Archivi tag: border ballad

Outlander, chapter 34: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

 Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

The Dowie Dens of Yarrow – a ballad from the Scottish Border. Murtagh teaches this song to Claire when they travel together looking for Jamie after he is taken by the Watch.
(continue “The Search” Outlander Tv season I)

“The Dowie Dens of Yarrow”, “The Dewy Dens of Yarrow” or  “The Breas of Yarrow”, “The Banks of Yarrow” exists in many variants in Child’s book ( The O Braes’ Yarrow Child ballad  IV, # 214). The story was also told in the poem by William Hamilton, published in Tea-Table Miscellany (Allan Ramsay, 1723) and also in  Reliques (Thomas Percy, vol II 1765): Hamilton was inspired by an old Scottish ballad of the oral tradition (see)
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented “Child printed nineteen texts of this beautiful Scottish tragic ballad, the oldest dating from the 18th century. Sir Walter Scott, who first published it in his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1803), believed that the ballad referred to a duel fought at the beginning of the 17th century between John Scott of Tushielaw and Walter Scott of Thirlestane in which the latter was slain. Child pointed out inaccuracies in this theory but tended to give credence to the possibility that the ballad did refer to an actual occurrence in Scott family history that was not too far removed from that of the ballad tale.
In a recent article, Norman Cazden discussed various social and historical implications of this ballad (and its relationship to Child 215, Rare Willie Drowned in Yarrow), as well as deriding Scott’s theories as to its origin.” (see Mainly Norfolk)
ETTRICK FOREST
The area is a sort of “Bermuda triangle” of the Celtic world, a strip of land rich in traditional tales of fairy raptures and magical apparitions!
(see also the Tam lin ballad)

The hero of the ballad was a knight of great bravery, popularly believed to be John Scott, sixth son of the Laird of Harden. According to history, he met a treacherous and untimely death in Ettrick Forest at the hands of his kin, the Scotts of Gilmanscleugh in the seventeenth century.

Newark Castle sullo Yarrow: not the castle of the ballad but a possible setting

THE AGREEMENT OVER  YARROW’S VALLEY

The song describes a young man (perhaps a border reiver) killed in an ambush near the Yarrow river by the brothers of the woman he loved. In some versions, the lady rejects nine suitors in preference for a servant or ploughman; the nine make a pact to kill the her real lover, in other they are men sent by the lady’s father.The reiver manages to kill or wound his assailants but eventually falls, pierced by the youngest of them.

The lady may see the events in a dream, some versions of the song end with the lady grieving, in others she dies of grief.
The structure is the classical one of the ancient ballads with the revealing of the story between the questions and answers of the protagonists and the commonplace of the death announced to the parents.

Paton-Yarrow
Sir Joseph Noel Paton: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

So many textual versions and different melodies, which I have grouped into three strands.

FIRST VERSION

The melody was collected by Lucy Broadwood  from John Potts of Whitehope Farm, Peeblesshire, published in The Journal of the Folk Song Society, vol.V (1905).

Matthew White (Canadian countertenor): Skye Consort in the Cd “O Sweet Woods 2013”, the arrangement is very interesting, with a Baroque atmosphere that echoes the era in which the first version is traced. Only verses I, II, IV, V, VI, VIII and XIV are performed

Mad Pudding in Dirt & Stone -1996 (except V verse) listen

I
There lived a lady in  the north (1);
You could scarcely find her marrow (2).
She was courted by nine noblemen
On the dewy dells (3) of Yarrow (4)
II
Her father had a bonny ploughboy (5)
And she did love him dearly.
She dressed him up like a noble lord
For to fight for her on Yarrow(6).
III
She kissed his cheek, she kamed his hair,
As oft she had done before O (7),
She gilted him with a right good sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
As he climbed up yon high hill
And they came down the other,
There he spied nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow.
V
‘Did you come here for to drink red wine,
Or did you come here to borrow?
Or did you come here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow?’
VI
‘I came not here for to drink red wine,
And I came not here to borrow,
But I came here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow’
VII
‘There are nine of you and one of me,
And that’s but an even number,
But it’s man to man I’ll fight you all
And die for her on Yarrow’
VIII
Three he drew and three he slew
And two lie deadly wounded,
When a stubborn knight crept up behind
And pierced him with his arrow.
IX
‘Go home, go home, my false young man,
And tell your sister Sarah
That her true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow’
X
As he gaed down yon high hill
And she came down the other,
It’s then he met his sister dear
A-coming fast to Yarrow.
XI
‘O brother dear, I had a dream last night,’
‘I can read it into sorrow;
Your true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow.’
XII
This maiden’s hair was three-quarters long (8),
The colour of it was yellow.
She tied it around his middle side (9)
And she carried him home to Yarrow.
XIII
She kissed his cheeks, she kamed his hair
As oft she had done before O,
Her true lover John lies dead and gone,
on the dewy dells of Yarrow.
XIV
O mother dear, make me my bed,
And make it long and narrow,
For the one that died for me today,
I shall die for him tomorrow
XV
‘O father dear, you have seven sons;
You can wed them all tomorrow,
For the fairest flower amongst them all (9)
Is the one that died on Yarrow.

NOTE
1) the north is not only a geographical location but a code word  in balladry for a sad story
2) marrow= a companion, a bosom friend, a kindred spirit (a husband)
3) dowue, dewy= sad, melancholy, dreary, dismal
Dens, dells= a narrow valley or ravine, usually wooded, a dingle
4) Yarrow is a river but also an officinal herb, Achillea millefolium. So the definition of the place “the valleys of the Yarrow” becomes more vague but also symbolic: the yarrow is a plant associated with death, and in popular beliefs the sign of a mourning.
From the healing powers already known in the times of Homer and used by the Druids, the plant is the main ingredient of a magic potion worthy of the secret recipe of the Panoramix druid. It is said that in the Upper Valle del Lys (Valle d’Aosta, Italy) the Salassi were great consumers of a drink that infused courage and strength. It became known as Ebòlabò and it is a drink still prepared by the inhabitants of the valley based on “achillea moscata”.
5) In some versions the boy is a country man but not necessarily a peasant, rather a cadet son of a small country nobility. Near Yarrow (Yarrow Krik) there is still a stone with an ancient inscription near a place called the “Warrior’s rest“.
6) Matthew White
“She killed here with a single sword
On the dewy dells of Yarrow”
7) the typical behavior of a devoted wife who looks after, combs and dresses her husband, the same care and devotion that she will give to the corpse
8)  In the Middle Ages the girls wore very long hair knotted in a thick braid
9) some interpret the verse as an expression of mourning in which the girl cuts her long hair (that reaches her knees) up to her waist. The phrase literally means, however, that she uses her hair to carry away the corpse interweaving them like a rope. The image is a little grotesque for our standards, but it must have been a common practice at the time
10) the verse says that the handsome peasant was the bravest of all, certainly not the brother!

“ERICA FUNESTA”

Second version: the lady makes a dream in which she is picking up the red heather on the slopes of the Yarrow, an omen of misfortune.
A Scottish legend explains how the common  heather has become white: Malvina, daughter of a Celtic bard, was engaged to a warrior named Oscar. Oscar was killed in battle, and the messenger that delivered the news gave her heather as a token of Oscar’s love. As her tears fell on the heather, it turned white.  Since then the white heather is the emblem of faithful love; the resemblance to the Norse legend of Baldur and the mistletoe is surprising.

Karine Powart version shows us the most extensive text of the ballad that the Pentangle translate into English and reduce to 7 verses

Bert Jansh  Yarrow, in Moonshine (1973).

 The Pentangle in Open the Door, 1985 ( I, II, III, IV, VI, VIII, XIII)

I
There was a lady in the north
You scarce would find her marrow
She was courted by nine gentlemen
And a plooboy lad fae Yarrow
II
Well, nine sat drinking at the wine
As oft they’d done afore O
And they made a vow amang themselves
Tae fight for her on Yarrow
III
She’s washed his face, she’s combed his hair,/ As she has done before,
She’s placed a brand down by his side,
To fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
So he’s come ower yon high, high hill
And doon by the den sae narrow
And there he spied nine armed men
Come tae fight wi’ him on Yarrow
V
He says, “There’s nine o’ you and but one o’ me/ It’s an unequal marrow”
But I’ll fight ye a’ noo one by one
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow
VI (1)
So it’s three he slew and three withdrew
An’ three he wounded sairly
‘Til her brother, he came in beyond
And he wounded him maist foully
VII
“Gae hame, gae hame, ye fause young man
And bring yer sister sorrow
For her ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
VIII
“Oh mither, (2) I hae dreamed a dream
A dream o’ doul and sorrow
I dreamed I was pu’ing the heathery bells (3)
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
IX
“Oh daughter dear, I ken yer dream
And I doobt it will bring sorrow
For yer ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
X
An’ so she’s run ower yon high, high hill
An’ doon by the den sae narrow
And it’s there she spied her dear lover John
Lyin’ pale and deid on Yarrow
XI
And so she’s washed his face an’ she’s kaimed his hair
As aft she’d done afore O
And she’s wrapped it ‘roond her middle sae sma’ (4)
And she’s carried him hame tae Yarrow
XII
“Oh haud yer tongue, my daughter dear/ What need for a’ this sorrow?
I’ll wed ye tae a far better man
Than the one who’s slain on Yarrow”
XIII
“Oh faither, ye hae seven sons
And ye may wed them a’ the morrow
But the fairest floo’er amang them a’
Was the plooboy lad fae Yarrow”
XIV
“Oh mother, mother mak my bed
And mak it saft and narrow
For my love died for me this day
And I’ll die for him tomorrow”

NOTE
8) qui il verso risulta un po’ oscuro mancando il particolare dei lunghi capelli di lei annodati in treccia che diventano corde da traino per portare il cadavere a casa
1) The Pentangle
It’s three he’s wounded, and three withdrew,
And three he’s killed on Yarrow,
2) The Pentangle say “father
3) heather bell is the name of the  Erica cinerea ; a Scottish legend explains how the common  heather has become white: Malvina, daughter of a Celtic bard, was engaged to a warrior named Oscar. Oscar was killed in battle, and the messenger that delivered the news gave her heather as a token of Oscar’s love. As her tears fell on the heather, it turned white.  Since then the white heather is the emblem of faithful love; the resemblance to the Norse legend of Baldur and the mistletoe is surprising.

THE HEATHERY HILLS OF YARROW

It’s Bothy band version that begins the story from the ambush and develops the dialogue between the lady and her relatives until her tragic death.
Bothy band (Tríona Ní Dhomhnaill voice) in After hours, 1979

I
It’s three drew and three slew,
And three lay deadly wounded,
When her brother John stepped in between,
And stuck his knife right through him.
II
As she went up yon high high hill,
And down through yonder valley,
Her brother John came down the glen,
Returning home from Yarrow.
III
Oh brother dear I dreamt last night
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
I dreamt that you were spilling blood,
On the dewy dens of Yarrow.
IV
Oh sister dear I read your dream,
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
For your true love John lies dead and gone
On the heathery hills of Yarrow.
V
This fair maid’s hair being three quarters long,
And the colour it was yellow,
She tied it round his middle waist,
And she carried him home from Yarrow.
VI
Oh father dear you’ve got seven sons,
You can wed them all tomorrow,
But a flower like my true love John,
Will never bloom in Yarrow.
VII
This fair maid she being tall and slim,
The fairest maid in Yarrow,
She laid her head on her father’s arm,
And she died through grief and sorrow.

References
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Child%27s_Ballads/214
http://literaryballadarchive.com/PDF/Hamilton_1_Braes_of_Yarrow_f.pdf
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C214.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thedowiedensofyarrow.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/145.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/484.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/67.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/dowie.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/families/scotts_harden.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9870
http://fallingangelslosthighways.blogspot.it/2013/04/the-eildon-hills-sacred-mountains-of.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46972

Johnny the Brine

Una ‘Border Ballad’ trascritta dal professor Child al numero 114 in ben 13 versioni:  Johnny the Brine, Johnnie Cock, Johnnie (Jock)  o’ Breadislee, Jock O’Braidosly, Johnnie o’ Graidie sono i vari nomi con cui è identificato questo bracconiere/bandito del Border scozzese.

LA GUERRA AL BRACCONAGGIO

“La foresta ha occupato un posto importantissimo nella vita inglese fino dai tempi antichi; ancora durante il regno della regina Elisabetta, fitte boscaglie ricoprivano le aree di intere contee, ed il mondo della foresta aveva guardie, leggi e tribunali propri ai quali neanche i nobili ed il clero potevano sottrarsi completamente. Dall’invasione normanna fino a Giorgio III è stata una continua lotta, per lungo tempo assai sanguinosa, tra il popolo da una parte e, dall’altra, le inique leggi che trattavano l’uccisione d’un cervo alla stregua di un assassinio e sottoponevano i cacciatori di frodo, quando non alla morte, all’abbacinamento o alla mutilazione degli arti. La foresta veniva “monopolizzata” dalla nobiltà per l’esclusivo “sport” della caccia, mentre per la gente essa rappresentava uno dei pochi mezzi di sostentamento. Il bracconaggio era dunque un’attività rischiosissima e poteva davvero costare la vita, anche perché i guardacaccia avevano la facoltà di abbattere sul posto chiunque fosse stato scoperto a cacciare di frodo. Da qui la denominazione di “guerra del bracconaggio“, che rende esattamente l’idea di che cosa davvero si trattasse (anche perché le foreste, ideale rifugio di banditi e Outlaws, venivano spesso soggette a vere e proprie spedizioni militari.” (Riccardo Venturi tratto da qui)

Nell’Alto Medioevo i bracconieri  erano considerati alla stregua di fuorilegge e uccisi sul posto dai guardacaccia. Successivamente le pene si mitigarono prevedendo l’incarcerazione e/o l’amputazione della mano (o l’abbacinamento) fino alla pena capitale quando gli animali erano della riserva di caccia del Re. In Inghilterra con la Magna Charta libertatum (1215) vennero abolite le pene per la caccia di frodo, ma nella prassi quotidiana i giudici della contea (ovvero gli stessi nobili “derubati”) raramente erano ben disposti verso i bracconieri. Le condanne  nei secoli successivi furono progressivamente più miti e nel settecento il bracconiere rischiava solo la detenzione in carcere per qualche mese e/o le frustate. Era inoltre possibile pagare una multa (anche se salata) per riavere la libertà.

