Archivi tag: Bear McCreary

Outlander: Skye boat song

Leggi in italiano.

“E LA BARCA VA”

charlie e flora
Flora and the Prince

After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart, then twenty-six, escaped and remained hidden for several months, protected by his faithful.
Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met the Bonnie Prince and helped him to leave the Hebrides; we see them depicted into a boat at the mercy of the waves, she wraps in her shawl and looks at the horizon as the sun sets, he rows with enthusiasm.
(here’s how it actually went: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

THE CROSSING AT SEA: THE ESCAPE OF CHARLES STUART

The “romantic” escape is remembered in “Skye boat song” written by Sir Harold Boulton in 1884 on a scottish traditional melody which is said to have been arranged by Anne Campbell MacLeod; a decade ago Anne was on a trip to the Isle of Skye and heard some sailors singing “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in English “The Cuckoo in the Grove”). “The Cuckoo in the Grove” was printed in 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, by Alfred Moffat, with a text attributed to William Ross (1762 – 1790). The melody is therefore at least dating back to the time of the story.

LO IORRAM
The song (in “Songs of the North” by Sir Harold Boulton and Anne Campbell MacLeod, London  1884)  is a “iorram”, not really a sea shanty: his function is giving rhythm to the rowers but at the same time it was also a funeral lament. The time is 3/4 or 6/8: the first beat is very accentuated and corresponds to the phase in which the oar is lifted and brought forward, 2 and 3 are the backward stroke. Some of these tunes are still played in the Hebrides as a waltz.

The song was a success: from the very beginning rumors circulated that they passed the text as a translation of an ancient Gaelic song and soon became a classic piece of Celtic music and in particular of traditional Scottish music (revisited from beat to smooth, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), countless instrumental versions (from one instrument – harp, bagpipe, guitar, flute – or two up to the orchestra) with classical arrangements, traditional, new age, also for military and choral bands.


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king(1)
Over the sea to Skye (2)
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked (3) in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head

III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again (4).

NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Who was the “Young Pretender”? Probably just a dandy with the Italian accent and the passion of the brandy, but how much was the charm that exercised on the Scottish Highlands! (see more)
2) Skye isle in theInner Hebrides, but it sounds like “sky” and therefore a metaphor, Charlie is a hero in the firmament
3)  “rocked” as in many sea songs and sea shanties it stand for “cradled by the sea”
4) in 1884 Charles Stuart was dust, but romantic literature maintained live the Jacobite spirit and songs still burned in hearts

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)In 1896 Robert Louis Stevenson wrote “Over the sea to Skye” (aka Sing Me a Song of a Lad That Is Gone) a new version of Sir Harold Boulton’s Skye Boat song, because he wasn’t satisfied with what it was written by an English baronet.
Charles Edward wasn’t a Bonny Prince any more but an old, sickness man, even if in his “golden” exile between Rome and Florence. Vittorio Alfieri describes him as tyrannic and always drunk husband (but he was in love with Louise of Stolberg-Gedern -Charles Edward’s fair-haired wife). The Prince, embittered and addicted to alcohol, died in Rome on 31 January 1788 (also abandoned by his wife four years ago).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
Robert Louis Stevenson 1896)
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?

III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.

OUTLANDER VERSION

Skye Boat song’s tune is a principal theme in Outlander tv series sung by Raya Yarbrough and arranged by Bear McCreary, from Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem,  referencing how Claire Randall travels 200 years back in time.
Outlander season I -The Skye Boat Song (Short)
Outlander Season I -The Skye Boat Song (Extended)
Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song (French version)

Outlander season 3  -The Skye Boat Song Caribbean version

I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul (1), she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye. 
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.


French Version
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone,
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun,
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
III
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye.
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rùm on the port
Eigg on the starboard bow
Glory of youth glowed in her soul
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there
Give me the sun that shone
Give me the eyes, give me the soul
Give me the lass that’s gone
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas
Mountains of rain and sun
All that was good, all that was fair
All that was me is gone
Notes
1) she was feeling very merry in her heart, she was happy

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

Outlander: Dance of the Druids

Leggi in italiano

Dance of the Druids (aka The Summoning) is a song composed  by Bear McCreary on a Gaelic prayer transcribed by Alexander Carmichael in his “Carmina Gadelica” (1900) entitled “Duan na Muthairne” ( Rune of the Muthairn).

An ancient song still known at South Uist in 1874, the witness Duncan MacLellan had heard from an old woman that repeated long chants night after night by the fire (then came the television!) Probably the old lady preferred the prayer in the Gaelic of his fathers instead of the Our Father of the Catholic Church!
Apparently a prayer to the Creator but  if in place of Rìgh na = “King of” we put a Rìghinn na = “Queen of” we get the description of the Milky Way
Raya Yarbrough  in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) – only the first stanza

 

I
Thou King of the moon (1),
Thou King of the sun,
Thou King of the planets (2),
Thou King of the stars,
Thou King of the globe,
Thou King of the sky (3),
Oh! Lovely Thy countenance,
Thou beauteous Beam (4).
II
Two loops of silk
Down by thy limbs,
Smooth-skinned (5);
Yellow jeweIs
And a handful
Out of every stock of them (6).
I
A Righ na gile (1)
A Righ na greine,
A Righ na rinne (2),
A Righ na reula,
A Righ na cruinne,
A Righ na speura (3),
Is aluinn do ghnuis,
A lub (4) eibhinn.
II
Da lub shioda
Shios rid’ leasraich
Mhinich, chraicich;
Usgannan buidhe
Agus dolach
As gach sath dhiubh

NOTES
Carmichael allowed himself rather a lot of freedom in his translations, so Tom Thomson (gaelic speaking) argues
1) “na gile” (of the whiteness)
2) I can’t see how “na rinne” (singular) can mean “of the planets” (plural) – it’s clearly singular and means either “of the world” or perhaps “of creation” or even “of the universe”
3) “na speura” (of heaven)
4) A lùb=”young man”
5) a silky skin, soft and luminous
6) Celts liked the golden jewellery

OUTLANDER SAGA

The novel is a romantic love story between Claire Randall and James Fraser aka James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser Lord of Broch Tuarach and their vicissitudes along Europe and the Americas. A portrait of Scotland in the mid-700 century torn by the Jacobite struggles and clan conflicts, carefully recreated by Diana Gabaldon, through the traditions and life of the Scottish people, in a rich and evocative style.

