) Il Pool era una darsena naturale del fiume Mersey, un porto sicuro del fiume che sfocia nel Mare d’Irlanda. Nel Medioevo ci costruirono un castello per sorvegliarlo e ricavarne i dazi.
“The end of the Pool came in 1709 when work began on Thomas Steers’ pioneering dock (now known as the Old Dock). The dock opened in 1715, and was the first commercial wet dock, complete with gates at the entrance to protect ships from the huge tidal ranges. Thus the Pool was the very birthplace of Liverpool’s later commercial successes.Today, the Old Dock is preserved beneath the Liverpool One development, and to study a map of the city centre is to trace the course of the old waterway up Paradise Street, up Whitechapel and Byrom Street, where it began. “(tratto da qui)
3) Canning è il quartiere residenziale di Livepool improntato dall’architettura georgiana, vi si trovava la Liverpool Sailor’s Home

The Sailors Home in Canning Place (costruita nel 1850 – demolita nel 1969)

l’intera traccia della canzone registrata per il film.

Il brano è un rifacimento della versione del gruppo skiffle The Vipers (1957 ) già ripresa dagli Spinners nel 1964. La melodia si rifaceva a “Darling Nellie Gray”, una minstrel song scritta a metà del XIX secolo dal compositore americano Benjamin Russel Hanby.

ASCOLTA Hughie Jones (The Spinners)


I
Now gather round you sailor boys,
and listen to my plea
And when you’ve heard
my tale, pity me
For I was a ready fool
in the port of Liverpool
The first time that
I come home from sea
II
I was paid off at the Home (3) from the port of Sierra Leone
Four pounds in a month it was me pay
With a pocket full of tin I was very soon took in
By a girl with the name of Maggie May
CHORUS
Oh Maggie, Maggie May
they have taken her away
And she’ll never walk
down Lime street anymore
For she robbed so many sailors and captains of the whalers
That dirty, robbin’ no good Maggie May
III
Oh, well do I remember when I first met Maggie May
She was cruising up and down Canning Place
She’d a figure so divine, just like a frigate of the line
And me being just a sailor, I gave chase
IV
In the morning I awoke, I was flat and stoney broke
No jacket, trousers, waistcoat could I find
When I asked her where they were she said “My very good sir,
They’re down in Kelly’s pawnshop number nine”
V
Well, to the pawnshop I did go but no clothes there could I find
The policeman came and took that girl away
The judge he guilty found her, of robbing the homeward–bounder
And paid her passage back to Botany Bay (5)
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Venitemi intorno marinai
e ascoltate il mio lamento
e dopo che avrete sentito la mia storia, compatitemi,
perché stavo per impazzire
nel porto di Liverpool
la prima volta che
ritornai a casa dal mare
II
Avevo un ingaggio dalla Casa (3) al porto di Sierra Leone
4 sterline al mese era la mia paga
con le tasche piene di grana
fui subito preso
da una ragazza di nome Maggie Mae
CORO
Oh, Maggie,  Maggie Mae
l’hanno portata via
e così non passeggerà più
per Lime Street
perché derubava così tanti marinai e capitani delle baleniere (4)
quella 
sporca, cattiva ladra Maggie May
III
Beh ricordo quando la prima volta vidi Maggie May,
passeggiava su e giù per Canning Place.
Aveva un figurino così divino proprio come una fregata in assetto da battaglia, e essendo un marinaio le diedi la caccia.
IV
Poi al mattino mi svegliai, ero pallido e a pezzi
non trovai né giacca, né pantaloni, né panciotto
e quando le chiesi dove fossero
lei rispose “Mio carissimo signore,
sono giù al banco dei pegni di Kelly  al numero nove”
V
Andai al banco dei pegni ma non trovai nessun vestito là
e la polizia venne e si portò via la ragazza
e il giudice la trovò colpevole
di aver derubato un marinaio
e le pagò un passaggio per Botany Bay (5)