La ballata è ancora popolare in Scozia (dal Fife all’Aberdeenshire fino al Border) e le sue prime versioni in stampa risalgono alla fine del Settecento: si narra di un giovane che va a caccia di cervi, ma in sprezzo del pericolo, dopo il buon esito della caccia, se ne resta nel bosco appisolandosi dopo un lauto banchetto. Sorpreso da un servitore della zona viene denunciato ai guardacaccia del Re i quali gli tendono un’imboscata per ucciderlo: sono sette contro uno ma Johnny riesce a ucciderne sei. Il finale varia a seconda delle versioni: il settimo guardacaccia riesce a mettersi in salvo fuggendo sul cavallo, o viene lasciato in vita per poter riferire l’accaduto; in altre è un uccellino che viene inviato a casa con la richiesta di soccorso, ma la fine è sempre tragica e il bracconiere muore a causa delle ferite.

Johnny of Braidislee-Samuel Edmund Waller

LA VERSIONE ESTESA: Jock O’Braidosly

ASCOLTA The Corries, live

ASCOLTA Top Floor Taivers live in un arrangiamento molto personale


I
Johnny got up on a May mornin’
Called for water to wash his hands
Says “Gie loose tae me my twa grey dugs
That lie in iron bands – bands
That lie in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s mother she heard o’ this
Her hands for dool she wrang
Sayin’ “Johnny for your venison
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang – gang
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang”
III
But Johnny has ta’en his guid bend bow
His arrows one by one
And he’s awa’ tae the greenwood gane
Tae ding the dun deer doon – doon
Tae ding the dun deer doon
IV
Noo Johnny shot and the dun deer leapt
And he wounded her in the side
And there between the water and the woods
The grey hounds laid her pride – her pride/The grey hounds laid her pride
V
They ate so much o’ the venison
They drank so much o’ the blood
That Johnny and his twa grey dugs
Fell asleep as though were deid – were deid
Fell asleep as though were deid
VI
Then by there cam’ a silly auld man
An ill death may he dee
For he’s awa’ tae Esslemont (1)
The seven foresters for tae see – tae see
The foresters for tae see
VII
“As I cam’ in by Monymusk (2)
Doon among yon scruggs
Well there I spied the bonniest youth
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs – twa dugs
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs”
VIII (3)
The buttons that were upon his sleeve
Were o’ the gowd sae guid
And the twa grey hounds that he lay between
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood – wi’ blood
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood
IX
Then up and jumps the first forester
He was captain o’ them a’
Sayin “If that be Jock o’ Braidislee
Unto him we’ll draw – we’ll draw
Unto him we’ll draw”
X
The first shot that the foresters fired
It hit Johnny on the knee
And the second shot that the foresters fired
His heart’s blood blint his e’e – his e’e
His heart’s blood blint his e’e
XI (4)
Then up jumps Johnny fae oot o’ his sleep
And an angry man was he
Sayin “Ye micht have woken me fae my sleep
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e – my e’e
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e”
XII
But he’s rested his back against an oak
His fit upon a stane
And he has fired at the seven o’ them
He’s killed them a’ but ane – but ane
He’s killed them a’ but ane
XIII
He’s broken four o’ that one’s ribs
His airm and his collar bane (5)
And he has set him upon his horse
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame – hame
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame
XIV
But Johnny’s guid bend bow is broke
His twa grey dugs are slain
And his body lies in Monymusk
His huntin’ days are dane – are dane
His huntin’ days are dane
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani
“Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri
sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La madre di Johnny che seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
” Johnny per la tua caccia
al bosco non andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo, le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù – per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna spiccò un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda,
la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Molto mangiarono della carne
e bevvero tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono di colpo –
di colpo
si addormentarono di colpo
VI
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio,
che peste lo colga,
che andava a Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia, –
vedere
per vedere i sette guardacaccia.
VII
“Mentre venivo qui da Monymusk
per quella boscaglia
vidi il ragazzo più bello
che giaceva addormentato tra due cani- due cani
giaceva addormentato tra due cani
VIII
I bottoni che portava alla maniche
erano d’oro zecchino
e i due levrieri tra cui era
disteso
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue- di sangue
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue
IX
Saltò su il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Se quello è il giovane Jock o’ Braidislee andremo da lui –
andremo da lui”
X
Il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, colpì Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio- occhio il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
XI
Saltò su Johnny risvegliandosi dal sonno
ed era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Mi avete risvegliato dal sonno
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio”
XII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno – uno
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
XIII
Aveva quattro delle costole rotte
il braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa
XIV
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti – sono finiti, i giorni della caccia sono finiti

NOTE
1) nell’Aberdeenshire si trovano ancora i resti del Castello di Esslemont
2) Monymusk è un ameno paesello, oggi la tenuta Monymusk gestisce una vasta area boschiava lungo le rive del fiume Don (vedi)
3) un classico espediente dei narratori che aggiungevano dettagli sfarzosi alla storia per destare meraviglia tra il pubblico
4) è una strofa riempitiva secondo lo schema della ripetizione tipico delle ballate popolari (vedi)
5) un passaggio un po’ brusco inerente il settimo guardacaccia lasciato in vita, anche se malconcio issato sul cavallo e liberato perchè fosse un testimone di quanto accaduto

SECONDA VERSIONE: Johnny the Brine

La versione è quella della traveller Jeannie Robertson un po’ più rielaborata nelle strofe finali.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee

ed ecco l’intervista filmanta dallo stesso Sam Lee in merito alla trasmissione orale della ballata all’interno della famiglia Robertson


I
Johnny arose one May morning
Called water to wash his hands
“so bring to me my twa greyhounds
They are bound in iron bands, bands
They are bound in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s wife she wrang her hands –
“To the greenwoods dinnae gang
for the sake o’ the venison
To the greenwoods dinnae gang, gang
To the greenwoods dinnae gang”
III
Johnny’s gane up through Monymusk
And doon some scroggs
And there he spied a young deer leap
She was lying in a field of scrub, scrub
She was lying in a field of scrub
IV
The first arrow he fired
It wounded her on the side
And between the water and the wood
His greyhounds laid her pride, pride
His greyhounds laid her pride
V
Johnny and his two greyhounds
Drank so much blood
That Johnny an his two greyhounds
They fell sleeping in the wood, wood
They fell sleeping in the wood
VI
By them came a fool old man
And an ill death may he dee
he went up and telt the forester
And he telt what he did lie, lie
And he telt what he did lie
VII
“If that be young Johnny of the Brine
then let him sleep on (1)”
but the seventh forester denied (2)
he was Johnny’s sister’s son, son
“To the greenwood we will gang”
VIII
The first arrow that they fired
wounded him upon the thigh,
And the second arrow that they fired
his heart’s blood blinded his eye, eye
his heart’s blood blinded his eye
IX
Johnny rose up wi’ a angry growl
For an angry man was he –
“I‘ll kill a’ you six foresters
And brak the seventh one’s back in three, three, three
And brak the seventh one’s back in three”
X
He put his foot all against a stane
And his back against a tree
An he’s kilt a’ the six foresters
And broke the seventh one’s back in three,
and he broke his collar-bone
An he put him on his grey mare’s back
For to carry the tidings home, home
For to carry the tidings home
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani “Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri, sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La moglie di Johnny si torse le mani
“Al bosco non andare
per amor della caggiagione
al bosco non andare, andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Johnny è andato per il Monymusk,
in mezzo alla boscaglia
e lì vide una giovane cerva
distesa nella macchia, macchia
distesa nella macchia
IV
La prima freccia scoccata
la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda, la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
bevvero così tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono nel bosco, bosco
si addormentarono nel bosco
VI
Presso di loro venne un vecchio pazzo,
che peste lo colga,
e andò a chiamare i guardacaccia
per dire dove (John) dormiva, dormiva
per dire dove lui dormiva.
VII
“Se quello è il giovane Johnny of the Brine allora che riposi in pace” eccetto il settimo dei guardacaccia  che li rimproverò, era il figlio della sorella di Johnny, il figlio “e al bosco andremo”
VIII
La prima freccia che tirarono
lo ferì alla coscia, e la seconda freccia che tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
IX
Johnny si alzò con un urlo straziante
perchè era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Ucciderò tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre, tre, tre
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre”
X
Mise un piede contro la pietra
e la schiena contro l’albero
e uccise tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzò la schiena del settimo in tre,
e gli ruppe la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso della sua cavalla grigia
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa

NOTE
1) l’intendo dei guardiaboschi è di cogliere Johnny nel sonno perchè non si risvegli mai più
2) sono tutti daccordo a tendere l’imboscata mentre il bracconiere dorme indifeso, tranne il settimo guardacaccia, il quale li rimprovera, in alcune versioni si dice che nemmeno un lupo avrebbe attaccato un uomo inerme 

TERZA VERSIONE: Johnny O’Breadislee

ASCOLTA Hamish Imlach
ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in “Five” 1997


I
Johnny arose on a May mornin’
Gone for water tae wash his hands
He hae loused tae me his twa gray dogs
That lie bound in iron bands
II
When Johnny’s mother, she heard o’ this
Her hands for dule she wrang
Cryin’, “Johnny, for yer venison
Tae the green woods dinna ye gang”
III
Aye, but Johnny hae taen his good benbow
His arrows one by one
Aye, and he’s awa tae green wood gaen
Tae dae the dun deer doon
IV
Oh Johnny, he shot, and the dun deer lapp’t
He wounded her in the side
Aye, between the water and the wood
The gray dogs laid their pride
V
It’s by there cam’ a silly auld man
Wi’ an ill that John he might dee
And he’s awa’ doon tae Esslemont
Well, the King’s seven foresters tae see
VI
It’s up and spake the first forester
He was heid ane amang them a’
“Can this be Johnny O’ Braidislee?
Untae him we will draw”
VII
An’ the first shot that the foresters, they fired
They wounded John in the knee
An’ the second shot that the foresters, they fired
Well, his hairt’s blood blint his e’e
VIII
But he’s leaned his back against an oak
An’ his foot against a stane
Oh and he hae fired on the seven foresters
An’ he’s killed them a’ but ane
IX
Aye, he hae broke fower o’ this man’s ribs
His airm and his collar bain
Oh and he has sent him on a horse
For tae carry the tidings hame
X
Johnny’s good benbow, it lies broke
His twa gray dogs, they lie deid
And his body, it lies doon in Monymusk
And his huntin’ days are daen
His huntin’ days are daen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e andò al fiume per lavarsi le mani
aveva liberato per me i suoi due levrieri  legati con catene di ferro.
II
Quando la madre di Johnny seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
gridando “Johnny per la tua cacciagione al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo,
le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna diede un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i levrieri presero la preda
V
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio
in animo che John dovesse morire,
ed è uscito da Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia
del Re
VI
Saltò su a parlare il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Potrebbe essere Johnny O’ Braidislee? Andremo da lui!”
VII
E il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono
colpirono Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo che i guardacaccia tirarono il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
VIII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro
la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette i guardacaccia
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
IX
Aveva rotto quattro delle costole di quell’uomo
il suo braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa
X
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti
i giorni della caccia sono finiti


FONTI
http://www.mostly-medieval.com/explore/johnie.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch114.htm
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=9398
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/johnnyobredislee.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/johnny.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/johnobre.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/johnnie-o-breadisley/

SHE’S CAST A LOOK ON THE LITTLE MUSGRAVE

“Little Musgrave” è una murder ballad  in cui si narra del tradimento di una giovane moglie sposata a un Lord, la quale cogliendo l’opportunità di un assenza del marito, trascorre una notte di passione con il giovane Musgrave (o Matty Groves). Il finale però è tragico con la morte dei due amanti (prima parte).
Una ballata a tinte fosche che andava per la maggiore in quel territorio selvaggio e di frontiera detto il Border (vedi) durante il Medioevo.

PRIMA MELODIA: VERSIONE A (CHILD #81)

La melodia è stata arrangiata da Nic Jones da una versione americana della ballata intitolata “Little Matty Groves”. Come ebbe modo di spiegare Nic Jones: “Musgrave‘s tune is more a creation of my own than anything else, although the bulk of it is based on an American variant of the same ballad, entitled “Little Matty Groves”.
Un decennio più tardi i Planxty ripresero il motivo musicale di Nic su un testo più vicino alla Versione A in Child # 81 (vedi) che si adatta in modo più scorrevole e fluido rispetto al primo testo. Christy Moore scrive nelle note: “Little Musgrove, a version in which I used old lyrics, added some lyrics of my own and put them together with a tune from the singing of Nick Jones“. (tratto da qui).

LUSSURIA O VERO AMORE?

Le strofe in comune introducono il contesto di un giorno di festa in cui Musgrave è in chiesa con il resto del paese e adocchia la più bella, ovvero la moglie di Lord Barnard, ma è soprattutto lei a puntare al giovanotto con il suo sguardo “As bright as summer’s sun“: nella versione di Jones è la donna a mostrarsi più opportunista, e invitando Musgrave, spera che il marito, partito per la caccia, non ritorni mai più.
La versione dei Planxty è più romantica, i due si professano amore reciproco e il giovane è innamorato  da tempo di Lady Barnard.

Il servo messo a guardia della porta, tradisce la padrona e corre subito alla ricerca del padrone per avvisarlo, d’altra parte un servitore del seguito di Lord Barnard cerca di allertare i due suonando il corno di caccia: Musgrave comprende il segnale, ma la Lady lo “distrae” invitandolo a restare tra le sue braccia, così incautamente i due si addormentano.

tumblr_lgp06ebOB21qbjveuo1_500

Il Lord li coglie nel sonno, lascia che Musgrave prenda la spada per ucciderlo onorevolmente in duello, e forse risparmierebbe la donna, ma lei lo oltraggia invece di invocare il perdono, e così il Lord le trafigge il cuore con la spada!