CRAIGH NA DUN

A story beginning  “over the top”, with a journey through time of the protagonist who, during her honeymoon in Inverness, finds herself projected into the past by crossing throug Craigh na Dun: from 1945 in 1743.
The theme of the Dance of the Druids renamed “Stones Theme” is often recalled in the Outlander television series linked to the mystery of the stone circle and to the rituals in the ancient religion.

second part

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/megalitismo.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/religione-celti.html?cb=1521975648601

http://www.carmichaelwatson.lib.ed.ac.uk/cwatson/en/catalogueentry/2126
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/corpus/Carmina/G9.html
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/archive/75760440?mode=transcription

Outlander: Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh

Leggi in italiano

The “lost portrait” of Charles Edward Stuart is a portrait, painted in late autumn 1745 by Scottish artist Allan Ramsay,

“Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa”  (= Song to the Prince) or “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” was written 1745 by Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  Highlands bard and fervent Jacobite, to be addressed as a letter to Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, known as Bonnie Prince Charlie or The Young Pretender.

The Prince was in France in the vain expectation of a favorable sign by King Louis XV to help him to recover the throne of England and Scotland. But the question dragged on for long, Louis never received his poor relative at court, so the boy was also snubbed by the Parisian Nobility and certainly the words of encouragement of the supporters in Scotland could not but comfort him.
The original text of “Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa” is written in Scottish Gaelic, a language that the prince could not understand (having been born and raised in Rome ).

In “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (see) lyrics and tune  (#113) and the notes of the published edition for the School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edinburgh 2011 are “This stirring Jacobite song has been attributed to Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). The text and translation here are adapted from JLC, which has 17 couplets plus refrain. That text is derived from the 1839 edition (p.85) of Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair’s collection (ASE); the 1839 edition is identical with the 1834 edition, but the fact that the song does not appear in the first edition (1751) raises doubts as to the ascription (see JLC 42, n.1): in fact the text was almost certainly lifted into the 1834 edition from PT, where it is headed simply ‘LUINNEAG’ and is not ascribed. The 1834 or 1839 text of the Ais-Eiridh is doubtless the source of that in AO 102, which ascribes the song to Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair. Campbell prints the tune in 3/4 time (JLC 301).
JLC = CAMPBELL, John Lorne, ed.(1933, Rev.1984) Highland Songs of the Forty-Five … [With thirteen melodies] (Edinburgh: John Grant, 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press for the Scottish Gaelic Texts Society).

Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album entirely dedicated to the scottish gaelic songs that have been preserved in the Hebrides on the ruinous parable of the Jacobite rebellion led by Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745

Dàimh in “Moidart to Mabou” 2000, a new generation group from the West Coast of Scotland, formed by musicians from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and California
https://daimh.bandcamp.com/track/oran-eile-don-phrionnsa

Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince (1) comes
To the land of Clanranald(2)
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird

I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

NOTES

My hope is constant in thee

1) Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) The Macdonalds of Clanranald, are one of the branch clans of Clan Donald—one of the largest Scottish clans. in which “king of the isles and king of Argyll” was elected. At the time of the 1745 rebellion, the old chieftain was not in favor of the Stuard, but did not prevent his son from allying with the Young Pretender. The two met in Paris. The young Ranald was among the first to join the Jacobite cause by proselytizing the other clans.

OUTLANDER TV SERIES: “THE FOX’S LAIR”

The song has been brought back to popularity with the inclusion in Outlander TV series – second season- following in the footsteps of the great editorial success of the series written by Diana Gabaldon, as underlined by the artistic director Bear McCreary this is one of the few songs written just in the making of the Scottish rebellion.
To properly underscore these episodes, I needed a song that was written during the Jacobite uprising as opposed to after it, a song that makes no comment about loss, only promises of victory.
I turned to famed Scottish composer and music historian John Purser, who was gracious with his time and assembled a collection a historically-accurate songs for me. I was immediately drawn to the soaring melody in “Moch Sa Mhadainn,” a song composed by Alasdair mac Mghaighstir Alasdair. A celebrated poet of the Jacobite era, Alasdair composed this song upon hearing the news that Prince Charles Edward Stuart had landed at Glenfinnan. That was perfect!  When Jamie opens the letter in “The Fox’s Lair” and learns he has been roped into the revolution, this song was actually being composed somewhere in Scotland at that very moment.” (see).

Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) : “It is always difficult negotiating the gap between tradition and innovation but it is something I am becoming increasingly used to, “I performed the song at a much slower tempo than it would normally be performed traditionally but I think it worked to great effect with the rich string voicings and the percussive elements of the piece. I was also very pleased to work with my friend John Purser who helped direct my performance of the song to suit the arrangement.’

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.

I
Early in the morning as I awaken
Great is my joy and hearty laughter
Since I’ve heard of the Prince’s coming
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel (3), as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.

NOTE

Let Us Unite

3) Donald Cameron of Lochiel (c.1700 – October 1748) among the most influential chieftains traditionally loyal to the Stuart House. He joined Prince Charles in 1745 and later Culloden fled to France where he died in exile.
The family was rehabilitated and reinstated in the title with the amnesty of 1748.

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

Outlander: Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain

 Leggi in italiano

Tune: Bear McCreary
Lyrics: Diana Gabaldon

“Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain” or “The Woman of Balnain”  is a scottish gaelic song  in the Outlander tv series.

In the “Outlander” book  Diana Gabaldon narrates the journey through time of Claire Randall who, crossing a circle of stones near Inverness (Scotland), is magically catapulted two hundred years back in the mid-eighteenth century. Runned into some highlanders, she is taken to Castel Leoch  to meet the chief clan, Colum McKenzie.

the Welsh bard Gwyllyn (Gillebrìde MacMillan)

In the evening entertainment Gwyllyn performs a tale about the wife of the Laird of Balnain, who returned through rocks on a fairy hill. In the Outlander Tv Series (I season, “The Way Out”) the story becomes a song.
Gillebrìde MacMillan in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack)

Karliene


I
“I am the lady of Baile An Àthain.
The folk have stolen me again, again,”
it is as if every stone is saying.
II
Suddenly then, the night darkened
And I heard a loud noise like thunder
And the moon came out
From the shadow of the clouds.
And it shone on the damsel.
III
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
Weary and worn as she had walked far.
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
But she couldn’t tell where she was
Nor even how she came [there].
I
“‘S mise bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain
Tha na Sìth air mo ghoid a-rithist, a-risthist,”
Tha mar g’eill gach clach ga ràdh.
II
Gu h-obann an sin, dhorchnaidh an oidhch’
‘S chualas fuaim àrd mar thàirneanach
‘S thàinig a’ ghealach a-mach
Fo sgàil nan neòil.
‘S bhoillsg ì air a’ chaileig
III
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
‘Sgìth ‘s claoidht mar gun d’shiubhail i fada.
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
Ach nach b’urrainn ins càite an robh i
No idir mar rinn i tighinn.