NOTE
4) gli ingaggi sulle baleniere erano i più alti dato gli alti profitti che si ricavavano
5) Botany Bay è la baia di Sydney (Australia) dove i primi esploratori europei sbarcarono il 29 aprile 1770. Quando Sir Joseph Banks suggerì che Botany Bay poteva essere il luogo ideale per una colonia penale, essa venne scelta come meta per i nuovi coloni; giocavano a favore della scelta, la lontananza della destinazione (letteralmente agli Antipodi) e un terreno che si riteneva sufficientemente fertile per diventare autosufficiente entro un anno. Ben presto i coloni si accorsero che la baia era inospitale perchè tutto il terreno era solo sabbia e c’era poca acqua dolce; così si spostarono un po’ più in su lungo la costa e sbarcarono a Port Jackson (l’attuale porto di Sydney), dove fondarono la prima colonia penale (per la precisione a Sydney Cove). Tuttava il nome Botany Bay restò nell’immaginario collettivo come riferimento per l’Australia e le sue colonie penali. (continua)

ASCOLTA Carl Peterson


I
Come all you sailors bold, and when my tale is told,
I know you will all sadly pity me.
For I was a bloody fool,
in the port of Liverpool,
on the voyage when I first went out to sea.
Chorus:
Oh, Maggie, Maggie May,
they have taken her away,
she is never gonna walk down Park Lane (6) anymore.
For she robbed so many sailors and also lots of whalers, and now she’s doing time (7) in Botany Bay 
II
I’d made it back to home after a voyage to Sierre Leone,
2 pounds 10 a month had been my pay,
As I jingled in me tin, I was sadly taken in,
by a lady of the name of Maggie May.
III
When I stood into her, I hadn’t got a care,
I was cruising off on down old Canning Place.
She was dressed in a gown so fine,
like a frigate of the line,
and I bein’ a sailor man gave chase.
IV
She gave me a saucy nod, and I like a farmer’s clod,
let her take me line abreast in tow.
And under all plain sail we ran before the gale,
and to the Crow’s Nest tavern we did go.
V
Next morning when I woke, I found that I was broke,
I hadn’t got a penny to me name
So I had to pop me suit, me John L’s (8) and me boots,
down at the Park Lane pawn shop number nine.
VI
Oh you thieving Maggie May,
you robbed me of me pay,
when I slept with you last night ashore.
But the judge he guilty found her,
for robbing a homeward bounder,
she’ll never roll down Park Lane anymore.
VII
She was chained and sent away,
from Liverpool one day,
the lads they cheered,
as she sailed down the bay.
And every sailor lad,
he only was too glad,
that they sent the old barge out to Botany Bay.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi bravi marinai
quando avrò raccontato la mia storia
sono certo che mi compatirete
perché stavo per impazzire
nel porto di Liverpool
nel viaggio della prima volta che andai per mare
CORO
Oh, Maggie,  Maggie Mae
l’hanno portata via
e così non passeggerà più
per Park Lane (6),
perché derubava così tanti marinai e anche tanti balenieri
e ora se la spassa (7) a Botany Bay! 

II
Ritornavo a casa dopo un viaggio a Sierra Leone
2 sterline e 10 scellini al mese era la mia paga
che tintinnavano nella mia tasca,
fui subito preso
da una ragazza di nome Maggie May
III
Quando mi imbattei in lei, non mi ero preoccupato,
passeggiavo su e giù
per Canning Place.
Era vestita con un bell’abito
come una fregata in assetto da battaglia, e essendo un marinaio le diedi la caccia.
IV
Mi lanciò un’occhiata malandrina e io come una zolla di campagna
la lasciai prendermi sottobraccio
e a vele spiegate corremmo prima della tempesta e alla taverna “Il Nido del Corvo” andammo
V
Al mattino seguente quando mi svegliai, ero a pezzi;
senza un penny con il mio nome
così mi infilai i vestiti, i miei John L’s (8) e gli stivali
e giù al banco dei pegni di Park Lane  al numero nove
VI
O tu ladra di una Maggie May
mi hai rubato della paga
quando dormivo con te la scorsa notte.
Ma il giudice la trovò colpevole
di aver derubato un marinaio
e non passeggerà più per Park Lane, non più
VII
Fu incatenata e mandata via
da Liverpool un giorno
i ragazzi la salutarono
mentre navigava nella Baia
e ogni marinaio era tanto contento
che la vecchia barca fosse mandata a Botany Bay