OMICIDIO COLPOSO

Lord Barnard ha sfidato il suo rivale seguendo alla lettera il codice d’onore del tempo e “tecnicamente” non ha compiuto un vero e proprio omicidio, egli ha commesso quello che oggi verrebbe definito “omicidio colposo”, in Horder’s words, to keep a killing done in the heat of anger from being murder, the killer had to show that he was “wiling to fight fairly, to hazard his own life at the same time as he put that of his ultimate victim at risk.  The killer, in other words, had to demonstrate not only that his killing was unpremeditated but also that he had shown courage and respect for his opponent, by allowing the latter to draw his sword before engaging him.” (tratto da qui)
Anche per l’uccisione della moglie Lord Barnard non sarebbe stato incriminato, essendo egli la parte offesa e l’adultera passibile di severe punizioni (proporzionalmente al lignaggio): sempre tecnicamente il duello tra il marito e l’amante equivaleva all’ordalia con la quale la donna poteva cercare una discolpa dall’accusa di adulterio. Ma qui i due sono stati sorpresi a letto e quindi la colpevolezza della donna è fuori discussione.
Così nella versione dei Planxty Lord Barnard è tutto sommato un gentiluomo che si duole di aver ucciso il più valente cavaliere e la donna più bella, e ordina ai suoi di seppellire insieme i due amanti.

ASCOLTA Nic Jones in ‘Ballads and Songs’, 1970

ASCOLTA Planxty in “The Woman I Loved So Well“, 1980.

VERSIONE NIC JONES
I
As it fell out upon a day
As many in the year
Musgrave to the church did go
To see fair ladies there
II
And some came down in red velvet
And some came down in Pall (1)
And the last to come down was the Lady Barnard, The fairest of them all
III
She’s cast a look on the Little Musgrave
As bright as the summer sun
And then bethought this Little Musgrave
This lady’s love I’ve won
IV
Good-day good-day you handsome youth,
God make you safe and free
What would you give this day Musgrave
To lie one night with me
V
Oh, I dare not for my lands, lady
I dare not for my life
For the ring on your white finger shows
You are Lord Barnard’s wife
VI
Lord Barnard’s to the hunting gone
And I hope he’ll never return
And you shall sleep into his bed
And keep his lady warm
VII
There’s nothing for to fear Musgrave
You nothing have to fear
I’ll set a page outside the gate
To watch til morning clear
VIII
And woe be to the little footpage
And an ill death may he die
For he’s away to the green wood
As fast as he could fly
IX
And when he came to the wide water
He fell on his belly and swam
And when he came to the other side
He took to his heels and ran
X
And when he came to the green wood
‘Twas dark as dark can be
And he found Lord Barnard and his men
Asleep beneath the trees
XI
Rise up rise up Master he said
Rise up and speak to me
Your wife’s in bed with Little Musgrave
Rise up right speedily
XII
If this be truth you tell to me
Then gold shall be your fee
And if it be false you tell to me
Then hangéd you shall be
XIII
Go saddle me the black he said
Go saddle me the grey
And sound you not the horn said he
Lest our coming it would betray
XIV
Now there was a man in Lord Barnard’s train,
Who loved the Little Musgrave
And he blew his horn both loud and shrill
Away! Musgrave Away!
XV
Oh, I think I hear the morning cock
think I hear the jay
I think I hear Lord Barnard’s horn
Away Musgrave Away
XVI
Oh, Lie still, lie still, you little Musgrave
And keep me from the cold
It’s nothing but a shepherd boy
Driving his flock to the fold
XVII
Is not your hawk upon its perch
Your steed is eating hay
And you a gay lady in your arms
And yet you would away
XVIII
So he’s turned him right and round about,
And he fell fast asleep
And when he woke Lord Barnard’s men
Were standing at his feet
XIX
And how do you like my bed Musgrave
And how do you like my sheets
And how do you like my fair lady
That lies in your arms asleep
XX
Oh, It’s well I like your bed he said
And well I like your sheets
And better I like your fair lady
That lies in my arms asleep
XXI
Get up, get up young man he said
Get up as swift as you can
For it never will be said in my country
I slew an unarmed man
XXII
I have two swords in one scabbard
Full dear they cost me purse
And you shall have the best of them
I shall have the worst
XXIII
And So slowly, so slowly he rose up
And slowly he put on
And slowly down the stairs he goes
A-Thinking to be slain
XXIV
And the first stroke Little Musgrave took
It was both deep and sore
And down he fell at Barnard’s feet
And word he never spoke more
XXV
And how do you like his cheeks, lady
And how do you like his chin
And how do you like his fair body
Now there’s no life within

XXVI
It’s well I like his cheeks she said
And well I like his chin
And better I like his fair body
Than all your kith and kin
XXVII
And he’s taken up his long long sword
To strike a mortal blow
And through and through the Lady’s heart
The cold steel it did go
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Accadde in un giorno (di festa)
come ce ne son tanti in un anno,
Musgrave andò in chiesa,
per incontrare le belle ragazze
II
Una di loro aveva un velluto rosso,
un’altra una cappa bianca (1);
per ultima giunse Lady Barnard,
di tutte certo la più bella.
III
Lanciò uno sguardo al giovane
Musgrave,
splendente come il sole d’estate,
e pensò allora il giovane
Musgrave
d’averle conquistato il cuore.
IV
“Buon Giorno, buon Giorno a te
bel giovane,
che Dio ti assista
che ne diresti oggi
Musgrave
di passare la notte con me?”
V
“Oh non mi curo delle mie terre (2), signora
non mi curo della mia vita,
ma dell’anello che mostrate al vostro candido dito,
voi siete la moglie di Lord Barnard”
VI
“Lord Barnard è andato
a caccia
e spero non faccia più ritorno (3)
e tu dormirai nel suo letto
e terrai la sua signora al caldo
VII
Non c’è nulla da temere
Musgrave
non hai nulla da temere
metterò un paggio fuori dalla porta
per vegliare fino all’alba”
VIII
Che disgrazia colga il paggetto (4)
e che possa morire di mala morte
perchè  lui andò nel bosco
volando il più velocemente possibile
IX
E quando venne
al fiume
si tuffò e nuotò
e quando arrivò all’altra
riva
si alzò in piedi e corse
X
E quando venne
al bosco
era notte fonda e buia
e lui trovò Lord Barnard
e i suoi uomini
addormentati sotto agli alberi
XI
“Svegliati padrone – disse-
svegliati e parlami,
tua moglie è a letto con il giovane Musgrave
svegliati immediatamente”
XII
“Se questo che mi dici è vero
allora ti darò volentieri l’oro,
ma se dici il falso,
allora ti farò impiccare”
XIII
“Sellatemi, presto, il nero -disse
sellatemi il grigio”
“E non suonate il corno – disse-
per non tradire il nostro arrivo”
XIV
C’era un uomo nel gruppo di Lord Barnard
che amava il giovane Musgrave
e suonò il suo corno forte
e chiaro:
“Scappa, Musgrave, scappa!”
XV
“Credo d’avere sentito il tordo,
credo d’aver sentito la ghiandaia;
credo d’aver sentito il corno di Lord Barnard, scappa, Musgrave, scappa”
XVI
“Stai calmo, stai calmo, giovane Musgrave,
e proteggimi dal freddo.
È solamente un pastorello
che guida le pecore al pascolo.
XVII
“Non hai il falcone sulla staffa,
e il cavallo a mangiare fieno?
Non hai una bella donna tra le braccia,
dunque, vorresti andare via?”
XVIII
Così lui si girò
sul fianco
e si addormentò,
e quando si alzò, gli uomini
di Lord Barnard
stavano ritti ai suoi piedi
XIX
“Quanto ti piace il mio letto Musgrave,
quanto ti piacciono le mie lenzuola?
Trovi bella la mia signora
che giace tra le tue braccia addormentata?”
XX
“Oh molto, mi piacciono il tuo letto e le tue lenzuola
e ancora di più la tua bella signora che giace tra le mie braccia addormentata”
XXI
“Alzati, alzati, piccolo Musgrave,
più in fretta che puoi,
nel mio paese non sarà mai detto
che ho ucciso un uomo nudo (5).
XXII
“Ho due spade nel fodero,
che tanto mi sono costate;
e tu avrai la migliore,
mentre io prenderò la peggiore.”
XXIII
Pian piano lui
si alzò
e piano si mise in piedi
e piano giù per le scale andò
pensando di essere in salvo
XXIV
Il primo colpo che il giovane Musgrave
prese
fu profondo e letale
e giù cadde ai piedi di Lord Barnard
e non parlò più.
XXV
“Quanto ti piacciono le sue guance, signora, e quanto ti piace il uso mento? E quanto ti piace il suo bel corpo ora che è privo di vita?”
XXVI
“Oh molto, mi piacciono le sue guance- lei disse- molto mi piace il suo mento, e ancora di più mi piace il suo bel corpo che tutti i tuoi titoli e terre”
XXVII
Ed egli prese la sua lunga, lunga spada per tirare una stoccata mortale
e colpì dritto il cuore della signora con il freddo acciaio

NOTE
1) pall è il termine con cui si indica il drappo con cui è rivestita la bara, poteva essere nero o bianco
2) Musgrave è probabilmente un laird o forse un figlio cadetto, nella ballataè evidente la distinzione tra il nobile e potente Lord Barnard e il “little” Musgrave
3) la caccia nel Medioevo era uno sport pericoloso
4) nella ballata abbiamo un doppio tradimento quello dell’adultera e quello dei servitori che parteggiano per l’uno o per l’altro dei padroni. Il narratore di questa versione condannando la delazione del servitore implicitamente riconosce la donna come vittima
5) nel senso di “disarmato”

VERSIONE PLANXTY
I
It fell upon a holy day
As many in the year
Musgrave to the church did go
To see fair ladies there
II
And some were dressed in velvet red
And some in velvet pale
Then came Lord Barnard’s wife
The fairest ‘mongst them all
III
She cast an eye on the Little Musgrave
As bright as summer’s sun
Said Musgrave unto himself
This lady’s heart I’ve won
IV
“I have loved you, fair lady,
full long and many’s the day.”
“And I have loved you, Little Musgrave, and never a word did say.”
V
“I’ve a bower in Bucklesfordbury,
it’s my heart’s delight.
I’ll take you back there with me
if you’ll lie in me arms tonight.”
VII
But standing by was a little footpage,
from the lady’s coach he ran,
“Although I am a lady’s page,
I am Lord Barnard’s man.”
VIII
“And milord Barnard will hear of this,
oh whether I sink or swim.”
Everywhere the bridge was broke
he’d enter the water and swim.
IX
“Oh milord Barnard, milord Barnard,
you are a man of life,
But Musgrave, he’s at Bucklesfordbury,
asleep with your wedded wife.”
X
“If this be true, me little footpage,
this thing that you tell me,
All the gold in Bucklesfordbury
I gladly will give to thee.”
XI
But if this be a lie, me little footpage,
this thing that you tell me,
From the highest tree
in Bucklesfordbury hanged you will be.”

XII
“Go saddle me the black,” he said,
“go saddle me the gray.”
“And sound ye not your horns,” he said,
“lest our coming be betrayed.”
XIII
But there was a man in Lord Barnard’s thrain, who loved the Little Musgrave,
He blew his horn both loud and shrill,
“Away, Musgrave, away.”
XIV
“I think I hear the morning cock,
I think I hear the jay,
I think I hear Lord Barnard’s men,
I wish I was away.”
XV
“Lie still, lie still, me Little Musgrave,
hug me from the cold,
It’s nothing but a shepherd lad,
a-bringing his flock to fold.”

XVI
“Is not your hawk upon it’s perch,
your steed eats oats and hay,
And you a lady in your arms,
and yet you’d go away.”
XVII
He’s turned her around and he’s kissed her twice, and then they fell asleep,
When they awoke Lord Barnard’s men were standing at their feet.
XVIII
“How do ye like me bed,” he said,
“and how do you like me sheets?”
“How do you like me fair lady,
that lies in your arms asleep?”

XIX
“It’s well I like your bed,” he said,
“and great it gives me pain,
I’d gladly give a hundred pound
to be on yonder plain.”

XX
“Rise up, rise up, Little Musgrave,
rise up and then put on.
It’ll not be said in this country
I slayed a naked man”
XXI
So slowly, so slowly he got up,
so slowly he put on.
Slowly down the stairs,
thinking to be slain.
XXII
“There are two swords down by my side,
and dear they cost me purse.
You can have the best of them,
and I will take the worst.”
XXIII
And the first stroke that Little Musgrave stroke, it hurt Lord Barnard sore,
But the next stroke Lord Barnard stroke,
Little Musgrave ne’er stroke more.

XXIV
And then up spoke the lady fair,
from the bed whereon she lay,
“Although you’re dead,
me Little Musgrave, still for you I’ll pray.”
XXV
“How do you like his cheeks,” he said,
“How do you like his chin?”
“How do you like his dead body,
now there’s no life within?”