 

FROM “THE WAY OUT”

In Castle Leoch hall Jamie Fraser, sitting near Claire, translates the text and in her immediately comes the hope of being able to return to her time (1945) and her husband Frank. But Jamie’s version used to explain the words is different from song


Jamie:  Now this one is about a man out late on a fairy hill on the eve of Samhain who hears the sound of a woman singing sad and plaintive from the very rocks of the hill.

I am a woman of Balnain.
The folk have stolen me over again, ‘
the stones seemed to say.
I stood upon the hill, and wind did rise,
and the sound of thunder rolled across the land.
I placed my hands upon the tallest stone
and traveled to a far, distant land,
where I lived for a time among strangers
who became lovers and friends.
But one day, I saw the moon came out,
and the wind rose once more.
so I touched the stones
and traveled back to my own land
and took up again with the man I had left behind.
ClaireShe came back through the stones?
JamieAye, she did. They always do.

In the television adaptation, Doune Castle was used as the exterior of the fictional Castle Leoch.

FONTI
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-the-way-out-the-gathering-and-rent/
https://ancroiait.wordpress.com/2017/11/03/723-the-woman-of-balnain/

OUTLANDER SERIES: Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain

Read the post in English  

“Bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain” ovvero “The Woman of Balnain”  (in italiano “La moglie di Balnain”) è un canto in gaelico per la serie TV Outlander, composto appositamente da  Bear McCreary (sul testo di Diana Gabaldon).
Nel primo libro della serie intitolato “Outlander” (in italiano La straniera) Diana Gabaldon narra del viaggio nel tempo di Claire Randall che attraversando un cerchio di pietre nei pressi di Inverness,  si ritrova magicamente catapultata duecento anni indietro nella Scozia di metà Settecento. Imbattutasi in un gruppetto di highlanders del clan McKenzie viene condotta a Castel Leoch dove conosce il capo clan Colum McKenzie.

il bardo gallese Gwyllyn (Gillebrìde MacMillan )

L’intrattenimento serale ha come ospite d’onore il bardo gallese Gwyllyn con musica, canti e racconti  in particolare sui Wee Folk (il piccolo popolo, vezzeggiativo con cui sono chiamate le creature magiche del folklore scozzese)

L’ESTRATTO DA LIBRO

Così scrivel Gabaldon nella parte seconda del libro sotto il titolo di “Intrattenimenti serali”:
“Una mi colpì in particolare, e cioè quella in cui si parlava di un uomo che , trovandosi su un colle incantato, udì il canto “triste e lamentoso” di una donna proveniente dalle stesse rocce della collina. Ascoltando più attentamente, udì queste parole
“Sono la moglie del Laird di Balnain.
i Folk mi han rapito di nuovo ahimè”
Così l’uomo si era precipitato a casa di Balnain, scoprendo che il proprietario non c’era più, così come il suo figlioletto e sua moglie. Andò subito a cercare un prete e lo portò sulla collinetta. Il prete benedisse le rocce del dun, spruzzandole di acqua santa. Tutto a un tratto calarono le tenebre e si udì un forte rombo simile al tuono. Poi la luna sbucò da una nuvola illuminando la donna, la moglie di Balnain, che giaceva esausta sull’erba con il bimbo tra le braccia. La donna era stanca come se avesse viaggiato da molto lontano, ma non sapeva dire dove fosse stata, nè in che modo fosse arrivata lì.”

Nella versione della serie televisiva Outlander (I stagione, III episodio “The Way Out”) il racconto diventa un canto.
ASCOLTA Gillebrìde MacMillan che nella serie interpreta il ruolo di Gwyllyn the Bard in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack)

ASCOLTA Karliene

I
“‘S mise bean Tighearna Bhail’ ‘n Athain
Tha na Sìth air mo ghoid a-rithist, a-risthist,”
Tha mar g’eill gach clach ga ràdh.
II
Gu h-obann an sin, dhorchnaidh an oidhch’
‘S chualas fuaim àrd mar thàirneanach
‘S thàinig a’ ghealach a-mach
Fo sgàil nan neòil.
‘S bhoillsg ì air a’ chaileig
III
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
‘Sgìth ‘s claoidht mar gun d’shiubhail i fada.
Bean Bhail ‘n Athain ì fhèin a bh’ann,
Ach nach b’urrainn ins càite an robh i
No idir mar rinn i tighinn.


I
“I am the lady of Baile An Àthain.
The folk have stolen me again, again,”
it is as if every stone is saying.
II
Suddenly then, the night darkened
And I heard a loud noise like thunder
And the moon came out
From the shadow of the clouds.
And it shone on the damsel.
III
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
Weary and worn as she had walked far.
It was the woman of Balnain herself that was there,
But she couldn’t tell where she was
Nor even how she came [there].
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
“Sono la moglie del Laird di Balnain, i Folk mi han rapito, rapito di nuovo”
è come se ogni roccia dicesse
II
Tutto a un tratto calarono le tenebre e udii un forte rombo simile al tuono
e la luna sbucò
dall’ombra delle nuvole
e illuminò la damigella.
III
Era la moglie stessa di Balnain
che era là
stanca e sfinita come se avesse viaggiato da molto lontano.
Era la moglie stessa di Balnain
che era là
ma non sapeva dire dove fosse stata, nè in che modo fosse arrivata lì

NOTE
* dalla versione in italiano del libro

 

LA SCENA DALLA SERIE TV OUTLANDER

Jamie Fraser al fianco di Claire le traduce il testo e in lei subito si accende la speranza di poter ritornare nuovamente alla sua epoca (il 1945) e al marito Frank.

La traduzione di Jamie è però diversa dal testo in gaelico
Jamie:  Now this one is about a man out late on a fairy hill on the eve of Samhain who hears the sound of a woman singing sad and plaintive from the very rocks of the hill.