NOTE
6) lo scalo merci ferroviario di Park Lane che serviva i Liverpool Docks
7) i detenuti ai lavori forzati nelle colonie penali facevano una dura vita (vedi)
8) John Lewis, nota marca di jeans

FONTI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie_May_(folk_song)
http://www.pepperland.it/the-beatles/discografia/album/let-it-be/maggie-mae
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/maggiemay.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/liverpool/localhistory/journey/lime_street/maggie_may/maggie_may.shtml
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/site/lyrics/song_688.html

QUARE BUNGLE RYE: A BASKET WITH SURPRISE

In “Quare Bungle Rye” si narra in modo comico dell’ingegnosità delle ragazze madri pre-ottocentesche che riescono a far pagare all’uomo un risarcimento in denaro per la loro maternità fuori dal matrimonio. Non necessariamente il malcapitato è il padre del bambino ma viene preso a bersaglio semplicemente per la sua ingenuità!
Secondo Contemplator la ballata “Quare bungle rye” è la versione irlandese di “Oyster Girl” (The Basket of Oysters) di cui diverse copie ottocentesche possono essere rintracciati presso la Bodleian Library. Il tema si accomuna anche alla ballata intitolata più variamente “The Basket of Eggs”, “Eggs in Her Basket” o “Eggs and bacon”. (vedi)

LA SORPRESA NEL CESTO

In tutti questi testi si allude al cesto della fanciulla come a una gravidanza “a sorpresa” infatti dentro c’è un bambino che viene lasciato come “pacco” (cioè come fregatura) al malcapitato protagonista (che proprio estraneo alla faccenda non deve essere visto che in una delle tante versioni viene riconosciuto come padre del bambino). In Mudcat sono riportate tutta una serie di ballate sempre nella collezione della Bodleian Library che partono dal 1700 e trattano lo stesso tema (vedi).

QUARE BUNGLE?!?

La versione irlandese della storia è pittoresca quantomeno nella definizione della “strana merce” contenuta nel cesto della ragazza! quare è una variante dialettale di “queer” un termine in uso fin dal 1500 che significa “strano“.
The Online Etymology Dictionary dates the birth of the English word queer to about 1500, with its meaning (adj) of “strange, peculiar, eccentric” from Scottish, perhaps from the Low German queer meaning “oblique, off-center,” related to the German quer, meaning “oblique, perverse, odd,” in turn from the Old High German twerh, “oblique”. During the course of the 18th century, it acquired a new and associated sense — still as an adjective — of “feeling out of sorts, unwell, faint, giddy”. Charles Dickens, in his Pickwick Papers of 1837, wrote queasily of “legs shaky — head queer — round and round — earthquake sort of feeling — very.” From the late 18th century on, queer has also been used as a verb: first meaning “to puzzle, ridicule or cheat”, and then later, from about 1812, changing to mean “spoil or ruin”, or “to jeopardize”. By the turn of the 20th century, the word had acquired firm connotations of sexual deviance, especially referring to the behavior of homosexual or effeminate males, and it’s difficult to determine exactly when queer moved from this loose meaning of kinky, aberrant or dissolute to the more specific sense of homosexual. (tratto da qui)
Mentre l’articolo prosegue con le definizioni più attuali del termine, noi ci fermiamo al suo significato settecentesco e poi dickensiano (vedi nota 2)