XXVI
“It’s more I like his cheeks,”
she cried, “and more I want his chin,
It’s more I love that dead body,
than all your kith and kin.”
XXVII
He’s taken out his long long sword,
to strike the mortal blow,
Through and through the lady’s heart,
the cold steel it did go.
XXVIII
“A grave, a grave,” Lord Barnard cried,
“to put these lovers in,
with me lady on the upper hand.
She came from better kin.”
XXIX
“For I’ve just killed the finest knight
that ever rode a steed.”
“And I’ve just killed the finest lady
that ever did a woman’s deed.”
TRADUZIONE  di Cattia Salto
I
Accadde in un giorno di festa
come ce ne son tanti in un anno,
Musgrave andò in chiesa,
per incontrare le belle ragazze
II
Una di loro aveva un velluto rosso,
un’altra un velluto bianco;
poi giunse la moglie di Lord Barnard, di tutte certo la più bella.
III
Lanciò uno sguardo al giovane Musgrave,
splendente come il sole d’estate,
e pensò allora Musgrave
d’averle conquistato il cuore.
IV
“Mi sono innamorato di te, bella signora, oramai da tanti giorni;”
“Anch’io ti amo, giovane Musgrave,
ma non ho detto nulla.”
V
“Ho un rifugio a Bucklesfordbury (6), che è pieno di belle cose.
ti porterò là con me,
se tu starai stanotte fra le mie braccia.”
VII
Ma accanto c’era un paggetto
che saltò sulla carrozza della signora:
“Sebbene io sia il paggio della lady
sono un uomo di Lord Barnard.
VIII
“Il mio Lord Barnard lo deve sapere
anche se dovrò nuotare o annegare.”
Ed anche dove i ponti eran rotti
lui si gettò in acqua e nuotò.
IX
“Milord Barnard,
milord Barnard
sei un uomo ardito,
ma Musgrave è
a Bucklesfordbury
a letto con la tua sposa.”
X
“Se questo è vero, mio piccolo paggio, la cosa che mi stai dicendo
allora ti darò volentieri
tutte le terre di Bucklesfordbery.
XI
Ma se è una bugia, mio piccolo paggio, la cosa che mi stai dicendo,
allorà ti farò impiccare
al più alto albero di Bucklesfordbury.”
XII
“Sellatemi, presto, il nero -disse
sellatemi il grigio”
“E non suonate il corno- disse-
per non tradire il nostro arrivo”
XIII
C’era un uomo nel gruppo di Lord Barnard
che amava il giovane Musgrave
e suonò il suo corno forte
e gridò “Scappa, Musgrave, scappa!”
XIV
“Credo d’avere sentito il tordo,
credo d’aver sentito la ghiandaia;
credo d’aver sentito gli uomini di Lord Barnard e vorrei andare via.”
XV
“Stai calmo, giovane Musgrave,
e proteggimi dal freddo;
è solamente un pastorello
che guida le pecore al pascolo.
XVI
“Non hai il falcone sulla staffa,
e il cavallo a mangiare fieno e avena?
Non hai una donna tra le braccia, e tuttavia vorresti andare via?”
XVII
Lui si girò sul fianco e la baciò due volte (7) e poi si addormentò,
quando si alzò gli uomini
di Lord Barnard stavano ritti innanzi
XVIII
“Quanto ti piace il mio letto -disse-
quanto ti piacciono le mie lenzuola?
Trovi bella la mia bella signora
che giace tra le tue braccia addormentata?”
XIX
“Mi piace il tuo letto -disse –
ed è per questo che sono ancor più triste, darei volentieri cento ghinee
per essere lontano all’aperto.”
XX
“Alzati, alzati, giovane Musgrave,
su, rimettiti i vestiti;
nel mio paese non sarà mai detto
che ho ucciso un uomo nudo (4).
XXI
Pian piano lui si alzò
e piano si mise in piedi
e piano giù per le scale andò
pensando di essere in salvo
XXII
“Ho due spade al fianco,
che tanto mi sono costate;
e tu avrai la migliore,
mentre io prenderò la peggiore.”
XXIII
Il primo colpo dato dal piccolo Musgrave
ferì seriamente Lord Barnard;
ma il secondo colpo lo diede Lord Barnard
e il piccolo Musgrave non colpì più.
XXIV
Allora parlò la bella signora,
nel letto dove giaceva:
“Anche se sei morto, piccolo Musgrave, io voglio pregare per te.
XXV
“Quanto ti piacciono le sue guance – dice lui – quanto ti piace il uso mento? E quanto ti piace il suo cadavere ora che è privo di vita?”
XXVI
“Oh molto, mi piacciono le sue guance- lei gridò- molto mi piace il suo mento, e ancora di più mi piace il suo cadavere che tutti i tuoi titoli e terre”
XXVII
Ed egli prese la sua lunga, lunga spada per tirare una stoccata mortale
e colpì dritto il cuore della signora con il freddo acciaio
XXVIII
“Una tomba, una tomba”, gridò Lord Barnard,
“Per seppellire questi due amanti;
ma stendete sopra la mia sposa
perché era nata da miglior casato.”
XXIX
“Ho ucciso il più valente cavaliere
che mai sia salito a cavallo;
Ed anche la più bella donna
che mai sia stata partorita.”

NOTE
6) per quanto sia difficile collocare il punto d’origine della ballata, in questa versione il castello è a Bucklesfordbury, probabilmente il Barnard Castle nella Contea di Durham. Il termine utilizzato “bower” comprende gli appartamenti del castello riservati alla padrona che comprendono soggiorno e camera da letto.

Barnard Castle – William Turner, 1825

7) possiamo solo immaginarci che furono ben più di due baci

continua

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=142120
http://singout.org/2012/02/24/god-make-you-safe-and-free/

THE ENGLISH LADYE AND THE KNIGHT

Sir Walter Scott scrisse la poesia “The English Ladye and the Knight” nel 1805 (in “The Lay of the Last Minstrel”). Qualche secolo più tardi   Loreena McKennitt ne mise buona parte in musica per il suo “An Ancient Muse” (2006)

Si narra di un amore sfortunato, una storia alla Romeo e Giulietta, che invece di appartenere a due diverse casate di Verona, stanno uno al di qua e l’altra aldilà del Border, quella terra che nel Medioevo era il Far West del’Isola, teatro di scorrerie,  sanguinose battaglie e faide. E Sir Walter Scott  ne fu il portavoce; la maggior parte della storia e leggende sul Border scozzese ci viene dal suo illustre figlio, il quale riportò (ricamandoci anche un po’ sopra) nel suo Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1833) tutto quello che alla sua epoca ancora si conosceva del passato, rifacendosi ad una lunga tradizione orale: si narra di un medioevo oscuro ma anche più libero, in cui c’era appunto la libertà di muoversi per i territori  e soprattutto di esprimersi più liberamente continua

THE SUN SHINES FAIR ON CARLISLE WALL

The_Meeting_on_the_Turret_Stairs_by_Frederick_William_Burton_4848Così scrive Loreena McKennith nelle note del Booklet allegato al cd “In the song “An English Ladye”, this is a segment of a very long narrative poem by Sir Walter Scott called The Lay of the Last Minstrel and what fascinated me by this corner of this long narrative, it’s situated at Carlisle Castle. Now, Carlisle Castle is built on an ancient Celtic settlement site so there was that kind of Celtic archaeological moment. But also in the story it reflects upon a sort of Romeo and Juliet story where a Scottish knight falls in love with an English woman, and follows a theme that love often transcends cultural barriers. And in this story, the brother of this English lady finds it intolerable that his sister should be in love with a Scottish knight and he murders his sister. The Scottish knight comes and then murders the brother and then in this depth of passionate grief, he decides to go on and fight a war for the love of this woman that died. And then in the last verse you hear that he goes off to fight this war in Palestine. And what’s quite fascinating is that of course Palestine is a place that is very much in our contemporary minds and lives, and the troubles there. And I just thought it was an interesting note, you might say, where yes, this is a historical piece of literature but in actual fact, as with history, history is never really truly dead, that history is really the underpinnings of our contemporary times. And the poem also caused me to reflect on certainly one of the reasons why some people go off to war or have gone off to war.”

La poesia doveva aver commosso molti cuori e soprattutto con quell'”Amore avrà sempre su tutto signoria” contribuito alla diffusione dell’amore romantico. Le due frasi del refrain le ritroviamo in questa versione ottocentesca di The Cruel Mother dove però “Amore” si trasforma misteriosamente ovvero per assonanza in “Leone“!.

ASCOLTA Loreena McKennit
La melodia è malinconica, i toni sono mesti e cupi con quelle campane che rintoccano a morto e gli archi e cori che richiamano un lamento funebre

I
It was an English ladye bright,
(The sun shines fair on Carlisle wall,)
And she would marry a Scottish knight,
For Love will still be lord of all.
II
Blithely they saw the rising sun
When he shone fair on Carlisle wall;
But they were sad ere day was done,
Though Love was still the lord of all.
III
Her sire gave brooch and jewel fine,
Where the sun shines fair on Carlisle wall;
Her brother gave but a flask of wine,
For ire that Love was lord of all.
IV
For she had lands both meadow and lea,
Where the sun shines fair on Carlisle wall,
For he swore her death, ere he would see
A Scottish knight the lord of all.
V
That wine she had not tasted well
(The sun shines fair on Carlisle wall)
When dead, in her true love’s arms, she fell,
For Love was still the lord of all!
VI
He pierced her brother to the heart,
Where the sun shines fair on Carlisle wall –
So perish all would true love part
That Love may still be lord of all!
VII
And then he took the cross divine,
Where the sun shines fair on Carlisle wall,
And died for her sake in Palestine;
So Love was still the lord of all.
VIII
Now all ye lovers, that faithful prove,
(The sun shines fair on Carlisle wall)
Pray for their souls who died for love,
For Love shall still be Lord of all.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
C’era una bionda dama inglese
(il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle(1)
e avrebbe sposato un cavaliere scozzese
perché Amore avrà sempre su tutto signoria
II
Con gioia videro il sorgere del sole
che splende bello sul castello di Carlisle
ma divennero tristi alla fine del giorno
anche se Amore aveva sempre su tutto signoria
III
Il suo cavalliere le diede la spilla(2) e dei bei gioielli
Quando il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle
e suo fratello(3) le diede solo un bottiglia di vino
per odio che Amore avesse su tutto signoria
IV
Perché lei aveva terre sia coltivate che a maggese
dove il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle
e lui giurò sulla sua morte, che mai avrebbe voluto vedere
un cavaliere scozzese su tutto signore
V
Quel vino non aveva un buon sapore
(il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle)
che morta tra le braccia del suo vero amore cadde
perché Amore può avere sempre su tutto signoria
VI
Allora lui pugnalò il fratello di lei al cuore
quando il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle
e morì per amor suo in Palestina
così Amore aveva sempre su tutto signoria
VIII
Cosi o voi amanti, che date prova di fedeltà
(il sole splende bello sul castello di Carlisle)
pregate per coloro che morirono per amore
perché Amore ha sempre su tutto signoria

NOTE
1) Carlisle castle si trova in Cumbia al confine tra Inghilterra e Scozia
2) la spilla d’argento è un dono tradizionalmente regalato alla sposa in vista del matrimonio. In Scozia prende il nome di Spilla Luckenbooth il quale deriva dalle bancarelle che si trovavano stabilmente nell’antico mercato lungo la Royal Mile di Edimburgo fin dal Tardo Medioevo e dove si vendevano anche i gioielli; queste bancarelle di notte erano chiuse con i lucchetti ossia “locked”.
Nel linguaggio dell’amore due cuori intrecciati significano condividere lo stesso sentimento d’amore uno per l’altro.
E’ una spilla della tradizione scozzese di solito in argento e con incisi due cuori intrecciati, variamente lavorata anche con pietre incastonate: è un regalo di fidanzamento che viene indossato durante il matrimonio e che passerà al primogenito, la spilla stessa è un amuleto che protegge la nuova coppia dall’invidia delle fate o più in generale dal male, favorendo la nascita di un bambino.
3) i fratelli crudeli sono un argomento topico delle ballate medievali, questo non volendo imparentarsi con uno “scozzese” preferisce uccidere la sorella. E così la faida ha inizio!

FONTI
https://archive.org/stream/layoflastminst00scot/layoflastminst00scot_djvu.txt
http://laviejamusa.blogspot.it/2008/11/english-ladye-and-knight-it-was-english.html

JOCK O HAZELDEAN

Child ballad #293

Prima di tutto una bellissima melodia che viene dal cuore della Scozia (in tutti i sensi) scritta probabilmente nel 1600 (“The Bony Brow” 1640) ma potrebbe benissimo essere stata composta ieri.

ASCOLTA Doug Young 

ASCOLTA Ed Harris

ASCOLTA Jed Mugford (fiddle) & Mikk Skinner (guitar).

La ballata è relativamente rara nella tradizione orale, è stata trovata nell’America del Nord in Scozia, in Inghilterra e Irlanda ed è anche stata avanzata l’ipotesi che le versioni trovate in America siano state influenzate dalla tradizione irlandese.

Mike Yates scrive: “When I first got to know Packie [Packie Manus Byrne originario del Donegal, sebbene vivesse a Manchestewr all’epoca della registrazione di Johnny o’ Hazelgreen (1964)] he asked me to record some of his whistle tunes so that he could send a tape to a relative in Canada.  Accordingly, he came round to my home one evening and we recorded the tunes.  I had been reading Evelyn Wells’ book The Ballad Tree at the time and, knowing that Packie knew some songs, I followed Evelyn’s advice and asked Packie if he knew the one ‘about the milk-white steed’.  “God, yes.”  He said.  “But I haven’t sung that in years.”  I switched on the tape machine and Packie’s sang me a version of Johnny o’ Hazelgreen.  It was possibly the first version to come from an Irish singer and I was just about knocked out.  This is that early recording, and not the one that appeared on Packie’s Topic LP Songs of a Donegal Man (12TS257).Professor Child included five Scottish versions of Johnny o Hazelgreen in his collection, all of which date from the early part of the 19th century and, in the form rewritten by Sir Walter Scott, the ballad has proven especially popular in Scotland.  Versions have also turned up in North America.  Packie believes that the ballad was taken to Donegal by his grand-uncle, who had learnt it whilst working in Scotland, and who had taught the song to Packie’s aunt, ‘Big’ Bridget Sweeney of Meenagolin, County Donegal, who in turn taught it to Packie.” (tratto da qui)

PRIMA VERSIONE

Jock of Hazeldean nella versione più antica (in stile soap-opera medievale) si chiamava John (Johnny) o’ the Hazelgreen o Hazle Green, e se proprio vogliamo cercare la località potrebbe trovarsi con buona probabilità nei pressi di Edimburgo.
Le versioni testuali sono molte ma si possono distinguere dai due incipit
As I walked out one May morning down by the greenwood side, I heard a charming fair maid heave a sigh and a tear,
oppure
One night as I rode o’er the lea with moonlight shining clear; I overheard a fair young maid lamenting for her dear.