I
I am a woman of Balnain.
The folk have stolen me over again, ‘
the stones seemed to say.
I stood upon the hill, and wind did rise, and the sound of thunder rolled across the land.
II
I placed my hands upon the tallest stone and traveled to a far, distant land, where I lived for a time among strangers who became lovers and friends.
III
But one day, I saw the moon came out, and the wind rose once more.
so I touched the stones
and traveled back to my own land
and took up again with the man I had left behind.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Sono la moglie di Balnain,
i Folk mi han rapito di nuovo”
sembravano dire le rocce.
Stavo sulla collina
e s’alzò il vento
e il rombo del tuono squassò la terra
II
Misi le mano sulla pietra più alta
e viaggiai in una terra molto lontana
dove ho vissuto per molto tempo tra stranieri che divennero amanti e amici.
III
Ma un giorno, vidi sbucare la luna
e il vento alzarsi di nuovo,
così toccai le rocce
e ritornai indietro alla mia terra
e feci ritorno all’uomo da cui ero stata portata via.

Claire: She came back through the stones?
Jamie: Aye, she did. They always do.

Ed ecco la sequenza televisiva Outlander “The Way Out”

Sia Castel Leoch che il dun di pietre (Craigh na Dun) sono invenzioni dell’autrice di Outlander ma ovviamente l’adattamento TV è stato girato negli scenari della Scozia, perciò il Castello di Doune nei pressi di Stirling è il castello di Colum MacKenzie e del suo clan

FONTI
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-the-way-out-the-gathering-and-rent/
https://ancroiait.wordpress.com/2017/11/03/723-the-woman-of-balnain/

Dance of the Druids aka Duan na Muthairn serie Outlander

Read the post in English

Per i fan della serie Outlander la” Danza dei Druidi” (anche con il titolo The Summoning) è un brano composto per l’occasione da Bear McCreary su una preghiera in gaelico trascritta da Alexander Carmichael nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” (1900)- in formato digitale (qui) detta “Duan na Muthairne” (Rune of the Muthairn)
Un antico canto ancora ripetuto nell’isola di South Uist nel 1874, il testimone tale Duncan MacLellan lo aveva ascoltato da una vecchia dell’isola che ripeteva lunghe cantilene notte dopo notte accanto al fuoco (poi è arrivata la televisione!) Probabilmente la vecchina preferiva recitare la preghiera nel gaelico dei suoi padri invece del Padre Nostro della Chiesa cattolica! (continua)
All’apparenza una preghiera al Dio creatore ma  se al posto di  Rìgh na = “Re del” mettiamo una Rìghinn na = “Regina del” otteniamo la descrizione della Via Lattea

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbrough  canta solo la prima strofa in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) 

I
A Righ na gile (1)
A Righ na greine,
A Righ na rinne (2),
A Righ na reula,
A Righ na cruinne,
A Righ na speura (3),
Is aluinn do ghnuis,
A lub (4) eibhinn.
II
Da lub shioda
Shios rid’ leasraich
Mhinich, chraicich;
Usgannan buidhe
Agus dolach
As gach sath dhiubh


I
Thou King of the moon (1),
Thou King of the sun,
Thou King of the planets (2),
Thou King of the stars,
Thou King of the globe,
Thou King of the sky (3),
Oh! Lovely Thy countenance,
Thou beauteous Beam (4).
II
Two loops of silk
Down by thy limbs,
Smooth-skinned (5);
Yellow jeweIs
And a handful
Out of every stock of them (6).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tu re  della luna
tu re  del sole
tu re  della creazione,
tu re  delle stelle
tu re  della Terra
tu re  del Cielo
amabile il tuo volto
tu meraviglioso raggio
II
Due giri di seta
ti avvolgono i lombi
dalla pelle levigata;
gioielli dorati
e una ricca
paroure 

NOTE
E’ risaputo che  Carmichael si prese delle libertà nella traduzione del gaelico, così Tom Thomson (gaelico scozzese come lingua madre) trae delle considerazioni che riporto nelle note lasciandole in inglese
1) “na gile” (of the whiteness)  e in senso lato Luna
2) I can’t see how “na rinne” (singular) can mean “of the planets” (plural) – it’s clearly singular and means either “of the world” or perhaps “of creation” or even “of the universe”
3) “na speura” (of heaven)
4) A lùb: tra i vari significati  che il dizionario riporta non c’è “beam” ma un “young man” che potrebbe fare al caso nostro
5) una pelle serica, soffice e luminosa come le raffinate vesti indossate
6) ai celti piaceva molto la chincaglieria (d’oro massiccio naturalmente): s’intende un assortimento di bracciali, anelli, collane, orecchini e ciondoli, in italiano si direbbe “un vasto abbinamento di gioielleria” ma così si perde l’asciuttezza del verso gaelico. 

LA SAGA OUTLANDER

Per chi ama i romanzi storici romance Diana Gabaldon con la sua serie Outlander è ormai diventata un punto di riferimento. Il suo successo è ormai planetario e in Italia e non solo non si contano più i siti e i forum dedicati a questa autrice e ai meravigliosi personaggi da lei creati. La serie Outlander, ancora in corso di pubblicazione, è composta da 7 libri; la casa editrice Corbaccio nell’edizione italiana ha scelto di dividere i 7 libri in due (escluso “La Straniera”) e fin’ora ne sono stati pubblicati 13. La notorietà si è ulteriormente amplificata con la produzione e la messa in onda di una serie televisiva  dal titolo “Outlander”.

Il romanzo è anche una storia romantica dell’amore nato tra Claire Randall e James Fraser ovvero James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser Lord di Broch Tuarach e le loro peripezie per l’Europa e le Americhe. La vicenda storica è calata nella Scozia della metà del 700 dilaniata dalle lotte giacobite e dai conflitti tra i clan, accuratamente ricreata dalla Gabaldon, attraverso le tradizioni e la vita del popolo scozzese, in uno stile ricco ed evocativo, mai lento o noioso.