Tutta la storia è tra il comico e l’allusivo (bawdy song) e il marinaio ci fa la figura dell’ingenuo se non proprio dell’imbecille!
Una specie di morale della storia è data nella strofa finale con l’avvertenza di guardare sempre bene per la merce che si vuole comprare per evitare fregature; ma l’uomo si “dimentica” anche troppo facilmente, di essere stato proprio lui  il primo ad aver dato la fregatura alla ragazza, lasciandola con un bambino in grembo!
E’ una tipica drinking song ma anche una sea song (se non proprio una sea shanty) diffusa in Irlanda nelle zone di Limerick e Waterford, come pure nel Nord Irlanda, in Scozia e in America (zona Monti Appalachi), registrata dai Clancy Brothers e i Dubliners i quali l’hanno riproposta spesso nel corso della loro lunga carriera.

ASCOLTA Dubliners in Drinking and Wenching 1969

ASCOLTA The Blarney Lads

ASCOLTA Carl Peterson in  “Pirate Song, Sea Song & Shanties, 2006


I
Now Jack was a sailor
who roamed on the town
And she was a damsel
who slipped up and down(1)
Said the damsel to Jack
as shee passed him by
“Would you care for to purchase some quare bungle(2)” ri-raddy-ri
Fol the diddle lie, Roddy rye, Roddy rye.

II
Thought Jack to himself,
“Now what can this be
But the finest old whisky
from far Germany?
Smuggled up in a basket
and sold on the sly
And the name that it goes by
is quare bungle” …
III
Jack gave her a pound
and he thought nothing strange
She said, “hold on to the basket
‘til I run for your change”
Jack looked in the basket
and a child he did spy
“Begorrah(3)! and says Jack
this is quare bungle” ….
IV
Now to get that child christened
was Jack’s next intent
For to get the child christened
to the parson he went
Said the parson to Jack,
“what will he go by?”
“Bedad(3) now, says Jack,
call him quare bungle” …
V
Says the parson to Jack,
“there’s a very queer name”
“Bedad(3) now, says Jack,
‘twas the queer way he came
Smuggled up in a basket
and sold on the sly
And the name that he’ll go by
is quare bungle” ….
VI
Now all you bold sailors
who roam on the town
Beware of the damsels
who skip up and down
Take a peep in their baskets
as they pass you by
Or else they may pawn
on you some quare bungle …..
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Jack era un marinaio
a zonzo per la città
e lei era una fanciulla
allo struscio(1),
disse la damigella a Jack
mentre gli passava accanto
” Vuoi comprare un quare bungle?(2)”
CORO
nonsense
II
Pensò Jack tra sè e sè
“Di cosa si può trattare
se non del più buon vecchio whisky
dalla lontana Germania?
Spacciato in un cesto
e venduto di nascosto
e il nome che gli danno
è quare bungle!”
III
Jack le diede una sterlina
e non ci trovò niente di strano
che lei dicesse ” Tieni il cestino
che corro per cambiare”
Jack guardò nel cesto
e vide un bambino
“Per Dio – disse Jack-
Questo è un quare bungle?!?”
IV
Battezzare il bambino
fu la successiva intenzione di Jack,
per battezzare il bambino
dal parroco andò
disse il parroco a Jack
“Come lo chiamiamo?”
“Oddio (3) -dice Jack
chiamiamolo Quare Bungle”
V
Dice il parroco a Jack
“E’ un nome molto strano”
“Oddio -dice Jack-
E’ strano il modo in cui è arrivato
contrabbandato in un cesto
e venduto di nascosto
e il nome che avrà
sarà Quare Bungle”
VI
Così voi marinai audaci
che passeggiate per la città
attenti alle damigelle
che vanno su e giù,
date un’occhiata ai loro cesti
mentre ci passate accanto
altrimenti vi possono rifilare
un “quare bungle