John-O'Hazelgreen-cIl plot della storia non varia: un nobiluomo anziano cerca di convincere una giovane fanciulla a sposarsi con il figlio più giovane (o più grande), ma lei adduce vari pretesti non ultimo la differenza di status sociale e soprattutto il fatto di essersi innamorata (in alcune versioni in sogno) di John Hazelgreen. Come sia la fanciulla si lascia condurre alla casa del nobiluomo e scopre che il promesso sposo è proprio il ragazzo di cui si è innamorata. Insomma una favoletta così incredibile, che possiamo stare certi sia stata messa in giro, per scoraggiare i giovani che, contagiati da una malattia così perniciosa come l’amore romantico, preferivano fare di testa loro e sottrarsi al controllo dei genitori. (continua)

Anche queste versioni antiche sono a ben vedere “recenti” ovvero scritte con un linguaggio più moderno. “The history of Scotland is a very violent and bloody one.  Since records began the country appears to have been in an almost constant state of conflict, either with England or internally, without taking into account the bloody border frays which gave rise to many of the border ballads.  Exceptions seem to have been the last five years of James II’s reign and the following six years, c.1455-66. James IV’s reign, 1488 -1513 was quite peaceful until the Battle of Flodden shattered the peace.  The Union of England and Scotland under James VI saw the start of a more peaceful era, and it is the modern language and the pleasant theme of the ballad that impress me with the idea that, if the ballad is indeed based on real events like many of the other Scots ballads, it is probably set in the seventeenth century“. (tratto da qui)

SECONDA VERSIONE TESTUALE: SIR WALTER SCOTT

La versione più diffusa è quella che prende le mosse dalla riscrittura di Sir Walter Scott ed è una delle poche ballate del Border a lieto fine: costretta a sposarsi assecondando il volere delle famiglie, la nostra eroina preferisce fuggire con l’uomo di cui è segretamente innamorata. Una storia alla Romeo e Giulietta con un finale aperto in cui i due riparano oltre confine cioè in Inghilterra.
The_Meeting_on_the_Turret_Stairs_by_Frederick_William_Burton_4848Storicamente era vero il contrario invece: erano le coppie inglesi “clandestine” a organizzare la fuga d’amore in Scozia per sposarsi nonostante la giovane età della fanciulla o il parere sfavorevole dei genitori. In Inghilterra nel 1753 era stata emanata una legge che impediva ai giovani minorenni (al tempo di età inferiore ai 21 anni) di sposarsi senza il consenso delle famiglie, la legge però non era stata estesa anche alla Scozia, così grazie all’atto d’Unione tra i due paesi il matrimonio celebrato in Scozia era valido anche in Inghilterra. Il paesino più vicino al confine era Gretna Green (che si trovava subito dopo Carlise lungo la strada delle carrozze per il servizio postale) che diventò famoso come la Las Vegas di oggi: la capitale dei matrimoni “d’amore” celebrati senza tante complicazioni! Bastava già allora che i due sposi avessero 16 anni e dichiarassero il loro amore di fronte a due testimoni. (continua)

Per l’ascolto ho selezionato due versioni che sono “perfette”

Jim Malcolm live 2013. La voce di Jim è particolarmente indicata per ballate di questo genere fatte di chiaroscuri.

ASCOLTA Gary Lightbody (dall’Irlanda del Nord) con il violino di John McDaid in Turn 2014

Il mio “best of” però va a
ASCOLTA Eddy Reader (quando ha esordito con i Fairground Attraction) 1988. Una voce di velluto e quasi jazz, delicata e intensa una melodia appena tracciata dalle chitarre, percussioni soft: quando la voce è magia, vibrazione nell’aria..

La versione testuale è quella riportata da Dick Gaughan (qui), che la registrò nel 1972


I
“Why weep ye by the tide, lady,
why weep ye by the tide?
A’ll wad ye tae my youngest son
an ye shall be his bride
An ye shall be his bride lady
sae comely tae be seen”
But aye(1) she lout(2) the tears doun faa for Jock o Hazeldean
II
“Nou let this willfu (3) grief be dune
an dry those cheeks sae pale
Young Frank is chief of Erthington (4) an Lord o Langleydale(5)
His step is first in peacefu haa (6)
his sword in battle keen”
Bit aye she lout the tears doun faa
for Jock o Hazeldean
III
“A coat (7) o gowd ye sall nae lack
nor kaim (8) tae bind your hair
Nor mettled hound nor managed hawk nor palfrey fresh an fair
An you, the foremaist o them aa
sall ride, our forest queen”
Bit aye she lout the tears doun faa for Jock o Hazeldean
IV
The kirk was deckt at mornintide,
the tapers glimmert fair
The priest an bridegroum wait the bride an dame an knight were there
They searcht for her in bower an haa (9) the lady wisnae seen
She’s owre the Border (10) an awa
wi Jock o Hazeldean
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
“Perchè piangi con la marea, Signora,
perchè piangi con la marea?
Andrai in matrimonio al mio figlio più giovane e sarai la sua sposa,
sarai la sua sposa, Signora,
così bella tra le belle”.
Ma ahimè lei piangeva sempre le sue lacrime per Jock di Hazeldean.
II
“Cessa questo dolore sconsolato
e asciuga le tue guance così pallide
il giovane Frank è il capo di Erthington e Signore di Langleydale.
Temuto sia in pace che in guerra
per la sua spada smaniosa della battaglia”
Ma ahimè lei piangeva sempre le sue lacrime per Jock di Hazeldean.
III
“Non ti mancherà una catena d’oro per intrecciare i capelli,
né segugio, né falco,
né palafreno tranquillo e fidato
e tu la più bella del reame
passeggerai nella foresta da regina”.
Ma ahimè lei piangeva le sue lacrime per Jock di Hazeldean.
IV
La chiesa era decorata per la marea del mattino, i ceri luccicavano luminosi,
il sacerdote e lo sposo attendevano la sposa, e le dame e i cavalieri c’erano tutti. La cercarono in lungo e in largo ma la dama non si trovò,
è oltre il confine fuggita via
con Jock di Hazeldean.

NOTE
1) aye=always
2) loot, lout=let
3) weary
4) Errington
5) Sir Walter Scott, when he appropriated one of the stanzas for his poem Jock of Hazeldean, set his poem firmly in Northumberland on the estate of the Errington family around Langley Dale not far from Hexham near Hadrian’s Wall. Remnants of his Hazel Dean still exist just to the north of the Wall next to Errington Hill Head (O.S. ref NY 959698). (tratto da qui)
6) oppure: His step is feared thoughout the land
7) chain
8) braid
9) They sought her far throughout the land
10) il Border sono le terre scozzesi confinanti con l’Inghilterra

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_293 http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung16.htm http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung16a.htm http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/matrimonio-celtico-storia.htm http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-Hazelgreen.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/johnofhazelgreen.html http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/faJOH.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1900 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/hazelgreen.htm https://thesession.org/discussions/11499

CLAYMORES FIGHTING UNDER THE MOONLIGHT, THE BATTLE OF OTTERBURN

Child ballad # 161

Una battaglia nel Border  in un oscuro medioevo teatro di continue scorrerie tra Scozia e Inghilterra (siamo nel 1388) in cui Sir James Douglas, secondo conte di Douglas condusse diversi clan scozzesi alla vittoria contro le truppe inglesi comandate da Henry “”Hotspur” Percy figlio del conte di Northumberland.
Il resoconto della battaglia narrato come ballata, si ritrova su manoscritto solo a partire dal 1550, riportato poi più volte nei broadsides e stampato nelle maggiori raccolte settecentesche, fino a essere ripreso da sir Walter Scott nel suo Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1833).

il Conte Douglas

Il conte Douglas era un personaggio influente nel Border, sposato niente meno che con la Principessa Isabella Bruce una delle figlie di Re Roberto II di Scozia.
Una teoria ipotizza che nella ballata si narri di una ripresa delle ostilità contro l’Inghilterra con due eserciti scozzesi uno diretto verso il Cumberland e l’altro verso il Northumberland che dovevano convergere verso Carlise.

LA BATTAGLIA DI OTTERBURN

L’incursione contro il porto di Newcastle, stava però per concludersi in una razzia sulla strada del ritorno, quando il gruppo degli scozzesi fu sorpreso di notte dagli Inglesi al loro inseguimento.
La battaglia si svolse al chiar di luna  in una grande confusione, un feroce corpo a corpo, con gli Scozzesi che riuscirono a riarmarsi e a spingere le truppe inglesi verso un crepaccio. All’alba l’esercito inglese iniziò a ritirarsi in disordine e Hotspur (=lo sperone infernale) con il fratello venne fatto prigioniero da Sir John Montgomery. Il conte Douglas morì durante la battaglia e il suo cadavere venne rinvenuto solo al mattino, depredato dell’armatura e con una profonda ferita al collo.

La kilometrica ballata è spesso abbreviata dagli interpreti moderni (contrariamente al passato in cui invece le ballate si dipanavano oltre alla quarantina di strofe e servivano a intrattenere il pubblico per un buon quarto d’ora e più!!)

Tony Cuffe in  “When I First Came to Caledonia” 1994 (da I a III e da V a VIII )

ASCOLTA The Corries -Lammas Tide (strofe da I a VII)


I
It fell aboot the Lammas-tide
when muir men win their hay
The doughty Douglas bound him ride tae England tae catch a prey
He’s ta’en the Gordons
and the Graemes and the Lindsays light and gay
The Jardines would not wi’ him ride, they rue it tae this day
II
And he has burnt the dales o’ Tyne
and hairried Bambroughshire
The Otterdale he’s burnt it hale
and set it a’ on fire
And he rade up tae Newcastle
and rode it roond aboot
Sayin’, “Wha’s the laird(1) o’ this castle, and wha’s the lady o’t?”
III
Then up spake proud Lord Percy then, and oh but he spak’ high
“I am the lord o’ this castle,
my wife’s the lady gay”
“If thou’rt the lord o’ this castle,
sae weel it pleases me
For ere I cross the border fells
the tane(2) o’ us shall dee”
IV
He took a lang spear in his hand
shod wi’ the metal free(4)
For to meet the Douglas
there he rade right furiouslie
But Oh how pale his lady
looked frae aff the castle wa’
When doon before the Scottish spear she saw proud Percy fa’(5)
V
They lichted(6) high on Otterburn upon the bent(7) sae broon
They lichted high on Otterburn
and threw their broadswords doon
But up there spoke a bonnie boy before the break o’ dawn
Sayin’, Wake ye now, my good lords a’, Lord Percy’s near at han’
VI
When Percy wi’ the Douglas met
I wat(8) he was fu’ fain
They swappit swords and sair(9)
they swat, the blood ran doon between
But Percy wi’ his good broadsword that could sae sharply wound
Has wounded Douglas on the brow till he fell tae the ground
VII
“Oh, bury me ‘neath the bracken bush that grows by yonder brier
Let never a living mortal ken
that Douglas he lies here”
They’ve lifted up that noble lord
wi’ the salt tear in their e’e
They’ve buried him ‘neath
the bracken bush that his merry men might not see
VIII
When Percy wi’ Montgomery met that either of other were fain
They swappit swords and sair they swat, the blood ran doon like rain
This deed was done at Otterburn before the break of day
Earl Douglas was buried
at the bracken bush(11)
and Percy led captive away
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Fu a Lammas (1 agosto)
quando gli uomini delle pianure tagliavano il fieno,
che il valoroso Douglas partì a cavallo
per una razzia in Inghilterra;
aveva preso i Gordons e i Graemes
e i Lindsay leggiadri e gai,
ma i Jardiners non andarono con loro e si rammaricano ancora oggi!
II
Ha bruciato le valli del Tyne
e saccheggiato la contea di Bambrough, l’Otterdale ha messo a ferro e fuoco
ed è piombato su Newcastle
e ci ha girato tutt’ intorno
dicendo “Chi è il Laird(1) di questo castello e chi ne è la Lady?
III
Allora gridò forte l’orgoglioso Lord Percy e come parlò chiaro
Io sono il Lord di questo castello
e mia moglie è la bella Lady

“Se voi siete il Lord di questo castello,
allora accontentatemi

poiché ho attraversato il confine
e uno di noi due deve morire

IV (3)
Prese in mano una lunga lancia
rivestita di ferro,
per incontrare il Douglas
dritto là corse con furia,
ma oh come pallida la sua dama
sembrava dalle mura del castello,
quando vide sotto la lancia scozzese
la caduta dell’orgoglioso Percy (5)
V
(Gli scozzesi) si accamparono più a nord
a Otterburn sull’erba riarsa,
si accamparono più a nord
a Otterburn  e posarono le loro spade,
ma così parlò un ragazzo
prima dell’alba dicendo
Alzatevi ora miei bravi Lords,
Lord Percy è qui vicino

VI
Quando Percy si scontrò con Douglas
(si sa che) era pieno di bramosia, estrassero le spade e colpirono con furore, il sangue scorreva
tra loro,
ma Percy con la sua buona spada
che sapeva dare ferite mortali,
ferì Douglas sulla fronte
finchè  cadde a terra (10)
VII
Seppellitemi sotto il cespuglio di felci
che cresce tra i rovi

in modo che nessun mortale sappia
che Douglas qui giace.

Hanno alzato quel nobile lord
con le lacrime agli occhi
e lo hanno seppellito sotto al cespuglio di felci in modo che i suoi compagni non potessero vedere.
VIII
Quando Percy con Montgomery si scontrò, l’un l’altro erano bramosi,
estrassero le spade e colpirono con furore, il sangue scorreva come pioggia.
Così accadde a Otterburn
prima dello spuntar del giorno,
il Conte Douglas fu sepolto(11)
presso il cespuglio di felci
e Percy fu catturato.