IL CERCHIO DI PIETRE: IL PORTARE PER IL VIAGGIO NEL TEMPO

L’avvio della storia è apparentemente un po’ “sopra le righe”, con un viaggio nel tempo della protagonista che, in viaggio di nozze ad Inverness, si ritrova proiettata nel passato, dopo aver attraversato il cerchio di pietra di Craigh na Dun: dal 1945 nel 1743.
Il tema della Danza dei Druidi ribattezzato “Stones Theme” ritorna spesso nella versione della serie televisiva legato al mistero dei Cerchi di Pietre e ai rituali praticati nell’antica religione.

continua seconda parte

I BARDI DELLE TERRE CELTICHE

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/megalitismo.html
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/religione-celti.html?cb=1521975648601

http://www.carmichaelwatson.lib.ed.ac.uk/cwatson/en/catalogueentry/2126
http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/corpus/Carmina/G9.html
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/archive/75760440?mode=transcription

To the Begging I Will Go

La protesta contro il “sistema” all’insegna del sex-drinks&piping s’incanala in uno specifico filone di canti popolari (britannici e irlandesi) sul mestiere di mendicante, uno spirito libero che vagabonda per il paese senza radici e vuole solo essere lasciato in pace. Molti sono i canti in gaelico in cui il protagonista rivendica l’esercizio della libera volontà, niente tasse, preoccupazioni e dispiaceri, ma la vita presa come viene affidandosi a lavori saltuari e alla carità della gente. (continua)

LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE: To the Begging I Will Go

Esistono molte varianti della canzone a testimonianza della sua vasta popolarità e diffusione. Una vecchia bothy ballad che affonda nella materia medievale dei canti dei vaganti, quel vasto sottobosco di umanità un po’ artistoide, un po’ disadattata, un po’ morta di fame che si arrabattava a sbarcare il lunario esercitando i mestieri più improbabili e spesso truffaldini.
Probabilmente già lo stesso Richard Brome si ispirò  a questi canti dei mendicanti per la sua commedia “A Jovial Crew, or the Merry Beggars” (1640), in cui scrive il coro “The Beggar” detto anche The Jovial Beggar, con il refrain: 
And a Begging we will go, we’ll go, we’ll go,
And a Begging we will go.
Come sia la melodia raggiunge una notevole popolarità moltiplicandosi in tutta una serie di “clonazioni” A bowling we will go, A fishing we will go, A hawking we will go, and A hunting we will go e così via.

ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary “To the Begging I Will Go” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

PRIMA VERSIONE
Tae the Beggin’ / Maid Behind the Bar

ASCOLTA Ossian, la melodia che accompagna il canto è “Maid Behind the Bar”, un Irish reel


I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

II
And I’ll gang tae the tailor
wi’ a wab o’ hoddin gray,
and gar him mak’ a cloak for me
tae hap me night and day.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

III
An’ I’ll gang tae the cobbler
and I’ll gar him sort my shoon
an inch thick tae the boddams
and clodded weel aboun.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
IV
And I’ll gang tae the tanner
and I’ll gar him mak’ a dish,
and it maun haud three ha’pens,
for it canna weel be less.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

V
And when that I begin my trade,
sure, I’ll let my beard grow strang,
nor pare my nails this year or day
for beggars wear them lang.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VI
And I will seek my lodging
before that it grows dark –
when each gude man is getting hame, and new hame frae his work.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VII
And if begging be as good as trade,
and as I hope it may,
it’s time that I was oot o’ here
an’ haudin’ doon the brae.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.

VIII=I
Of all the trades that I do ken,
sure, the begging is the best
for  when a beggar’s weary
he can aye sit down and rest.
Tae the beggin’ I will go, will go,
tae the beggin’ I will go.
 
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri che conosco,
di sicuro il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
E andrò dal sarto
con una pezza di ruvida lana grigia
e gli chiederò di farmi un mantello
per ricoprirmi di notte e giorno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò, a mendicare andrò
III
Andrò dal calzolaio
e gli chiederò di risuolare le mie scarpe con del cuoio spesso
per camminare bene sulle zolle.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
IV
E andrò dal tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte perchè non si può fare con meno.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

V
E quando poi inizierò il mio mestiere, di sicuro mi lascerò crescere la barba quest’anno o oggi, nè mi taglierò le unghie, perchè i mendicanti le portano lunghe. A mendicare andrò,
andrò, a mendicare andrò

VI
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cali la sera –
quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

VII
E se il mendicare sarà un buon affare, come spero lo sia,
è tempo che io vada via da qui e m’incammini per la collina.
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò

SECONDA VERSIONE: To the Beggin’ I Will Go

ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs

Chorus
To the beggin’ I will go, go
To the beggin’ I will go
O’ a’ the trades a man can try,
the beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s weary
he can just sit down and rest.
First I maun get a meal-pock
made out o’ leather reed
And it will haud twa firlots (1)
wi’ room for beef and breid.
Afore that I do gang awa,
I’ll lat my beard grow strang
And for my nails I winna pair,
for a beggar wears them lang.
I’ll gang to find some greasy cook
and buy frae her a hat(2)
Wi’ twa-three inches o’ a rim,
a’ glitterin’ owre wi’ fat.
Syne I’ll gang to a turner
and gar him mak a dish
And it maun haud three chappins (3)
for I cudna dee wi’ less.
I’ll gang and seek my quarters
before that it grows dark
Jist when the guidman’s sitting doon
and new-hame frae his wark.
Syne I’ll tak out my muckle dish
and stap it fu’ o’ meal
And say, “Guidwife, gin ye gie me bree,
I winna seek you kail”.
And maybe the guidman will say,
“Puirman, put up your meal
You’re welcome to your brose (4) the nicht, likewise your breid and kail”.
If there’s a wedding in the toon,
I’ll airt me to be there
And pour my kindest benison
upon the winsome pair.
And some will gie me breid
and beef and some will gie me cheese
And I’ll slip out among the folk
and gather up bawbees (5).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
A mendicare andrò, andrò,
a mendicare andrò
Di tutti i mestieri che un uomo può fare, il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare.
Per prima cosa prenderò una bisaccia
fatta di cuoio
e conterrà due staia
con un posto per carne e pane.
Prima di andare via
mi farò crescere la barba lunga
e non mi taglierò le unghie
perchè il mendicante le porta lunghe.
(Andrò a cercare un grassa cuoca
e comprerò da lei un cappello
con la falda di due o tre pollici
tutto scintillante di grasso.)
E andrò da un tornitore
e gli chiederò di farmi una scodella
che possa contenere tre mezze pinte
perchè non posso fare con meno.
E mi cercerò un riparo
prima che cada il buio
– quando ogni brav’uomo è rientrato a casa, di nuovo a casa dal lavoro.
Poi tirerò fuori il mio grande piatto
e lo riempirò di farina d’avena
e dico “Buona donna, se mi date del brodo, non vi chiedo del cavolo”
E forse il padrone di casa dirà
“Poveruomo, metti da parte la tua farina, saluta il tuo brose di stasera
come pure il pane e cavolo”
Se ci sarà un matrimonio in città
mi recherò là
ed elargirò la mia più cara benedizione
su quella bella coppia.
E qualcuno mi darà il pane
e manzo e qualcuno mi darà del formaggio e mi aggirerò tra la gente
a raccogliere delle monetine