NOTE
1) mi è sembrato pertinente utilizzare un termine colorito anche se dialettale, proveniente da Napoli che è diventato sinonimo di passeggiata domenicale o serale in cittadine di provincia.
2) prima ancora di acquistare una valenza negativa come “To queer the pitch” il termine richiamava nel 700-800 un senso di tremore, debolezza e vertigini; solo così si comprende come il nostro marinaio abbia potuto pensare al whisky e ai suoi effetti!
3) esclamazioni eufemistiche per By God

FONTI
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?ThreadID=17061
http://www.glossophilia.org/?p=3192 http://www.contemplator.com/england/qbrye.html http://www.8notes.com/scores/5999.asp http://worldmusic.about.com/od/irishsonglyrics/a/quare-Bungle-Rye.htm

CAPTAIN KIDD

v0_masterIl capitano William Kidd (1645-1701) fu impiccato a Londra il 24 maggio 1701 dopo essere stato processato con l’accusa di pirateria.

Il ritratto che lo raffigura con tanto di parrucca e cravatta (così viene chiamato questo nuovo capo dell’abbigliamento maschile, entrato nella moda nella seconda metà del 1650: ovvero una striscia in seta con alto bordo in pizzo annodata a fiocco o più semplicemente ravvolta a più giri) è quello di un fiero capitano della seconda metà del Seicento, non certo di un pirata (barbuto o baffuto, con sporchi capelli arruffati o treccine, orecchini e bandana  ) !!

L’Adventure, la nave di Kidd nella seconda parte della sua carriera

UN RISPETTABILE CORSARO

C’era una linea, sempre più sottile all’epoca, che divideva i rispettabili corsari dai pirati: i corsari avevano la licenza di depredare le navi “nemiche” sia che fossero francesi o spagnole o navi pirata ed erano in possesso della “lettera di corsa” con siglate le varie condizioni in merito alla “licenza”, avvallate anche dai rispettivi regnanti (perciò una parte del bottino spettava alla Corona); i pirati depredavano qualunque nave mercantile o pirata e il bottino era spartito tra l’equipaggio, di cui una bella fetta andava ovviamente al capitano.
William Kidd quella lettera ce l’aveva quando ritornò a fare il corsaro nel 1696 alla volta dell’Oceano Indiano, per meritarsi la fama di “Terrore di tutti i Mari”, poi le sua gesta in odore di pirateria o più semplicemente il mutare del vento (gli interessi mercantili della sempre più potente Compagnia delle Indie) lo fecero cadere in disgrazia.
Alcuni storici parlano di congiura contro il capitano Kidd manovrato dalle alte sfere come capro espiatorio; come sia la sua impiccagione diede il via a una notevole mole di cronache, atti processuali e ballate e lo fece diventare un personaggio famoso, ripreso nella letteratura e nel cinema.

Il personaggio mi ha riportato alla mente la storia del pirata Long John Silver (La vera storia del pirata Long John Silver di Larsson Björn -1995), -che consiglio caldamente di leggere -non per assonanza di vicissitudini quanto, io credo, di filosofia così riassunta “Se c’è qualcosa che dà un senso alla vita, è senz’altro il fatto di non essere soggetto ad alcuna legge, di non avere mani e piedi legati. E non importa il tipo di fune o chi ha stretto il nodo. È la corda stessa il male. È con quella che prima o poi si finisce per legarsi da soli o per essere appesi a una forca. Questa è stata la mia filosofia, e giustamente sono ancora vivo”

PRIMA VERSIONE DELLA BALLATA, 1701

936La prima broadside ballad venne distribuita tra la folla andata ad assistere all’impiccagione: “Captain Kid’s Farewel to the Seas, or the Famous Pirate’s Lament” sulla melodia “Coming Down” conteneva una ventina di strofe in cui il capitano confessava i suoi crimini (le navi depredate, l’uccisione di William Moore, il ricco bottino accumulato) e concludeva con rassegnazione davanti alla morte, dando l’addio al mare.