NOTE
1) il termine Laird è tipicamente scozzese per indicare un capo, non un Lord che è di rango superiore (per terre e titolo)
2) tane = one
3) nel duello James riesce a prendere lo stendardo di Henry Percy , vicenda è riportata da Froissart (Chroniques, Buchon, XI, 362 ss, cap. 115 ss) si stralcia una sintesi della cronaca da qui “.. they divided their army, directing the main body towards Carlisle, under command of Archibald Douglas, of the Earl of Fife, son of the king, and many other nobles, while a detachment of three or four hundred picked men-at-arms, supported by two thousand stout fellows, partly archers, all well mounted, and commanded by James, Earl of Douglas, the Earl of March and Dunbar, and the Earl of Murray, were to strike for Newcastle, cross the river, and burn and ravage the bishopric of Durham. The eastern division (with which alone we are concerned) carried out their program to the letter. They advanced at speed, stopping for nothing, and meeting with no resistance, and the burning and pillaging had begun in Durham before the Earl of Northumberland knew of their arrival. Fire and smoke soon showed what was going on. The earl dispatched his sons Henry and Ralph Percy to Newcastle, where the whole country rallied, gentle and simple; he himself remaining at Alnwick, in the hope of being able to enclose the Scots, when they should take the way north, between two bodies of English. The Scots attained to the very gates of Durham; then, having burned every unfortified town between there and Newcastle, they turned northward, with a large booty, repassed the Tyne, and halted at Newcastle. There was skirmishing for two days before the city, and in the course of a long combat between Douglas and Henry Percy the Scot got possession of the Englishman’s pennon. This he told Percy he would raise on the highest point of his castle at Dalkeith; Percy answered that he should never accomplish that vaunt, nor should he carry the pennon out of Northumberland. ‘Come then to-night and win it back,’ said Douglas; ‘I will plant it before my tent.’ It was then late, and the fighting ceased; but the Scots kept good guard, looking for Percy to come that very night for his pennon. Percy, however, was constrained to let that night pass.
4) metal free: se ho capito bene è metallo non in lega
5) si saltano un bel po’ di strofe , gli Scozzesi levano le tende di un assedio raffazzonato e si ritirano verso il confine “The Scots broke up their camp early the next morning and withdrew homewards. Taking and burning the tower and town of Ponteland on their way, they moved on to Otterburn, thirty miles northwest from Newcastle, where there was a strong castle or tower, in marshy ground, which they assailed for a day without success.” Froissart riferisce che sia Douglas che Percy erano ossessionati dalla sfida e che Percy corse dietro alle truppe scozzesi appena venne a conoscenza, tramite i suoi informatori, che non si trattava di un grande esercito (appena poco più che tremila uomini riferirono le spie, in realtà erano seimila) “Some of the Scots knights were supping, and more were asleep (for they had had hard work at the assault on the tower, and were meaning to be up betimes to renew the attack), when the English were upon the camp, crying, Percy! Percy! There was naturally great alarm. The English made their attack at that part of the camp where, as before said, the servants and foragers were lodged. This was, however, strong, and the knights sent some of their men to hold it while they themselves were arming. Then the Scots formed, each under his own earl and captain. It was night, but the weather was fair and the moon shining. The Scots did not go straight for the English, but took their way along by the marshes and by a hill, according to a plan which they had previously arranged against the case that their camp should be attacked. The English made short work with the underlings, but, as they advanced, always found fresh people to keep up a skirmish. And now the Scots, having executed a flank movement, fell upon their assailants in a mass, from a quarter where nothing was looked for, shouting their battle-cries with one voice. The English were astounded, but closed up, and gave them Percy! for Douglas! Then began a fell battle. The English, being in excess and eager to win, beat back the Scots, who were at the point of being worsted. James Douglas, who was young, strong, and keen for glory, sent his banner to the front, with the cry, Douglas! Douglas! Henry and Ralph Percy, indignant against the earl for the loss of the pennon, turned in the direction of the cry, responding, Percy! Knights and squires had no thought but to fight as long as spears and axes would hold out. It was a hand-to-hand fight; the parties were so close together that the archers of neither could operate; neither side budged, but both stood firm. The Scots showed extraordinary valor, for the English were three to one; but be this said without disparagement of the English, who have always done their duty.”
6) lichted = set down, camped;
7) bent = grass
8) wat = know
9) sair = sore
10) la lotta tra i due capi è solo un abbellimento del cronista, ma nessuno seppe con certezza di come andò, il cadavere del conte James Douglas venne trovato solo al mattino, depredato dell’armatura e con una profonda ferita al collo.
11) in realtà Il suo corpo venne riportato in Scozia e sepolto nella tomba di famiglia nell’abbazia di Melrose.

earl of douglas
Trasporto del corpo del conte Douglas dopo la battaglia di Otterburn

La stessa storia viene narrata nella ballata intitolata Chevy Chase che Child classifica al numero 162, la versione più antica risale al 1430 (detta anche The Hunting of Cheviot) mentre quella tramandata dalla tradizione orale è stata probabilmente scritta in inglese moderno nel 1620. Una grande battuta di caccia sulle Cheviot Hills organizzata da Henry “”Hotspur” Percy viene scambiata dal Conte Dougles come un tentativo di aggressione e il conte decide di dare battaglia. I due eserciti si scontreranno a Ottenburg.

Al momento non ho trovato file audio per l’ascolto

FONTI
http://www.glasgowguide.co.uk/wjmc/itfellab.shtml http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_161 http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/batotter.html
http://www.thesonsofscotland.co.uk/thebattleofotterburn1388.htm http://www.chevychasehistory.org/chevychase/naming-chevy-chase http://chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/otterburn.html http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/medlyric/chevychase.htm http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Chevy_Chase http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C162.html

LITTLE MUSGRAVE: LA SOAP OPERA NEL MEDIOEVO

Little Musgrave” è una murder ballad  forse di origine scozzese, (Musgrave e Bernard sono nomi abbastanza comuni nell’Inghilterra del Nord e nella Scozia del Sud, i territori del Border per intenderci) e probabilmente d’epoca medievale: la storia narra del tradimento di una giovane moglie sposata a Lord Barnard o Barnet, ma anche Arnel (Arlen, Arnold) o Darnel, Donald (presumiamo più anziano di lei) che cogliendo l’opportunità di un assenza del marito, “si guarda intorno” e trova Little Musgrave, il giovanotto con cui trascorrere una notte di passione.

QUESTIONE DI CORNA  E D’ONORE

Il bel Musgrave (un cavaliere della bassa nobiltà) e molto giovane (detto perciò Little) si gode i favori della Lady e al risveglio viene ucciso dal Lord rientrato nottetempo, perchè avvertito da un servitore (o uno scudiero) della tresca in atto. Anche la donna è trafitta al cuore (in altre versioni decapitata) -alcune descrizioni dell’assassinio sono molto cruente -eppure la ballata non è priva di ironiche e grasse battute!

La ballata presenta molte versioni con finali diversi. in alcune Musgrave affronta il Lord con coraggio, in altre si comporta da vigliacco; in effetti sebbene la storia sia sempre la stessa, variano le seppur rudimentali caratterizzazioni psicologiche dei personaggi. Così la ballata stratifica i suoi significati nel tempo (forse agli inizi più stereotipati) e muta con il mutare dei valori del momento! Tuttavia come per tutte le ballate popolari il giudizio morale è lasciato a chi ascolta e la ballata si limita a narrare i fatti di cronaca nella loro complessa e contraddittoria realtà.

IL TRIANGOLO AMOROSO…

Così il Lord a volte vendica il suo onore controvoglia e fa un grande rumore nella speranza che l’amante sia abbastanza sveglio da fuggire, o si rammarica per il sangue versato e domanda ai suoi cortigiani perchè nessuno sia intervenuto a fermarlo!
Musgrave a volte è perdutamente innamorato della Lady, a volte un ingenuo che si lascia sedurre, oppure è un cavaliere gaudente, ma comunque non abbastanza sveglio da scappare in tempo. La donna è spesso quella più moralmente condannabile perchè in lei risiede l’onore dell’uomo e della sua discendenza, ma è anche quella che rivendica la sua gioventù e il desiderio di essere felice (da questo punto di vista richiama la ballata Raggle Taggle Gypsy)

E IL SERVITORE

Tutta la tragedia s’innesca con la delazione del paggio, che corre dal Lord a riferire l’infedeltà della moglie: è un fedele servitore (del padrone), o vuole vendicarsi della padrona? Spera di essere lautamente ricompensato?
Il suo contributo prende tutta la parte centrale della ballata e di certo il narratore ci prendeva gusto ad allungare il suo percorso verso la meta per aumentare la suspence del racconto!

"Hellelil and Hildebrand, the Meeting on the Turret Stairs" - Frederick William Burton, 1864.
“Hellelil and Hildebrand, the Meeting on the Turret Stairs” – Frederick William Burton, 1864.

AMOR CORTESE

L’amor cavalleresco celebrato nelle canzoni dei trovatori e trovieri medievali era una grande novità dei tempi.
Se si vuole semplificare, era la sublimazione degli impulsi sessuali incanalati verso il concetto di donna angelicata, la quale non più oggetto passivo, diventava agente e sorgente di una sorta di perfezionamento o estrinsecazione delle migliori qualità di un uomo.
Eppure la dama era per lo più la Signora del Castello, moglie del Sire, e quindi l’amore cortese era forse una costruzione più intellettuale che praticata, in ogni caso, incompatibile con il matrimonio, il quale era visto come un contratto di convenienza.
Se l’innamorato per elevarsi spiritualmente doveva mettersi al completo servizio della sua Signora, si trattava solo di una devozione spirituale o anche carnale? Leggendo tra le righe, pur tra gli stereotipi del genere, qualcosa di più concreto doveva esserci, anche se circondato da molta, molta circospezione!!

La prima versione testuale stampata della ballata a cui si riesce a risalire è del 1658 (o del primo decennio del Seicento) e la ritroviamo nella poderosa raccolta del professor Child al numero 81 (Child # 81) in ben 15 versioni, ma molte più sono quelle tramandate oralmente e raccolte sul campo. La melodia di questa ballata cambia a seconda degli artisti che l’hanno interpretata, qui si riassumo le tre principali ramificazioni

VERSIONE BORDER
VERSIONE INGLESE (FAIRPORT CONVENTION)
VERSIONE AMERICANA

FONTI
http://singout.org/2012/02/20/matty-groves-little-musgrave-and-lady-barnard/
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Musgrave_and_the_Lady_Barnard
http://www.talkawhile.co.uk/yabbse/index.php?topic=27356.0
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_81
http://zeegrooves.blogspot.it/2010/02/fairport-convention-matty-groves.htm

ADAM (EDOM) GORDON LAIRD OF AUCHINDOUN: BURNING TOWIE CASTLE

Child Ballad #178

La ballata Edom O’ Gordon (Adam Gordon) ci mostra gli orrori delle guerre tra i clan scozzesi durante il 1500: in particolare la faida tra i  Gordon sostenitori della regina Maria (Maria Stuart alias Maria I di Scozia) e i  Forbes sostenitori di Giacomo IV (che diventerà Giacomo I d’Inghilterra).

LA FAIDA

Adam Gordon (1545-1580) è il fratello minore del sesto Conte di Huntly (primo Marchese di Huntly dal 1599) Laird del castello di Auchindoun, il quale nel mese di novembre del 1570 o 1571 prende d’assalto il castello dei Forbes a Towie presso Creishbrowe ; ma il Laird è lontano e la sua Signora preferisce la morte piuttosto che la resa.
Ci troviamo quindi nell’Aberdeenshire, anche se la ballata a volte è rappresentata nel Border scozzese, come sia la sua prima versione fu scritta poco dopo l’accaduto (vedi Cotton Manuscript Vespasian, A. xxv, No 67, fol. 187). Nel 1700 è presente ancora nelle principali collezioni del tempo ed è riportata nella raccolta del professor Child in bel 9 versioni, alcune con anche una trentina di strofe. La melodia è stata trascritta in molte partiture per liuto intorno al 1597.

Si stralcia dal sito di The Child Ballads curato da Ed de Moel al quale si rimanda per l’approfondimento: “During the three wretched and bloody years which followed the assassination of the regent Murray, the Catholic Earl of Huntly, George Gordon, was one of the most eminent and active of the partisans of the queen. Mary created him her lieutenant-governor, and his brother, Adam Gordon, a remarkably gallant and able soldier, whether so created or not, is sometimes called the queen’s deputy-lieutenant in the north. Our ballad is concerned with a minor incident of the hostilities in Aberdeenshire between the Gordons and the Forbeses, a rival but much less powerful clan, who supported the Reformed faith and the regency or king’s party” continua

L’INCENDIO DELLA CASA-TORRE DI TOWIE

burning-castleA volte la responsabilità della malefatta viene addossata al capitano Kar (o Carr) ma la dinamica dell’accaduto è simile in tutte le versioni: la dama del castello, che doveva essere una piccola dimora fortificata d’importanza secondaria, cerca di negoziare con gli assalitori, tuttavia i Gordon chiedono la consegna del castello (e anche i favori della castellana).
Il castello è dato alle fiamme (a volte da un traditore) e la donna implora la pietà per i suoi figli più piccoli, ma il fuoco divampa e tutti gli occupanti (una trentina di persone) muoiono nell’incendio.
In alcune versioni la donna cerca di salvare i figli (a volte sono tre a volte nove), calandoli giù dalle finestre, ma una volta a terra vengono tutti passati alle armi (questa versione potrebbe essere una contro propaganda dei Forbes).
All’epoca nessuno aveva il cuore tenero e si scannavano tutti allegramente pur di ottenere vendetta!