NOTE
1) unità di misura scozzese
2) il senso della frase mi sfugge
3) vecchia misura scozzese per liquidi equivalente e mezza pinta
4) il brose è il porrige preparato alla maniera scozzese. Se ho capito bene il senso del discorso , il mendicante chiede alla padrona di casa un po’ di brodo caldo per prepararsi il suo brose a base di farina d’avena, ma il padrone di casa lo invita a mangiare alla sua tavola cibi ben più sostanziosi
5) bawbees: half pennies

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

E’ la versione del Lancashire riportata in “Folk Songs of Lancashire” (Harding 1980). Leggiamo nelle note ” This version was collected from an old weaver in Delph called Becket Whitehead by Herbert Smith and Ewan McColl.”
ASCOLTA Ewan McColl


I
Of all the trades in England,
a-beggin’ is the best
For when a beggar’s tired,
he can sit him down to rest.
And to a begging I will go,
to the begging I will go
II
There’s a poke (1) for me oatmeal,
& another for me salt
I’ve a pair of little crutches,
‘tha should see how I can hault
III
There’s patches on me fusticoat,
there’s a black patch on me ‘ee
But when it comes to tuppenny ale (2),
I can see as well as thee
IV
My britches, they are no but holes,
but my heart is free from care
As long as I’ve a bellyfull,
my backside can go bare
V
There’s a bed for me where ‘ere I like,
& I don’t pay no rent
I’ve got no noisy looms to mind,
& I am right content
VI
I can rest when I am tired
& I heed no master’s bell (3)
A man ud be daft to be a king,
when beggars live so well
VII
Oh, I’ve been deef at Dokenfield (4),
& I’ve been blind at Shaw (5)
And many the right & willing lass
I’ve bedded in the straw
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Di tutti i mestieri in Inghilterra
il mendicante è il migliore
perchè quando un mendicante è stanco si può fermare e riposare
A mendicare andrò,
a mendicare andrò
II
Ho una tasca per la farina d’avena
e un’altra per il sale
ho un paio di stampelle, dovreste vedere come riesco a zoppicare!
III
Ci sono toppe sul mio cappotto frusto e una toppa nera sul mio occhio ma quandosi tratta di birra da due penny, riesco a vedere bene quanto te!
IV
I miei pantalono non hanno che buchi
ma il mio cuore è libero dall’affanno
finchè ho la pancia piena
il mio fondoschiena può andare nudo
V
C’è un letto per me ovunque mi piaccia
e non pago l’affitto
non ho pensieri fastidiosi in testa
e sono proprio contento
VI
Mi riposo quando sono stanco
e non ascolto la campana del padrone
è da pazzi voler essere un re 
quando i mendicanti vivono così bene!
VII
Sono stato sordo a Dokenfield
e sono stato cieco a Shaw
e più di una ragazza ben disposta
ho portato a letto nella paglia

NOTE
1) poke è in senso letterale un sacchetto ma in questo contesto vuole dire pocket
2) tippeny ale è la birra a buon mercato bevuta normalmente dalla gente comune
2) non ha un padrone o un principale da cui correre appena sente suonare il campanello/sirena
3) Dukinfield è una cittadina nella Grande Manchester
4) Shaw and Crompton, detta comunemente Shaw è una cittadina industriale nella Grande Manchester

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE: The Beggarman’s song

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://www.spiersfamilygroup.co.uk/Tae%20the%20Beggin%20I%20will%20go.pdf
https://tullamore.band/track/1238160/tae-the-beggin-maid-behind-the-bar
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/thebeggingsong.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/tothe.htm
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=49513&lang=it
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82650
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/gd/fullrecord/60319/9
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/126.html
http://www.kitchenmusician.net/smoke/beggin.html

The Bonny Moorhen

Ennesima jacobite song made in Scozia, scritta in codice e in cui l’uccello invocato non è un “moorhen” ma il Bel Carletto.
La melodia è quantomeno seicentesca (in Henry Atkinson MS, 1694, dal titolo “Take tent to the rippells good Man”).
C’è anche una versione goliardica di Robert Burns riportata nelle “Merry Muses of Caledonia” uscito postumo dal titolo “The Bonie Moo-hen” a hunting song”: nella versione di Robert Burns si tratta di una battuta di caccia alla gallinella d’acqua (vedi). Il poemetto è un linguaggio cifrato tra lui e la bella Nancy McLehose con cui il bardo intratteneva una relazione adulterina, ennesima prova di una loro relazione molto più carnale di quanto sia stato lecito supporre nei salotti edimburghesi del tempo.

Bear McCreary ne ha fatto un personale arrangiamento strumentale per la serie Outlander (stagione 1) con il titolo “Tracking Jamie” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

LA VERSIONE TRADIZIONALE

La bella gallinella d’acqua (Gallinula chloropus) –  il maschio e la femmina hanno una livrea identica con colorazione prevalentemente marrone scuro-grigio e nera – porta i colori del vecchio tartan Stuart: becco rosso acceso, zampe verdi, piumaggio nero e grigio con una spruzzata di bianco, e molto probabilmente proprio per questo è stata presa come avatar del  “giovane” e ultimo pretendente Stuart al trono di Scozia, tuttavia alcuni ritengono offensivo paragonare il bel principe a una gallinella (moor-hen) e preferiscono considerare il termine come un ulteriore allusione al moor-cock!
Già in “The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow” mi sono soffermata sul Moorcock, perchè ben due uccelli si condendono il nome: il gallo cedrone ma anche la pernice di Scozia, entrambi della famiglia dei fagiani. (continua)

La versione testuale proviene da “The Jacobite Relics of Scotland, being the Songs, Airs and Legends of the Adherents to the House of Stuart”( James Hogg, 1818)
ASCOLTA The Corries