La “confessione” in realtà non fu mai pronunciata da capitan Kidd che anzi si proclamò sempre innocente! Si tratta chiaramente di una “Good-night Ballads”  un genere di moda nel 1700, con cui il condannato a morte si accomiata dalla folla andata ad assistere all’esecuzione. Alcune di queste canzoni sono state commissionate dagli stessi prigionieri, eppure non bisogna dare troppo credito documentario alle storie narrate, in quanto l’autore anonimo del broadside ci ricamava parecchio sopra.
Gallows songs, printed for sale at public executions, were a popular form of broadside until public hanging was abolished in the mid nineteenth century. These events attracted great crowds […] and provided an eager market for broadside sellers. […]. There must have been hundreds, perhaps thousands, of gallows songs telling the stories of murderers, pirates, traitors and other felons. They fulfilled a similar role to that of today’s more sensational Sunday newspapers, and when more popular newspapers came on the market from the mid nineteenth century, gallows songs faded away, though many went on being sung in oral tradition. Some were noted by the early collectors, who tended to reject them as ‘vulgar’. (Pollard, Folksong 32) (tratto da qui)

La canzone rimbalzò nelle Colonie inglesi d’America in cui circolò in forma di ballata dal 1730 al 1820 (e curiosamente il nome del capitano divenne Robert) e si arricchì di altre strofe e vari rimaneggiamenti.

LE MELODIE

Nell’esaustiva e dettagliata dissertazione di David Kidd (vedi) possiamo seguire tutta la storia della melodia rintracciata in terra scozzese e nella seconda metà del 1500 (Complaynt of Scotland 1549) diventata “My luve’s in Germanie” (una canzone sulla guerra del 1630-1648) di cui si ritrova la stampa con il titolo “Germanie Thomas“, in data 1794 (ascolta) tuttavia non tutti gli storici sono disposti a vedere questa diretta discendenza, pur riconoscendo una sorta di “motivo musicale” comune nelle Lowlands scozzesi sul tema amoroso. Un’altra radice celtica è stata rintracciata nella canzone gallese Mentra Gwen (in inglese Plaint of the Widow).

Veniamo quindi alla melodia indicata nel foglio della ballata stampato nel 1701, detta “Coming Down“: come si sa, nei fogli di strada erano riportati solo i testi (per lo più anonimi) e per la melodia si faceva riferimento ad arie popolari e in voga; proprio l’anno prima era stato giustiziato un tale di nome Jack Hall la cui ballata conosciuta da tutti terminava con “but never a word I said coming down” diventata poi Sam Hall nel 1849, la straziante storia dello spazzacamino di Londra impiccato per l’accusa di furto aggravato. Incidentalmente la melodia è simile alla ballata Admiral Benbow Air scritta nel 1702, mentre lo spartito è pubblicato nel 1783 in The Vocal Enchantress. Dalla stessa melodia popolare discende anche il brano “Ye Jacobites by name” scritto da Robert Burns nel 1792.

In America sulla melodia così orecchiabile si sono composti molti inni religiosi che hanno generato a loro volta una serie infinita di varianti e aggiustamenti

IL FOLK REVIVAL

Le versioni moderne del brano derivano per lo più dall’arrangiamento fatto da Pete Seeger (in “Golden Ring”, 1964) sulla versione che aveva imparato da Steve Benbow a sua volta influenzato da Admiral Benbow.
ASCOLTA Carl Peterson in I Love Scottish and Irish Sea Songs 2003. Qui la melodia è proprio un lamento e il testo è più simile alla ballata nella sua prima edizione (le immagini abbinate nel video sono disegni a carboncino, schizzi a matita o a china, litografie con navi, barche e marinai di varie epoche)