ASCOLTA Malinky in The Unseen Hours, 2005


I
It fell aboot the Martinmas time
When the wind blew shrill and cauld
Cried Edom o’ Gordon tae his men
“We maun draw tae some hauld”
II
“Whit hauld, whit hauld,” cried his merry men
“Whit hauld sal we gang tae?”
“It’s tae Towie’s Hoose that we maun ride
And see yon fair lady”
III
She thocht it was her ain dear lord
That she saw ridin’ hame
But was the traitor Edom o’ Gordon
That rik nae sin nor shame
IV
“Come doon,  Lady Campbell,” he cried
“And gie yer hoose tae me,
Or else this nicht I swear I’ll burn
Ye an’ yer bairnies three”
V
“I winna come doon,” the lady cried
“For laird nor yet for loon
Nor yet for any rank robber
That comes frae Auchendoon”
VI
The lady frae the battlements
Twa bullets she let flee
But it missed its mark wi’ Gordon
For it scarcely grazed his knee
VII
“Lady Campbell,” the Gordon cried
“That shot will cost you dear”
An’ he has ca’ed tae his ain Jock
Tae bring the faggots near
VIII
“I winna come doon, ye fause Gordon
I winna gie up tae ye
I winna forsake ma ain dear lord
That is sae far frae me”
IX
Then up and spak her  youngest son
Sat on the nooris’s knee
“Oh open the door and   let me oot
For this reek is choking   me”
X
“I wid gie up ma   gowd,” she cried
“Ma siller and ma fee
For a blast o’ the   whistling wind
Tae blaw this reek frae   me”
XII
Then oot an’ spak her  dochter dear
She wis baith jimp and sma’
“Oh row me in a pair   o’ sheets
And throw me ower the   wa’”
XIII
They rowed her in a pair o’   sheets
And threw her ower the wa’
But on the point o’ the  Gordon’s sword
She got a deidly fa’
XIV
Then Gordon turned her ower and ower/ And oh her face was white
Ah micht had spared that   bonny face
Tae be some man’s delight
XV
Oh pity on yon fair castle
That was biggit wi’ stane   and lime
And wae for Lady Campbell   herself
Burnt wi’ her bairnies nine
XVI
Oh three o’ them were mairried wives
And three o’ them were   bairns
And three o’ them were leal   maidens
That ne’er lay in young   men’s airms
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Accadde nell’estate di S. Martino (1)
quando il vento freddo soffia stridulo ,
urlò Adam Gordon ai suoi uomini,
Dobbiamo stanare qualche vecchia volpe (2).”
II
“In quale castello, – gridarono i suoi bravi (3)-  in quale castello dobbiamo andare” “Al castello di Towie (4) dobbiamo cavalcare
per visitare la bella dama“.
III
Lei pensò fosse suo marito che ritornava a casa a cavallo; e invece era Adam Gordon, il traditore, che non aveva né macchia né vergogna (5)
IV
Scendi, Lady Campbell (6)- gridò –
e consegnami la tua casa
o entro stanotte giuro che brucerò
tu e i tuoi tre figlioletti.”
V
Non scenderò –la dama gridò-
né per un signore, né per un pezzente
e nemmeno per un predone
che viene da Auchindoun
VI
La dama dai bastioni
due colpi sparò
ma mancò il bersaglio di Gordon
perchè gli sfiorò solo il ginocchio
VII
Lady Campbell – Gordon gridò –
questo colpo ti costerà caro
e chiamò il suo Jock
per accatastare le fascine
VIII
Non scenderò, voi falso Gordon
non vi verrò incontro,
non abbandonerò il mio caro signore
che è così lontano!
IX
Parlò allora il suo figlio minore
che stava in grembo alla balia:
“Apri la porta e fammi uscire,
che il fumo mi soffoca!
X
Darei tutto il mio oro – lei gridò-
l’argento e tutto il mio corredo
per una folata di ponente
che mandasse via il fumo!
XII
Poi parlò la sua cara figlia
che era snella che piccola
Avvolgimi in un lenzuolo,
e calami giù dalle mura
XIII
La avvolsero in un paio di lenzuola
e la calarono giù dalle mura,
ma sulla punta della lama di Gordon
lei fece una terribile caduta
XIV
Allora Gordon la rigirò mille volte
e il suo volto era bianco, oh avrebbe potuto risparmiare quel bel volto, tale da essere la delizia di un uomo!
XV
Oh pietà per quel bel castello
che era eretto con pietra e calce
e per la stessa Lady Campbell
bruciata con i suoi nove figli.
XVI
Tre di loro era mogli
e tre di loro erano bambini
e tre di loro erano leali fanciulle
che mai giacquero tra le braccia dei giovanotti

NOTE
1) l’estate di San Martino è un periodo relativamente caldo dell’autunno in coincidenza con la festa di San Martino che si celebra l’11 novembre
2) hauld sta per old, il riferimento generico riguarda un “vecchio” riferito nel contesto al clan rivale e quindi al suo castello avito, ho tradotto così a senso
3) dare del merry agli uomini è tipico delle frasi stereotipate delle ballate
4) Il castello Towie-Barclay, probabilmente ricostruito sul sito del primitivo castello dato alle fiamme è ora proprietà privata. Per tradizione la vicenda è stata spostata un po’ più in alto presso Corgarff oggi popolare destinazione turistica. In altre versioni diventa il castello di Rhodes più per un assonanza con il nome Forbes che in riferimento ad un luogo reale
5) cioè fino ad allora si era comportato onorevolmente, non così nell’assalto del castello
6) Lady Margaret Forbes signora del castello era nata Campbell

ASCOLTA Folkal Point, 1972

CHILD #178 D – Versione di Robert & Andrew Foulis in “Edom of Gordon: An Ancient Scottish Poem” 1755


I
It fell about the Martinmas,
When the wind blew shrill and cauld,
Said Edom o Gordon to his merry men,
We maun draw to a hauld.
II
‘And whatna(7) hauld sall we draw to,
My merry men and me?
We will gae to the house of the Rodes,
To see that fair ladye.’
III
She had nae sooner buskit(5) hersell,
Nor sooner said the grace,
when Edom o Gordon and his merry men
Were lighted about the place.
IV
‘Come doun to me, my lady gay,
Come doun Come doun to me;
This night ye’ll lig in my bed,
tomorrow my bride sall be.’
V
She stood upon her castle wa’,
And let twa bullets   flee:
She miss’d that   bluidy butcher’s heart,
And only razed his   knee.
VI
(8)
VII
But when the ladye   saw the fire
Come–flaming o’er her head,
She wept, and kiss’d her children twain,/Says, ‘Bairns, we been but dead.’
VIII
The Gordon then his bugle blew,
And said, ‘Awa’, awa’!
This house o’ the Rodes is a’ in a flame;
I hauld it time to ga’.’
IX
And after the Gordon he is gane,
Sae fast as he might dri’e;
And soon i’ the Gordon’s foul heart’s blude
He’s wroken(10) his fair ladye.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Accadde nell’estate di S. Martino (1)
quando il vento freddo soffia stridulo ,
disse Adam Gordon ai suoi bravacci,
Dobbiamo stanare qualche vecchia volpe (2).”
II
“E che tipo castello dobbiamo assalire
i miei uomini ed io?“”Andremo nella fortezza di Rhodes (4) per visitare la bella dama
III
Si era appena vestita e aveva detto le preghiere quando Adam Gordon e i suoi bravaqcci
diedero fuoco al posto
IV
Arrendetevi, mia signora
arrendetevi, arrendetevi
questa notte vi intratterrete nel mio letto
e domani sarete la mia sposa
V
Lei stava sulle mura del castello
e due colpi sparò
ma mancò il cuore di quel macellaio
e solo gli sfiorò il ginocchio
VI

VII
Ma appena la signora vide il fuoco
caderle addosso
pianse e baciò i figli due volte
dicendo “Bambini siamo belle che morti
VIII
Il Gorgon allora la sua tromba suonò
e disse “Via, Via!
questa dimora di Rodes è tutta bruciata;
è arrivato il tempo di andare”
IX
E dopo  Gordon si partì
a spron battuto
ma presto (il marito) colpirà il cuore sanguinario di Gordon e vendicherà la sua bella dama

NOTE
7) whatna: What kind of a.
4) house of the Rodes. un castello a poche miglia a sud di Duns nel Berwickshire
8) buskit hersell: Got ready, dressed herself
9) strofa riassunta dal gruppo
10) wroken: Revenged

ASCOLTA Alison McMorland, versione testuale riportata nella collezione Greig-Duncan.

E LA FAIDA CONTINUA vedi

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/wars/152BurningOfTowieCastle.pdf
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_178
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C178.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=en&id=93
http://www.exclassics.com/percy/perc20.htm
http://history.wdgordon.com/gordon12.htm
http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/
pageturner.cfm?id=87739066

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch178.htm
http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/edom-o-gordon

THE DOWIE DENS OF YARROW: le ballate del Border scozzese

Read the post in English

DA LA STRANIERA, CAPITOLO 34

Murtagh insegna The Dowie Dens of Yarrow a Claire mentre vanno in cerca di Jamie catturato dalla Vigilanza (le giubbe rosse).
(Continua con l’episodio “The Search” nella Outlander Tv stagione I)

Il testo proviene della tradizione scozzese delle border ballads, brano noto anche come “The Dowie Dens of Yarrow”, “The Dewy Dens of Yarrow” o come “The Breas of Yarrow” oppure “The Banks of Yarrow” compare in varie versioni nella raccolta delle ballate del professor Francis James Child. (IV volume: The O Braes ‘Yarrow Child ballad # 214) e la sua origine potrebbe essere settecentesca. Secondo quanto riportato da sir Walter Scott, la ballata narra di un uccisione accaduta realmente durante  una partita di caccia nella foresta di Ettrick (nel 1500 o ai primi del 1600), per una faida famigliare tra John Scott di Tushielaw e Walter Scott di Thirlestane. Una teoria smentita dal professor Child.
La storia è stata narrata anche nella poesia di William Hamilton, pubblicata in Tea-Table Miscellany di Allan Ramsay nel 1723 e anche nel II volume di Reliques di Thomas Percy (1765): Hamilton si era ispirato a una vecchia ballata scozzese della tradizione orale (vedi)

L’area è una specie di “triangolo delle Bermude” del mondo celtico, un lembo di terra ricco di racconti tradizionali sui rapimenti fatati e magiche apparizioni! (vedasi anche la ballata di Tam lin)
Yarrow è il nome di un fiume ma anche di un’erba officinale, l’achillea. Quindi la definizione del luogo “le valli dell’achillea” diventa più vaga ma anche simbolica: l’achillea è una pianta associata alla morte, e nelle credenze popolari sognarla equivale a un lutto in famiglia se la donna è sposata o alla perdita dell’innamorato.
Secondo la leggenda l’eroe della ballata era John Scott sesto e ultimo figlio del Laird di Harden, ma noto nella tradizione locale come barone di Oakwood (tenuta di Kirkhope) ucciso dagli Scott di Gilmanscleugh durante una partita di caccia nella foresta di Ettrick (la vicenda risale alla fine del 1500 o ai primi del 1600).

Newark Castle sullo Yarrow: non il castello della ballata ma una possibile ambientazione

L’AGGUATO PRESSO LO YARROW

Si racconta dell’uccisione di un giovanotto, forse un border reiver, in un’imboscata presso il fiume Yarrow tesa dai fratelli della donna che lui amava. Nelle varie versioni la dama respinge nove pretendenti che si mettono d’accordo per uccidere il suo vero innamorato, oppure sono gli stessi fratelli della donna, o ancora gli uomini inviati dal padre, a tendere l’imboscata. Il ragazzo riesce a uccidere o ferire un buon numero dei suoi assalitori ma infine cade, trafitto nella schiena dalla mano dal più giovane di loro.

Paton-Yarrow
Sir Joseph Noel Paton: The Dowie Dens of Yarrow

La vicenda è evocata come in sogno da parte della donna che al risveglio si precipita sulle colline e incontra il fratello recante la notizia della morte del suo innamorato. Nel tragico finale annuncia la sua morte imminente alla madre, tanto era il dolore per la perdita.

La struttura è quella classica delle ballate antiche, diffuse per larga parte d’Europa in epoca medievale con lo svelarsi della storia tra domande e risposte dei protagonisti e il commonplace della morte annunciata ai genitori.

Versioni testuali e melodie diverse con molte interpretazioni,  che ho raggruppato in tre filoni

PRIMA VERSIONE

La melodia è stata collezionata da Lucy Broadwood che la raccolse da John Potts di Whitehope Farm, Peeblesshire, pubblicata in The Journal of the Folk Song Society, vol.V (1905).

ASCOLTA Matthew White (controtenore canadese): Skye Consort nel Cd “O Sweet Woods” 2013, l’arrangiamento è molto interessante, dall’atmosfera barocca che riecheggia l’epoca in cui si fa risalire la prima versione. Sono eseguite però solo le strofe I, II, IV, V, VI, VIII e XIV

ASCOLTA Mad Pudding in Dirt & Stone -1996 (tranne la V strofa) in versione integrale su Spotify. Strepitosa versione del gruppo canadese -Columbia britannica-fondato nel 1994, bravissimi ma poco conosciuti.


I
There lived a lady in  the north;
You could scarcely find her marrow.
She was courted by nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow
II
Her father had a bonny ploughboy
And she did love him dearly.
She dressed him up like a noble lord
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
III
She kissed his cheek, she kamed his hair,
As oft she had done before O,
She gilted him with a right good sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
As he climbed up yon high hill
And they came down the other,
There he spied nine noblemen
On the dewy dells of Yarrow.
V
‘Did you come here for to drink red wine,
Or did you come here to borrow?
Or did you come here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow?’
VI
‘I came not here for to drink red wine,
And I came not here to borrow,
But I came here with a single sword
For to fight for her on Yarrow’
VII
‘There are nine of you and one of me,
And that’s but an even number,
But it’s man to man I’ll fight you all
And die for her on Yarrow’
VIII
Three he drew and three he slew
And two lie deadly wounded,
When a stubborn knight crept up behind
And pierced him with his arrow.
IX
‘Go home, go home, my false young man,
And tell your sister Sarah
That her true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow’
X
As he gaed down yon high hill
And she came down the other,
It’s then he met his sister dear
A-coming fast to Yarrow.
XI
‘O brother dear, I had a dream last night,’
‘I can read it into sorrow;
Your true lover John lies dead and gone/ On the dewy dells of Yarrow.’
XII
This maiden’s hair was three-quarters long,
The colour of it was yellow.
She tied it around his middle side
And she carried him home to Yarrow.
XIII
She kissed his cheeks, she kamed his hair
As oft she had done before O,
Her true lover John lies dead and gone,
on the dewy dells of Yarrow.
XIV
O mother dear, make me my bed,
And make it long and narrow,
For the one that died for me today,
I shall die for him tomorrow
XV
‘O father dear, you have seven sons;
You can wed them all tomorrow,
For the fairest flower amongst them all/ Is the one that died on Yarrow.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una dama nel Nord
che non aveva un marito (1)
ed era corteggiata da nove nobili
nelle tristi valli (2) dello Yarrow (3)
II
Suo padre aveva un grazioso contadinello (4) che lei amava teneramente, lo vestì da nobiluomo perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow (5)
III
Lo baciò sulla guancia, gli accarezzò
i capelli
come faceva di solito (6),
gli fece dono di una buona spada
perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow
IV
Mentre lui saliva sull’alta collina
loro scendevano dall’altra
e là vide i nove gentiluomini
sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
V
Sei venuto qui per bere del vino
rosso,

o per chiedere un prestito?
O sei venuto qui con una sola
spada

per batterti per lei a Yarrow?”
VI
Non sono venuto qui per bere
del vino rosso, o per chiedere un prestito,
ma sono venuto qui con una sola spada
per battermi per lei a Yarrow
VII
Siete nove contro uno,
e non siamo in forze equivalenti,
ma vi combatterò uno per volta
e morirò per lei a Yarrow
VIII
Tre li trafisse e tre li uccise
e due li ferì in modo mortale
quando un cavaliere tenace gli arrivò da dietro,
e lo colpì con la freccia
IX
A casa, a casa,  mio giovane
traditore

vai a dire a tua sorella Sara
che il suo amore John è morto e sepolto
sulle tristi valli di Yarrow
X
Allora lui si precipitò giù dal’alta collina
e lei scese già dall’altra
e così incontrò la cara sorella
che arrivava in fretta a Yarrow
XI
O caro fratello, ho fatto un sogno la notte scorsa
 e non posso sopportare il dolore
ll tuo amante John è morto stecchito
sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
XII
I capelli della fanciulla erano lunghi fino alle ginocchia (7)
e di colore biondo,
li annodò intorno alla sua vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa dallo Yarrow
XIII
Gli baciò le guance e gli pettinò
i capelli
come aveva sempre fatto
il suo vero amore John era morto stecchito, sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow
XIV
O madre cara, preparami il letto
e fallo lungo e stretto
per colui che è morto per me oggi,
io morirò per lui domani
XV
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare tutti domani,
ma il fiore più bello di tutti (9)
è quello morto a Yarrow”