I
My bonnie moorhen,
my bonnie moorhen,
Up in the grey hills,
and doon in the glen,
It’s when ye gang butt the hoose,
when ye gang ben
I’ll drink a health tae
my bonnie moorhen.
II
My bonnie moorhen’s gane
o’er the main,
And it will be summer
till she comes again,
But when she comes back again
some folk will ken,
Oh, joy be with you
my bonnie moorhen.
III
My bonnie moorhen
has feathers anew,
And she’s a’ fine colours,
but nane o’ them blue,
She’s red an’ she’s white,
an’ she’s green an’ she’s grey
My bonnie moorhen come hither way.
IV
Come up by Glen Duich,
and doon by Glen Shee
An’ roun’ past Kinclaven
and hither by me,
For Ranald and Donald
lie low in the fen,
Tae brak the wing o’
my bonnie moorhen.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua,
la mia bella gallinella
su per le grige colline
e giù nelle valli
è quando uscirai di casa
per venire qui [1]
berrò alla salute della mia bella gallinella d’acqua
II
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua
è andata oltre il mare
ma quando sarà estate
ritornerà di nuovo
e quando ritornerà,
e lo sapete bene
che la gioia sia con te [2]
mia bella gallinella
III
La mia bella gallinella
ha un nuovo piumaggio,
ha tanti bei colori,
ma tra di essi non c’è l’azzurro.[3]
Rosso e bianco
e verde e grigio[4]
la mia bella gallinella verrà quaggiù
IV
Vieni su per Glenduich
e giù per Glendee
e superato Kinclaven[5]
e poi da me
perchè Ranald e Donald[6]
sono acquattati nel fango
per spezzare le ali
alla mia bella gallinella

NOTE
1) “when ye gang but the house, when ye gang ben…” =when you go out of the house and when you come in. Il Bonny Prince si trova esule in Francia
2) frase tipica di un brindisi benaugurale
3) blu significa anche triste
4) sono i colori del tartan stuart
5) a detta di James Hogg un itinerario non corretto
6) i soldati inglesi, anche se Ranald e Donald sono nomi tipicamente scozzesi, si vuole forse alludere ai traditori

LA VERSIONE DELLA FAMIGLIA CARTHY

E’ una versione testuale completamente diversa anche se cantata sulla stessa melodia (vedi)

FONTI
http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/linnut/moorhen
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/bonnymoorhen.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=10726
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/moorhen.htm
http://www.robertburns.org/works/157.shtml
https://nslmblog.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/the-bonie-moorhen-1788/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=50450&lang=en

ORAN EILE DON PHRIONNSA

Read the post in English

Il Bonny Prince (Carlo Edoardo Stuart) ritratto da Allan Ramsay subito dopo la marcia su Edimburgo

Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa,  “Canzone per il Principe” (= Song to the Prince) ma anche dal primo verso “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” (in italiano “Appena mi sveglio”) venne scritta nel 1745 da Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  bardo delle Highlands e fervente giacobita, perché fosse indirizzata come missiva al Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, noto più semplicemente come il Bonnie Prince Charlie o The Young Pretender. All’epoca il Principe si trovava in Francia nella vana attesa di un cenno di favore da parte del Re Luigi XV affinchè lo aiutasse a riprendersi il trono d’Inghilterra e Scozia. Ma la questione si trascinava per le lunghe, Luigi non ricevette mai a Corte il suo parente povero, così il ragazzo venne snobbato anche dalla Nobiltà parigina e di certo le parole d’incoraggiamento dei sostenitori in Scozia non potevano che dargli conforto. continua
Il testo originale di Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa ( anche “Moch Sa Mhadainn”, “Hùg Ò Laithill Ò” “Hùg Ò Laithill O Horo”), è scritto in gaelico scozzese, lingua che il principe non capiva (essendo nato e cresciuto a Roma).

Ne “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (qui) sono riportati testo e melodia (#113) così nelle note dell’edizione pubblicata per lo School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edimburgo 2011 leggiamo “Questa toccante canzone giacobita è stata attribuita a Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). Il testo e la traduzione di  JLC [John Lorne CAMPBELL(1933, Rev.1984)], riporta 17 strofe più il ritornello. Il testo deriva dall’edizione del 1839  (p.85) dalla collezione di Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (ASE); l’edizione del 1839 è identica a quella del 1834, ma il fatto che la canzone non appaia nella prima edizione (1751) solleva dubbi sull’attribuzione (vedi JLC 42, n.1): in effetti il testo è stato quasi certamente preso dall’edizione 1834 da PT, dov’è semplicemente intitolato ‘LUINNEAG’ senza alcuna attribuzione.

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album interamente dedicato ai canti in gaelico che si sono conservati nelle Isole Ebridi sulla rovinosa parabola della ribellione giacobita capeggiata dal Bonnie Prince Charlie nel 1745

ASCOLTA Dàimh in Moidart to Mabou 2000, un gruppo di nuova generazione dalla West Coast della Scozia formato da musicisti  dall’Irlanda, Scozia, Capo Bretone e California.

Chi canta dopo aver impostato la prima strofa, prosegue riprendendo gli ultimi due versi come i primi della strofa successiva, e aggiunge altri due nuovi versi
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh
I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Da quando seppi che il Principe verrà nella terra del Clanranald
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno
III
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
IV
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
V
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.

NOTE
1) Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) il Clan dei Macdonald di Clanranald (Clan RanaldClan Ronald) è uno dei rami più grandi dei clan scozzesi in cui si eleggeva il Re delle Isole e di Argyll. All’epoca delle ribellione del 1745 il vecchio capo clan non era favorevole agli Stuard, ma non impedì al figlio di allearsi con il Giovane Pretendente. I due si conobbero a Parigi. Ranald il giovane fu tra i primi ad aderire alla causa giacobita facendo proseliti presso gli altri clan.

LA SERIE OUTLANDER

Il brano è stato riportato alla popolarità con l’inserimento nella seconda stagione della serie televisiva Outlander (sulle orme del grandissimo successo editoriale dell’omonima serie scritta da Diana Gabaldon), come sottolinea lo stesso direttore artistico Bear McCreary questo è uno dei pochi canti scritti proprio nel farsi della ribellione scozzese.
“Quando Jamie apre la lettera nell’episodio  “The Fox’s Lair” e scopre di essere stato invischiato nella rivoluzione, questa canzone era contemporanea essendo stata composta da qualche parte in Scozia  proprio in quel preciso momento.” (qui).

ASCOLTA Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) il brano ha un andamento marziale  e Griogair racconta
“È sempre difficile mediare il divario tra tradizione e innovazione, ma è qualcosa a cui mi sto abituando sempre più spesso, ho eseguito la canzone ad un ritmo molto più lento di quello tradizionale, ma penso che abbia raggiunto un grande effetto con i ricchi cori dei violini e gli elementi percussivi. Sono stato anche molto contento di lavorare con il mio amico John Purser che ha contribuito a dirigere la mia esecuzione della canzone per adattarla all’arrangiamento.

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.


I
Early as I awaken,
Great my joy, loud my laughter,
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel, as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
III
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.
IV
I vostri amici saranno pieni di gioia
se sarete incoronato,
e Lochiel (3), come si conviene, farà arrivare i Gaeli per la battaglia

NOTE

Fedeli agli amici

3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio.
La famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.