I
My name is Captain Kidd,
as I sailed, as I sailed
My name is Captian Kidd, as I sailed
My name is Captian Kidd,
God’s laws I did forbid
And most wickedly I did,
as I sailed, as I sailed
II
I was born in Greenock(1) town
as I sailed, as I sailed ..
from where the great ship
they did abound and they sailed the whole world round
III
Oh, my parents taught me well,
to shun the gates of Hell
But against them I rebelled
IV
Well, I murdered William Moore(2),
and I left him in his gore
Forty leagues from shore,
V
To execution dock(3)
I must go,
lay my head upon the block
And no more the laws I’ll mock
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
I
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e ho navigato
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare.
II
Sono nato a Greenock(1)
e ho navigato
da dove il grande veliero
è salpato
e si navigava in tutto il mondo
III
I miei genitori mi hanno ben insegnato
ad evitare i cancelli dell’Inferno,
ma contro di loro mi ribellai
IV
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
20 leghe lontano dalla riva
V
Al molo degli impiccati(3)
devo andare
metto la testa nel cappio,
non mi farò più beffe delle leggi

NOTE
1) William Kidd nacque intorno al 1645 a Greenock, porto scozzese nei pressi del fiordo di Clyde, figlio di un ministro presbiteriano a 14 anni scappò di casa per imbarcarsi e finalmente a 44 anni divenne capitano di una nave corsara che veleggiava nel mare dei Caraibi; due anni dopo si sistemò a New York (porto preferito da tanti pirati dell’epoca) con una ricca vedova in una bella casa di Coney Island. Però la vita da sposato (ancorchè trafficante) gli andava stretta e nel 1695 salpò per Londra a cercare dei finanziatori per riprendere i mari come corsaro.
2) l’uccisione immotivata di William Moore si unì all’accusa di pirateria, nonostante si trattasse di reazione ad un tentativo di ammutinamento della ciurma (pare che il capitano lo avesse colpito con un secchio sulla testa)
3) Kidd arrestato in America nel 1699 venne processato in Inghilterra e impiccato a Londra sul molo del Tamigi vicino a Wapping, famigerato per essere diventato “Il molo dell’esecuzione” (Galgendock). La pena capitale era riservata agli atti di ammutinamento e gli omicidi in alto mare per cui qui venivano impiccati ammutinati, contrabbandieri e pirati. La corda era tenuta corta, in modo che al condannato la morte sopraggiungesse lentamente per soffocamento (con la corda lasciata più lunga, la brusca caduta del corpo all’apertura della botola sottostante causava più facilmente  la rottura del collo). Pare che la corda di Kidd si ruppe al primo tentativo, e così pure al secondo, ma non sopraggiunse la grazia. Il suo corpo venne lasciato appeso in una gabbia di ferro a imputridire per tre anni, come avvertimento agli altri pirati.

La melodia è identica a Sam Hall, qui le versioni sono  più allegre e fanno assumere al testo una venatura ironica.
ASCOLTA Great Big Sea


Chorus:
My name is Captain Kidd
As I sailed, as I sailed
Oh, my name is Captain Kidd, as I sailed
My name is Captain Kidd
And God’s laws I did forbid
And most wickedly, I did
as I sailed
I
My father taught me well(1)
To shun the gates of hell
But against him I rebelled
as I sailed,
He stuck a bible in my hand
But I left it in the sand
And I pulled away from land
II
I murdered William Moore(2)
And I left him in his gore
Twenty leagues away from shore
And even crueler still,
his gunner I did kill
And his precious blood did spill
III
I was sick and nigh to death
And I vowed at every breath
To walk in wisdom’s path
But my repentance lasted not
For vows I had forgot
Oh damnation is my lot
IV
To the execution dock(3)
Lay my head upon the block
No more laws I will mock,
Take warning here and heed
To shun bad company
Or you’ll wind up just like me
TRADUZIONE di CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e ho navigato
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
Il mio nome è Capitan Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare.
I
Mio padre mi ha ben insegnato(1)
ad evitare i cancelli dell’Inferno,
ma contro di lui mi ribellai;
e ho navigato 
lui mise la bibbia nella mano,
ma la abbandonai sulla sabbia
e mi allontanai dalla terra
II
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
20 leghe lontano dalla riva
e ancor più crudelmente
il suo cannoniere ho ucciso
e il suo sangue prezioso ho versato
III
Ero malato e prossimo alla morte
e dedicai ogni respiro
a camminare sulla retta via
ma il mio pentimento non è durato
e quei voti ho dimenticato
oh la dannazione è il mio destino
V
Al molo dell’impiccato (3)
metto la testa nel cappio,
non mi farò più beffe delle leggi,
prestate attenzione qui e ascoltate:
evitate le cattive compagnie o
finirete proprio come me