NOTE
1) marrow= parola arcaica per compagno, amico o amante; nel contesto traducibile anche come “marito”
2) dowie -dewey qui scritto come dewy è un termine scozzese diffuso anche nella Northumbria inglese per “triste o noioso”. Dens o dells è un altro termine scozzese per indicare una” stretta valle ricca di boschi” tipica della zona
3) Yarrow è il nome di un fiume ma anche di un’erba officinale, l’achillea. Quindi la definizione del luogo “le valli dell’achillea” diventa più vaga ma anche simbolica: l’achillea è una pianta associata alla morte, e nelle credenze popolari sognarla equivale a un lutto in famiglia se la donna è sposata o alla perdita dell’innamorato. Dai poteri cicatrizzanti noti già ai tempi di Omero e utilizzata dai Druidi, la pianta è l’ingrediente principale di una pozione magica degna della ricetta segreta del druido Panoramix. Si narra infatti che nella Alta Valle del Lys (Valle d’Aosta) i Salassi fossero grandi consumatori di una bevanda che infondeva coraggio e forza. Divenne nota con il nome di Ebòlabò (letto come ebolebo) e si tratta di una bevanda ancora preparata dagli abitanti della valle a base di achillea moscata. (vedi scheda)
4) In alcune versioni il ragazzo è un uomo di campagna ma non necessariamente un contadinello, piuttosto un figlio cadetto di una piccola nobiltà di campagna. Nei dintorni di Yarrow (Yarrow Krik) si trova ancora una pietra con un’antica iscrizione nei pressi di un posto chiamato il “Riposo del Guerriero“.
5) nella versione di Matthew White dice “She killed here with a single sword/On the dewy dells of Yarrow”
6) si descrive il tipico comportamento di una moglie devota che accudisce, pettina e veste il marito, la stessa cura e devozione che riserverà al cadavere
7) I capelli lunghi fino a tre quarti dell’altezza vuol dire che arrivano alle ginocchia. Era usanza una volta che le fanciulle portassero i lunghi capelli annodati in una spessa treccia
8) alcuni interpretano il verso come un’espressione di lutto in cui la fanciulla si taglia i suoi lunghissimi capelli fino alla vita. La frase letteralmente però significa che lei usa i capelli per trasportare via il cadavere intrecciandoli come una corda. L’immagine è un po’ grottesca per i nostri standard ma doveva essere una prassi comune al tempo; tant’è che viene riportata anche in un altra ballata
9) il verso vuole semplicemente dire che il bel contadinello era il più valoroso tra tutti, non certo che era il fratello!

L’ERICA FUNESTA

Seconda versione: la dama racconta di essersi vista in sogno mentre coglieva l’erica rossa sui pendii dello Yarrow, anche questo sogno è da interpretarsi come presagio di sventura.
Una leggenda scozzese spiega come la comune erica rosata sia diventata bianca: sono state le lacrime di Malvina per il suo Oscar ferito a morte dopo il suo duello con Cairbar nell’Ulster. Il prode guerriero figlio di Ossian diede a un compagno d’armi un ramo di erica violetta affinchè lo portasse a Malvina per dimostrarle l’amore eterno che nutriva per lei . E Malvina con la forza del suo amore e la disperazione del suo cuore fece scolorire i fiori bagnandoli di lacrime. Da allora l’erica bianca fu emblema dell’amore fedele; la somiglianza con la leggenda norrena di Baldur e del vischio è sorprendente.
Il sogno della fanciulla è così funesto poichè l’erica cenerina è rossa presagio della morte in duello del suo innamorato.

La versione di Karine Powart ci riporta il testo più esteso della ballata che i Pentangle traducono in inglese e riducono a 7 strofe
ASCOLTA Karine Powart 2007 (tutte le strofe tranne la III)

ASCOLTA Bert Jansh non male questa versione intitolata solo Yarrow, in Moonshine (1973).

ASCOLTA The Pentangle dopo la reunion in Open the Door, 1985 (strofe I, II, III, IV, VI, VIII, XIII)


I
There was a lady in the north
You scarce would find her marrow
She was courted by nine gentlemen
And a plooboy lad fae Yarrow
II
Well, nine sat drinking at the wine
As oft they’d done afore O
And they made a vow amang themselves
Tae fight for her on Yarrow
III
She’s washed his face, she’s combed his hair,/ As she has done before,
She’s placed a brand down by his side,
To fight for her on Yarrow.
IV
So he’s come ower yon high, high hill
And doon by the den sae narrow
And there he spied nine armed men
Come tae fight wi’ him on Yarrow
V
He says, “There’s nine o’ you and but one o’ me/ It’s an unequal marrow”
But I’ll fight ye a’ noo one by one
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow
VI
So it’s three he slew and three withdrew
An’ three he wounded sairly
‘Til her brother, he came in beyond
And he wounded him maist foully
VII
“Gae hame, gae hame, ye fause young man
And bring yer sister sorrow
For her ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
VIII
“Oh mither, I hae dreamed a dream
A dream o’ doul and sorrow
I dreamed I was pu’ing the heathery bells
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
IX
“Oh daughter dear, I ken yer dream
And I doobt it will bring sorrow
For yer ain true love lies pale and wan
On the Dowie Dens o’ Yarrow”
X
An’ so she’s run ower yon high, high hill
An’ doon by the den sae narrow
And it’s there she spied her dear lover John
Lyin’ pale and deid on Yarrow
XI
And so she’s washed his face an’ she’s kaimed his hair
As aft she’d done afore O
And she’s wrapped it ‘roond her middle sae sma’
And she’s carried him hame tae Yarrow
XII
“Oh haud yer tongue, my daughter dear/ What need for a’ this sorrow?
I’ll wed ye tae a far better man
Than the one who’s slain on Yarrow”
XIII
“Oh faither, ye hae seven sons
And ye may wed them a’ the morrow
But the fairest floo’er amang them a’
Was the plooboy lad fae Yarrow”
XIV
“Oh mother, mother mak my bed
And mak it saft and narrow
For my love died for me this day
And I’ll die for him tomorrow”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era una dama nel  Nord
che non aveva un marito (1)
ed era corteggiata da nove nobili
e da un contadinello (4) di Yarrow (3)
II
Beh i nove stavano a bere del vino
come facevano prima (di andare a caccia) e si scambiarono la promessa reciproca
di combattere per lei sullo Yarrow
III
Lei gli lavò il viso, gli pettinò i capelli
come faceva di solito (5),
e lo cinse con una spada
perché si battesse per lei a Yarrow
IV
Mentre lui saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva i pendii di Yarrow
vide i nove uomini armati
per combattere contro di lui a Yarrow
V
Disse “Siete nove contro uno,
e non siamo in forze equivalenti,
ma vi combatterò uno per volta
sulle tristi (2) valli dello Yarrow”
VI (10)
Tre li uccise e tre li mise
in fuga
e tre li ferì a morte
finchè il fratello di lei si mise in mezzo
e lo pugnalò con furia
VII
Vai a casa, vai a casa giovane
sleale
e porta la triste notizia a tua sorella
che il suo vero amore sta pallido e esangue sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow”
VIII
O madre (11) ho fatto un sogno
e temo che porterà sventura
ho sognato di raccogliere
l’erica rossa  (12)
sulle tristi valli di Yarrow
IX
“O cara figlia, conosco il tuo sogno
e temo che porterà sventura
perchè il tuo vero amore sta pallido e esangue sulle tristi valli dello Yarrow”
X
Mentre lei saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva nella stretta valle
là vide il suo caro amore
John
che stava pallido e morto sullo Yarrow
XI
Lei gli lavò il viso, gli pettinò
i capelli
come faceva di solito (5),
si annodò (i  capelli)  intorno alla esile vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa dallo Yarrow
XII
“Frena la tua lingua, figlia cara
perchè tutto questo dolore?
Ti mariterò a un uomo migliore
di quello che è stato ucciso sullo Yarrow”
XIII
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare domani,
ma il fiore più bello di tutti (9)
era il contadinello di Yarrow
XIV
“O madre, madre cara fammi il letto
e fallo soffice e stretto
perchè il mio amore è morto per me oggi
e io morirò per lui domani”

NOTE
8) qui il verso risulta un po’ oscuro mancando il particolare dei lunghi capelli di lei annodati in treccia che diventano corde da traino per portare il cadavere a casa
10) la strofa dei Pentangle dice
It’s three he’s wounded, and three withdrew,
And three he’s killed on Yarrow,
Till her brother John, came in behind.
And pierced his body through.
(Tre li trafisse e tre li fece
recedere e due li uccise sullo Yarrow
finchè il fratello di lei John si mise in mezzo, e lo pugnalò)
11) i Pentangle dicono “Father”
12) heather bell è il nome dell’erica cenerina che vive su  suoli rocciosi e rupi (vedi scheda); una leggenda scozzese spiega come la comune erica rosata sia diventata bianca: sono state le lacrime di Malvina per il suo Oscar ferito a morte dopo il suo duello con Cairbar nell’Ulster. Il prode guerriero figlio di Ossian diede a un compagno d’armi un ramo di erica violetta affinchè lo portasse a Malvina per dimostrarle l’amore eterno che nutriva per lei . E Malvina con la forza del suo amore e la disperazione del suo cuore fece scolorire i fiori bagnandoli di lacrime. Da allora l’erica bianca fu emblema dell’amore fedele; la somiglianza con la leggenda norrena di Baldur e del vischio è sorprendente.
Il sogno della fanciulla è così funesto perchè l’erica cenerina è rossa presagio della morte in duello del suo innamorato.

THE HEATHERY HILLS OF YARROW

Terza versione
E’ la versione della Bothy band che inizia il racconto dall’agguato e svolge il dialogo tra la dama e i suoi parenti fino alla sua tragica morte.

ASCOLTA Bothy band (voce Tríona Ní Dhomhnaill) in After hours, 1979, un bel video con immagini mozzafiato della Scozia


I
It’s three drew and three slew,
And three lay deadly wounded,
When her brother John stepped in between,
And stuck his knife right through him.
II
As she went up yon high high hill,
And down through yonder valley,
Her brother John came down the glen,
Returning home from Yarrow.
III
Oh brother dear I dreamt last night
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
I dreamt that you were spilling blood,
On the dewy dens of Yarrow.
IV
Oh sister dear I read your dream,
I’m afraid it will bring sorrow,
For your true love John lies dead and gone
On the heathery hills of Yarrow.
V
This fair maid’s hair being three quarters long,
And the colour it was yellow,
She tied it round his middle waist,
And she carried him home from Yarrow.
VI
Oh father dear you’ve got seven sons,
You can wed them all tomorrow,
But a flower like my true love John,
Will never bloom in Yarrow.
VII
This fair maid she being tall and slim,
The fairest maid in Yarrow,
She laid her head on her father’s arm,
And she died through grief and sorrow.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Tre li trafisse e tre li uccise
e tre erano feriti a morte
quando il fratello di lei John si mise in mezzo
e lo colpì deciso con un coltello.
II
Mentre lei saliva sull’alta, alta collina
e scendeva i pendii di Yarrow
suo fratello John scendeva nella valle
per ritornare dallo Yarrow
III
O caro fratello ho fatto un sogno ieri notte e temo che porterà sventura
ho sognato che tu spargevi sangue
sulle tristi (2) valli di Yarrow
IV
O sorella cara, ho visto il tuo sogno
e temo che porterà dolore
perchè il tuo amante John è morto stecchito

sulle colline d’edera dello Yarrow
V
I capelli della fanciulla erano lunghi fino alle ginocchia (7)
e di colore biondo,
li annodò intorno alla sua vita (8)
e lo riportò a casa
dallo Yarrow
VI
O padre caro, hai sette figli,
li potrai sposare tutti domani,
ma un fiore come il mio vero amore John
non fiorirà più a Yarrow
VII
Questa bella fanciulla era alta e slanciata la più bella fanciulla  a Yarrow
appoggiò il capo sulle braccia del padre e morì per il grande dolore

FONTI
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Child%27s_Ballads/214
http://literaryballadarchive.com/PDF/Hamilton_1_Braes_of_Yarrow_f.pdf
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C214.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thedowiedensofyarrow.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/145.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/484.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/67.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/dowie.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/families/scotts_harden.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9870
http://fallingangelslosthighways.blogspot.it/2013/04/the-eildon-hills-sacred-mountains-of.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46972