FONTI
http://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

COMIN THRO’ THE RYE

“Camminando in un campo di segale” è una nursery rhyme che nasce però come canzone a doppio senso (e della quale esistono versioni decisamente sconce).
Il testo oggi fa sorridere ma all’epoca in cui circolava (sicuramente il settecento ma potrebbe anche essere antecedente) era decisamente sconveniente: un tempo nei campi non solo si lavorava, ma ci si scambiavano effusioni più o meno spinte, e solo i due interessati potevano sapere fino a che punto si fossero fermati (o a quale conclusione fossero addivenuti).

LA MELODIA

Per i fans di Diana Gabaldon e la serie televisiva Outlander che ha debuttato negli States nel 2014 (la prima Tv in Italia risale all’estate 2015)
ASCOLTA l’arrangiamento strumentale di Bear McCreary in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 1 (Original Television Soundtrack) ascolta su Spotify (qui)

Coming Through The Rye  è anche un Scottish country dance

LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS (1796)

W. Napier scrive a proposito : “The original words of “Comin’ thro’ the rye” cannot be satisfactorily traced. There are many different versions of the song. The version which is now to be found in the Works of Burns is the one given in Johnson’s Museum, which passed through the hands of Burns; but the song itself, in some form or other, was known long before Burns” (Napier 1876 in Notes and Queries)
Nello “Scots Musical Museum” Volume V ci sono due versioni del testo, il primo (#417) è attribuito a Robert Burns il secondo (#418) non ha attribuzioni.

Se la donna non grida “al lupo” nessuno può sapere quello che accade tra la segale, ma l’autore aggiunge: il fatto non deve essere di pubblico dominio bensì è una faccenda personale; è implicita la polemica verso i pettegolezzi e i giudizi dei puritani (o bigotti) sempre pronti a condannare come immorali le pulsioni sessuali che la Natura richiama.

ASCOLTA Ian Bruce

Scots Museum vol V # 417
Robert Burns
I
O Jenny’s a’ weet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry:
She draigl’t(1) a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye(2)!
II
Comin thro’ the rye, poor body,
Comin thro’ the rye,
She draigl’t a’ her petticoatie,
Comin thro’ the rye!
III
Gin(3) a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the rye,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry(4)?
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the glen,
Gin a body kiss a body,
Need the warld(5) ken(6)?
V (strofa aggiuntiva)
Gin a body meet a body
Comin thro’ the grain,
Gin a body kiss a body,
The thing’s a body’s ain(7).
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oh Jenny è tutta bagnata poverina
Jenny sta raramente all’asciutto
sta inzuppando (infangando) le sue sottovesti venendo attraverso la segale
II
Venendo attraverso la segale, poverina
venendo attraverso la segale
sta infangando le sue sottovesti
venendo attraverso la segale
III
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la segale
se una persona bacia una persona
deve una persona piangere?
IV
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la valle
se una persona bacia una persona
lo debbono sapere tutti?
V (strofa aggiuntiva non in Burns)
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso il grano
se una persona bacia una persona
sono affari suoi

NOTE
1) draigl’t – draggled: ‘covered with mud’ o ‘drenched’.
2) rye è la segale, ma un’altra interpretazione, pubblicata nel Glasgow Herald del 1867 suggerisce che il Rye è un fiume dell’Ayrshire e che la canzone si riferisce ad un guado  a nord di Drakemyre (non lontano dalla confluenza del fiume Rye con il River Garnock).
3) gin – if, should
4) cry – call out [for help] nel senso di chiedere aiuto
5) warld – world
6) ken – know
7) ain – own; tradotto letteralmente: la cosa riguarda la persona stessa

Traduzione Inglese
di Michael R. Burch
I
Oh, Jenny’s all wet, poor body,
Jenny’s seldom dry;
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
II
Comin’ through the rye, poor body,
Comin’ through the rye.
She’s draggin’ all her petticoats
Comin’ through the rye.
III
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the rye,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need anybody cry?
IV
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the glen,
Should a body kiss a body,
Need all the world know, then?
V
Should a body meet a body
Comin’ through the grain,
Should a body kiss a body,
The thing is a body’s own

Ma la canzone ha molte varianti tramandati dalla tradizione orale, come questa

ASCOLTA Blialam

I
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the rye
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body cry?
Chorus
Ilka lassie has her laddie
Nane, they say, hae I
Yet aa the lads they smile at me
When comin through the rye
II
Gin a body meet a body
Comin through the toon,
Gin a body greet a body
Need a body froon?
III
Amang the train there is a swain
I dearly loe masel
But what’s his name
an where’s his hame
I dinna care to tell
IV
Gin a body meet a body
Comin frae the well
Gin a body kiss a body
Need a body tell?

Nelle versioni americane Jenny diventa Sally, una melodia old-time
ASCOLTA The Ephemeral Stringband
La versione cantata dai The Real McKenzies aggiunge ulteriori variazioni

 
CHORUS
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the rye,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body cry!
Ilka lassie ha’e ha laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I,
When all the lassies smile at me,
We’re comin’ thro’ the rye!
I
Gin a body meet a body,
Comin’ thro’ the town,
Gin a body meet a body,
Nae a body frown!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene attraverso la segale
se una persona incontra una persona
deve una persona piangere?
Ogni ragazza ha il suo ragazzo
ma io non ne ho nessuno, dicono
quando tutte le ragazze mi sorridono
arriviamo dalla segale
I
Se una persona incontra una persona
che viene per la città
se una persona incontra una persona
nessuno deve disapprovare!
E infine la versione come nursery rhymes
I
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the rye;
If a body kiss a body,
Need a body cry?
II
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!
III
If a body meet a body,
Comin’ through the town;
If a body greet a body,
Need a body frown?
IV
Every lassie has her laddie,
Nane, they say, ha’e I;
Yet all the lads they smile on me,
When comin’ through the rye!

FONTI
http://musicofyesterday.com/sheet-music-c/comin-thro-rye-burns/
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-417,-page-430-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-v,-song-418,-page-431-comin-thro-the-rye.aspx
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4555472.asp
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/CominThroughTheRye.html
http://milwburnsclub.virtualimprint.com/songs/throrye.htm
https://daeandwrite.wordpress.com/tag/catcher-in-the-rye-book-club-menu/
http://discoveryholden.blogspot.it/2010/03/catcher-in-rye-cosa-si-nasconde-dietro.html
http://stooryduster.co.uk/draiglet/