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty della ballata, anche se Stan Hugill non la riporta nella sua “Bibbia

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed 4 Black Flag

I
O, my name was Captain Kidd,
as I sailed, as I sailed,
O, my name was Captain Kidd,
as I sailed.
My name was Captain Kidd
And God’s laws I did forbid,
And so wickedly I did
as I sailed, as I sailed.
So wickedly I did
as I sailed.
II
I murdered William Moore(2),
I laid him in his gore,
Not many leagues from the shore,
O, I murdered William Moore,
as I sailed, as I sailed.
III
I spied three ships from Spain
and I fired on them a-main,
And most of them I slain,
as I sailed, as I sailed.
IV
Come all you young and old,
see me die, see me die.
Come all you young and old,
see me die.
You are welcome to my goal,
And by it I lost my soul
Come all you young and old,
I must die, I must die.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
quando navigavo, quando navigavo
oh Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
quando navigavo
oh Il mio nome era Capitano Kidd
e le leggi che Dio ha vietato
con cattiveria ho perseguito
quando andavo per mare
così crudelmente
quando navigavo
II
Ho assassinato William Moore(2)
e l’ho lasciato nel suo sangue,
a non molte leghe dalla spiaggia
oh ho assassinato William Moore
quando andavo per mare
III
Ho spiato tre navi dalla Spagna
e ho sparato su di loro in mare
e molti ne ho ucciso
quando andavo per mare
IV
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
a vedermi morire, a vedermi morire
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
a vedermi morire,
Siete i benvenuti al mio trionfo
e a causa sua ho perso la mia anima
Venite tutti, giovani e vecchi
devo morire, devo morire

Interessante anche questa versione folk-rock dei Tempest che hanno riscritto il testo in difesa del corsaro Kidd ASCOLTA

IL TESORO SEPOLTO

Capitan Kidd illustrato da ANGUS McBRIDE

Il leggendario tesoro di Capitan Kidd è ancora sepolto da qualche parte a Long Island (oppure in un’isola sperduta nei Caraibi). Pare che il casus belli fosse l’ultima nave depredata, il mercantile Quedagh Merchant con oro, argento, pietre preziose e stoffe pregiate, per un valore di quattrocentomila sterline equivalenti a circa sessanta milioni di sterline odierne – poco meno di 67 milioni di euro. Purtroppo la maggior parte del carico apparteneva alla Compagnia Britannica delle Indie Orientali che pretese la testa del Capitano!
Recentemente un noto cacciatori di tesori, Barry Clifford, ha rivendicato la scoperta del relitto della nave di Kidd, l’Adventure Galley.
Il mitico tesoro ha ispirato Robert Louis Stevenson nella stesura dell'”Isola del Tesoro”..

FONTI
http://www.bluebird-electric.net/academia/Marine_Archaeology_Treasure_Ships/Captain_William_Kidd_Pirates_Adventure_Galley_Privateer_Ship.htm
http://www.instoria.it/home/capitano_kidd.htm
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LK35.html
http://www.davidkidd.net/Captain_Kidd_Lyrics.html
http://www.davidkidd.net/Captain_Kidd_Music.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=70693
http://people.brandeis.edu/~dkew/David/Bonner-CaptKidd_ballad-1944.pdf